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Publication numberUS3625402 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 7, 1971
Filing dateSep 15, 1969
Priority dateSep 15, 1969
Also published asCA952872A1, DE2029488A1
Publication numberUS 3625402 A, US 3625402A, US-A-3625402, US3625402 A, US3625402A
InventorsArthur W Kulis
Original AssigneeEaton Yale & Towne
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric post mixing dispensing apparatus
US 3625402 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] inventor Arthur W. Kulis Morton Grove, Ill.

[21 Appl. No. 857,692

[22] Filed Sept. 15, I969 [45] Patented Dec. 7, 1971 [73] Assignee Eaton Yale 8: Towne, Inc.

Cleveland, Ohio [54] ELECTRIC POST MIXING DISPENSING APPARATUS 8 Claims, 2 Drawing Figs.

[52] 0.5. CI ZZZ/129.3, 137/604, 222/l53, 222/504 [5 1] Int. Cl 867d 5/56 [50] Field of Search ZZZ/129.], 129.3, 129.4, 145, 504, 153,400.5,400.7, 129.2;

607, 170.]; 251/321; 285/820, DIG. 22

Primary Examiner-Samuel F. Coleman Assistanl E.ran1iner Larry H. Martin Allorne vl-lill, Sherman, Meroni, Gross & Simpson ABSTRACT: An efficient, highly serviceable fluid dispensing apparatus comprises a control valve assembly detachably connected to an inlet housing assembly by means of a quick disconnect coupling wherein the supply of fluid from the inlet housing assembly is automatically shut-off upon disconnection of the valve component. At least first and second passageways extend through the apparatus from an inlet in the inlet supply housing to an outlet in the valve assembly. Each passageway includes a check valve disposed in a first portion thereof and first and second valve means disposed in a second portion thereof. of the first valve means includes a chamber surrounding an upstanding member having a seat on its upper end about an opening into the passageway against which seat an armature movable closure disc seats and unseats to close and open the passageway. The second valve means in the first passageway is an adjustable diffuser assembly comprising a diffuser mount, a pair of telescoping opposed splash cups positioned on the mount and a stack of diffuser discs on the mount retained between the opposed cups in clamping engagement whereby variance of the pressure between the disc controls the CO content of carbonated water dispensed therefrom. The second valve means in the second passageway is an adjustable metering valve having a hollow stem with an upper inlet end adapted to seat against a portion of the valve assembly body to open and close the second passageway to the flow of fluid. Controls for the first valve means allow dispensing of fluid from both passageways into a mixing spout or from the first passageway only.

ELECTRIC POST MIXING DISPENSING APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention v This invention generally relates to a control valve means and more particularly contemplates an easily maintained component electric post-mix beverage dispensing valve with a control valve assembly component detachably connected to an inlet housing assembly component wherein the supply of fluid is automatically shut off upon disconnection of the valve component from the inlet component.

2. Prior Art Although the popularity and technology of post-mix dispensing systems has seen great advancements in recent years I have observed that in the area of service and maintenance the prior art equipment has failed to keep pace. Thus,

I have discovered that while systems have been devised that are bigger and more efficient, yet even the simplest repairs to these more complex systems and their components are required to be done at the site thus rendering the new equipment unavailable for various periods of time and thereby negating the benefits of these advancements in technology. As an example, if the post-mix valve in the prior art systems is disconnected and replaced, the entire system must be shutdown unless expensive valvings are provided at each dispensing station. Compounding this down time" problem is the fact that special tools and equipment are necessary to disconnect the valve and to make the necessary repairs. Moreover, these special tools require skilled mechanics and a substantial amount of time. There has thus existed a long felt need for a dispensing system in which the components are constructed to provide a minimum of cost and a maximum of serviceability and reliability.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with my present invention the disadvantages of the prior art have been overcome to the extent that an entire valve may be replaced in a matter of seconds without the use of any tools whatsoever. Moreover, the valve itself may be quickly assembled or disassembled with the very simplest of tools by even those unfamiliar with the equipment. As a result, the down time" of the system while repairs are being completed has been virtually eliminated. Thus, a dispensing valve assembly of my invention may even be replaced by the fountain operator or bar tender at the very time difficulties are encountered.

Simplicity and convenience of operation of the apparatus of my invention result from the fact that the valve may be actuated by pressure of a paper cup against an actuating lever. At least two pressurized fluids may be dispensed either together or alone. Thus, either a mixed drink or plain soda water is available with my apparatus. A diffuser of the carbonated water according to my invention has improved fluid flow characteristics and allows ready adjustment of the carbon dioxide content in the water by simple, quick and sure adjustments.

