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Publication numberUS3629866 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 28, 1971
Filing dateDec 10, 1970
Priority dateDec 10, 1970
Also published asCA949253A, CA949253A1, DE2151212A1, DE2151212B2, DE2151212C3
Publication numberUS 3629866 A, US 3629866A, US-A-3629866, US3629866 A, US3629866A
InventorsBlue Sidney D
Original AssigneeBlue Sidney D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shirt collar construction
US 3629866 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Primary Examiner-James R. Boler Attorney-Pennie, Edmonds, Morton, Taylor & Adams ABSTRACT: In a shirt of the type which includes a cloth body and a collar secured thereto along an upper marginal edge of the neck opening of the body, the collar including a neckband portion, a cape portion turned downwardly with respect to the neckband along a fold line and an elongated semirigid element disposed within the cape portion to displace the fold line upwardly with respect to the neckband portion so that the displaced portion of the fold line coincides substantially with the upper marginal edge of the semirigid element, the improvement comprising opposite end portions of the neckband which have an upper marginal edge tapering downwardly toward the shirt body to a substantially zero height with respect to the shirt body at the juncture between the neckband and the shirt body, a buttonhole disposed in one end portion of the neckband adjacent the juncture with the shirt body, and two semirigid elements disposed within the respective end portions of the neckband which contact with the semirigid element in the cape portion to prevent buckling of the neckband when the cape portion is folded downwardly with respect to the neckband and the end portions of the neckband are secured to each other in overlapping relationship.

PATENlEnnzczsln 3,629,866

SHEET 1 OF 4 I INVENTOR Sudney D. Blue TTORNEYS PATENTED [ED281971 SHEET 2 OF 4 INVENTOR Sidney D. Blue BY 1, Hakka,

PATENIEB M28 19?:

SHEET 3 0F 4 40 FIG. 7

ATTORNEYS PATENTEU 06:28 1971 3629.666

SHEET 0F 4 FIG. 10

I50 I42 ISOA INVENTOR I34 I28 Sidney D. Blue TTOR EYS SI-IIRT COLLAR CONSTRUCTION BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to an improved construction for collars of the type attached to shirts for men and boys, and, is specifically directed to collars embodying the construction disclosed in my U.S. Pat. No. 3,363,263.

The present invention provides an improvement which, when incorporated with the construction of my prior patent, eliminates the major cause of discomfort which is inherent in shirt collars as they are presently constructed.

Attached collars on shirts include a neckband portion and a turned down top or cape portion. The lower edge of the neckband is secured to the neck opening of the shirt body. Dress shirts, other than the type disclosed in my U.S. Pat. Nos. 2,935,479 and 3,1 l4,l52, have neckband portions with ends that overlap at the front and are fastened to each other, usually by a button and corresponding buttonhole.

In the construction disclosed by my U.S. Pat. No. 3,363,263, the fold line at the front of the collar is disposed above the normal fold line along the demarcation between the collar top and the neckband portions. According to this construction, for a short distance, a part of the upper edges of the confronting ends of the collar top are folded inwardly and downwardly to constitute an upward extension of the top edge of the neckband. The reduction in height of the real neckband portion corresponds to the increase in height achieved by the inwardly turned down upper edge of the collar top. This construction provides a collar having a normal height in the front area of what functions as a neckband even though this part of the neckband combines a portion of the collar top and a portion of the real neckband. Since the front ends of the real neckband portion are reduced in height, the upper edges of such ends are no longer visible above the knot of the necktie thus overcoming an unsightly effect.

Experience gained by the usage of this construction has shown that it has benefits in addition to those originally recognized. For example, in shirts having neckband ends which overlap, the lowered height of the neckband ends has contributed to greater comfort for the wearer. As a result of such experience, it became evident that a further contribution to comfort could be achieved if the area of overlapped neckband ends were further reduced. At the same time, such proposed construction would substantially eliminate the constricting limitations in conventional shirt collars.

The anatomy of the average male is such that the location of the most sensitive part of the neck, i.e. the area covering the thyroid cartilage generally known as the Adam s apple, usually is encircled by the collar neckband portion with the overlapped ends of the neckband resting directly on or pressing against the peak or at least the lower portion of the Adams apple. Thus, if the collar of a conventional shirt should shrink or if the wearer's neck circumference should increase, the wearer will experience an uncomfortable feeling of constriction which can only be relieved by disengaging the button and buttonhole. Such disengagement obviously detracts from the desired appearance of the collar.

