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Publication numberUS3628056 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 14, 1971
Filing dateJun 10, 1970
Priority dateJun 10, 1970
Publication numberUS 3628056 A, US 3628056A, US-A-3628056, US3628056 A, US3628056A
InventorsEugene B Buchanan
Original AssigneeEugene B Buchanan
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Antitheft starting and ignition system
US 3628056 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Inventor Eugene B. Buchanan Beaverbrook Road, Box 449, RD. #4, Newburgh, N.Y. 12550 Appl. No. 45,122 I Filed June 10, I970 Patented Dec. 14, I971 ANTITHEFI STARTING AND IGNITION SYSTEM 9 Claims, 6 Drawing Figs.

0.8. CI 307/10, 340/64, [80/1 14 Int. Cl H02g 3/00 Field of Search 307/9, 10; l80/l 14; 340/63, 64

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,525,4l4 8/1970 Copelan 307/l0AT Primary Examiner-Herman J. Hohauser AttorneyWenderoth, Lind & Ponack ABSTRACT: An antitheft starting and ignition system includes an activating circuit for selectively operating a starting and ignition circuit. The activating circuit includes a second solenoid relay integrally attached to the starter. The primary of the second solenoid relay operates to start the starter when a predetermined voltage different from that of the starting and ignition circuit is present in such primary. This predetermined voltage is supplied to the primary of a distributor relay. This primary closes the secondary of the distributor relay to provide current to the distributor points only when the predetermined voltage is present in the primary. The primary of the distributor relay is grounded only when the starter switch is in the START" position.

STARTER I SWITCH LL I IEGULA INVENTOR EUGENE B. BUCHANAN Patented Dec. 14, 1971 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 l I g: .1

j l l l L J BY I Mfi; gm v ATTORNEYS Patented Dec, 14, 1971 3,628,056

3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR EUGENE B. BUCHANAN ATTORNEYS Patented Dec. 14, 1971 3 Sheets-Sheet a FlG.3A

FIGBB N mA NN EA VH NC U B B E N E G U E ANTITI-IEFI STARTING AND IGNITION SYSTEM BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION a system whereby it is made virtually impossible to bypass the starter motor to jump-start the vehicle engine.

The theft or unauthorized operation of motor vehicles, particularly automobiles, has become a very great problem in modern society. Many attempts have been made to develop systems devised to prevent such thefts. For instance, the ignition system of the vehicle has been provided with circuitry to sound the vehicle horn or some other alarm upon the unauthorized use of the vehicle. In addition, systems have been developed which require that a series of sequential switches or dials be operated to activate the ignition switch. Also, systems have been developed which comprise a series of latches to prevent the entry into the vehicle.

However, for various reasons none of these systems have met with any great degree of success. All such prior art systems are expensive. Furthermore, such systems are complicated and time consuming to operate. In addition, all such prior art systems suffer from the inherent disadvantage that it is relatively easy to bypass the system and the starter motor to jump-start the vehicle motor.

With this background in mind, it is a principle object of the present invention to provide a motor vehicle starting and ignition system which prevents the unauthorized starting of the motor vehicle without the ignition key.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide such a system in which it is virtually impossible to bypass the starter motor to jump-start the vehicle engine.

lt is an even further object of the present invention to provide such a system which is inexpensive to manufacture and install.

lt is a yet further object of the present invention to provide such a system which requires no additional manipulative operation by the vehicle operator.

These objects are achieved in accordance with the present invention by a provision of a conventional starting and ignition circuit such as a l2-volt circuit, which has been modified to be activated by an activating circuit operable at a different voltage, such as for example six. volts. The activating circuit includes a solenoid relay which is in addition to the conventional starter solenoid relay and which is connected to the casing of the starter motor. The conductor from the starter switch to the second solenoid relay includes a constant voltage regulator therein which converts the voltage through the primary of the additional solenoid relay from twelve to six volts. The additional solenoid relay is integrally fastened to the casing of the starter motor in such a manner that there are no exposed terminals on the output side of the relay or on the input side of the starter.

The output wire of the primary of the additional solenoid is not grounded, but is rather connected to a novel distributor relay within the ignition distributor. The output wires enters the distributor below the breaker plate thereof and is connected to the primary of the distributor relay. A l2-volt wire from the conventional ignition coil connects to a contact arm of the secondary of the distributor relay. The contact arm is made of magnetically attractable material and is adapted to close contact with a soft iron output contact by the primary of the distributor relay when precisely six volts flows therethrough.

