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Publication numberUS3627005 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 14, 1971
Filing dateApr 15, 1969
Priority dateApr 15, 1969
Also published asCA942635A1
Publication numberUS 3627005 A, US 3627005A, US-A-3627005, US3627005 A, US3627005A
InventorsLanders Adrian L, Morton David L
Original AssigneeLanders Adrian L, Morton David L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for cutting peeler cores or logs into studs and chips
US 3627005 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent I 72] Inventors David L. Morton 4503 Federal Way. Boise, Idaho 83705; Adrian L. Lenders, 570 Courthouse St.,

Many, La. 71449 1211 Appl. No. 816,355 [22] Filed Apr. 15, I969 [45] Patented Dec. 14, 1971 [54] MACHINE FOR CUTTING PEELER CORES OR LOGS INTO STUDS AND CHIPS 9 Claims, 12 Drawing Figs.

[52] U.S. Cl 144/39, 144/3,144/176,144/162 [51 Int. Cl 1327c 9/04, 8271 11/02 [50] Field of Search 144/39, 3, 176,162,41, 118

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 955,379 4/1910 Burns et a1 144/39 Primary Examiner- Donald R. Schran Auomey- Lawrence E. Lauhscher ABSTRACT: A core-handling apparatus for supporting a core or log for horizontal longitudinal advancement along a path past various tool heads operably to cut the core or log into a plurality of studs and chips. The core and log-handling apparatus includes structure operable to move cores or logs along a predetermined path, independent of any displacement of the core or log other than longitudinally of the path, and the tool heads are disposed along the intended path of movement of the associated cores and logs and operable to sequentially chip material from the opposite sides of the cores or logs to form parallel opposite side planar faces on the cores or logs, chip material from the upper and lower portions of the cores or logs to form planar parallel upper and lower surfaces on the cores or logs, and form at least one horizontal kerf through the cores or legs after the latter have been shaped.

Patented Dec. 14, 1971 3,627,005

4 Sheets-Sheet 1 David L. Morfan WWW Patented Dec. 14, 1971 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 David L. Morton Adrian L. Landem MM 29m Patented Dec. 14, 1971. 3,627,005

4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Fig. 4

David L. Morton Adrian L Landem IM/I;N'I'()I WW H Fig.3

Patented Dec. 14, 1971 3,627,005

4 Sheets-Sheet l David L. Marlon Adrian L. Landers INVI'IN'I'UKS' MACHINE FOR CUTTING lPlElELER COMES R LOGS INTO STUDS AND CI-IIIPS The machine of the instant invention has been specifically designed to support and longitudinally displace a peeler core or log along a predetermined path having tool heads spaced therealong operable to transform the cylindrical core or log into a plurality of pieces of lumber in a single pass of the core or log through the machine. In addition, the machine of the instant invention is operable to first transform the cylindrical core or log into a single piece of lumber which is generally rectangular in cross section and which is thereafter cut into a plurality of smaller pieces of lumber of rectangular cross section. Further, during the process of transforming the cylindrical core into a single large piece of lumber of rectangular cross section, instead of merely forming four longitudinal kerfs in a core or log in order to form the first large rectangular cross section piece of lumber, the cylindrical core or log is initially transformed into the single large cross-sectional area piece of lumber by rotary chipping heads operable to rapidly chip away the necessary wood in order to transform the cylindrical core or log into a single large cross-sectional area piece of lumber. By this method of transformation, the waste material is already cut up into fine chips and may therefore be readily commercially disposed of for the production of wood pulp.

The machine is constructed in a manner whereby the cylin drical cores or log to be transformed into rectangular pieces of lumber are precisely guidingly supported for movement along their intended path and driven along their intended path at a prescribed rate proportional to the speed of operation of the chipping heads which are to act upon the cylindrical cores or logs during their transformation into single large pieces of lumber of rectangular cross-sectional shape.

