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Publication numberUS3629790 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 21, 1971
Filing dateDec 4, 1970
Priority dateDec 4, 1970
Publication numberUS 3629790 A, US 3629790A, US-A-3629790, US3629790 A, US3629790A
InventorsMcsherry Frank D Jr
Original AssigneeRaymond Lee Organization Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
No shock electric plug
US 3629790 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Mal-ted States Patent Inventor Frank D. McSherry, Jr.

McAlester, Okla. Appl. No. 95,304 Filed Dec. 4, 1970 Patented Dec. 21, 19711 Assignee The Raymond Lee Organization, Inc.

New York, N .Y.

N0 SHOCK ELECTRIC PLUG 4 Claims, 3 Drawing Figs.

U.S. Cl 339/42, 339/61 R Int. Cl 110- 13/44, H01r 13/60 Field of Search 339/36, 40,

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Graham Staley Hudson Rubens... Brown Primary Examiner-Marvin A. Champion Assistant Examiner-Terrell P. Lewis 339/60 R X 339/42 339/60 R 339/42 339/42 ABSTRACT: A sliding collar is secured to an electric plug having metal prongs by elastic means whereby the prongs are covered by the collar during insertion] in and removal from an electrified socket.

NO SHOCK ELECTRIC PLUG BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Conventional electric plugs have metal prongs which are exposed during insertion in and removal from an electrified socket. These exposed prongs continue to conduct current until completely separated from the socket. A user can accidentally touch these prongs while still carrying current during such insertion or removal whereby the user can receive an electric shock and can be injured or even killed.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION My invention is directed toward a collar slidingly secured to an electric plug by an elastic which normally assumes minimum length and pulls the collar to a position at which the metal prongs of the plug are covered. As the plug is inserted in a socket, the elastic gradually lengthens and pulls the collar back to permit the prongs to be inserted into the female openings in the socket and yet cover the portions of the prongs not yet in the female openings whereby the plug can be properly seated without permitting the user to touch the prongs. When the plug is removed, the process is reversed and the elastic is gradually shortened, again without permitting the user to touch the prongs.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of my invention;

FIG. 2 illustrates my invention in process of being inserted in or removed from a socket; and

FIG. 3 illustrates my invention seated in a socket.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to FIGS. 1-3, an electric plug comprises a head to which a two conductor cable 12 is connected with two outwardly extending electrically conductive metal prongs 14, each prong being connected to a corresponding conductor of the cable. The plug is to be seated in or removed from current carrying or electrified socket 16 in such manner as to prevent a user from accidentally touching the prongs.

To this end, a hollow electrically nonconductive circular cylinder 18 open at both ends serves as a collar and is slidable back and forth in the longitudinal direction about the outer periphery of the head I0. An elastic :strip 20 secured at opposite ends within the wall of the cylinder in such manner as to define a transverse diameter when in its normal or fully contracted position. In other words, the cylinder in cross section defines a circle and in the same view the strip forms a web spanning the circle and secured thereto at opposite points. This web extends between the prongs and is secured to the head at a point centrally intermediate the prongs.

As the plug is inserted in the socket, the strip elongates, pulling the collar rearward along the head to permit the prongs to be inserted in the socket and yet not be touched by the user. As the plug is removed, the strip contracts, reversing the above process, while still protecting the user as previously described.

While I have described my invention with particular reference to the drawings, such is not to be considered as limiting its actual scope.

Having thus described this invention, what is asserted as new is:

I. In combination with an electric plug having a head with a pair of electrically conductive prongs extending thereout:

an electrically nonconductive cylinder open at both ends,

said plug being slidable back and forth in said cylinder and said cylinder being slidable back and forth longitudinally along the plug; and

elastic means disposed in the cylinder and secured therein and to said plug, said means having a normal fully contracted position at which said cylinder extends beyond said prongs, said means being capable of bemg temporarily extended to expose portions of said prongs.

2. The combination as set forth IIIl claim I wherein said means is an elastic web or strip.

3. The combination as set forth in claim 2 wherein opposite ends of the strip are secured to corresponding oppositely disposed points on the cylinder.

4. The combination as set forth in claim 3 wherein the strip extends between the prongs and the center of the strip is secured to the head at a point centrally disposed between said prongs.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1724592 *Feb 23, 1928Aug 13, 1929Jack L AdamsSoft-rubber plug and socket body
US2082986 *Dec 2, 1935Jun 8, 1937Staley Joseph HProtected terminal
US2501674 *Dec 16, 1944Mar 28, 1950Mec Elec Engineering CoElectrical coupling
US3147055 *Dec 11, 1961Sep 1, 1964Rubens George JResilient safety sleeve for electrical prongs
US3210717 *Jun 14, 1965Oct 5, 1965Brown Robert SSafety connector plug
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3865453 *Oct 5, 1973Feb 11, 1975Leviton Manufacturing CoSafety adapter for three-wire grounding plug
US5599196 *May 1, 1995Feb 4, 1997Powell; Patti J.Electrical plug safety cover
US6743030 *Sep 30, 2002Jun 1, 2004Asia Vital Components Co., Ltd.Portable storage device with universal serial bus
US7011535Nov 14, 2003Mar 14, 2006Elumina Lighting Technologies, Inc.Safety device for electrical plugs and a method of attaching same
US7094080Mar 14, 2005Aug 22, 2006American Tack & Hardware Co., Inc.Safety device for electrical plugs and a method of attaching the same
US9040822Mar 12, 2012May 26, 2015Ricardo Nieto LopezSafety device for live electrical wire
US20040063346 *Sep 30, 2002Apr 1, 2004Asia Vital Components Co., Ltd.Portable storage device with universal serial bus
US20050106909 *Nov 14, 2003May 19, 2005Dickie Robert G.Safety device for electrical plugs and a method of attaching same
US20050159031 *Mar 14, 2005Jul 21, 2005Elumina Lighting Technologies, Inc.Safety device for electrical plugs and a method of attaching the same
EP2590269A1 *Oct 29, 2012May 8, 2013Integration Technique et Cablage (ITEC)Equipped electric conductor
WO2005048411A1 *Nov 8, 2004May 26, 2005Dickie Robert GSafety device for electrical plugs and a method of attaching the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/140
International ClassificationH01R13/44, H01R13/447
Cooperative ClassificationH01R13/447
European ClassificationH01R13/447