The output of the primary of the distributor relay is then connected to a contact on the starter switch which is adapted to be closed, thereby grounding the output of the distributor relay, only when the starter switch is in the start position. When precisely six volts flows through the primary of the distributor relay, the contact arm is caused to contact the soft iron output contact, thereby providing current to the distributor points which operate in the conventional manner. When either more or less than precisely six volts is in the primary of the distributor relay, the contact arm will not contact the soft iron output contact. Therefore, there will not be current to the distributor points, and the engine may not be started.

All wires leading to and from the distributor relay enter the distributor below the breaker plate thereof. In addition, none of these wires are color coded. Furthermore, the additional solenoid relay which is attached to the starter motor casing has a circuit breaker in the primary thereof. Therefore, if more than six volts is applied to the primary of the additional solenoid, the circuit will be opened, thereby preventing the actuation of the primary of the distributor relay.

Other objects and features of the invention will be made clear by the following description, taken together with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS:

FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram illustrating a preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an illustration partly in schematic and partly in cross section of the additional solenoid relay used in the present invention;

FIG. 3A is a schematic diagram of thedistributor relay of the present invention shown in the off position or in the position wherein less than the required voltage is supplied to the primary;

FIG. 3B is a schematic diagram of the distributor relay of the present invention wherein there is precisely the required voltage through the primary and wherein the secondary is in the operative position;

FIG. 3C is in a schematic diagram of the distributor relay of the present invention wherein more than the required voltage is present in the primary; and

FIG. 4 is an illustration partly in schematic and partly in cross section 'of the ignition switch and circuit used in the present invention.

With reference now to the drawings, the present invention will be described in detail. In FIG. I is shown a schematic diagram of the circuitry of a starting and ignition system for motor vehicles in accordance with the present invention. A suitable battery such as a 12 -volt battery having positive and negative terminals is shown by reference numeral 1. The negative tenninal is grounded through wire 2 in a conventional manner. The positive terminal of the battery is connected to supply 12 volts through wire 3 to a starter switch 4. The positive terminal of the battery also supplies 12 volts to the secondary of a conventional solenoid relay 6. A wire 7 provides 12 volts from the starter switch to the secondary of solenoid relay 6. The solenoid 6 operates in the conventional manner, wherein coil 6a causes contact 6b to close. Coil 6a is grounded in the normal manner. When switch 6b is closed, 12 volts are thus supplied through wire 8 to the secondary of an additional solenoid relay 9.

A wire 10 supplies 12 volts from starter switch 4 to a voltage regulator 11. Voltage regulator 11 includes a constant voltage regulator 12 and a diode l3. Constant voltage regulator 12 changes the voltage from 12 volts to some other desired voltage, for instance 6 volts. Diode l3 acts to insure that current may not be supplied in the reverse direction to the starter switch. A wire 14 supplies the reduced voltage, such as 6 volts, to the secondary of the additional solenoid relay 9. Coil 9a of the secondary of solenoid relay 9 acts to close switch 9b in a conventional manner. Solenoid relay 9 also includes a circuit breaker 15 to cut off voltage thereto when a voltage higher than 6 volts is supplied thereto. When switch 9b of the secondary of solenoid switch 9 is operative, 12 volts is supplied through wire 16 to the vehicle starting motor 17. Starting motor 17 operates and is grounded in a conventional manner.

The output of the primary of solenoid relay 9 is not grounded, but rather provides 6 volts to the primary 19a of a novel distributor relay 19. A wire 20 provides l2 volts from starter switch 4 to a conventional ignition coil 21. The primary of the ignition coil through wire 22 leads to the secondary of distributor relay 19. The secondary of distributor 19 includes a moveable contact arm 23 made of magnetically attractable material. The secondary of the distributor relay 19 also includes a soft iron output contact 24. Wire 25 leadsfrom the soft iron output contact 24 to the distributor points 26. The distributor points 26 are operated in a conventional manner when current is supplied thereto through wire 25. When the correct voltage is supplied from the primary of solenoid relay 9 through wire 18 and the primary 19a of distributor relay 19, contact arm 23 will be attracted by the field created by the primary 19a and will be caused to contact the soft iron output contact 24. This will complete the circuit and allow current to flow through wire 25 to the distributor points 26. The output of the primary 19a of distributor relay 19 is connected to the starter switch through wire 27. A diode 28 is provided in wire 27 to prevent reverse current flow therethrough. A contact 29 is provided on starter switch 4 and is contacted only when the ignition key of the starter switch is in the start" position. In all other positions of the ignition key, the contact 29 is not contacted, and the circuit is thus opened.