The average conventional neckband is designed to have a standing front height of slightly less than 1 inch when measured vertically thru the line of engagement of the button and buttonhole. The horizontal line of engagement is usually located at the center of the neckband end. This means that any lateral or circumferential tension meets resistance at the point where the overlapped ends of the neckband are fastened together. Since the point of fastening is located at the lateral centerline of the neckband, all stress is registered equally at the top and bottom margins of the neckband.

The human neck is generally conical in configuration, the largest circumference being at the base where the muscles splay out into the shoulder and chest areas. The neck tapers as it rises and, on the average man, is about one inch smaller in circumference at a point or line which would correspond to the top of the neckband. This line is generally used to.determine the size of the shirt that a wearer should purchase. The collar size marked on a shirt usually implies that the collar will measure accordingly when it is laid out flat and measured along that part of the upper edge of the neckband which extends from one end of the collar top to the other. At the same time, if the neckband is measured from the center of the button to the furthest end of the buttonhole it will be found that it is customary to make this measurement es inch longer than the marked size.

When the neckband is fastened about the wearers neck, it assumes a frustoconical shape to provide a slightly greater circumference at the bottom of the neckband than the aforesaid average inch differential, but not enough to provide for the approximate 1 inch differential existing between the circumference of the neck, at the location of the top and bottom margins of the neckband. When the collar is buttoned the neckband front area alignment pivots at the buttoned fastening. If the front of the collar is drawn downwardly out of the predetermined alignment towards the chest, the pivoting action will increase the angle of the conical configuration of the neckband and provide more useable circumference at the bottom edge of the neckband and correspondingly less useable circumference at the top edge of the neckband. Accordingly, any movement, either up or down, of the front area of the neckband that disturbs the intended horizontal axis of the front portion of the neckband will affect the continuity of alignment along the front edge of the shirt where it is intended that the edge of the body and the end edge of the neckband form a straight vertical line. Thus, if the configuration of the wearer's neck and chest relationship causes the collar to settle lower than the predetermined slope or angle in the front of the collar, a distortion of the vertical alignment of the edge of the body and the end edge of the neckband will occur. When this occurs, the end of the neckband pivots downwardly from the buttoned fastening so that the end edge of the neckband exerts a cantilever force. This causes a downward vertical pressure on the free edge of the shirt body front with the result that it buckles or bulges in an unsightly manner.

Prior unsuccessful attempts to provide a collar construction in which discomfort and buckling are mitigated are disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 1,243,463 and 1,453,144 and in German Pat. No. 362,038. Another unsuccessful prior construction of interest is U.S. Pat. No. 2,308,369 which discloses a neckband that forms a V-shaped notch in the front area but also includes a rigid fastening in the center of the neckband. Such collar construction does not provide a low bulk, soft and adjustable crossing of the Adam's apple area which is desirable for maximum comfort.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The shirt of the present invention includes a cloth body having a neck opening and a collar secured to the body along an upper marginal edge of the neck opening. The collar includes a neckband portion, a cape portion secured to an upper marginal edge of the neckband portion and turned downwardly with respect to the neckband portion along a fold line, and a first elongated semirigid element disposed within the cape portion. The first element which displaces the fold line upwardly with respect to at least a portion of the neckband, the displaced portion of the fold line coinciding substantially with an upper marginal edge of the first element. Opposite end portions of the neckband are substantially triangular in configuration and have an upper marginal edge which tapers downwardly toward the shirt body at a sharp angle to a substantially zero height with respect to the shirt body at the junctures between the ends of the neckband and the shirt body. One end portion of the neckband has a buttonhole disposed adjacent the juncture with the shirt body so that the respective end portions of the neckband, when overlapped and secured to each other, present a substantial V-shaped opening. Second and third semirigid elements are disposed within the respective end portion of of the neckband. The second and third elements contact lower portions of the first element in the cape portion to prevent buckling of the neckband when the cape portion is folded downwardly with respect to the neckband and the end portions of the neckband are secured to each other in overlapping relationship.