The main object of this invention is to provide a machine which will be capable of cutting peeler cores or logs into a plu rality of studs.

Another object of this invention, in accordance with the immediately preceding object, is to provide a machine which will be capable of rapidly cutting a peeler core or logs into studs with a singe pass of each peeler core or log through the machine.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a machine in accordance with the preceding objects which, in the transformation of a peeler core or log into a plurality of studs, is operable to transform all of the waste material either into chips or into sawdust for ready processing into wood pulp.

A further object of this invention is to provide a machine in accordance with the preceding objects which will be capable of efficiently transforming cylindrical peeler cores or logs into a plurality of studs while the peeler cores or logs are being rapidly advanced through the machine at a speed slightly greater than 1 foot per second, or at any speed proportional to the speed of operation of the chipping heads A still further object of this invention is to provide a machine including a guidance and propelling system of unique design and construction so as to give exceptional accuracy in the sizing of the studs or cores and exceptional quality to the surfaces on the lumber developed by the machine.

A final object of this invention to be specifically enumerated herein is to provide a machine in accordance with the preceding objects which will conform to conventional forms ofoperation, be of simple construction and easy to use so as to provide a device that will be economically feasible, long lasting and relatively trouble-free in operation.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of the machine ofthe instant invention with open positions of the pivotally supported opposite side chipper heads of the machine illustrated in phantom lines;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the assemblage illus trated in FIG. I;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary transverse vertical sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 3-3 of FIG. I;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary transverse vertical sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line d-d of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is an exploded schematic view of most of the working components of the machine;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary enlarged longitudinal vertical sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 6-6 ofFIG. I;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of one bers ofthe machine;

FIG. 8 is a somewhat enlarged vertical sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 8-8 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a somewhat enlarged vertical sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 99 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary schematic side elevational view illustrating the manner in which the opposite side chip-cutting heads of the machine act upon a peeler core or log being advanced through the machine;

FIG. 11 is a schematic top plan view of the assemblage illustrated in FIG. 10; and

FIG. I2 is a fragmentary enlarged transverse vertical sectional view illustrating a peeler core or log slidingly supported and cradled from the lower peeler core support means of the machine and with the outline of the plurality of studs into which the core or log is to be cut illustrated in phantom lines.

Referring now more specifically to the drawings, the numeral It) generally designates the machine of the instant invention. The machine It) includes a frame structure referred to in general by the reference numeral 12 and has one end thereof aligned with the outlet end of a supply conveyor assembly referred to in general by the reference numeral 14. The supply conveyor assembly 141 includes an elevated transversely extending stop bar 116 adjacent its discharge end against which a peeler core or log greater in diameter than that which may be handled by the machine It) will abut. In addition, the supply conveyor assembly M includes opposite side plates I8 between which an endless conveyor 20 has its upper reach disposed and which guide a peeler core or log such as core or log 22 from the discharge end of the supply conveyor assembly I4 to the inlet end of the machine Ill.

The machine 10 includes a longitudinally extending inverted channel-shaped member 24 at its inlet end including a pair of depending sides or flanges 26 interconnected at their upper edges by means ofa bight portion 23. A pair of upstanding flanges 30 are secured to and project above the upper marginal edge portions of the flanges 26. The ends of the flanges 30 at the inlet end of the machine 10 are disposed between the adjacent ends of the opposite side plates I3 and a peeler core or log 22 being discharged from the supply conveyor assembly Ml is automatically guidingly engaged and supportingly cradled between the ends of the flanges 30 adjacent the supply conveyor assembly M.

The machine I0 includes a centering and drive wheel assembly generally referred to by the reference numeral 32 mounted on the output shaft portion 34 of a gear reduction assembly 36 whose input shaft portion 38 is driven from a motor 40 supported from the free end of a vertically swingable support arm 412 mounted at the inlet end of the machine It) in a manner such that the free end of the support arm 42 overlies the discharge end of the supply conveyor assembly 14. The motor 40 and gear reduction assembly 36 are each supported from the free end of the arm 42 and the output shaft of the motor 44) is coupled to the input shaft portion 38 of the gear reduction assembly 36 by means ofan endless flexible belt 44.

