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Publication numberUS3626714 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 14, 1971
Filing dateNov 13, 1969
Priority dateNov 13, 1969
Publication numberUS 3626714 A, US 3626714A, US-A-3626714, US3626714 A, US3626714A
InventorsBlore James H
Original AssigneePhillips Fibers Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Double knit fabric having a textured appearance
US 3626714 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 14, 1971 DOUBLE KNIT FABRIC HAVING A TEXTURED APPEARANCE Filed Nov. 13, 1969 COURSE J. H. BLORE 4 Shoots-Sheet 1 DI Cl D2 C2 D3 C3 D4 C4 D5 C5 D6 C6 D7 C7 D8 C8 LJLJL ll w u I I IN v F/c. m'i f A T TORNE VS Dec. 14, 1971 DOUBLE KNIT FABRIC HAVING A TEXTURED APPEARANCE Filed Nov. 13, 1969 COURSE FEED m w b J. H. BLORE 4 Shoots-Shut 2 CYLINDER DIAL Cl c2 c3 c4 cs cs c7 ca on 02 03 04 05 D6 07 D8 KNIT FIG. 2' YINVENTOR.

J.H.BLORE BY :WELT

A T TORNE Y5 J. H. BLORE Dec. 14, I971 DOUBLE KNIT FABRIC HAVING A TEXTURED APPEARANCE Filed NOV. 1.3, 1969 4 Shuts-Shut 5 FIG. 3

INVENTOR.

J. H. BLORE 4 rromvsrs Dec. 14, 1971 Filed Nov. 13, 1969 FEED J. H. BLORE DOUBLE KNIT FABRIC HAVING A TEXTURED APPEARANCE 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 CYLINDEF! l L- CI c2 ca c4 cs C6 c7 ca 0| 02 03 04 05 D6 D7 D8 O OO OO O O O O O O O O O O O OOO O O O O O O O O O O O O O O OO O O O O O O O O O O O O O O OOO O O O O O O O O O O O O O O OO O O O O OO O O O O O O OO O OO O O O O 0 0 0 o o o. o O OO O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O OO- O O O O O O OO O OO" O O O O 0 0 0 o 0 o o O OO O O O O O O -O O O O O O O 09 o 0 o '0 0 o 0 o o o 0 o 0 o O OO OOO O O O O -O O O O O O L w F/G.4 INVENTOR. =KN|T J.H. BLORE BY Q) =TUCK ATTORNEYS United States Patent ()fice 3,626,714 Patented Dec. 14, 1971 3,626,714 DOUBLE KNIT FABRIC HAVING A TEXTURED APPEARANCE James H. Blore, Greenville, S.C., assignor to Phillips Fibers Corporation Filed Nov. 13, 1969, Ser. No. 876,390 Int. Cl. D04b 9/08 US. Cl. 66-196 8 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The double knit fabric has a first set of alternating wales forming the reverse side of the fabric. Each course has first and second yarns. In the front Wales the yarns are knitted in a random fashion, with the first yarn in each course having a knit stitch when the second yarn has either a tuck stitch or a welt stitch and having either a tuck stitch or a welt stitch when the second yarn has a knit stitch. One set of the first yarns or the second yarns has more knit stitches than the other set in the front wales, and one set has a longer average knit stitch length than the other set in the front wales. In the reverse side wales, the first and second yarns have knit stitches in even numbered wales in even numbered courses and in the odd numbered wales in odd numbered courses, and either tuck or welt stitches in the remainder.

This invention relates to a double knit fabric. In one aspect the invention is directed to a double knit fabric made with untextured yarn, but having the appearance of having been prepared with textured yarn.

It has been customary to utilize textured yarns in the manufacture of double knit fabrics to achieve greater degree of covering for a given weight of fabric and to provide a softer hand than would be obtained with the untextured yarn. However, the texturing of the yarn involves an additional processing step and increases the cost of the yarn.

In accordance with the invention, it has now been discovered that a double 'knit fabric having the appearance of being formed of textured yarn can be prepared with an untextured yarn.

