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Publication numberUS3625235 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 7, 1971
Filing dateJun 29, 1970
Priority dateJul 3, 1969
Publication numberUS 3625235 A, US 3625235A, US-A-3625235, US3625235 A, US3625235A
InventorsGorgichuk Peter
Original AssigneeGorgichuk Peter
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Portable shelter
US 3625235 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Peter Gorgichuk 108 McNaughton Street, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada [21 Appl. No. 50,688

[22] Filed June 29, 1970 [45] Patented Dec. 7, 1971 [32] Priority July 3, 1969 [3 3 Canada 54] PORTABLE SHELTER 2,661,010 12/1953 Powers et a1 2,690,185 9/1954 Pomykala... 3,039,478 6/1962 Timmons....

3,114,377 12/1963 Clement Primary Examiner- Kenneth Downey Attorney-Stevens, Davis, Miller & Mosher 8/1966 Holbitz..

135/3 R 135/3 R 135/3 R 135/3 R 135/3 R ABSTRACT: A free-standing portable, sphere-segmentshaped, shelter is made from basically three types of components; initially straight resilient rods, joining members and,

almssnrawing Figs of course, a cover. The rods are bent into arcs within their [52] U.S.Cl 135/1, elastic limit so that two circles are formed and these are 135/3 separated and a dome provided by other initially straight rods 1] Int. Cl A! 1/00 similarly bent elastically; a top joining member in the form fa Field ofSearch 135/1, 3, 4, circular late can have a central hole to provide ventilation 5, 7.1; 52/81, 82 and an outlet for a stovepipe.

a 3 2 \Q l r \g 34 5 t 57 5 l6 10 A 5% 3 e 31 PORTABLE SHELTER This invention relates to the field of portable shelters generally and in particular to a shelter which is curvilinear approaching a spherical shape and yet may be completely dismantled with its component parts in the manner of a tent.

As is well known, tents are bonded by edges which are straight, or approximately so, allowing for sag of ropes. Thus, tents generically present large flat areas to the elements. which makes them unsuitable in rough weather; high wind causes the canvas to flap and billow like a sail; much of the floor area is not convenient to use due to central supports or low sidewalls (unless elaborate construction is used) and as the ratio of surface area to enclosed volume is high, they are difficult to heat and are warm-weather or tourist devices.

Many portable shelters of generally curvilinear shape have been proposed. These fall into two main classes which may be graphically (if not quite accurately) described as the umbrella" type and the stressed skin type. The umbrella type has pin joints with the attendant disadvantages that it cannot be completely dismantled; also of course it is expensive and more easily damaged; U.S. Pat. No. 3,039,478 and Canadian Pat. No. 644,662 illustrates this kind of construction. In the stressed skin" type the structure can be dismantled but it relies upon the shape of the cover or sockets in the floor portion of the cover to locate the frame members and hence to bend them to the desired shape; U.S. Pat. No. 2,948,287 and Canadian Pat. No. 681,598 illustrate this type. This classification is approximate and for illustrative purposes only, since, as umbrella covers are stressed, there is obviously overlap between the two types. in one interesting US. Pat. No. 3,269,398 the ground is used to maintain the stability of the framework which would otherwise spring open.

In contrast to these devices, I have found that a free-standing curvilinear three-dimensional frame can be made whose only components comprise straight, resilient elongated members cut to suitable lengths and joint members adapted to receive these straight resilient members. I have also found that a suitable arrangement of these components with correctly chosen lengths results, with a cover, in an enclosed space resembling a major segment of a sphere so as to give adequate headroom above almost the entire floor area. By yet a further step. a large centerpiece at the top of the structure is provided to accommodate and outlet for a stovepipe so that the covered structure may be used for ice fishing.

My invention will be more easily understood by reference to the attached drawing in wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an embodiment incorporating all details of the invention with the cover partly removed;

F IG. 2 is a view of an upper junction of four rods;

FIG. 3 is a view of a lower junction of three rods showing that the joint block retains the cover by a pocket.

in FIG. 1 the framework is indicated generally as 10. This structure is independent of the cover 12 in the sense that the framework does not rely for its integrity or stability on the cover but it is complete in itself. The construction of the cover, 12, will therefore be described later.

The framework comprises basically a multiplicity of two simple types of component-resilient members and joint members-it being fully understood that the quantity of each component, their materials and dimensions (and by dimensions 1 means cross-sectional areas, shapes and lengths) below are by way of example only and that changes even quite extensive changes, may be made by those skilled in the art.

Thus, I prefer the resilient members to be all of solid round 3/l6-inch diameter spring steel rod, suitably treated to avoid rust. However, other resilient materials such as glass-reinforced polyester are also suitable for the framework. One series of eight such rods 21 through 28 are formed into a lower circle, generally indicated at 20, with eight hardwood block joining members 14. With 3/ l 6-inch stock spring steel, a convenient length for each rod is 48 inches and thus with eight rods round the periphery. the base diameter is ID feet. The hardwood blocks 14 are 2 inches wide by 3 inches tall by onehalf of l inch thick, the holes being drilled three-sixteenths inch which allowing for the compression of the wood and the moisture absorption outdoors gives a press fit with the rods. I prefer not to drill the holes right through as this gives a positive location for each end of each rod.