The above noted advantages are but a few of the benefits of my fluid dispensing apparatus invention which comprises a control valve assembly detachably connected to an inlet housing assembly wherein at least one passageway and preferably separate first and second passageways each having interconnected first and second portions pass through both said inlet housing assembly and the control valve assembly. The inlet housing assembly includes a body portion through which a first portion of each of the passageways extends. An inlet supply connector adjacent the inlet end of the first passageway may be detachably connected to the body of the inlet housing. The outlet end of each first passageway portion has a seal construction therein and receives a hollow male projection on the inlet end of the second portion of each passageway. A check valve is disposed in the first portion of each passageway intermediate the inlet and outlet ends thereof and advantageously takes the form of a springbiased ball held against the seal construction on the outlet end.

A means connecting the inlet housing assembly to the valve assembly is positioned adjacent the first portion outlet end and the second portion inlet end and they advantageously include a spring-biased clamp on one of the assembly bodies and a retaining protrusion on the other of the assembly bodies with the clamp having a hook thereon engaging the protrusions to hold the assemblies in operative relationship. The control valve assembly includes a first valve means intermediate the inlet and outlet ends of the second portion of each of the passageways and a second valve means in the outlet end of the second portion of each of the passageways. The second valve means in the first passageway is an adjustable diffuser as sembly which comprises a diffuser mount, a pair of telescoping opposed splash cups positioned on the mount, and a stack of diffuser discs on the mount retained between the opposed cups. The cups are incrementally movable toward and away from each other so that the clamping pressure on the discs may be increased or decreased.

The second valve means in the second passageway is an adjustable metering valve having a hollow stem that extends down into a mixing spout which surrounds the outlet ends of the passageways. The stem has a lower outlet end and an upper inlet end with the upper inlet end adapted to seat against a portion of the controlled valve assembly body and to thereby open or close the second passageway to the flow of fluid. A slot may be provided in the outlet end of the stem so that rotation may be easily imparted to the stem to move it into and out of engagement with the seat and thereby control the flow.

The first valve means includes an enclosed valve chamber having a bottom, sides and a top. A hollow member through which the second portion of each of the passageways extends, upstands from the chamber bottom and has an opening in its upper end of a size lesser than the size of the chamber. A seating surface surrounds the opening and flow through the opening is controlled by a closure disc movable into and out of engagement with the seating surface. The movement of this closure disc is advantageously effected by incorporating the disc on the end of an armature in an electric valve actuating mechanism. A simple control for the electric valve is provided by an actuator which depends to a position below the mixing spout so that when a cup is placed below the mixing spout the valve will be actuated to dispense fluids from the first and second passageways. These fluids advantageously may be carbonated water and syrup respectively. It is also an important provision of the invention that a second control device is provided at a convenient point on the apparatus so that only a single fluid may be provided. Thus, this second control would allow the dispensing of only carbonated water for example.

The inlet housing assembly may be advantageously affixed to a support and the valve control assembly attached solely to the inlet housing. A suitable cover or cabinet may be provided for the apparatus. Fabrication of the apparatus may advantageously employ the use of synthetic resinous materials.

It may be thus seen that the structure of my invention is of simple construction which makes possible low initial cost as well as low maintenance and high serviceability.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Other objects, features and advantages of the invention will be readily apparent from the following description of certain preferred embodiments thereof, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, although variations and modifications may be effected without departing from the spirit and scope of the novel concepts of the disclosure, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a schematic elevational cross-sectional view of the control valve assembly in operative position attached to the supply inlet assembly;

FIG. 2 is an end view of reduced scale taken along the lines 11- of FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS As shown in FIG. 1 a post-mix valve apparatus generally indicated at is attached to an inlet housing assembly component generally indicated at 12 by a quick disconnect means as will be hereinafter explained. A first passageway 18 and a second passageway 19 each extend from an inlet at the opening 20c, 20d respectively in inlet connectors 20a, 20b respectively, as may be seen in FIG. 2 through the inlet and valve components 10, 12, to an outlet in a mixing dispensing spout 17. Flow of the pressurized fluid in the first and second passageways 18, 19 is controlled by a pair of valve means 13, 14 respectively. Actuation of the valve means l3, 14 may be controlled by a pair of electrical control means schematically indicated at 150 and 15b which, through suitable electrical circuits not shown, transmit signals to dispense fluid from both passageways for mixture in the mixing spout 17 or to dispense only a single fluid such as carbonated water.