The centering and drive wheel assembly 32 is toothed and concavo-convex in longitudinal cross-sectional shape and therefore has a centering effect as well as a driving action on the forwardly advancing end of each core or log moved toward the assembly 32 on the supply conveyor assembly 14.

of the cutter blade mem- The support arm 42 is limited in downward swinging movement at its rear end by means of a movement limiting assembly 46 and the machine 10 includes a plurality of further longitudinally spaced drive wheel assemblies generally referred to by the reference numerals 48, 50 and 52. Each of the drive wheel assemblies includes a pair of axially spaced toothed wheel disks 54 mounted on the output shaft portion of a gear reduction assembly 56 driven from an electric motor 58 through an endless flexible belt 60. Further, each of the drive wheel assemblies includes a support arm 62 similar to the support arm 42 and which is also limited in downward movement at its free end by means of a movement limiting assembly 64 corresponding to the movement limiting assembly 46.

It may be noted, however, from FIG. of the drawings that the axial spacing between the disks 54 of the drive wheel assembly 48 is greater than the axial spacing between the disks 54 of the drive wheel assembly 50. Further, the spacing between the disks 5 4 of the assembly 50 is greater than the spacing between the disks 54 of the assembly 52. From FIGS. 3 and 4 of the drawings it may be seen that the toothed wheel disks 54 therefore engage the core 22 along six generally parallel and spaced apart paths 66 extending along the top of the core or log 22. In this manner, each of the driven and toothed wheel disks 54 frictionally engages and bites into the core or log in a manner such that constant forward linear speed of the core or log 22 is assured. Of course, inasmuch as the arms 42 and 62 are free to swing vertically at their free ends through limited arcs, the arms 42 and 62 automatically compensate for cores or logs of different diameters passing through the machine 10. Also, as previously set forth, the elevated transverse abutment 16 is provided to insure that a core or log such as core or log 22 but ofa diameter too large to be handled by the machine will not be able to be advanced forwardly by the conveyor assembly 14 toward the machine 10 past the elevated transverse abutment 16 and in position to be engaged by either of the drive wheel assemblies 32, 48, 50 or 52.

At this point it is believed that it should be pointed out that in addition to the axially spaced toothed disks 54 biting into eachcore or log 22 along parallel but spaced apart paths, each core or log 22 is pushed downwardly upon the upper marginal edge portions of the flanges 30 by its own weight and by the downward forces acting upon the cores or logs 22 by the arms 42 and 62 and their respective drive wheel assemblies. This of course causes the cores or logs 22 to bear downwardly upon the upper marginal edge portions of the flanges 30 with a greater force than the weight of the cores or logs with the result that the upper marginal edge portions of the flanges 30 not only serve to guidingly support and cradle the cores or logs 22 but also to score or inwardly depress the outer surface portions of the cores or logs 22 engaged by the flanges 30 so as to form shallow longitudinal grooves 68 in each of the cores or logs 22 passed through the machine 10. These grooves 68 and the paths 66, together with the cradling action of the flanges 30 on the cores or logs 22 insure that the cores or logs 22 will be guidingly supported and shifted through the machine 10 in a manner positively preventing lateral or rotational movement of the cores or logs. Accordingly, quite accurate machining or chipping and sawing of the cores or logs into a plurality of studs is made possible.

