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Publication numberUS3626523 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 14, 1971
Filing dateSep 25, 1970
Priority dateSep 25, 1970
Publication numberUS 3626523 A, US 3626523A, US-A-3626523, US3626523 A, US3626523A
InventorsRobins Harry J
Original AssigneeRobins Harry J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bed foundation and mattress assembly
US 3626523 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. J. ROBINS BED FOUNDATION AND MATTRESS ASSEMBLY Dec. 14, 1971 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Sept. 25, 1970 HARRY iggl/Ns BY fam@ A GRA/EYB Dec. 14, 1971 H. J. RoBlNs 3,626,523

BED FOUNDATION AND MATTRESS ASSEMBLY Filed Sept. 25, 1970 2 Sheets-Sheet z v Y /4 END PORT/0N INTERMEDIATE PORT/0N EAI/9 PORT/0N HARRY J. Ro/Ns l N VEN 0R.

United States Patent O U.S. Cl. -345 6 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE An improved -bed foundation and mattress assembly which provides varying degrees of firmness for support and comfort of a human anatomy. The center section of the assembly is stiffened to provide additional firmness.

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTS As is well-known, individual preferences in the firmness of beds vary widely. A substantial num-ber of people prefer a bed which firmly supports their buttocks and the middle portion of their anatomy. Generally included within such class of people are those persons who suffer from back ailments and disorders. Such persons are continually searching for a bed which will provide adequate support for the middle portions of their anatomy without being so rigid in respect to other parts of their anatomy that comfortable sleep is prevented.

It is an object of the invention to provide a bed foundation and mattress assembly which supply support to the human anatomy by varying the firmness of such assembly, whereby extra firmness supports the middle portion of the human anatomy but not the head and feet of such anatomy.

Another object of the invention is to provide a bed foundation and mattress assembly in which the mattress supplements the bed foundation in supplying varying degrees of firmness to the human anatomy.

It is an object of this invention that such variation in firmness in the bed foundation and mattress assembly will produce no physical distortion in such assembly.

The present invention provides an improved bed foundation and mattress assembly wherein that portion of the bed assembly which supports the middle portion of a human anatomy has increased firmness. Such improved bed assembly is comprised of an improved foundation unit and an improved mattress. The improved bed foundation unit utilizes springs to produce its desired resilient effect. Those springscomprising the intermediate portion of such bed foundation are compressed and prestressed in order to provide firmer support than provided by the springs comprising the end portions of such foundation unit. The improved mattress coacts with such bed foundation; its novel construction supplements the function of the bed foundation in providing varying support for the human anatomy. 'Ihe improved mattress includes means which correspond with the firmer portion of the bed foundation unit and provide additional support to the human anatomy, means which correspond with the firmer portion of the bed foundation unit and add additional cushioning, and means extended longitudinally along the entire length of the mattress which function to integrate the varying degrees of firmness.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS These and other objects, as Well as the invention itself both as to organization and methods of operation, will become readily apparent in the following description when read in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is an exploded view in cross-section of the improved bed foundation in its prestressed state in cor- "ice respondence with the improved mattress (the exploded elevation of the mattress is not to scale);

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the improved bed foundation showing the springs attached to the base;

FIG. 3 is a side elevation of FIG. 2 before the springs in the intermediate portion of such -bed foundation have been compressed and prestressed;

FIG. 4 is a side elevation of FIG. 2 after the springs in intermediate portion of such foundation have been compressed and prestressed;

FIG. 5 is an isometric view of a spring utilized in the end portions of the bed foundation;

FIG. 6 is an isometric view of a spring utilized in the intermediate portion of the bed foundation (such spring is in its compressed `and prestressed state); and

FIG. 7 is a plan view of the mattress with the outer covering partially cut away showing the flexible stiffening means, the flexible cushion means, and the integrating means.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The improved bed foundation and mattress assembly according to the invention functions to provide firm support to the middle portion of the anatomy of a person without being so rigid in respect to other parts of a persons anatomy that comfortable sleep is prevented. Such improved assembly is a combination of a foundation unit and a mattress; the latter supplements the former.