The fluid inlet housing assembly 12 comprises a body 16 which may be formed of a suitable material such as a high impact synthetic plastic, for example. In the illustrated embodiment a pair of fluid supply conduits 18a and 19a are shown attached to a pair of detachable inlet connectors 20a, 20b. In a typical post-mix system the line 19a conveys a soft drink syrup under pressure and the line 18a conveys carbon dioxide saturated water under pressure. Although FIG. I shows only the second passageway 19, fluid supply line conduit 190 up to the first valve means 13, 14, it will be understood that the first passageway 18 and fluid supply line conduit 18a are constructed in a similar manner and embody the same inventive principles.

The conduit attachment connector 20b includes about the outer surface of a lower end a grooved surface 21 adapted to create a positive leak proof connection with the conduit 19a. A passageway 19b extends through the connector 20b and communicates with a coaxial passageway 19c and a passageway 19d transverse thereto in the body 16. The upper end of the connector means 20b is tightly received in an enlarged opening 23. An O-ring 25 in an annular groove 24 about the upper end of the connector 20b provide a fluidtight connection between the passageway 19b and the enlarged opening 23 in the inlet housing body 16.

A series of generally concentric passageways 26, 27, 19d 28, 29, and extend through the body 16 of the inlet housing assembly 12. A removable plug 31 is held in pressuretight sealing engagement with the passageway 30 by means ofa groove, O-ring seal 32, 33 and includes a bore 34 which is an extension ofthe passageway 28. Removal of the plug 31 allows access to the interior passageway 19d thereby facilitating maintenance and cleaning.

A check valve which prevents flow through the passageway 19 includes a resilient means such as a coil spring 36 mounted in the passageway 19d with one end in a recess 28 and an opposite end resiliently biasing a ball check valve 40a against a seat 42. The seat 42 may comprise a resilient washer held in position against a shoulder 27a in the passageway 27 by a seat body 44 and a retainer ring 46. In the closed position 40a the ball check valve is assisted in forming a fluidtight seal with the washer 42 by the pressure of the fluid in the passageway 19d. The inlet housing 12 may be suitably affixed to a support to provide a secure means to which the control valve assembly 10 may be attached or plugged into. A passageway or socket extends through the retainer ring 46, seat body 44 and seat 42 and receives therein in a fluid tight coupling engagement a hollow male projection portion 60 of the control valve assembly 10. A passageway 19c passes through the male projection and connects the passageway 10d with the first valve chamber 19f. For purposes of description the passageways 19b, 19c and 19d may be referred to as the first portion of the second passageway 19. The opening 20d is the inlet opening to the first portion and the socket 50 may generally be referred to the outlet of the first portion. Suitable seals are generally indicated at 52, 54 are provided between the outer surface of the seat body 44 and the passageway 27 and between the inner passage 50 and the male projection 60 respectively. The seals 52, 54 advantageously take the form of grooves receiving 0- rings therein.

Attachment of the inlet housing assembly 12 to the valve assembly 10 is effected by the insertion of the hollow male projection 60 into the sealed passageway 50 to the extent that the projection end 60a unseats the ball 40a from the seat 42 and moves it against the bias of the spring 36 to the position indicated at 40 thereby opening the check valve and allowing the pressurized fluid to continue to flow through the passageway 19. An indentation 60b in the lip of the projection allows the fluid to flow around the ball 40 and into the passageway 19e.

The control valve assembly component 10 is retained in operative connection with the inlet housing assembly 12 by means of a releasable connector 70 spring biased in a counterclockwise manner as shown, which is affixed to the inlet housing assembly 12 and has a hooked portion 70a that hooks over a projection 660 on the valve assembly 10. Attachment is facilitated by providing the projection 660 with a surface inclined away from the hook so that as the assemblies are brought together with the projection 60 being received in the socket 50 the hook 70a will ride up in the inclined surface against the spring bias and snap into the position shown. It is of course within the contemplation of the invention that the positions of the connector means 70, 66:: may be reversed between the assemblies 10 and 12. In this manner the connection 70 automatically engages upon the full insertion of the projection 60 into the socket 50 and is readily detached by merely moving the connector 70 against the bias spring to disengage the hook 700 from the projection 66a. Upon disengagement the withdrawal of the male projection 60 reseats the ball 40 on the seat 42 and it closes to prevent further flow of the fluid. It may be seen that this simple removal of the valve assembly 10 from the housing assembly 12 requires no tools and just the flick of a finger. Of course where a cover 62 is provided this must also be removed. The cover 62, however, may be snap retained and serves the further purpose of preventing accidental disengagement and tampering. Complete removal of the valve assembly 10 may further involve an electrical disconnection, however, these may be of the conventional quick disconnect type.