The frame 12 includes a pair of opposite side door assemblies 70 and 72 which are substantially identical except for being right and left handed and which are swingable from the solid line positions illustrated in FIG. 1 of the drawings to the phantom line positions illustrated in FIG. 1. Any suitable means (not shown) may be utilized for securing the door assemblies 70 and 72 in the closed positions and each of the assemblies includes an electric motor 74 including an output shaft 76 upon which a generally diametric fly bar 78 is mounted. The opposite ends of the fly bars 78 are spaced unequally from the axis of rotation of the output shafts 76 and the ends of the fly bars 78 include identical cutter blade members 80 and 82 removably secured thereto by fasteners such as fasteners 84 illustrated in FIG. 6. Referring to FIGS. 7-9 it will be seen that the cutter blade member includes planar parallel upper and lower surfaces 80a and 80b, respectively, a vertical first sidewall 80c, and an outwardly inclined second sidewall 80d. At one end the cutter member includes a vertical end wall 802, and at the other end the cutting member contains a V-shaped notch that defines a pair of bevelled angularly arranged cutting edges 86, 88. The horizontal cutting edge 86 formed on the lower surface 80b is arranged at an angle of about 30 to the longitudinal axis of the cutting member, and the inclined vertical edge 88 formed on the inclined wall 80e is arranged at an angle of about 45 to the horizontal, whereby an obtuse angle is defined between the cutting edges 86 and 88 as shown in FIG. 7. The cutter member 82 has a corresponding construction. As will be described in greater detail below with regard to FIG. 10, the cutter members are so connected in an inclined manner to the ends of the fly bar that the cutting edges are generally parallel with the plane of rotation of the fly bar and face forwardly of the direction of rotation thereof.

The machine 10 additionally includes a second pair of electric motors 90 which may be seen to best advantage in FIG. 4 of the drawings and which also have output shaft portions 92 upon which fly bars 94 corresponding to fly bars 78 are mounted, the fly bars 94 including cutter blade members 96 and 98 corresponding to the cutter blade members 80 and 82. From FIG. 4 of the drawings it may be seen that the fly bars are rotated about vertical axes spaced slightly to one side of the longitudinal centerline of the core or log 22 and from FIG. 3 of the drawings it may be seen that the fly bars 78 are rotated about axes spaced above the centerline of the core or log 22.

The fly bars 78 are disposed in a housinglike structure 100 supported within the frame structure 12 and the fly bars 94 are supported in a similar housing structure 102 supported within the frame structure 12. Suitable ducting 104 and 106 communicates with the interiors of the housing structures 100 and 102 for conveying chips cut from the core or log 22 by the fly bars 78 and 94 to a suitable chip removal system 108.

Spaced toward the outlet end of the machine 10 from the motors 90 are a pair of vertically disposed motors 110 and 112 including upwardly projecting output shafts 114 upon which a pair of vertically spaced and horizontally disposed circular saw blades 116 are mounted. Corresponding saw blades are horizontally aligned and adjacent outer peripheral portions of the saw blades 116 extend through the same vertical plane extending longitudinally of the machine 10 whereby the kerfs cut in the cores or logs 22 by the saw blades 116 on opposite sides of the machine 10 will overlap each other. i

As the cores or logs 22 leave the housing structure 102 the cores or logs 22 are supported from a horizontal bearing plate 118 which extends from the discharge end of the housing structure 102 to the outlet end of the machine 10, the flanges 30 terminating at their ends adjacent the discharge end of the machine 10 in the inlet end of the housing structure 102. Also, the housing structure 102 includes upper and lower anvil plates 120 and 122 which are adjustably supported from the frame structure 12 as desired so as to align with the corresponding planar side surface formed on the log, the anvil plates being provided on the side of the longitudinal centerline of the core or log 22 remote from the side of the centerline to which the axes of rotation of the output shaft portions 92 of the motor 90 extend, In this manner, the climb out" cutting action of the fly bars 94 tend to urge the core or log 22 against the abutment plates 120 and 122. Further, the axes of rotation of the shaft portions 76 are disposed above the center of the core or log 22 and therefore the climb out cutting action of the fly bars 78 on the core 22 tend to hold the core or log 22 down in contact with the flanges 30.