A second series of eight resilient rods 31 through 38 are formed into an upper circle generally indicated at 30, again with eight hardwood block joining members 16 each of which has four holes to accommodate tow pairs of rods. I prefer to make each rod 31 through 38 44 inches long when using 3/ l 6- inch spring steel stock to give me a diameter of a little over 9 feetfor reasons which will appear in the next paragraph. incidentally, I prefer to make blocks 14 with only three holes rather than make blocks 14 and 16 interchangeable; the empty hole tends to fill with dirt and the lower surface becomes abraded gradually destroying the initial interchangeability.

The reason I choose these lengths is that l find it convenient to adopt a construction in which the two series of eight resilient rods in the vertical plane (that is the lower series of 41 through 48 and the upper series of 51 through 58) are both 5 feet long. This enables the rods to be distinguished easily; also the maximum diameter of the structure occurs above the base; this latter means that a man of average height can stand upright over a larger portion of the base area. Circle 30 also adds to the stability of the framework.

The lower series of eight S-foot long rods 41 through 48 (44 being hidden by the stovepipe 64 and 46 and 47 by the cover) require no further description but the upper series converge onto and have their ends remote from circle 30 accommodated in top plate 60 which is of %-inch thick plywood 12- inch diameter. When these rods are properly in position in their l-inch deep holes in top plate 60, the height of the top plate about ground level is 6 feet, 9 inches.

The top plate 60, itself serves two purposes; firstly it is a single piece ensuring that all rods are of a convenient length (since otherwise it would be possible to combine diametrically opposite rods such as 51 and 55 to make four unwieldly rods or else have single block-type joints with shorter pieces) and secondly a 4stove diameter hole 62 accommodates stovepipe 64 from the heating stove 66. It will be fully understood that hole 62 is a clearance hole and the stovepipe does not support the top plate 60.

The cover 12 requires little comment; I prefer to stitch eight nylon panels in the shape of truncated ogives together with alternate panels being in contrasting colors, providing a 2-inch double thickness around the base; I also provide eight pockets, 72, as shown in FIG. 3. Hardwood block joints 14 hold the cover on the frame in high winds, the frame being anchored by 10-inch spiral nails. Due to the flexibility of the resilient members 41-48 such a cover will slip over the structure even though the cover base periphery is smaller than the maximum horizontal octagon formed by these rods. Two slide closures (commonly called zip fasteners) 68 and 70, 6 feet long and 2 feet long respectively, are provided for easy access to the interior.

With the above materials and dimensions the tent frame and cover can be accommodated in a bag 6 feet long by about 9 inches in diameter (flattened locally to accommodate top plate 60) and weights about 25 pounds. The number of joints is not critical but if reduced, either the structure becomes too small or the rods become too long and inconvenient for long portages. Incidentally, I prefer to leave the blocks l4, 16 on rods 41-48 when dismantling the shelter as it hastens reassembly and inhibits loss of joint blocks.

lclaim:

1. A portable free-standing dismantleable curvilinear frame formed of rectilinear components comprising:

a multiplicity of initially straight resilient rods,

a first multiplicity of joining members having cavities, the cavities and resilient rods being adapted so that two rods before bending are collinear and another rod before bending is at right angles to the two collinear rods,

a second multiplicity of joining members having cavities, the cavities and resilient rods being adapted so that two rods, before bending are collinear and another two rods, before bending are also collinear but at right angles to the first two rods,

the first multiplicity of joining members and a first series of the multiplicity of resilient rods comprising two collinear rods being bent to form an endless closed curved approximating a circle in one plane,

the second multiplicity of joining members and a second series of the multiplicity of resilient rods comprising two collinear rods being bent to form an endless closed curve approximating a circle in a second plane,

the planes of the first and second closed curves being spaced apart by a third series of resilient rods having ends engaging the first and second series of joining members each resilient rod in the third series having an outwardly bowed arcuate shape, and

a fourth series of rods being in a plurality of planes at right angles to said second plane and on the same side thereof and formed into a plurality of arcuate sections, the end of the arcuate sections terminating in the joining members of the second series, so that all the resilient rods lie on the surface of a spheroid whose largest cross section lies between the first and second planes.

2. A frame as claimed in claim 1 in which the resilient members of the first and second closed curves are of substantially the same length, and the first and second planes are separated by a distance approximating half the diameter of the endless closed curves so that all the resilient rods lie on the surface of a spheroid whose largest cross section lies approximately half way between the first and second planes.