The housing body 16 may include a depending body portion 16a that serves to help retain the valve assembly firmly in place. While the connection means have been shown only with respect to the second passageway 19 it is to be understood that a similar construction is provided for the first passageway 18 and any other passageways.

The control valve assembly 10 includes a body portion 66 which, as previously indicated has a projection 60 and protrusion 66a thereon or integrally formed therewith. A high impact synthetic resinous material has been found to provide excellent results and provide convenience of construction of the body 66.

Fluids flow under pressure through passageways l8, 19 in the valve 10 from inlets such as the hollow projection 60 to outlets in a mixing spout 17. This fluid flow through the valve 10 is controlled initially by a first valve means 13, 14 and finally by a flow rate control second valve means in the mixing spout 17.

In one advantageous beverage dispensing embodiment of my invention two incoming supply lines shown in FIG. 2 at 18a and 19a convey carbonated water and syrup respectively from a supply means not shown. Each of the different fluids follows a separate path, each with a separate valve means and flow rate control disposed therein.

Referring to FIG. 1 it may be seen that the syrup in passageway 19 flows around the unseated ball check valve 40, through a notch 60b in the projection 60, thence through a passageway 19e in the projection 60 and on to a valve chamber l9fin a first valve means generally indicated at 14.

The valve chamber 19f has a lower portion 80 which may be integrally fonned with the body 66 and includes a bottom 82 and sides 84. An integrally formed hollow member 85 through which a passageway 193 extends is upstanding from the chamber bottom 82 and has an opening 88 in its upper end which opening will generally conform to the size of the passageway 19. A seating surface 85a is formed about the opening 88 at a level below the level of the sides 84. Flow through the opening 88 is controlled by a closure disc 92 movable into and out of engagement with the seating surface 85a. The movement of this closure disc is advantageously effected by incorporating the disc on the end of an armature 94 in an electric valve actuating mechanism generally indicated at 96.

Operation of the valve means is advantageously effected in a known manner with a provision of a magnetic core 96 which may be energized to move the armature 94 upwardly and thus lift the sealing surface 92 out of engagement with the seat 85a to open the passageway 193. To control or limit the vertical movement of the armature 94 in the coil 96 I have provided an adjustable stop 98 that threadedly engages a switch support member 99 and has a nut head 100 projecting thereabove. In this manner the distance between the sealing surface 92 and the seat 85a may be fixed to control maximum flow of the fluid through the valve. The valve chamber 19f has an upper portion closed by an integral cap structure guide assembly 88. The cap 88 includes a lower portion 88a which depends into a groove 66b that extends about the opening of the lower portion 80 of the chamber 19f. A suitable seal means 89 effects a fluid-type seal between the depending portion 880 in the groove 66b. An upstanding portion 88b of the cap 88 extends into the center of the coil 96 and provides a guide for the armature 94 and serves as an enclosure for the armature 90 and the adjustment means 98 to prevent leakage of fluids into these areas.

A spring 102 positioned between the chamber closure cap 88 and a washer 104 on the armature 94 biases the surface 92 against the seat 85a to keep the valve 14 closed when the coil 96 is not activated. The spring 102 thus assures that positive control is maintained over the fluid flow under all conditions including possible electrical failure.

After the pressurized fluid or syrup has filled the cavity 19f and has been allowed to pass the first valve means 14 into the passageway 193 it will flow downwardly into a transversely extending passageway 19h which has a second valve means or syrup metering valve 120 at one end and a removable screw access cap 114 closing its other end.