From FIG. 10 of the drawings it may be seen that the axes of rotation of each of the fly bars 78 and 94, the direction of the rotation of these fly bars and the depth of cut made by the cutting blade members of the fly bars 78 and 94 insure that the cutting action of the cutter blade members 80, 82, 96 and 98 is such that the cutting or chipping strokes are inclined at least slightly in the direction in which the core 22 is being advanced, the cutting blade members 22 and 9% cutting from point A to point B in FIG. l and the cutting blade members 80 and as cutting from point C to point I) in FIG. 10.

The cutting blade members 82 and 9b are spaced approximately one-fourth to 1 inch back away from the planes in which the cutter blade members hi) and swing. In this manner, the cutter blade members b2 and 9% remove all but the last one-fourth to 1 inch of wood from the sides and top and bottom of the cores or logs 22 and the cutter blade members 80 and 96 remove the final one-fourth to 1 inch of material. Of course, the cutter blade members tit) and 96 are carried by the shorter ends of the fly bars 7% and 941 and it is to be noted that the cores or logs 22 are longitudinally advanced at a linear speed proportional to the rotating speed of the fly bars 78 and 94 whereby the cores or logs 22 are advanced fiveeighths to l inch each revolution of the fly bars 78 and 94. As shown in FIGS. 3, 4i and 10, each of the cutter members is connected with its respective fly bar in an inclined manner with the cutting edges thereof lying in a plane generally parallel with the plane of rotation of the fly bar.

As the squared cores or logs 22 move from between the fly bars 941 they are guided by vertical rollers 1122, I24 and 126 journaled for rotation about fixed axes as well as drive rollers 128 and 113MB disposed on the opposite side of the machine 10, mounted on horizontally swingable arms 1132 and 134i and yieldingly urged into contact with the cores or logs 22 by fluid actuators 136 and 1138 acting upon the arms 132 and 134. The rollers 128 and 130 are fluted and the rollers 1124, 126 and 130 include horizontally aligned circumferential flanges M0 and 142 spaced axially of the rollers which are also horizontally registered with the saw blades IE6 and are therefore receivable in the kerfs made by the saw blades 116. Further, during movement of the cores or logs 22 from the housing structure 102 the cores or logs 22 are urged downwardly against the plate 1118 by a vertically swingable overhead roller M6 and the cores or logs 22 are urged into tight sliding frictional en gagement with the abutment plates 120 and 1122 by means ofa horizontally swingable pressure roller M8, see FIG. 5.

The plate 118 extends between the ripsaw assemblies defined by the saw blades 116, see FIG. I and the ripsaw assemblies include partial cylindrical shrouds M9 in which the corresponding saw blades I116 are substantially fully enclosed and which include outlet neck portions M0 to which a suitable sawdust removal means may be connected.

In review of the operation of the machine 110 it is pointed out that the conveyor assembly 114 conveys peeler cores or logs 22 toward the inlet end of the machine llll. Cores or logs 22 which are too large to be handled by the machine 10 abut the elevated horizontal transverse member 16 and these large cores are removed from the conveyor assembly M by hand or other means. As a core or log member 22 which is not too large to be handled by the machine It) begins to move off the outlet end of the conveyor assembly M, the leading end of the core or log 22 is engaged by the centering and drive wheel assembly 32 which automatically properly centers the cylindrical core or log 22 in alignment with the center of the spacing between the flanges 30. Therefore, the core or log 22 moves from the conveyor assembly 14 and its forward or leading end drops onto and is slidingly engaged with and supported from the flanges 30 in a cradling manner. Then, the leading end of the core or log member 22 passes under the drive wheel assembly d8 whose disk members engage and bite into the core or log member 22 along the remote paths '66, see FIG. 3. Thereafter, the core or log passes under the drive wheel as sembly 50 and the drive wheel assembly 52 with the disk members 54 of these assemblies engaging the cores or logs 22 along the corresponding paths 656. As the leading ends of the cores or logs 22 pass beneath the drive wheel assembly 50 and move lowurtl the drive wheel assembly 52, the fly bars 7% form planar surfaces on the opposite sides of the cores or logs 22. Thereafter, as the leading ends of the cores or logs 22 pass from beneath the drive wheel assembly 52, the fly bars 94 form planar surfaces on the upper and lower portions of the cores or logs 22. Thereafter, while the core or log is being driven by roller 1128 and guided by roller i122 and also held down upon the plate lllfl by roller M6, the squared core or log 22 has a pair of horizontal kerfs formed therethrough by the saw blades 11116 and the flanges Mt) and M2 on the rollers 124, 126 and we are received in these kerfs to prevent the plurality of studs formed thereby from pinching the saw blades 1116.