With reference now to H0. 2 of the drawings, the additional solenoid relay 9 will be described in further detail. Solenoid 9 includes casing 90 and terminals 9d and 9e. Terminal 9e is connected to the interior of starter housing 30 by means such as screw nut 31. Wire 16 leads to the starter brushes, but is not accessible unless the starter is dismantled and taken apart. Wire 8 is connected to terminal 9d and is adapted to provide 12 volts to wire 16 when switch 9b of the secondary of solenoid relay 9 is closed. Wire 14 provides 6 volts through terminal 32 to the primary of solenoid relay 9. When this voltage is supplied to coil 9a, switch 9b is closed. If more than 6 volts is supplied from wire 14, circuit breaker will be actuated to open the circuit. The outlet of the primary of solenoid relay 9 is connected to wire 18 through terminal 33.

With reference now to FIGS. 3A through 3C ,of the drawings the distributor relay of the present invention will be described in more detail. FlG. 3A illustrates the position of the distributor relay in the off" position or when less than the required voltage, such as 6 volts, is supplied to the primary thereof. In this position, there is not enough of a magnetic field to attract the contact arm 23 into contact with soft iron output contact 24. Therefore, the circuit of the secondary of the distributor relay 19 is opened, and no current can flow to the distributor points. Therefore, the vehicle engine cannot be started.

F [6. 38 illustrates the operative position of the distributor relay 19 when exactly the desired voltage, such as 6 volts, is supplied to the primary of the distributor relay. In this operative position, the desired voltage creates a sufficient magnetic field to attract the contact arm 23 into contact with the soft iron output contact 24. Thus, the circuit of the secondary of the distributor relay 19 is completed, and I2 volts are allowed to pass to the distributor points. Therefore. the vehicle engine may be started.

FIG. 3C illustrates the position of the distributor relay 19 when more than the desired voltage, such as 7 or more volts, is supplied to the primary of the distributor relay. When this occurs, the magnetic field created by coil 19a is so great that the contact arm 23 is attracted past the point of contact with soft iron output contact 24. Therefore, the circuit of the secondary distributor relay 19 is open, and current cannot flow to the distributor points. Thus, the vehicle engine may not be started.

A further provision of the present invention is that wires 18 and 22 leading into the distributor and wire 27 leading from the distributor do so below the breaker plate of the distributor. Furthermore, wires 18, 22 and 27 should not be color coded. By means of these provisions, it would be extremely time consuming for an unauthorized operator or a thief to dismantle and rewire the distributor so that the vehicle engine may be started.

With reference now to FIG. 4 of the drawings, the starter switch of the present invention will be described in further detail. The starter switch 4 may be of a generally conventional design and include a casing 34 and a tumbler and switch element 37. A conventional element such as a key 35 is inserted into starter switch 4 to initiate the starting action. As previously discussed, contact 29 is provided on the interior of starter switch 4 and is contacted by the tumbler only when the starter switch is in the start" position. During this time the primary of the distributor relay is grounded through wire 27 and contact 29. When key 25 is in all other positions, the circuit of the primary of the distributor relay 19 is open and therefore inoperative. However, once the circuit has been satisfactorily operated to cause contact arm 23 to contact the soft iron output contact 24, this relationship will be maintained until the starter switch is turned to the off position. This is true since, once contact arm 23 has contacted soft iron output contact 24, it will remain in this position until current is terminated through wire 20, coil 21 and wire 22.

A ridge 36 is provided in the interior of casing 34 to prevent the insertion of a wire or other element within the starter switch to ground out contact 29. Thus, the only manner in which contact 29 maybe grounded and the circuit may be completed is by the insertion of the proper key turned to the start position.