Accordingly, it is an object of the invention to provide a new and improved double knit fabric. Another object of the invention is to reduce the cost of a double knit fabric. Yet another object of the invention is to utilize untextured yarn to produce a double knit fabric having the appearance of having been formed with textured yarn.

Other objects, aspects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from a study of the specification, the drawings and the appended claims to the invention.

In the drawings, FIG. 1 is a schematic representation of a theoretical stitch construction of a double knit fabric in accordance with the invention, with the stitches being expanded laterally to show both the face stitches and the reverse side stitches. FIG. 2 is a pattern diagram of the face stitches formed by the cylinder needles and the reverse side stitches formed by the dial needles in making the portion of the fabric illustrated in FIG. 1 on a circular knitting machine. FIG. 3 is a photographic reproduction of a double knit fabric prepared in accordance with the present invention. 'FIG. 4 a pattern diagram of the face stitches formed by the cylinder needles and the reverse side stitches formed by the dial needle in making a fabric on a circular knitting machine in accordance with another embodiment of the invention.

Referring now to the drawings in detail and to FIGS. 1- and 2 in particular, there is illustrated a fabric swatch twelve courses high and sixteen wales wide. This can constitute the complete repeat pattern for the fabric or only a portion of the repeat pattern. While the stitch pattern for the face is random within the repeat pattern, it is still desirable that the repeat pattern comprises at least twelve courses and at least fourteen wales to minimize any perception by a human eye of the existence of the repeat pattern. It is presently preferred to employ a repeat pattern of at least 36 courses and at least 28 wales, and more preferably at least 48 courses and at least 56 wales to further minimize any perception of a repeat pattern. The number of wales in the repeat pattern will generally be determined by the number of needles or a factor of the number of needles in the cylinder. The number of courses in the repeat pattern will be determined by the pattern generating device, for example a Jacquard mechanism utilizing pattern wheels, punched discs, punched cards, perforated rolls, programmed tape, or electronic programming.

The wales C1, C2 C8 formed by the cylinder needles alternate the fabric with the wales D1, D2 D8 formed by the dial needles. Thus, each cylinder wale in the interior of the fabric is positioned between two dial wales. In the finished fabric the set of cylinder wales are in a plane parallel to the set of dial wales, and the fabric contracts laterally so that the set of cylinder wales contact each other to form the face of the fabric and the set of dial wales contact each other to form the reverse side of the fabric.

Each course comprises a first, or odd numbered feed, yarn and a second, or even numbered feed, yarn. The stitch pattern for the first yarns is random for the cylinder wales, and the stitch pattern in the cylinder wales for the second yarn in any course is the reverse of the stitch pattern of the first yarn of the same course. Thus, in each course the first yarn has knit stitches formed therein at randomly selected cylinder wales and has welt stitches formed therein at the remaining cylinder wales. The second yarn has welt stitches at the randomly selected cylinder wales at which the corresponding first yarn has knit stitches, and has knit stitches at the remaining cylinder wales. While the fabric represented in FIGS. 1 and 2 utilizes only knit and welt stitches, it is within the contemplation of the invention to employ tuck stitches instead of the welt stitches in the cylinder wales as used herein and in the claims, the term special stitch means either a tuck stitch or a welt stitch.

To enchance the textured appearance, the knit stitches in the cylinder wales of one of the set of yarns and the set of second yarns constitute at least 55 percent of the total knit stitches of the two sets of yarns in the cylinder wales. In the repeat pattern of FIGS. 1 and 2, there are 57 knit stitches for the odd numbered feed (first) yarns in the cylinder wales and only 39 knit stitches for the even numbered feed (second) yarns in the cylinder wales. Thus, the set of first yarns has 59.4% of the total knit stitches in the cylinder wales.