A suitable gear head motor use, see FIG. 2, is provided and is drivingly connected to the rollers 22% and I130 in any convenient manner whereby these rollers may effectively drive the cores or logs 22 after the rear ends of the latter have moved from beneath the drive wheel assembly 52.

Because of the precise cutting edges of the cutter blade members mounted on the fly bars 78 and 941 in radial as well as axial staggered relationship, the fly bars are able to chip material from the opposite sides, top and bottom of the cores or logs 22 in an efficient manner leaving a relatively smooth squared core or log to be cut into a plurality of studs by the saw blades 11116. The horsepower requirements of the various motors provided on the machine 110 is maintained at a minimum due to the efficient cutting action of the fly bars 78 and SM and the flanges M0 and 142 which are received in the kerfs formed by the circular saw blades llllti.

The upper motor 90 is supported from an L-shaped and inverted mounting plate 164 whose vertical flange 166 includes outwardly projecting studs I68 slidable through vertical slots formed in a second mounting plate 1180 supported from the adjacent side of the frame structure 12. The studs 168 have their free ends secured through the slots 170 by means of threaded nuts m2 and the mounting plate 1181 includes a horizontal flange portion 184 having a threaded bolt I86 journaled therethrough against axial displacement relative to the flange portion 184. The bolt we is vertically disposed and is threadedly engaged through a threaded bore 118% formed vertically through the upper horizontal leg of the mounting bracket or plate 1M. Accordingly, in order to adjust the height of the upper motor 90, the nuts 122 may be loosened and the bolt 176 may be rotated so as to cause vertical adjustment of the motor 90. Thereafter, the nuts 182 are tightened so as to maintain the upper motor MB in adjusted vertically shifted position.

Although not a part of the supporting and guiding system for logs which includes the flanges 30,. the horizontal bearing plate 118, the anvil or abutment plates 120 and 122 and the various horizontally and downwardly urged guide rollers, the fly bars 78 and 94 each include a centrally disposed disk 192 which is generally truncated cone-shaped in configuration and disposed concentric relative to the axis of rotation of the corresponding fly bar. Each of the disks 92 includes a smooth outer surface disposed normal to the axis of rotation of the corresponding fly bar and this smooth surface is spaced very slightly from the surface generated on the associated core or log by the fly bar from which the disk 192 is supported. Accordingly, while the outer smooth faces of the disks 1192 do not constantly engage the planar surfaces generated on the cores or studs 22, they are spaced ever so slightly outwardly from these planar surfaces so as to immediately resist any tendency of the adjacent portions of the cores or studs to vibrate laterally due to the cutting action of the various fly bars.

By providing the disks H92, extremely smooth planar surfaces may be generated on the four sides of the logs or cores 22.

lfit is desired, the guide or anvil plates R20 and 122 may be mounted so as to be horizontally adjustable transversely of the path of movement of the logs or cores through the machine and the motors 74 may also be supported for horizontal adjustment, when desired.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope ofthe invention.