The second valve means 120 is positioned in a recess 122 at one end of passageway 19h and includes an adjustable metering valve having a hollow stem 12] with a passageway l9j extending therethrough that depends into a mixing spout 17 which surrounds the outlet ends of the passageways 18 and 19. The stem 121 has a lower outlet end 120b and an upper enlarged inlet end 120a with the upper inlet end 120a adapted to seat against a seating surface 126 on the control valve assembly body 66 and to thereby open or close the second passageway 19 to flow of fluid. A depending portion 120c is of smaller diameter than the portion 120a and is threaded to engage a body bottom retainer plate 67. The depending portion 120C includes a slot 120d which allows the flow valve 120 to be turned and thus moved into and out of engagement with the seat surface 126 thereby controlling the fluid flow of the fluid from the passage 19h through the passage 19]. A suitable seal means 127 seals the outer surface of the portion 122 with the passageway 122. A shoulder 120e between the portions 120a and 1200 will abut the retainer plate 67 when the metering valve is fully opened. As shown, the metering valve is nearly closed to thereby greatly restrict the flow of syrup through the passageway 19. This simple, detachable second valve means 120 allows accurate control of the syrup dispensed and hence regulates the strength and taste of a carbonated drink. Removal is easily accomplished by unscrewing the screw 68 and detaching the retaining plate 67. For purposes of explanation the portions 19e, 19f, 19g, 1911 and l9j may be referred to as the second portion of the second passageway 19.

The passageway closure means 114 serves a dual function of providing a means whereby a spring 116 may bias the control means 15a away to a position below the mixing spout 17. In a manner similar to that set forth for the syrup or fluid in the second passageway 19, the carbonated water or fluid in the first passageway 18 flows through the inlet housing assembly 12, through a passageway in a male projection similar to 60 and into a valve chamber 18f in the first valve means 13. Inasmuch as the flow path in the passageway 18 to the point of entry into the fluid chamber 18f is identical of that of the flow through passageway 19 the description need not be repeated, but will be understood by one skilled in the art. An opening 128 schematically illustrates the entry of the fluid from the line 18 into the chamber 18f. The chamber 18f includes a portion 130 integrally formed in the valve'body 66 which may be of cylindrical configuration having a bottom 132 and sides 134. A hollow member 135 therein is similar to the upstanding portion 35 of the first valve means except that the passageway portion 18g through an upper opening 137 is smaller than a passageway portion 18h through the remainder thereof. This difference is required by the different fluids.

As shown in FIG. 1 the particular configuration and depth of the chamber 18f may be designed in accordance with the fluid to be controlled. Thus, where, as here, the fluid will be carbonated water, the chamber 18f may be of a deeper size than the chamber 19f.

A valve actuating means 146 identical to the valve means 96 may be provided for the valve 13. This structure again includes an armature 144 activated by a coil 146 and moved upwardly against a spring bias to a point controlled by an adjustment means 148. Inasmuch as this is identical with that described for the first valve 14 the description will not be repeated but will be understood by one skilled in the art.

Once past the valve 13, the fluid in passageway 18 continues through passageway portions 18g and 18h and into a passageway portion 18j which portion extends partially through a diffuser mount 141 of a diffuser assembly 140. An opening 143 in the passageway 181' exposes the fluid to the inside of a stack of washers 152 between which the fluid must flow to be dispersed The diffuser assembly in the outlet end of the first passageway 18 forms the second valve means therein and is particularly adapted to the dispersing of carbonated water under pressure.

The construction of the diffuser assembly and its means of attachment to the valve body form an important part of this invention. The diffuser assembly has an upper end portion 140a sealingly fitted in an enlarged opening 144 in the valve body 66. Suitable seal means 145 effect the seal. An enlarged portion 146 of the assembly 140 is retained behind the retainer plate 67 while a smaller mount portion 141 depends through an opening 67a in the body plate 67. lt is thus clear that removal of the retainer plate 67 allows easy detachment of the assembly 140.

The mount portion 141 extending below the plate 67 has fitted thereabout a pair of concentric telescoping opposed cup-shaped antisplash housings 150, 151 which are spaced from each other by a stack of washers 152. An upstanding lip 150a on the housing 150 is of a size which will allow it to telescope inside of a depending lip 1510 on the housing 151. As may be seen in H6. 1 the depending portion 141 has formed thereon a shoulder 1410 against which the larger inverted cup-shaped portion 151 of the telescoping antisplash housing abuts. The smaller concentric telescoping antisplash housing portion 150 has affixed thereto a screw threaded means which engages the lower end of the passageway l8j to allow the portion 150 to be screwed toward and away from the portion 151 thereby varying the pressure between the plu rality of washers 152 stacked on the mounting spindle 141 between the antisplash housing 150 and 151. Simple hand pressure applied to the portion 150 very adequately allows pressure variances. Suitable seal and pressure absorbing means 156, 158 may be provided on both ends of the stack of washers to adequately seal the antisplash housings and provide a tight fit that will not work loose. The opening 143 in the passageway 18j allows the carbonated water to escape between the washers 152 and thereby provide for the dispensing of carbonated water with a high carbon content according to the principles explained in US. Pat. No. 2,989,242 and No. 2,989,243. The concentric telescoping housing members 150, 15] generally enclose the washers and thereby assure better flow conditions and prevent the deflected spray to pass directly out of the mixing spout 17. In this manner a solid, high dissolved carbon dioxide percentage flow is assured that will mix well in the mixing spout 17 with a syrup that is dispensed from the passageway 19.