The present invention discloses a collar construction in which the bottom edge of the neckband is long enough to fit comfortably the larger circumference at the base of the neck and provides a circumference at the fold line of the collar top with a substantially greater differential from the circumference at the bottom of the neckband. It is contemplated that this differential may be instantly varied to conform either to the anatomy of the wearer or the size of his necktie knot.

According to the present invention, the fastening means for the overlapping neckband ends are placed on the lower edge of those ends at a point immediately adjacent the top of the shirt front neck opening in alignment with the button and the buttonhole line of the shirt front.

This fastening area on the buttonhole end of the band includes a single ply of the base interlining and a single ply each of the outer and inner-face plies of the neckband. As a result, the edges of the buttonhole are very flexible and readily yield to the passage of the button thru the buttonhole for fastening or releasing the ends of the band in their overlapped position.

The placement of the buttonhole in this position on the neckband of a conventional shirt would be impractical and nonfunctional because the buttonhole would engage a minimum of six thicknesses of fabric: two plies each of outer and inner-face plies, a single ply of the shirt front and, at least, a single ply of the base lining. Moreover, since most manufacturers fold back a small margin of the base lining, the buttonhole would penetrate seven thicknesses of fabric. Fabric of such thickness results in a buttonhole opening that would require considerable force to pass a button thru it in either direction. Furthermore, if the buttonhole of a conventional neckband were placed immediately adjacent the juncture of the top of the shirt front and the bottom of the neckband, either above or below the line of juncture, the cantilever effect of the entire height of the end edge of the neckband would continue to have the possibility of exerting pressure to disturb the appearance of the shirt front.

By placing the fastening means on the neckband of the present invention immediately adjacent the juncture of the neckband and the shirt front, the circumferential limit resides at the bottom edge of the neckband while the circumference at the fold line between the neckband and collar top is free to adjust to the wearer's comfort and appearance requirements. In making this adjustment there is no distortion of either the shirt front or of the collar top portions and a neat appearance prevails. Moreover, placement of the fastening means at the bottom of the band reduces the area of the overlapping band ends. In accordance with the present invention, the upper edges of the band ends are inclined in a straight line from the upper comer of the shirt front to the point where the top edge of the neckband and the front edge of the collar cape converge. When the neckband ends overlap each other in this manner, a small open V" is formed in the area of the Adam s apple thus relieving any feeling of constriction. This V is free to expand or contract to fit comfort and appearance requirements.

Because of the slanted profile of the end of the neckband of the present invention, the height of the end edge of the neckband is substantially zero where it merges with the upper comer of the shirt front. This feature eliminates the cantilever force which normally bears on the edge of the shirt front. This in conjunction with the minimizing of lateral misalignment along the bottom edge of the neckband by positioning the fastening button immediately adjacent the place where the bottom of the neckband rests on the wearers chest, eliminates forces that would disturb the smooth-lying appearance of the shirt front.

By constructing the neckband ends to eliminate bulk and constriction, a soft pressurcless crossing of the Adams apple area is achieved. However, this construction sacrifices some upright support of the band ends. To overcome this, a semirigid member, generally triangular in shape, is provided in each of the overlapping band ends. This member also acts as a strike plate for the lower longitudinal portion of the semirigid member denoted by the reference character 50 in my U.S. Pat. No. 3,363,263. The portion of the aforesaid semirigid member which is enclosed in the neckband thus impinges upon the surface of the semirigid member provided in the neckband ends of the present invention. When the collar top incorporating the semirigid member is folded down over its upper longitudinal edge, an inwardly directed tilting force is transmitted to its lower edge. This force is resisted and the tilting stopped by the semirigid member provided in the band end in the present invention. A positive location of the hinge action of the collar top is provided by placing all stitching in the area above the top edge of the semirigid strike plate.