Referring to the drawings, FIG. 1 illustrates the improved assembly comprising a foundation unit indicated generally at 10, which corresponds generally to a conventional box-spring, and a mattress indicated generally at 12, which corresponds generally to a conventional mattress.

Foundation unit 10 functions to provide a sturdy -base for the bed assembly, and provides the primary support to the human anatomy. In this regard, foundation unit 10 functions to provide the primary means of varying the firmness of the support provided to the human anatomy. Foundation unit 10 includes a solidly constructed base comprising a plurality of members 14 extending longitudinally along the length of the entire bed assembly to which are secured a plurality of cross-members 16. Such base may be constructed in any desired form so long as it provides the sturdy support needed for the vremaining elements of the bed assembly.

The springs included within such foundation unit 10 function to provide the varying degrees of rmness desired of such foundation unit 10. In order to provide firmer support for the buttocks and middle portion of the human anatomy than for the head and feet of such anatomy, the support provided -by such springs will vary depending on whether they are positioned in the intermediate portion or the end portions of such foundation unit 10.

FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrate that a plurality of springs are attached to the plurality of cross-members 16. Such springs are of two types. The first type of spring 18 is constructed in upstanding coil from a desired metal of a desired gauge and with a desired number of coils per inch. The second type of spring 20 is also constructed in upstanding coiled form. However, such second spring 20 is preferably constructed so that in its uncompressed state each spring has a greater height than such first spring 18. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, such second spring 20 is constructed from the same metal utilized in the first spring 18, but such metal is of a heavier gauge than that used to construct the first spring 18. Additionally, the length of the piece of metal used to construct the second spring 20 is longer than that used to construct the first spring 18. The'use of a longer strip of metal to construct the second spring 20 allows production of such second spring with a higher height than such first spring 18 even though the desired number of coils per inch remains constant.

The springs in a bed foundation unit function to exert pressure in an upward direction on the human anatomy and thereby support such body. Nevertheless, such springs yield somewhat to such body and thereby allow comfortable sleep. Springs in a bed assembly are a compromise between a means which supplies maximum support without yielding, such as concrete slab, and a means which completely yields and provides almost no support, such as a deep feather bed. In the bed foundation and mattress assembly according to this invention, such second springs 20 are designed so that when they are compressed and prestressed, they store more potential energy than the first springs 18 and thereby exert more upward force upon the body. Thus, such second springs 20 provides the desired additional support for the intermediate portions of the human anatomy but still yield somewhat to the motions of such body and thus permit comfortable sleep.

Referring to FIGS. and 6 which are isometric drawings of a first spring 18 and a second spring 20 respectively, it is observed that in the preferred embodiment of this invention such springs are suitably secured at their lower ends to the cross-members 16. Such first and second springs 18 and 20 may be secured to the cross-members 16 through the use of wire means 28 extending transversely and longitudinally along the base of the bed foundation unit. Such wire means 28 physically interconnect with the lower coils of such first and second springs 18 and 20 and when secured by a means 32, such as a staple, to the cross-member 16, act to secure the individual springs to such cross-members 16. As previously indicated, in the preferred embodiment of this invention a plurality of such first springs 18 are secured to the cross-members comprising the end portions of the bed assembly. A plurality of such second springs 2f) are secured to the cross-members comprising the intermediate portion of such bed assembly.

When the first and second springs 18 and 20 have been secured to the cross-members 16 of the foundation unit 10, variations in the height between such two types of springs are readily apparent. Referring to FIG. 3, it is observed that the plurality of second springs 20 comprising the intermediate portion of the foundation unit are of a greater height than the plurality of first springs 18 comprising the end portions of such foundation. As previously indicated, increased support will be afforded the intermediate portion of the human anatomy if such second springs 20 are compressed and prestressed. Therefore, a strapping means 34 functions to compress and prestress each of the plurality of second springs 20. In the preferred embodiment of this invention, the strapping means 34- is constructed of an inexpensive, easily obtainable material such as leather or plastic. Each strap is of a desired length so that when each second spring is secured, its compressed height will equal that of the first springs 18.