The mixing spout 17 advantageously is of the flexible type which may be snapped into place and be retained by attachment means schematically illustrated at 162, 164.

OPERATION Operation of the apparatus of my invention is simple and convenient. Thus, the inlet housing assembly 12 is mounted on some type of base and a carbonated water supply line 18a is attached to the connector 20a while a syrup supply line 19a is connected to an inlet connector 20b. When the control valve assembly is not connected to the inlet housing assembly 12 the spring loaded ball checks 400 are seated against the resilient seats 42 preventing flow of the fluids through the first portions of the passageways 18 and 19. The spring loaded clamp 70 rests against a stop 16b molded into the inlet housing body 16. The valve assembly 10 is installed by mating the two hollow male projections 60 for each of the passageways l8 and 19 with the two holes or sockets 50 in the valve body. When the clamp 70 rests against the raised step 66a which may be molded into the valve body 66, the valve assembly inlets 60 are brought into alignment with the inlet housing check valves. An initial push on the valve assembly body 66 into the inlet housing assembly 12 causes the clamp 70 to ride upon the step 66a and at the same time, the valve inlet grooves which may be provided in the outer surface of the male projection 60 has the first set of O-ring sealing means 54 in the inlet housing creating a seal around the male projections 60. Pushing the valve assembly 10 further towards the inlet housing 12 causes the clamp 70 to climb over the rear edge of the step 66a against the bias of its spring means and to lock in" on the back edge of the step 660, Advantageously, the overcenter arrangement of the clamp 70, the step 66a and the spring biasing means for the clamp are such that a pull on the valve assembly, without releasing the clamp 70, causes the clamp to bite" into the step 66a further to prevent accidental release. Also, as the clamp 70 locks-in, the male projection valve inlet 60 pushes the balls 40a off the seats 42. This allows fluid to pass around the balls through the grooves 60b in the valve inlet male projections, into the passageways 182, 1% and hence into the valve chambers 18f, 19f of the first valve means 13, 14. Actuation of the solenoid valve means 13, 14, causes the fluid products in the passageways 18, 19 to be dispensed.

To disconnect the valve assembly 10 from the inlet housing assembly 12 all that is required is a relatively light finger pressure to push the clamp 70 back. The valve assembly 10 can then be pulled away from the inlet housing at which time the male projection 60 allow the balls 40 to seat while the valve projections 60 are still sealed by the outer set of O-rings 54 in the inlet housing assembly. Further pull releases the valve entirely.

The wiring of the valve is arranged so that both solenoid valve means 13 and 14 will be actuated when the lever 15a is pushed back as for example by a paper cup. This, according to an embodiment of my invention, will dispense a mixed drink. lf soda only is desired, the front button 15b may be depressed. This actuates only the front solenoid valve 13 which dispenses soda only. In this case the lever switch 15a is electrically bypassed when the front button 15b is depressed.

The syrup metering valve is adjustable, as is the diffuser section 1403. The diffuser section provides the means for adjusting the amount of carbon dioxide in the drink and as shown the tightening of the diffuser control results in an increase in carbon dioxide retention. The spout l7 circles the diffuser section 150 and the syrup metering valve 120 directs the products so that they are mixed before being discharged.

From the above noted description of the invention it may be seen that l have provided a simple and efficient post-mix dispensing valve assembly which overcomes the disadvantages of the prior art and allows ease of construction, maintenance and service as well as flexibility in operation.

Although minor modifications might be suggested by those versed in the art, it should be understood that 1 wish to embody within the scope of the patent warranted hereon all such modifications as reasonably and properly come within the scope of my contribution to the art.