The textured appearance of the fabric is further augmented by a disparity of the height, or length, of the knit stitches. It is presently preferred that the average stitch length of the knit stitches in the group of odd numbered feed (first) yarns or the group of even numbered feed (second) yarns be longer than the average stitch length of the knit stitches in the other group. The variation in stitch length causes unbalanced tensions on the knit stitches of different length as the fabric is knitted, resulting in a distortion of the shape of a particular loop of greater or lesser length and of the shape of its immediate neighbors. Although the stitch length of a particular loop will change upon its being released by the knitting mechanism, as a result of the distortion due to the unbalanced forces between it and its neighbors, the relative significance of the variation in stitch length in the final fabric can be determined by noting the variations in the stitch length in the undistorted pattern. Thus, in FIG. 2, the knit stitches for feed number 1 have a relative, undistorted length of 1, 3, O, 0, 1, 2, 0, 3, 1, 0, 0, 3, 1, 2, O, and 3 for wales D1, C1, D2, C2, D3, C3, D4, C4, D5, C5, D6, C6, D7, C7, D8, and C8, respectively. The knit stitches for 4 for example, acrylonitrile polymers and copolymers; polyarnides, such as polyhexamethylene adipamide, polycaproamide, poly(meta-phenylene isophthalamide), and copolyamides; polyesters, such as polypivalolactone, polyethylene terephthalate, and copolyesters prepared from feed number 2 have a relative undistorted length of 3, glycols and terephthalic and isophthalic acids; polyolefins, 0, 0, l, 3, 0, 0, 0, 3, l, 0, 0, 3, O, 0, and O for Wales such as polyethylene, and ethylene copolymers, poly- Dl, C1, D2, C2, D3, C3, D4, C4, D5, C5, D6, C6, propylene and propylene copolymers; polybeazimidazole; D7, C7, D8, and C8, respectively. Similarly, it is desircopolymers of acrylonitrile with small amounts of coable that for each yarn the average stitch length for polymerizable monomers such as methyl methacrylate or the knit stitches in the cylinder Wales be different from vinyl acetate; and the like. Although it is presently prethe average stitch length for the knit stitches in the ferred that all of the yarns in the fabric have the same dial wales. The relative undistorted stitch lengths for color, yarns of two or more colors can be employed. the full repeat pattern of FIGS. 1 and 2 are set forth The denier of each yarn can vary with the type of fabric in the following table. desired. Generally the yarn denier will be in the range TABLE I Average knit Total knit Total knit Knit stitch length stitch length stitch length stitches Feed Cylinder wales Dial wales C1 02 c3 c4 c5 C6 C7 C8 D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 Cyl. Dial Odd Even Odd Even wales wales feeds feeds feeds feeds 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 o 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 1.0 3 15 7 3 0 2 3 0 2 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 2.4 1 16 9 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 1.33 3 16 7 2 3 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 2.4 1 16 9 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 1.0 3 15 7 6 2 3 0 3 0 3 0 1 0 1 0 1 6 1 2.6 1 17 9 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 3 6 3 0 3 6 3 6 1.33 3 16 7 3 0 2 3 2 0 2 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 2.4 1 16 9 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 6 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 1.25 3 17 3 0 3 0 2 0 3 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 2.5 1 14 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 1.0 3 15 7 3 0 3 0 3 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 u 2.3 1 1s 9 1 o 0 2 0 1 0 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 1.33 3 16 7 0 3 2 0 2 0 3 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 2.4 1 16 9 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 1.0 3 17 9 3 0 6 3 0 3 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 o 3.0 1 13 7 6 2 0 1 0 0 2 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 1.67 3 17 7 2 0 3 6 3 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 2.6 1 17 9 1 0 0 2 0 1 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 1.33 3 16 7 0 3 2 0 2 0 3 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 2.4 1 16 9 0 o 1 0 1 0 1 0 3 6 3 0 3 0 3 1.0 3 16 s 3 2 0 3 0 3 0 0 1 0 1 6 1 0 1 2.75 1 15 8 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 1.0 3 14 6 0 2 3 0 3 2 3 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 2.67 1 20 10 Total While the average relative undistorted knit stitch length for knit stitches in the cylinder wales is different from the average undistorted knit stitch length for the knit stitches in the dial Wales for each of feed yarns 124, it is within the contemplation of the invention for some of the yarns to have equal averages for the cylinder and dial wales. However, at least a majority of the yarns, and preferably at least 80 percent, of the yarns have unequal average knit stitch lengths for the cylinder and dial Wales. The average relative undistorted knit stitch length for the group of odd numbered feed (first) yarns is 194/105 or 1.85, while the average relative undistorted knit stitch length for the group of even numbered feed (second) yarns is 190/87 or 2.18.

As illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, the first and second yarns of the even numbered courses have knit stitches in each of the even numbered dial Wales and welt stitches in each of the odd numbered dial wales. Similarly the first and second yarns of the odd numbered courses have knit stitches in each of the odd numbered dial wales and welt stitches in each of the even numbered dial Wales. However, it is within the contemplation of the invention to utilize tuck stitches instead of the welt stitches. Since the stitch pattern for the cylinder stitches is random both from course to course and from Wale to wale, the designation of the courses and wales for the dial pattern as even and odd is only for convenience.

While the yarns have been illustrated in FIG. 1 as monofilaments for sake of simplicity, it is within the scope of the invention to employ any known substan tially compact, unbulked yarn of natural or synthetic material, whether monofilament, multifilament, continuous filament, staple, or blend of continuous filaments and staple. Synthetic yarns which can be employed include linear condensation polymers or linear addition polymers,

of to 200, and with multifilament yarn the d.p.f. will usually be in the range of 2 to 5.

Referring now to FIG. 3, the photographic reproduction is of the face side of the finished fabric. This fabric has a repeat pattern of 36 courses by 112 Wales. Each yarn is /68 polyester continuous filament yarn with approximately 0.5 t.p.i., in a compact, unbulked, nontextured form. The fabric was made on a Wildt Mellor Bromley Ltd. circular double knit machine, Type 8/RJ, having a thirty inch diameter cylinder, and employing 18 dial needles to the inch and 18 cylinder needles to the inch. The stitch pattern for the dial needles utilized only knit and welt stitches in the pattern illustrated in FIG. 2. The stitch pattern for the cylinder needles utilized only knit and welt stitches in a random selection from course to course and from Wale to 'wale. The fabric was then dyed, tumble dried and heat set. The finished fabric had a weight of approximately 6 ounces .per square yard. The knit stitches in the face wales of one set of alternatingly numbered yarns constituted approximately 60 percent of the total number of knit stitches in the face wales. The average stitch length of the knit stitches in the face wales Was greater than the average stitch length in the reverse side wales. One set of alternatingly numbered yarns had a greater average stitch length than the other alternatingly numbered yarns.

Reasonable variations and modifications are possible within the scope of the foregoing disclosure, the drawings and the appended claims to the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A double knit fabric having the appearance of having been prepared with textured yarn; knitted with substantially compact, unbulked yarn with a repeat pattern of at least 12 courses and at least 14 wales;

a first set of alternating wales forming the face of said fabric, and a second set of alternating wales forming the reverse side of said fabric, each interior wale of said first set of alternating wales being positioned between two wales of said second set of alternating wales;

each course comprising a first yarn and a second yarn, each said first yarn having knit stitches formed therein at randomly selected wales in said first set of alternating wales and having special stitches formed therein at the remaining wales in said first set of alternating wales, each said second yarn having special stitches at said randomly selected wales in said first set of alternating wales and having knit stitches at said remaining wales in said first set of alternating wales; and one of (a) the knit stitches of said first yarn in said first set of alternating wales and (b) the knit stitches of said second yarn in said first set of alternating wales constituting at least 55 percent of the knit stitches in said first set of alternating wales;

said first yarn in each of the courses forming a first group of yarns, said second yarn in each of the courses forming a second group of yarns, the average relative undistorted stitch length of the knit stitches in one of said first and second groups of yarns being longer than the average relative undistorted stitch length of the knit stitches in the other of said first and second groups of yarns; the average relative undistorted stitch length of the knit stitches in a given yarn in a given course being greater for one of said first and second sets of alternating wales than for the other of said first and second sets of alternating wales for at least a majority of the yarns in the fabric;

the first and second yarns of the even numbered courses having knit stitches formed therein in the even wales in said second set of alternating wales and special stitches formed therein in the odd wales in said second set of alternating wales, the first and second yarns in the odd numbered courses having special stitches formed therein in the even wales in said second set of alternating wales and having knit stitches formed therein in the odd wales in said second set of alternating wales.