A preferred method of securing such strap to such springs is illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4. Each strap is looped beneath the proper cross-member 16 and on either side of the second spring 20. Suitably connected to each end of such strap 34 is a conventional means 36, such as a bradded hook, for connecting each end of such strap to the upper coil of such second spring 20.

Once the plurality of second springs 20 have been compressed and prestressed so that all springs 18 and 20 are at approximately the same height, it is desired that the upper ends of such springs be secured in a fixed relationship to each other. The method of securing such springs utilized in the preferred embodiment of this invention includes a plurality of wire means extending transversely and longitudinally across the tops of the rst and second springs 18 and 20. Referring to FIGS. 2, 5 and 6, each length of such wire means 38 contains a plurality of crimps therein. rl`he crimps are spaced so that each crimp communicates with the inside top coil of a spring. A plurality of connecting wires 40 are utilized to secure such transverse and longitudinal wire means to the top coil of such first and second springs. Each connecting wire 40 slips under the top coil of a spring and over the transversing or longitudinal wire which is perpendicular to such connecting wire and is tangent to the top coil of such spring at that point.

When the plurality of first and second springs 18 and 20 have been secured in their desired fixed relationship, the outer covering 42 is utilized to completely enclose the top and sides of such plurality of springs. FIG. l illustrates that such outer covering is secured to the base. The outer covering 42 may be constructed of any of a number of materials such as cotton cloth.

An improved bed foundation unit which supplies the primary support with varying degrees of firmness for the human anatomy has been disclosed. However, the bed foundation and mattress assembly according to this invention utilizes an improved mattress in combination with such bed foundation unit. Such improved mattress functions to augment and supplement the varying degrees of firmness utilized to support the human anatomy.

The bulk of the improved mattress is provided by its core 48 which functions to produce the primary cushioning resiliency of the mattress. As illustrated in FIG. 1, the core 48 of the improved mattress 12 corresponds to cores used in conventional mattresses, that is, such core 48 may be comprised of innersprings, cotton padding, foam rubber, or any of a number of materials, or any combination thereof. The preferred embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIG. 1 has a mattress core comprising inner springs 52 and padding 51. In addition to such conventional core 48, the improved mattress 12 according to this invention includes certain components which function to correspond to the novel aspects of the bed foundation unit 10. Such mattress 12 includes a flexible stiffening means 44, a flexible cushioning means 46, and an integrating means 50.

The flexible stiffening means 44 function to correspond with the intermediate firmer portion of the bed foundation unit and provide additional rigidity and support to the human anatomy in the longitudinal direction. Referring to FIG. 7, it is illustrated that in the preferred embodiment of the invention these means 44 are conventional devices, such as wires of small diameter, which are secured to each other by a plurality of fiexible cords 45. The plurality of stiffening wires 44 extend in a longitudinal direction along the mattress but only over that intermediate portion of the mattress which corresponds with the intermediate portion of the fundation unit 10. The plurality of such flexible cords 45 connecting the stiffening wires 44 extend transversely across the bed. Thus, although the stiffening wires give support to the middle portion of the human anatomy in a longitudinal direction, the wires are flexible in transverse direction to allow such wires 44 to move freely responsive to the transverse contours of the body.

The fiexible cushioning means 46 is a conventional device which functions to cushion and integrate any rapid and discreet variations of firmness which might be produced by the fiexible stiffening means 44. Such fiexible stiffening means 46 is inserted into the improved mattress only on that portion thereof which corresponds to the intermediate portion of the bed foundation unit 10, which of course causes such means to correspond with the flexible stiffening means 44. The flexible cushioning means 46 is a conventional material such as sisal.