I claim as my invention:

1. A control valve assembly comprising a body, at least first and second passageways extending through said body, said passageways each having an inlet and an outlet end, a flow rate control means at the outlet end of each of said passageways, said flow rate control means for said first passageway being a detachable, adjustable diffuser assembly, said diffuser assembly having an upper end portion sealingly fitted in an enlarged opening in said valve body, said diffuser assembly having a first enlarged portion and a second smaller mount portion, said valve body having a retainer plate thereon, said smaller mount portion depending through a generally conforming opening in said retainer plate whereby a removal of the retainer plate allows easy detachment of the diffuser assembly, said mount portion extending below said retaining plate and having fitted thereabout a pair of concentric telescoping opposed cup-shaped antisplash housings, and said splash housings being separated by a stack of washers.

2. A fluid dispensing apparatus according to claim 1, wherein said antisplash housings include a first and second housing member, said first housing member being of a lesser width than said second housing member, said first housing member telescoping inside said second housing member, said first housing member having affixed thereto a screw threaded means engaging the lower end of said outlet end of said first passageway to allow the first housing member to be screwed toward and away from the second housing member, thereby varying the pressure between the plurality of washers so that a solid, high-dissolved carbon dioxide percentage flow is provided.

3. A fluid dispensing apparatus comprising a controlled valve assembly securely and readily detachably connected to an inlet housing assembly; at least one passageway having interconnected first and second portions passing through said apparatus; said inlet housing assembly including a body portion; said first portion of said passageway passing through said inlet housing assembly body portion and having an inlet end and a outlet end; an inlet supply connector adjacent said passageway first portion inlet end; said valve control assembly comprising a body; a second portion of each said passageway extending through said valve assembly and having an inlet end and a outlet end; a first connector means connecting said inlet housing assembly to said control valve assembly adjacent said first portion outlet end and said second portion inlet end, said first connector means including a hollow male projection integral with said control valve assembly and a check valve in said passageway first portion intermediate the inlet and outlet ends thereof, said projection being of a length to unseat said check valve when said control valve assembly and said inlet housing assembly are connected together; a second connector means comprising a resilient biased hook means on one of said assemblies and a retaining protrusion on the other of said assemblies whereby when said male projection unseats said check valve said hook means is resiliently snapped over said retaining protrusion to lock the assemblies in operative relationship.

4. A fluid dispensing apparatus according to claim 3 wherein said protrusion is generally right angularly shaped and inclined away from said clamp whereby when the assemblies are formed together the clamp will ride up the incline and snap into engagement behind the protrusion.

5. A fluid dispensing apparatus according to claim 3, wherein said apparatus has separated first and second passageways therethrough each of said passageways having said first and second portions, said second portions of each of said passageways having a valve means therein; said valve means in said first passageway being an adjustable diffuser assembly; and said valve means in said second passageway being an adjustable metering valve.

6. A fluid dispensing apparatus according to claim 5, wherein adjustable difiuser means comprises a diffuser mount, a pair of telescoping opposed splash cups positioned on said mount, a stack of diffuser discs on said mount retained between said opposed cups, said cups being incrementally movable toward and away from each other to increase or decrease the pressure on said diffuser discs.

7. A fluid dispensing apparatus according to claim 3, wherein said second passageway portions includes a first valve means comprising an enclosed valve chamber having a bottom, sides and top, a hollow member substantially upstanding from said chamber bottom through which the second portion of said passageway extends, an opening in the upper end of said hollow member of lesser size than said chamber, a seating surface surrounding said opening, a closure disc movable into and out of engagement with said seating surface to respectively close or open said passageway second portion.

8. A fluid dispensing apparatus according to claim 5, wherein said flow rate control means for said second passageway includes a metering valve having a hollow stem, said stem having a lower outlet end and an upper inlet end, said upper inlet end adapted to seat against said body to close said second passageway, said outlet end having a slot therein whereby adjustment may be efiected.

t It l t I?

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/129.3, 222/504, 222/153.9, 137/329.1, 137/898
International ClassificationB67D1/04, B67D1/00, F16K11/16
Cooperative ClassificationB67D1/0085, B67D1/005
European ClassificationB67D1/00H2B4H, B67D1/00H8C
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 31, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: ALCO STANDARD CORPORATION, A CORP. OF OH
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNORS:METALSOURCE CORPORATION, THE, A CORP. OF OH;REYNOLDS PRODUCTS, INC.,;BIG DRUM, INC., AN OH CORP.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:004765/0672
Effective date: 19870320