It will be apparent from the foregoing detailed description that there has been provided an extremely simple and effective theft prevention system. In order for an unauthorized operator or a thief to start the engine of a vehicle equipped with this system, there must be provided an external power source of exactly the same voltage as that required to operate the additional solenoid 9 and the distributor relay 19. in order to rewire the present system to use an external source it would be necessary to dismantle both the starter and the distributor. Even for a skilled mechanic this would take a considerable length of time. This manifestly will discourage unauthorized operations and thefts. in addition, the primary of the distributor relay 19 must be grounded out. Since all of the wires entering and leaving the distributor are not color coded, it would be extremely difficult to choose which wire to ground.

Although a single embodiment of the invention has been described in detail, such description is intended to illustrative only, and not restrictive, since many details of the operation and construction of the invention may be altered or modified without departing from the spirit or scope thereof. For instance, the preferred embodiment has been described as employing a voltage of 6 volts in the primary of the additional solenoid relay and the primary of, the distributor relay. However, since 6 volts is easily duplicated, any desirable voltage may be readily substituted. This may be easily preset as desired by a simple alteration of the voltage regulator. For instance, it is readily apparent that a voltage of 5% volts would be extremely difficult to duplicate.

Furthermore, it is to be understood that although certain of the elements of the preferred embodiments have been illustrated as relays, it is to be understood that these elements could very easily be transistorized. it is to be further understood that the more conventional features of the circuitry of the starting and, ignition system may be modified in known and conventional manners.

We claim:

1. In a starting and ignition system having a starting and ignition circuit operating at a first voltage and comprising a starter switch, a starter, a starter solenoid relay and a distributor; the improvement comprising an activating circuit operating at a second voltage different from said first voltage and operatively associated with and operable to activate said start ing and ignition circuit.

2. A starting and ignition system as claimed in claim 1, wherein said activating circuit comprises a second solenoid relay having a primary and a secondary and operatively connected to said starting and ignition circuit to activate said starter when said second voltage is present in said primary, a distributor relay having a primary and a secondary and operatively connected to said starting and ignition circuit to activate the points of said distributor when said second voltage is present in said primary of said distributor relay, and contact means for selectively grounding said primary of said distributor relay.

3. A starting and ignition system as claimed in claim 2, wherein the output of said secondary of said second solenoid relay leads to said starter and the output of said primary of said second solenoid relay leads to said primary of said distributor relay, and further comprising a voltage regulator connected to the input of said primary of said second solenoid relay for providing said second voltage therein.

4. A starting and ignition system as claimed in claim 3, wherein said second solenoid relay comprises a casing integrally fastened to the housing of said starter, said output of said secondary of said second solenoid relay being within said I 6. A starting and ignition system as claimed in claim 2, wherein the input of said primary of said distributor is connected to the output of said primary of said second solenoid relay, the output of said secondary of said distributor relay includes an output contact connected to said points, and the input of said secondary of said distributor relay includes a contact arm adapted to be attracted into contact with said output contact only when said second voltage is present in said primary of said distributor relay.

7. A starting and ignition system as claimed in claim 6, wherein said input and said output of said primary and said input of said secondary of said distributor relay are not coded and extend through the casing of said distributor below the breaker plate thereof.

8. A starting and ignition system as claimed in claim 2, wherein said contact means comprises a contact located within the interior of said starter switch and adapted to be grounded only when said starter switch is in the START position.

9. A starting and ignition system as claimed in claim 8, wherein said interior of said starter switch has a ridge means therein for preventing the unauthorized grounding of said contact,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3525414 *Mar 18, 1968Aug 25, 1970Aubrey I CopelanProtective automotive ignition circuit
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4071007 *Aug 24, 1976Jan 31, 1978Arix Robert JStop auto theft
US4110734 *Mar 26, 1976Aug 29, 1978Henry D. LeporeAnti-theft starting system
US4672225 *Jan 9, 1986Jun 9, 1987Hanisko John C PAutomotive anti-theft device
US6982631 *Dec 30, 2003Jan 3, 2006Directed Electronics, Inc.Automotive security system with self-biasing bypass immobilizer
US7023683 *Sep 4, 2002Apr 4, 2006Yazaki North America, IncElectric relay control circuit
Classifications
U.S. Classification307/10.3, 180/287
International ClassificationB60R25/04
Cooperative ClassificationB60R25/04
European ClassificationB60R25/04