The integrating means 50 are included within the improved mattress and function to integrate the changes in degress of firmness which might be produced between the intermediate portion and the end portions of the bed foundation and mattress assembly. The preferred embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIG. 7 uses conventional devices, such as wires, for such integration means 50. Such wires extend longitudinally along the entire length of the mattress and correspond to both the intermediate portion and end portions of the bed foundation unit. As in the case of the flexible stilfening means 44, some conventional means (not shown) must be employed to secure such wires 50 in a fixed transverse relationship to each other. As will be discussed below, the preferred embodiment of this invention juxtapositions such wires 50 with the inner springs 52. Accordingly, such wires 50 may be secured to such inner springs 52 to effect the desired fixed relationship.

Although the flexible stiffening means 46', the flexible cushioning means 50 and the integrating means 50 may be positioned at any horizontal stratum inside the mattress, FIG. 1 illustrates the positioning of such means in the preferred embodiment of this invention. it has been previously stated that the core 48 of the improved mattress 12 is a combination of inner springs 52 and cotton padding 51. For maximum comfort in such a preferred embodiment, the flexible stiffening means 44 are positioned on top of the outer covering 54 on the lower side of the mattress. The tiexible cushioning means 46 are then positioned on top of the flexible stiffening means 44 to integrate the effect of such fiexible stiffening means. On top of such flexible cushioning means 46 is inserted a layer of cotton padding 51. The integrating means `50 comprised of a plurality of wires are placed on top of such cotton padding 51 and such wires 50 are secured to the inner springs 52. Another layer of cotton padding 51 is secured to the top of inner springs 52, and an outer covering 54 of cotton cloth or the like is utilized to completely inclose the components comprising such mattress. Conventional means, such as staples or cord, is utilized to secure all of the components in the improved mattress in a desired fixed relationship.

In accordance with the present invention, it has been determined that the greatest support and sensitivity forl the entire human anatomy is obtained through the apparatus disclosed herein. It has been found that the mere use of the improved bed foundation unit with a conventional mattress is not satisfactory. Rather, the improved mattress, as disclosed herein, is necessary to provide the desired support without the inordinate rigidity which prevents comfortable sleep. It has also been found that the use of compressed and prestressed coils in the intermediate portion of the mattress did not function as well as the present invention which employs compressed and prestressed coils in the intermediate portion of the bed foundation unit. It has been determined that the use of the same gauge wire in both the first and second springs did not provide the support and sensitivity provided in the present invention, even if such second springs constructed of the same gauge wire as such first springs were compressed and prestressed in the manner of this invention. Conversely, it has been determined that the use of a heavier gauge -wire in the construction of the second spring (comprising the intermediate portion of such foundation unit) without compressing and prestressing such springs did not produce the support and sensitivity found in the present invention.

The invention has been particularly shown and defined with reference to a preferred embodiment. However, many variations and modifications of the invention will now be apparent to those having skill in the art. For instance, a plurality of methods may be utilized to secure the first springs and second springs to the base. Different methods may be utilized to secure the tops of such first and second springs to each other in a desired relationship. A plurality of types of material may be utilized as the flexible stiffening means, the flexible cushioning means 7 and the integrating means. Nevertheless, the substitution of these equivalents for each means are within the teachings of this invention.

The foregoing disclosure and description of the invention are illustrative and explanatory thereof and various changes in the size, shape and materials, as well as in the details of the illustrated construction, may be made within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What I claim is:

1. A bed foundation and mattress assembly comprising:

(a) foundation means including,

a base means,

a plurality of first springs of substantially equal height,

a plurality of second springs of greater unstressed height than such first springs,

means to secure one end of each of such first and second springs to such base in a desired fixed relationship wherein such first springs are positioned at the end portions of such base and such second springs are positioned at the intermediate portion of such base,

means to compress and prestress such second springs so that the height of each is equal to the height of such first springs,

means to secure the other ends of each of such first springs and such compressed second springs to each other in a desired fixed relationship, and

a cover means which encloses the top and sides of such assembled springs and attaches to said base;