2. A double knit fabric in accordance with claim 1 6 wherein said repeat pattern has at least 36 courses and at least 28 wales.

3. A double knit fabric in accordance with claim 2 wherein the average relative undistorted stitch length of the knit stitches in said second group of yarns is longer than the average relative undistorted stitch length of the knit stitches in said first group of yarns, and wherein said knit stitches of said first group of yarn in said first set of alternating wales constitute at least of the knit stitches in said first set of alternating wales.

4. A double knit fabric in accordance with claim 3 wherein the stitches in each said first yarn at said remaining wales and the stitches in each said second yarn at said randomly selected wales are welt stitches.

5. A double knit fabric in accordance with claim 3 wherein the stitches in each said first yarn at said remaining wales and the stitches in said second yarn at said randomly selected wales are tuck stitches.

6. A double knit fabric in accordance with claim 1 wherein all of said first and second yarns are substantially the same color.

7. A double knit fabric in accordance with claim 1 wherein the stitches in each said first yarn at said remaining wales and the stitches in each said second yarn at said randomly selected wales are welt stitches.

8. A double knit fabric in accordance with claim 1 wherein the stitches in each said first yarn at said remaining wales and the stitches in each said second yarn at said randomly selected wales are tuck stitches.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,204,590 11/1916 Quinn 66196 1,636,943 7/1927 Rothman 66190 X 2,170,741 8/1939 Ware 66197 FOREIGN PATENTS 188,611 4/1967 U.S.S.R. 66-196 OTHER REFERENCES Lancashire, J. B.: Knitting of Double Knit Blister Fabrics, Knitted Outerwear Times, vol. 38, No. 9, Mar. 3, 1969, PP. to 67.

RONALD FELDBAUM, Primary Examiner

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3937041 *Oct 21, 1974Feb 10, 1976Phillips Fibers CorporationHigh relief double knit fabric
US4062204 *Jun 12, 1975Dec 13, 1977Ancase S.A.High luster interlock fabric incorporating producer twist yarns
US4229954 *Dec 7, 1978Oct 28, 1980Phillips Petroleum CompanyDouble knit fabric
US4267710 *Oct 14, 1977May 19, 1981Mizuno Sporting Goods Co., Ltd.Double knit fabric with patterned loop interlocking
US4838045 *Dec 2, 1986Jun 13, 1989Sport Maska Inc.Double Knit fabric with holes therethrough and knitted color bands
US4891958 *Apr 18, 1989Jan 9, 1990Sport Maska Inc.For use in a sports garment to control body heat
US4941331 *Feb 17, 1989Jul 17, 1990Sport Maska Inc.Method of producing double knit fabric with holes therethrough and knitted color bands
US6622528Nov 20, 2002Sep 23, 2003Sport Maska Inc.Double knit fabric with holes therethrough and a two color laminated effect fabric
US7039991 *Apr 6, 2001May 9, 2006Scott & Fyfe LimitedVehicle safety device
US7707857 *Oct 13, 2005May 4, 2010Mcmurray Fabrics, Inc.Double faced weft-knit textile article
US7788953 *Nov 2, 2006Sep 7, 2010Mcmurray Fabrics, Inc.Double faced weft-knit textile article
US8187984Apr 26, 2007May 29, 2012Malden Mills Industries, Inc.Temperature responsive smart textile
US8192824Aug 8, 2007Jun 5, 2012Mmi-Ipco, LlcTemperature responsive smart textile
US8389100Oct 15, 2010Mar 5, 2013Mmi-Ipco, LlcTemperature responsive smart textile
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/196
International ClassificationD04B1/12, D04B1/10
Cooperative ClassificationD04B1/12
European ClassificationD04B1/12