3. A shelter comprising a frame as claimed in claim 1 and having an integument thereover.

4. A shelter comprising a frame as claimed in claim 2 and having an integument thereover.

5. A portable free-standing dismantleable curvilinear shelter formed of rectilinear components comprising:

a multiplicity of initially straight resilient rods,

a first multiplicity of joining members having cavities, the cavities and resilient rods being adapted so that two rods before bending are collinear and another rod before bending is at right angles to the two collinear rods,

a second multiplicity-of joining members having cavities, the cavities and resilient rods being adapted so that two rods, before bending are collinear and another two rods, before bending are also collinear but at right angles to the first two rods,

the first multiplicity of joining members and a first series of the multiplicity of resilient rods comprising two collinear rods being bent to form an endless closed curve approximating a circle in one plane,

the second multiplicity of joining members and a second series of the multiplicity of resilient rods comprising two collinear rods being bent to form an endless closed curve approximating a circle in a second plane,

the planes of the first and second closed curves being spaced apart by a third series of resilient rods having ends engaging the first and second series of joining members, each resilient rod in the third series having an outwardly bowed arcuate shape,

a top plate member having appreciable thickness and a series of lateral holes accommodated in the thickness,

a fourth series of resilient rods each formed into an arcuate section and having one end located at the joining member of the second endless closed curve and the other located in the lateral holes in said top plate, the two multiplicities ofjoining members and the four series of rods and the top plate together forming a curvilinear frame with the resilient rods lying on the surface of a spheroid whose largest cross section lies between the first and second planes, and

an integument over the frame. 6. A dismantleable curvilinear shelter as claimed in claim 5 in which the resilient member of the first and second closed curves are of substantially the same length and the first and second planes are separated by a distance approximating half the diameter of the endless closed curves so that all the resilient rods lie on the surface of a spheroid whose largest cross section lies approximately half way between the first and second planes.

7. A dismantleable curvilinear shelter as claimed in claim 5 in which the integument has pockets at the base thereof so as to accommodate at least a portion of the first multiplicity of joining members and thereby attach the integument securely to the frame.

8. A dismantleable curvilinear shelter as claimed in claim 5 in which the top plate has a hole therethrough of such a size as to accommodate freely a Stovepipe, and in which the integument also has a corresponding hole therethrough.

a: i a: t:

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2661010 *Oct 29, 1948Dec 1, 1953Powers & CompanyTent
US2690185 *Sep 27, 1949Sep 28, 1954Pomykala Edmund StanleyAll weather hut
US3039478 *Jul 23, 1959Jun 19, 1962Charles L TimmonsBuilding structures
US3114377 *Sep 6, 1960Dec 17, 1963Clyde H ClementSet-up tent
US3269398 *Oct 14, 1963Aug 30, 1966Yehuda HolbitzConvex tents
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3945156 *May 30, 1974Mar 23, 1976Wilfried HammInflatable building construction
US4144899 *Jan 16, 1978Mar 20, 1979Kays Sandra EFlexible-walled demountable greenhouse
US4265259 *Jun 7, 1979May 5, 1981Gillis Robert ETent
US4404980 *Sep 30, 1980Sep 20, 1983James NemecArched support structure with cover
US4558713 *Oct 29, 1982Dec 17, 1985American Canvas CompanyFrame system and connectors for portable shelters
US5628338 *Apr 19, 1996May 13, 1997Stumbo; Steven W.Collapsible blind
US5669403 *Apr 12, 1996Sep 23, 1997Belcher; Michael M.Hunting blind adapted to be mounted in a tree
US6021796 *Sep 22, 1998Feb 8, 2000T.A. Pelsue CompanyTetra tent
US6334456 *Feb 10, 2000Jan 1, 2002Christopher NevakMulti-level portable housing structure
US6892742 *Mar 2, 2003May 17, 2005Ching-Hsuan WangTent
US7063481 *Aug 13, 2003Jun 20, 2006Trull Scott EConnector block for modular construction and object fabricated therefrom
US7080653 *Sep 13, 2002Jul 25, 2006Patent Category Corp.Collapsible storage devices
US7252107Nov 18, 2005Aug 7, 2007Best Tide Mfg. Co., Ltd.Pop up collapsible structures
US7614517Dec 2, 2005Nov 10, 2009Patent Category Corp.Collapsible storage devices
US7845121 *Jul 6, 2005Dec 7, 2010Aloys WobbenFacility used for the production and/or assembly of goods
US8001987Dec 2, 2005Aug 23, 2011Let's Go Aero, Inc.Support system for shelters
US8387814Nov 9, 2009Mar 5, 2013Patent Category Corp.Collapsible storage devices
US8851956 *Dec 3, 2012Oct 7, 2014D.J. Toys Enterprise Corp.Playhouse
US9758985Sep 14, 2015Sep 12, 2017Ardent Conceptual Design, Ltd.Elevated hunting blind
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Classifications
U.S. Classification135/87, 135/91, 135/92, 135/125
International ClassificationE04H15/00, E04H15/26
Cooperative ClassificationE04H15/26
European ClassificationE04H15/26