mattress means including:

a core means extending longitudinally along the entire length of the mattress providing the primary cushioning resiliency,

fiexible stiffening means which positionally correspond with said second springs in said bed foundation and which supplement the firm support of such second springs,

flexible cushioning means which positionally correspond With said second springs in said bed foundation and said fiexible stiffening means, which cushion and integrate the effect of such flexible stiffening means,

integrating means extending longitudinally along the entire length of the mattress core which dampen the rate of change of firmness between such intermediate portion and such end portions of the bed foundation and mattress of such assembly and also supplement the support afforded the human anatomy,

means to secure such core, such -fiexible stiffening means, such fiexible cushioning means, and such integrating means in a desired fixed relationship, and

a cover means which encloses such core, flexible stiffening means, flexible cushioning means and integrating means.

2 A bed foundation and mattress assembly according to claim 1 wherein such first and second springs are constructed from helically coiled wire, and the length of wire utilized to construct each such second spring is a heavier gauge and of a longer length than the length of wire utilized to construct each such first spring.

3. A bed foundation and mattress assembly according to claim 1 wherein the means to compress and prestress such second springs includes:

a strapping means of desired length which, when secured to such base and secured to the top coil of such second spring, will reduce the height of each such second spring so that it corresponds to the height of each such first spring, and

means connected to each end of such strapping means to connect each end of such strapping means to the top coil of each such second spring.

4. A bed foundation and mattress assembly according to claim 1 wherein such stiffening means included within such mattress is constructed of a plurality of wires of small diameter extending longitudinally along the length of such assembly, and which are connected to a plurality of exible means extending transversely across such assembly.

5. A bed foundation and mattress assembly according to claim 1 wherein the exible cushioning means included within such mattress is constructed of sisal.

6. A bed foundation and mattress assembly according to claim 1 wherein the integrating means in such mattress is constructed of a plurality of wires of small diameter which extend longitudinally along the entire length of such mattress and diminish the varying degrees of rmness existing between the intermediate portion of such assembly and the end portions of such assembly.

References Cited CASMIR A. NUNBERG, Primary Examiner 10 A. CALVERT, Assistant Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4161046 *May 10, 1978Jul 17, 1979The United States Bedding CompanyCoil spring assembly
US4245362 *Sep 1, 1978Jan 20, 1981Watercoil, Inc.Flotation mattress
US4245363 *Sep 1, 1978Jan 20, 1981Watercoil, Inc.Flotation mattress
US5325553 *Oct 14, 1993Jul 5, 1994Namaco EnterprisesMattress spring structure with reinforcing frame in the lumbar area
US5778466 *May 15, 1997Jul 14, 1998Price; J. WesnerBox spring assembly with cross slats of different heights
US6122787 *Dec 2, 1999Sep 26, 2000Kao; Pei-ChinSectioned ergonomic bed mattress
US6170807 *Dec 31, 1998Jan 9, 2001Matsushita Industrial Co., Ltd.Inner springs for use in furniture and bedding and a producing method therefor
US6292965 *Oct 5, 2000Sep 25, 2001Dwain P GambrellMattress
US6370717 *Sep 22, 2000Apr 16, 2002Pei-Chin KaoBed mattress assembly
US6540214 *Dec 28, 2001Apr 1, 2003Barber Manufacturing Company, Inc.Coil spring assembly
US6883196Nov 26, 2003Apr 26, 2005Barber Manufacturing Company, Inc.Encased coil innerspring assembly
US6966091Nov 26, 2003Nov 22, 2005Barber Manufacturing Company, Inc.Coil innerspring assembly having varying degrees of firmness
WO2011026816A1 *Aug 30, 2010Mar 10, 2011Froli Kunststoffwerk Heinrich Fromme OhgBiasing device for a spring element
Classifications
U.S. Classification5/716, 5/727, 267/92
International ClassificationA47C27/04, A47C27/06
Cooperative ClassificationA47C27/062
European ClassificationA47C27/06B