Thus the present invention provides a neckband with overlapping ends having a lowered front profile which when used in combination with the fold line displacing feature of my previous patent will result in a collar that will provide greater comfort in the sensitive Adams apple area of the wearers neck by eliminating the elements that cause confining and constrictive limitations in shirts as they are presently constructed. The neckband of the present invention further permits the wearer to make instant adjustments in order to obtain complete comfort and at the same time allows him to present a neat collar appearance under the stress of body and neck movement or the desire to follow the dictates of fashion regarding the size of his necktie knot.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a fragmentary front elevation of an attached collar shirt collar of the present invention with one of the collar points bent upwardly to expose the arrangement of the members embodied in the front area of the collar;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the assembled members of an interlining for a cape or collar top portion for a collar having separately cut cape and neckband portions;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the assembled members of an interlining for a neckband portion of a two-piece collar;

FIG. 4 is a plan view which illustrates the resulting relationship of the interlining portions illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3 as joined together to form a collar;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged view of the buttonhole end of the interlining assembly;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of the turned down point of the collar taken substantially along tine 66 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of the combined interlining members taken substantially along line 7-7 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary front elevation of an attached onepiece collar with one of the collar points bent upwardly to illustrate the relative locations of the members in the front area of the collar;

FIG. 9 is an enlarged view of the buttonhole end of the interlining assembly for a one-piece collar;

FIG. 10 is a cross-sectional view of the turned down point of the collar taken substantially along line 10-- 10 of FIG. 8; and

FIG. 11 is a cross-sectional view of the interlining assembly taken substantially along line 11-11 of FIG. 9.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring initially to FIG. 1 a shirt collar 24 of the present invention is secured to a shirt 26 which includes first and second front body panels 52, 54 having respective tumedback edges 52A, 54A which overlap and are securable to each other by a series of buttons and buttonholes in the conventional manner. Upper portions of the front panels 52, 54 form the front half of an arcuate neck opening 16 which is configured to provide a comfortable fit at the base of the wearer's neck.

The collar of the present invention 24 includes a standing neckband portion and a collar top or cape portion 22. The collar 24 is attached to the shirt body by joining a lower edge of the neckband portion 20 along the neck opening 16 of the shirt fronts 52, 54 and along a curved edge of a yoke (not shown) which forms the shoulder and the top of the back of the shirt 26. Provision of a finishing stitch 60 completes the collar-setting operation.

The cape portion 22 and neckband portion 20 of the collar 24 include the three basic elements used in most collars, i.e., outer facing, inner or under facing with an interlining interposed between the two facings. The novel aspect of the present invention resides in part in the shapes and positions of supplementary pieces 30, 32 of interlining that are fused or bonded to a basic neckband interlining 28 as illustrated in the drawings. An X-ray" view of these supplementary patches 30, 32 is shown in FIG. 1 in the overlapped ends of the neckband portion 20. The collar cape 22 shows the outline of a fused patch consisting of the collar front and point support 40 which is integrated with the fold-line displacer 50 which was the subject of my previous U.S. Pat. No. 3,363,263.

A top edge or fold line 22A of the collar cape portion 22 is displaced upwardly from the normal fold line by the influence of the upwardly projecting longitudinal edge 50A of the foldline displacer 50. The normal fold line of a collar occurs at the line of demarcation between the neckband and collar cape portions. In a conventional two-piece collar including separately cut cape and neckband portions this line of demarcation occurs at the juncture between the two portions, that is, in the area of finishing stitch 48.

Top edges 18 of the neckband ends are tapered downwardly at a sharp angle. This slanting profile which has a zero height where it extends to the edge of the shirt front, corresponds to that of the supplementary patches 30, 32 encased in the respective neckband ends. The slanted edges 18, when overlapped, cross each other at a point below the normal fold line 48 and much below the displaced fold line 22A thereby providing a substantial V-opening where the neckband ends cross over the area of the Adams apple.

The present neckband end construction makes it possible to locate a buttonhole 44 at the bottom of the neckband adjacent to the neck opening of the shirt front. This low placement of the fastening of the overlapped neckband ends locates the point of circumferential limitation at the very bottom of the neckband where it can be sized to fit comfortably around the largest diameter of the neck which occurs at the base of the neck. When the neckband ends are fastened together in this manner, the point of fastening becomes a pivot thereby permitting the confronting tops of the cape ends 36A, 38A to move freely towards or away from each other as comfort or the size of the necktie knot dictates. The low placement of the buttonhole 44 and the low profile of the top edges 18 of the overlapped neckband ends further eliminates the usual constricting elements over the Adams apple.

The collar cape portion 22 includes a finishing or topstitching 46. As usual, this stitching 46 is placed at the accepted distance, according to fashion dictates, from and along the confronting ends 36, 38 and along bottom margin of the collar cape portion 22. The cross-sectional structure of the various plies of material including facing plies 56, 58, 60 and 62 in the buttonhole end of the present collar is shown best in FIG. 6.