We claim: 1. A machine for cutting a log or core workpiece into a plurality of studs, comprising feed means for supporting and longitudinally horizontally advancing said workpiece along a predetermined path;

shaping means for shaping the workpiece into a core having planar outer surfaces and a rectangular cross section, said shaping means including a first pair of horizontally spaced chipper means arranged on opposite sides of the workpiece and a second pair of vertically spaced chipper means arranged above and below the workpiece, each of said chipper means including a fly bar (78, 94) generally parallel with the longitudinal axis of said workpiece, means for rotating said fly bar intermediate its ends adapted to be slidingly engaged by and to cradle the cylindrical undersurface portion of said workpiece, said second higher support means including a horizontal planar surface upon which the planar undersurface of said workpiece is slidably supported. about an axis normal to said longitudinal axis, and a pair of generally rectangular cutter members (80, 82 and 96, 98) connected with the ends of said fly bar, respectively, each of said cutter members having planar upper (80a) and lower (80b) surfaces, and first (80c) and second (80d) sidewall surfaces normal to and inclined with respect to said upper and lower surfaces, respectively, said cutter member containing at one end a V-shaped notch defining on said lower surface a horizontal edge (86) arranged at an angle of approximately to the axis of said cutter member, said notch defining on said inclined sidewall surface an inclined edge (88) arranged at an obtuse angle relative to said horizontal edge, said cutter members being secured to said fly bar with said cutting edges directed forwardly relative to the direction of rotation of said fly bar and lying in a plane generally parallel with and spaced from the axis of said workpiece, the axis of rotation of said fly bar being offset from the center thereof to define two arms of unequal length, the cutting edges of the cutting member secured to the shorter arm lying in a plane closer to the axis of the work than the cutting edges of the cutting member secured to the longer arm; and

saw means for severing the shaped core into a plurality of studs, said cutting means including a plurality of horizontally disposed vertically spaced rotatably driven saw blades arranged on opposite sides of said core, said saw blades including adjacent peripheral portions passing through the same vertical plane containing the longitudinal axis of the core, the saw blades on one side of said core being horizontally aligned with corresponding ones of the blades on the other side ofsaid path.

2. Apparatus as defined in claim 1, and further including upstanding splitter roll means for supporting the severed stud portions during passage of said core through said saw means, said splitter roll means including a plurality of vertical rolls arranged on opposite sides of and longitudinally spaced relative to said core, said splitter rolls each including vertically spaced horizontal annular flange portions horizontally aligned with and receivable in the kerfs made by said saw blades, respectively.

3. The combination of claim 2 wherein said feed means for supporting and longitudinally horizontally advancing said workpiece includes upper and lower assemblies, said lower assembly including a pair of upstanding support flanges having parallel marginal edge portions for lengthwise slidingly supporting and cradling said workpiece thereon, said upper assembly including an upper holddown and drive means spaced above and along said flanges adapted to frictionally drivingly engage said workpiece and yieldingly resist upward movement of said workpiece relative to said flanges and prevent lateral shiftin of said workpiece.

4. The combination of claim 3 wherein said upper assembly includes a plurality of drive wheel assemblies spaced longitudinally of said path and including a driven wheel journaled for rotation about an axis extending transversely above said path and vertically shiftable relative to the latter, each of said wheels including a pair of coaxially arranged parallel spaced toothed end wheel disks, the disks of each driven wheel being spaced equally on opposite sides of vertical plane containing said path, the spacing between the disks of said drive wheels and the axial thickness of said disks being such that the disks of said wheels, respectively, are adapted to drivingly engage the upper surfaces of said workpiece.

5. The combination of claim 1 wherein the axes of rotation of said fly heads and the planes in which said cutter blade members are swingable are disposed relative to said path so as to have said cutter blade member cutting edges engage the associated core in a climb out manner throughout the full arcs of contact of said blade member cutting edges with said core.

6. The combination of claim 5 wherein said means for supporting and longitudinally horizontally advancing said workpiece includes means operative to advance said workpiece approximately five-eighths inch to one inch during each revolution of said fly bars, according to the desired chip length.

7. Apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein said feed means further includes side anvil means for supporting the planar core surfaces formed by said cutter means, respectively, said side anvil means extending along said machine throughout the zone thereof in which said top and bottom cutter means act upon said workpiece for form horizontal upper and lower planar surfaces thereon, said system further including vertically disposed roller means spaced along the other side of the machine on opposite sides of said zone for rollingly engaging the adjacent vertical side surface and urging the log or core toward intimate sliding engagement with said side anvil means, said system also including first lower and second higher support means disposed on the approach and discharge sides, respectively, of said zone for supporting the cylindrical under surface portions of said workpiece and the planar under surface thereof, respectively, on the approach and discharge sides of said zone, and overhead holddown roller means for rollingly engaging the upper surfaces of said log or core on opposite sides of said zone.

8. The combination of claim 7 wherein said first lower sup port means includes a pair of parallel upstanding support plates extending longitudinally of said machine and having upper marginal edge portions.

9. The combination of claim 8, and further including disc means defining smooth planar faces carried by said heads and disposed normal to their axes of rotation and confined within the circular paths through which the corresponding cutting edges swing, said smooth planar faces being slightly spaced outwardly of the planar faces generated by the corresponding cutting edges.

* 0 R i i UNITED STATES PATENT oFFitE CERTIFICATE OF @URREQ'HUW Patent No. 3,627,005 Dated December 14.. l97l Inventor(s) David L. Morton and Adrian L. Landers 7 It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Claim 1, lines 14-18, delete:

-- adapted to be slidingly engaged by and to cradle the cylindrical undersurface portion of said workpiece, said second higher support means including a horizontal planar undersurface upon which the planar undersurface of said workpiece is slidably supported Signed and sealed this Zhth day of April 1973,

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD M. FLETCHER, JR. ROBERT GOTTSCHALK v Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents i FORM PO-1050 (10-69) USCOMM-DC 60376-P69 U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1959 0-366-334,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3812891 *Nov 16, 1972May 28, 1974Linck GebTool heads for use in machining timber
US3814155 *Nov 16, 1972Jun 4, 1974Linck GebTool heads for use in machining timber
US3934630 *Jan 9, 1975Jan 27, 1976Cockle Roy RMethod and apparatus for producing rough cut lumber
US4690186 *Mar 5, 1986Sep 1, 1987Optimil Machinery, Inc.Log feed apparatus
US6267164Oct 27, 1998Jul 31, 2001Key Knife, Inc.Chip and method for the production of wood pulp
US6366351 *Apr 14, 2000Apr 2, 2002Autolog Inc.Apparatus for detecting defects in wood processed by a planer
EP0286701A1 *Apr 13, 1987Oct 19, 1988Johann Wolf GmbH KGMethod and device for the edge trimming of round wood
Classifications
U.S. Classification144/39, 144/4.9, 144/176, 144/162.1
International ClassificationB27L11/00, B27B33/00, B27F5/02, B27F5/00, B27B1/00, B27B33/20
Cooperative ClassificationB27B1/00, B27L11/007, B27F5/026, B27B33/20
European ClassificationB27F5/02B, B27B33/20, B27B1/00, B27L11/00D
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 19, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: KOCKUMS CANCAR, CORP., KING STREET AND COCHRAN AVE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:KOCKUMS INDUSTRIES, INC., A CORP. OF AL;REEL/FRAME:004150/0314
Effective date: 19830516
Jun 9, 1983AS03Merger
Owner name: ADCO WEST MACHINE MANUFACTURING, INC.
Effective date: 19771215
Owner name: KOCKUMS INDUSTRIES INC., A CORP. OF ALA.
Jun 9, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: KOCKUMS INDUSTRIES INC., A CORP. OF ALA.
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:ADCO WEST MACHINE MANUFACTURING, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004135/0797
Effective date: 19771215
Owner name: KOCKUMS INDUSTRIES INC., STATELESS