Referring to FIG. 2, a separately cut collar cape 22 includes a basic lining 34 which is made from fabric generally used for collar interlinings. The cape 22 further includes two supplementary layers of specially shaped fusible patches 40, 42. The full-length patch 42 has end portions that conform to the shape of point-supporting patches 40 and, in the preferred embodiment, includes an integrated member of a shape similar to that of the fold-line displacer 50 which is combined with the point support patch 40. The fusible patches 40, 42 may be of woven or nonwoven fabrics to which there has been applied a continuous or discontinuous coating of thermoplastic adhesive such as polyethylene or other suitable material. Coated fabrics of this type can be fused to the basic interlining or to themselves by the application of heat and pressure for which purpose many models and types of presses are commercially available.

After fusing, the patch plus the base fabric form a semirigid area conforming to the shape of the patch. The degree of rigidity is determined by the weight or density of the coated fabric and by the amount of adhesive coating applied. Rigidity is increased if multiple layers of patches are used.

FIG. 3 shows a full-length view of a neckband interlining assembly which includes a basic interlining 28 and button and buttonhole end patches 30 and 32, respectively. A cutout 32A eliminates the semirigid patch 32 in the area of buttonhole penetration.

FIG. 4 illustrates the relationship between the neckband 20 and the cape portions 22 inside the completed collar 24 when joined together along their respective longitudinal margins by stitching 48. As is usual in collars having separately cut neckband and cape portions, the longitudinal free edges are cut to have different arcs so that when they are joined together the neckband will assume a frustoconical shape to conform to the natural conical attitude of the neck. The circumferential fullness at the bottom of the neckband 20 will result in tapered puckers when the collar is laid out flat as shown in the drawmg.

FIG. 5, an enlarged view of the buttonhole end of the joined neckband 20 and cape 22 interlining assemblies, clearly illustrates the interaction of the respective semirigid patches. The patches 40 and 42 are fused to what is to become the under side of the cape interlining 34. Patches 30 and 32 are fused to what is to become the outer side of the interlining 28 of the neckband portion. When the two portions of the collar are joined together along the line 48 it will be seen that upper Iongitudinal edge 50A extends above the stitching 48 and the lower half of the fold-line displacer element 50 extends downwardly over the top edge of the semirigid elements 30, 32. Since the line of stitching 48 occurs above the top edges of patches 30, 32, it will serve in the same manner as the pin in a hinge. As the collar cape 22 is folded downwardly over the neckband 20, an outward tilting pressure is exerted on the edge 50A and a corresponding inward tilting pressure is registered along the bottom longitudinal edge of the fold-line displacer 50. Without the presence of semirigid members 30, 32 in the overlapped, low profile ends of the neckband, the tilting pressure would roll the neckband forward at the front of the collar and produce an untidy effect. Incorporation of the semirigid members 30 and 32 of the present invention in the neckband ends is intended to provide strike plates to resist the inward tilting force in the front area of the collar where the bottom edge of the fold-line displacer S0 impinges on the semirigid surface of the patches 30, 32.

Because of the very low profile of the neckband ends, it can be appreciated that in eliminating a large part of the material that exists in conventional collars and which covers the Adams apple area of the neck, the neckband ends would otherwise be practically unsupported in their vertical attitude if the semirigid members 30, 32 were not incorporated in the overlapped ends of the neckband and the collar would sag downwardly in the front if the necktie knot became loosened. The cross-sectional arrangement of the structure of the collar of FIG. Sis shown best in FIG. 7.

FIGS. 8, 9, l0 and 11 illustrate a second embodiment of the present invention in a collar of one-piece construction, i.e., wherein the basic interlining, the fusible patches and the outer and under face materials are each cut in one piece to integrate the neckband and cape portions.

The individual elements are indicated by the same numerals as used in FIGS. 1-7 excepting that they are of three digits with the first numeral being I in all cases.

In FIG. 9 the dashed line 170 indicates where the normal fold line would occur and the dotted area of the semirigid members I30, 132 of the present invention correspond to the foId-Iine-displacing element 50.

What is claimed is:

l. in a shirt of the type including a cloth body having a neck opening and a collar secured to the body along an upper marginal edge of the neck opening, the collar including a neckband portion, a cape portion secured to an upper marginal edge of the neckband portion and turned downwardly with respect to the neckband portion along a fold line, and a first elongated, semirigid element disposed within the cape portion, the first element displacing the fold line upwardly with respect to at least a portion of the neckband, the displaced portion of the fold line coinciding substantially with an upper marginal edge of the first element, the improvement in combination therewith comprising opposite end portions of the neckband being substantially triangular in configuration and having an upper marginal edge which tapers downwardly toward the shirt body at a sharp angle to a substantially zero height with respect to the shirt body at the junctures between the ends of the neckband and the shirt body, one end portion of the neckband having a buttonhole disposed adjacent the juncture with the shirt body, the respective end portions of the neckband when overlapped and secured to each other presenting a substantial V-shaped opening, and second and third semirigid elements disposed within the respective end portions of the neckband, the second and third elements contacting lower portions of the first element disposed within the cape portion to prevent buckling of the neckband when the cape portion is folded downwardly with respect to the neckband and the end portions of the neckband are secured to each other in overlapping relationship.

2. A shirt according to claim 1 wherein the semirigid element disposed within the buttonhole end of the neckband has a cutout to facilitate passage of a button through the buttonhole.

3. A shirt according to claim I further including fourth and fifth semirigid elements disposed within the cape to support the front and point portions of the cape.

4. A shirt according to claim 3 wherein the fourth and fifth elements are integral with the first element.

5. A shirt according to claim I wherein the neckband portion of the collar is integral with the cape portion.

i t 1 i l v UNITED STATES PATENT oFFIcE CERTIMQATE 6F CQR-REQHGN Patent No. 3, 629 866 Dated December 28, 1971 Inv n Sidney D. Blue It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below: I

Abstract, lines 1 and 2, "cloth body and a" should read -cloth body having front pan ls with Overlapping vertical edges and a-- Abstract, line 13, juncture between the neckband" should read --juncture between the terminal ends of the neckband-.,

Abstract, line 13, "neckband and the shirt body" should read --neckband and the vertical edges of the related panels of the shirt body,----.

Column 2, line 18, "drawn downwardly out of the should read --drawn downwardly toward-a the chest out of the--.

Column 2, line 19 delete "towards the chest". Column 2, line 47, "Such collar should read --Such a collar-f Column 2, line 54, "body having a neck" should read --body having front panels with overlapping vertical edges a neck.

Column 2, line 66, "tapers downwardly toward the" should read --tapers downwardly in a straight line toward the--.

Column 2, line 68, delete the phrase "with respect to the shirt body at the junctures between the ends of the neckband and" and insert in lieu thereof -where it terminates at the vertical edge ofthe related front panel of--.

Column 3, line 52, "means at the bottom of the" should read --means at the bottom of the neckband makes .it possible to reduce-.

ORM P 1 USCOMM-DC 60376-P69 5. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 2 1569 0-366'33A UNITED STATl IS PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. I 3, 629, 866 Dated December 28, 1971 Inventor(s) Sidney D. Blue It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 4, line 35, delete the word "collar" Column 4, line 47, delete "to form" and insert in lieu thereof -in forming--.

Column 4, line 50, delete the word "a" and insert in lieu thereof -an enlarged-.

Column 4, line 60, delete the word "a" and insert in lieu thereof -an enlarged.

Column 5, line 37, after the word "line" insert the word -at--.

Column 5, line 60, after the phrase "38 and along" insert r the word --the--. i

Column 5, lines 62 and 63, delete "60 and 62" and insert in lieu thereof -62 and 64--.

Column 5, line 65, delete "Referring to Fig. 2, a" and insert in lieu thereof -Z-\- 7 Column 5, line 66, after the numeral "34 insert the phrase as shown best in Fig. 2-. 7

Column 6, line 17, delete "neckband 2O andthe cape portions 22" and insert in lieu thereof --interlinings of" the necl-cband 20 and cape 2?. portions---.

Claim 1 cancel entire claim and insert the following: I

= ORM P0-1050 (10-69) 'uscoMM-oc (scan-pm U.S GOVERNMENY PRINTING OKHCE' I969 O-]l-6-\" V a UNITED- s'm'nss PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE 0 CORRECTIQN Patent No. 866 i Dated DecenflJer,-28, 1971 Inv'entor(s) Sidney D. Blue It: is certified that error appears i-n the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Claim 1. "In a shirt of the type including a clot f body having front panels with overlapping vertical edges, a neck opening and acollar secured to the body along anupper marginal edge of the neck opening, the collar including "a neckband portion, a cape portion secured to an upper marginal edge of the neckband portion and turned downwardly with respect to the neckband portion along a fold line, and a first elongated, semi-rigid element disposed within the cape portion the first element displacing the fold line upwardly with respect to at least a portion of the neckband, the displaced portion of the fold line coinciding substantially with an upper marginal edge of the first element, the improvement in] combination substantially triangular in configuration and having an upper marginal edge which tapers downwardly in a straight line at a sharp angle to a substantially zero height where it terminates at said vertical edge of the related front panel of the shirt body, one end portion of the neckband, having a buttonhole disposed adjacent the juncture with the shirt body, the I respective end portions of the neckband when overlapped and secured. to each other presenting a substantial "V"-shaped opening, and second and third semi-rigid elements disposed within the respective end portions of the neckband, the, second and third elements contacting lower portions of the first element disposed within the cape portion to prevent buckling of the neckband when the cape portion is folded downwardly with respect to the neckband and the endv portions of the neclzband are secured to each other in overlapping relationship.

Signed and sealed this 7th day of March 1972.

therewith comprising opposite end portions of the neckband being (SEAL) Attest: EDWARD T-L-PLETCHER'ML ROBERT GQTTSCHALK.

Attesting Officer Commissioner 0;? Patents po'mso H069) uscoMM-oc 603764 250

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2800660 *Jan 5, 1956Jul 30, 1957Myrick Lucious CExpansible collar
US3363263 *Sep 29, 1965Jan 16, 1968Sidney D. BlueShirt collar construction
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5950554 *Jan 6, 1997Sep 14, 1999Taltech Ltd.Pucker free yoke-to-front and yoke-to-back garment seam and method for production
US6070542 *Jan 29, 1999Jun 6, 2000Taltech LimitedPucker free collar seam and method of manufacture
US7849520 *Feb 16, 2006Dec 14, 2010Arc'teryx Equipment Inc.Laminated collar and a garment having such laminated collar
US8065746Aug 24, 2007Nov 29, 2011Capital Mercury Apparel, Ltd.Multi-scored winged collar support
US8065747 *Oct 24, 2005Nov 29, 2011Capital Mercury Apparel, Ltd.Finished slot and adjustable shirt collar and method of manufacturing same
US8336474Nov 14, 2005Dec 25, 2012Yugao ZhangWrinkle free garment and method of manufacture
US9204671 *May 15, 2014Dec 8, 2015Million Collar Collar, LLCPlacket stiffener arrangement for a garment such as a shirt
US20060048267 *Oct 24, 2005Mar 9, 2006Jim KeeterFinished slot and adjustable shirt collar and method of manufacturing same
US20070118955 *Oct 31, 2006May 31, 2007Kapadia Jay RStain resistant interlining for clothing
US20070118961 *Feb 16, 2006May 31, 2007Arc'teryx Equipment Inc.Laminated collar and a garment having such laminated collar
US20080047984 *Aug 24, 2007Feb 28, 2008Capital Mercury Apparel, Ltd.Multi-scored winged collar support
US20090229029 *May 28, 2009Sep 17, 2009Oxford Industries, Inc.Stain release interlining for clothing
US20100263105 *Oct 10, 2008Oct 21, 2010Christopher PilarskiComfortable and Cool Shirt Collar
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Classifications
U.S. Classification2/132
International ClassificationA41B1/00, A41B1/14, A41B1/12, A41B3/00, A41B3/08
Cooperative ClassificationA41B1/12, A41B3/08, A41B1/14
European ClassificationA41B1/12, A41B1/14, A41B3/08
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 6, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: CLUETT, PEABODY & CO., INC., A CORP OF GEORGIA
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:CLUETT, PEABODY & CO., INC., A CORP OF NY, (MERGED INTO);REEL/FRAME:004528/0448
Effective date: 19860221
Sep 8, 1980AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: BLUE, SIDNEY D.
Effective date: 19800619
Owner name: CLUETT, PEABODY & CO., INC., 510 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW