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Publication numberUS3629868 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 28, 1971
Filing dateJul 21, 1970
Priority dateJul 21, 1970
Publication numberUS 3629868 A, US 3629868A, US-A-3629868, US3629868 A, US3629868A
InventorsGreenlee Harry R
Original AssigneeTrison Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adapter assembly for a welding helmet or the like
US 3629868 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Inventor Harry R. Greenlee 12/1908 Knudsen 128/1423 Detroit, Mich. 2,258,325 /1941 Hess et al. 417/359 Appl. No. 56,908 2,261,391 ll/l941 Koch 417/359 Filed July 21, 1970 2,514,990 7/1950 Dewan 2/8 X Patented Dec. 28, 1971 2,690,296 9/1954 Rodwick 417/361 Assignee Trison Corporation 3,238,535 3/ 1966 Richey 2/8 Southiield, Mich. 3,353,191 11/1967 Dahly 2/l7l.3 3,535,707 10/1970 Greenlee 2/8 ADAPTER ASSEMBLY FOR A WELDING HELMET FOREIGN PATENTS 0R Canada Claims, 22 Drawing Figs. Primary Examiner-James R. Boler US. Cl 2/8 Rmanski An electric motor and fan driven thereby are "I carried by mounting means adapted to be detachably secured I 128/1423 416/63 ;g? to the forward portion of a protective helmet or a face-shield- H 15 ing mask so as to be effective, when actuated, to draw fresh air Reerences Cited into the mask or helmet generally about the operator's head and expelling such air through a forwardly directed opening, UNITED STATES PATENTS formed in the mask, in a stream-like path aimed at a selected g 901 a gleet al. 128/1423 direction with respect to the mask or helmet.

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AT TO RNEYS ADAPTER ASSEMBLY FOR A WELDING HELMET OR THE LIKE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION It is well known to those who have performed any welding operations, especially electric arc-welding, that such operations necessarily create dense fumes, smoke, sparks and heat. Because of these, the welders efficiency is impaired, the quality of the weld is often diminished and the operator's health is threatened.

For example, it has been determined in many instances that respiratory ailments and lung damage have occurred because of the direct inhalation of such smoke or noxious fumes. Yet, the welding helmets of the prior art presently being employed are not at all effective for preventing the welding operator from having to inhale such weld-generated fumes and smoke. In many industries where welding is employed as the prime means of metal joining, such as in ballistic or armament-welding, the welding operator spends substantially all of his workshift period wearing the mask and breathing such smoke and fumes.

Further, because of the presence of such heat, fumes and smoke, the welderss efficiency is reduced. That is, it has been observed that because of the heat within the mask or helmet, the welders face and brow perspire profusely resulting in perspiration flowing down into the welders eyes thereby impairing his ability to continue that particular weld pass until he first stops, lifts the helmet and wipes away such perspiration. This, of course, not only reduces his-total productivity but also reduces the quality of the weld because of the interruption in the weld pass.

Such interruptions in the weld pass also result from the dense smoke and fumes generated during the welding operation. That is, it has been found that because of the extremely dense smoke in the vicinity of the weld puddle the operator is often unable to clearly see the quality or formation of the weld bead being generated. The operator, therefore, interrupts the weld pass and lifts his helmet and manually fans away the smoke in order to see the weld characteristics. It should be apparent that if the operator does not so interrupt the weld pass he is taking the risk that the entire weld joint may be defective; however, if he does interrupt the weld pass he has immediately reduced the quality of the weld.

It is common practice to provide in such welding helmets an inner-mounted dark-tinted or polaroid lens and an outer clear glass lens. This is done in order to protect the more costly inner lens from becoming pitted by sparks and weld spatter. It has been found that because of the fumes the welder must periodically stop his normal welding operations in order to wipe and clean the outer surface of the outer lens because the fumes so cloud the said surface as to seriously impair his vision. Further, the flying sparks and weld spatter cause pitting of the same outer surface and, after a period of time, the pitting becomes severe enough to also seriously impair the operator's vision thereby requiring replacement of such lens.

Accordingly, the invention herein disclosed and claimed is directed to the solution of the above, as well as other problems, for example, associated with welding helmets of the prior art.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION According to the invention, a blower assembly adapter for use in combination with a welding helmet or the like having an operators face-protecting mask with aperture means formed through said mask forwardly thereof, comprises an electrically driven motor, a fan assembly operatively connected to said motor so as to be rotatably driven thereby, detachable mounting means for mounting said motor and fan assembly to said mask so as to position said fan assembly forwardly of said aperture means, said detachable mounting means being effective for positioning said fan assembly in any of a plurality of varying attitudes with respect to said mask in order to enable said fan assembly to direct a stream of air in a selected direction corresponding to a selected one of said plurality of attitudes, and fastener means for securing said detachable mounting means to said mask.

Various general and specific objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent when reference is made to the following detailed description considered in cooperation with the accompanying drawings.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the drawings wherein, for purposes of clarity, certain details and elements may be omitted for purposes of clarity:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view, with certain portions thereof broken away and in cross section, of a welding helmet assembly employing a blower assembly in accordance with the teachings of this invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged cross-sectional view of the blower assembly of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary view, with portions thereof broken away, taken generally on the plane of line 33 of FIG. 2 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 4 is a rear elevational view taken generally on the plane of line 44 of FIG. 2 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary elevational view of one of the elements of FIG. 2, taken generally on the plane of line 5-5 of FIG. 2 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view taken generally on the plane of line 66 of FIG. 4 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 7 is a view similar to FIG. 2 but illustrating a second embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 8 is a view, partly in cross section and partly in elevation, taken generally on the plane of line 8-8 of FIG. 7 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 9 is an elevational view, with selected elements removed for clarity, taken generally on the plane of line 9-9 of FIG. 7 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view typically illustrating a modification of the invention;

FIG. 11 is a view similar to FIG. 2 and 7 but illustrating a third embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 12 is a view, partly in cross section and partly in elevation, taken generally on the plane of line l212 of FIG. 11 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 13 is a view similar to FIG. 11 but illustrating a fourth embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary elevational view taken generally on the plane of line 14-14 of FIG. 13 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 15 is a view similar to FIG. 13 but illustrating a fifth embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 16 is a fragmentary elevational view taken generally on the plane of line l6-16 of FIG. 15 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 17 is a fragmentary elevational view, of one of the elements in FIG. 15, taken generally on the plane of line 1717 of FIG. 15 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 18 is a fragmentary elevational view, of certain of the elements of FIG. 15 in a particular operating position, taken generally on the plane of line 18- 18 of FIG. 15 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIGS. 19, 20 and 21 are each fragmentary cross-sectional views respectively taken on the planes of lines 19-19, 20-20 and 21-21 of FIG. 16 and looking in the direction of the arrows; and

FIG. 22 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective view of certain of the elements shown in FIG. 15.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now in greater detail to the drawings, FIG. 1 illustrates a welding helmet 10 of the prior modified to accommodate a blower assembly 12 constructed in accordance with the teachings of the invention. The welding helmet is illustrated as comprising a face-shielding mask 14 provided with a laterally disposed head-engaging band 16 and an upper headengaging band 18. Bands I6 and 18 may be of unitary construction, at their common junctures, and may be further provided, as in common practice, with suitable adjustment devices, as is typically shown at 20, for adjusting the lengths of the respective bands in order to conform to the size of the welding operators head 22. Band 18 would, of course, pass over the top of the operators head while band 16 would be situated generally about the operators head so as to engage the back, sides and forehead of the operators head. The entire headband assembly is, in turn, pivotally engaged at opposite sides as by suitable pivot shafts having portions extending through the wall portion of mask 14 and retained therethrough for pivotal rotation with respect thereto as by suitable retainers or fasteners as typically shown at 24. Such arrangements are well known in the art and accordingly it is not deemed necessary to show all of the precise details of such a pivotal-mounting assembly for bands 16 and i8.

Further, mask 14 is also provided with a suitable shieldingtype window assembly 30 through which the operator may observe the shielding operation being performed. The window assembly 30, which may be of any one of a number of such assemblies well known in the art, is illustrated as being comprised of an inner frame member 32 and an outer frame member 34 between which, if desired, may be secured a suitable shielding lens. As is also well known in the art, the outer frame 34 may be hingedly mounted and carry a separate darkly tinted lens which can be at times swung away as to permit the operator to observe the work without having to swingably raise the helmet assembly 10.

As also shown in FIGS. 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, the blower assembly 12 is illustrated as being comprised of a generally annular forwardly disposed mounting plate 36 having a centrally formed aperture defined generally by a bearing-mounting surface 38 which, as shown, is preferably a segment of a spherical surface. A rearwardly disposed mounting plate or member 40 has an integrally formed rearwardly directed cuplike portion 42, generally centrally thereof, which slideably contains a bearing support 44 having an aperture formed therein and defined generally by a bearing-mounting surface 46 which, as shown, is preferably a segment of a spherical surface. A compression spring 48 contained within cup portion 42 engages a flange 50 of bearing support 44 and resiliently urges the support 44 toward the fixed bearing surface 38 so as to yieldingly contain therebetween a generally spherical bearing 52 suitably secured to and carried by the housing 54 of an electric motor assembly 56. The motor assembly 56 may include a projecting output shaft 58 adapted to be drivingly engaged with a hub portion 60 of a fan assembly 62 including a plurality of fan blades 64 and a projecting portion 66 which, as will become apparent, may be grasped by the operator in order to adjust the inclination or attitude of the motor 56 and fan 62 with respect to the mask 14. In this connection it shouid be mentioned that preferably bearing support 44 is provided with a suitable abutment surface, such as conical surface 68, which, as illustrated, serves the function of engaging a portion of the motor assembly 56 in order to limit the degree of angular adjustment permitted.

Motor terminals 70 and 72 have electrical leads 74 and 76, respectively, with plug-type connectors 78 and 80 receivable in socket connectors 82 and 84 provided and carried by the end wall 86 of cuplike housing 42. As is well known in the art, printed circuit portions, as somewhat diagrammatically illustrated at 88 and 90, are formed on the outer surface of end wall 86 so as to have one end in electrical connection with the plug terminals 78 and 80. Such printed circuit portions 88 and 90 are adapted to electrically connect as with cooperating printed circuit portions 92 and 94 formed on the inner surface of a battery-holding plate or saddle 96 when secured to the end wall 86 as by a nut 98 and cooperating threaded stud 100 retained in a boss I02 on end wall 86.

As shown in FIGS. 2 and 4, the strap or plate 96 is provided at opposite ends with battery clamps I04 and 106 respectively receiving batteries 108 and 110 therein in a manner so as to have the opposite ends of the batteries engaged with electrically conductive contact members 112, 114, I16 and 118. As best seen but diagrammatically shown in FIG, 4, the printed circuit portion 92 extends from terminal 80 to a second terminal which forms an electrical connection with battery contact 118 while printed circuit portion 94 extends from terminal 78 to a first terminal I22 of a mercury switch assembly 124 carried as by an extension or arm 126 of the plate 96. The second terminal 128 of mercury switch assembly 124 is shown as being connected, via a printed circuit portion 130 formed on arm I26 and plate portion 96, to a terminal 132 in electrical connection with electrical contact 1 14. An additional printed circuit portion 134, FORMED on the inner surface of plate 96, extends to terminals 136 and 138 respectively in engagement with electrical contacts 112 and 116, It should be apparent that not only are circuit portions 92, 94, 103 and 134 illustrated somewhat in simplified schematic form for sake of clarity, but that such printed circuit portions could equally well be replaced by conventional wire-type conductors. Both of such possibilities are well within the knowledge and ability of those skilled in the art without the necessity of herein providing explicit detailed discussion of the manner in which such electrical connections should be constructed. Further, even though a mercury-type switch assembly 124 is preferred, since the opening and closing of the related circuitry can then be performed as a function of the attitude of the helmet (as, for example, opening the circuit when the helmet is removed by the operator and laid aside), other switching means both manual and automatic could be substituted for the mercury switch 124, or even placed in series therewith in order to thereby provide an overriding switching control.

As illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 5, the forward and rearward mounting plates 36 and 40 are retained to each other by means of a plurality of projections or studs I40, formed integrally with the radial plate portion of rearward mounting plate 40, which extend through cooperating apertures 142 formed through the forward mounting plate 36 and retained therein as by suitable spring push-on-type fasteners 144 (well known in the art). Accordingly, it can be seen that the fan 62, motor 56, hearing 52, forward and rearward mounting plates 36 and 40 and batteries [08 and 110 can be preassembled as a subassembly and then secured to the shield portion 14 as will be more fully set forth. That is, the batteries and battery carrying plate 96 may be first secured to the rear plate 40 and then the spring 48 and bearing mount 44 inserted into the cuplike housing portion 42. Subsequently, the motor electrical leads 74 and 76 can be piugged in and the motor assembly 56 and bearing 52 placed against surface 46 of bearing mount 44 followed by the forwardly disposed plate 36 being placed so as to have its bearing support surface 38 against the bearing 52. The forward plate 36 is then urged against bearing 52, causing spring 48 to become somewhat compressed, until it abuts against the rearward plate 40 at which time fasteners I44 are applied to studs I40 retaining the components in a subassembly. The fan 62 may then be pressed onto the motor output shaft 58.

As is best seen in FIGS. 2 and 3, the shield 14 is altered by cutting a generally circular hole 146 therethrough of a size as to be slightly larger than the outer effective diameter 148 of the rear mounting plate 40. A plurality of generally radically directed open-ended slots 150 are also formed in shield 14 so as to be generally circumferentially spaced thereabout. As shown in FIGS. 3 and 5, the forwardly disposed plate 36 has an effective outer diameter 152 of a size so that when assembled, as shown in FIG. 2, the outer diameter 152 thereof lies radially outwardly of the slots 150. Further, a plurality of angularly spaced slots or clearances 154 are formed through plate 36 in a manner so that when plate 36 is assembled, slots 154 coincide with slots 150.

A grille assembly 156 is comprised of a plurality of spaced annular wire straplike members 158, 160, 162 and 164 which serve to contain, in a predetermined relationship, a plurality of angularly spaced generally axially extending wire members 166 having forwardly disposed ends terminating at annular wire 164 and having rearwardly disposed ends provided with hooklike portions 168. The various wire members may be brazed or soldered to each other so as to form a unitized grille 156. As will be seen, the grille 156 not only provides a guard about the fan 62 but also serves as the means for detachably securing the previously described subassembly onto the shield 14. This is accomplished generally as follows.

The subassembly comprised of the forward and rearward mounting plates 36 and 40 and motor assembly 56 is placed within the opening 146 formed in the mask or shield 14, next a flat split annular spring 170 is placed against the rear surface of the shield 14 and the rear surface of rearwardly disposed mounting plate 40. The spring 170 being split at one point, permits the spring to be manually radially compressed and when such manual force is removed, the spring 170 returns to the position illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3. After the abovedescribed subassembly is fitted in opening 146 and rotated so as to have slots 154 align themselves with slots 150, the spring 170 is radially compressed and the rearward ends of grille wires 166 are passed through the slots 150 and 154 until the hooklike ends 168 are rearwardly disposed relative to the compressed flat spring 170 which is then released so as to assume the position shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. The force of spring 170 urges the ends of wires 166 radially outwardly and at the same time presents an abutment which prevents unintentional withdrawal of hooks 168 through the slots 150 and 154. As can be seen in FIG. 3, spring 170 when released has its outer effective diameter 172 substantially greater than the inner diameter 146 of shield 14 while its inner effective diameter 174 is substantially less than the outer diameter 148 of mounting plate 40. Therefore, the plate 40 cannot move rearwardly because of the abutting effect of spring 170 which is restrained from rearward movement by hook portions 168 which, in turn, are precluded from rearward movement by the annular wire 158 abutting against the forward mounting plate 36 and, of course, the plate 36 overlies the opening 146. Somewhat similarly, the same subassembly cannot move forwardly out of the aperture formed in the shield 14 because of the overlapping effect of flat spring 170 relative to shield aperture 146 and back plate 40.

As shown in FIGS. 4 and 6, arcuate slots or openings 176 and 178 are formed through the forwardly disposed mounting plate or member 36 while similar arcuate openings 180 and 182 are provided in the rearwardly disposed mounting plate or member 40. The openings 180 and 182 are respectively provided with juxtaposed shielding portions 184 and 186, which may as shown in FIG. 6 project generally angularly away from the base portion of member 40, in order to prevent a direct path through the openings and slots by which rays or spatter from the welding operation could strike the operator's face. Consequently, whenever the fan and motor assembly is energized, air is caused to flow about the operators head in a manner generally depicted by the broad arrows of FIG. 1 and out through the passage means formed by slots or openings 176, 178, 180 and 182 as typically indicated by arrows 188 of FIG. 6.

SECOND'EMBODIMENT FIGS. 7, 8 and 9 illustrate both a modification and another embodiment of the invention. All elements in FIGS. 7, 8 and 9 which are like or similar to those of FIGS. 16 are identified by like reference numerals with a suffix a. It should be mentioned that the invention as shown in FIGS. 7, 8 and 9, although not limited to, is particularly well suited to accommodate situations wherein the contour of the shield 14 is such as to prohibit the direct mounting thereto of the fan and motor assembly, or where the relative sizes of the shield 14 and blower assembly requires the formation of a larger aperture in the shield than can be accommodated thereby.

Accordingly, in situations as set forth above, it is contemplated that the shield l4a would be cut open forming an aperture 200 within which an adapter plate 202 is situated and which, in turn, receives the blower and grille assemblies. The adapter 200 is formed with lower and generally laterally extending skirtlike portions 204, 206 and 208, which blend into each other to form a continuous surface, and gusset portions 210, 212 and 214 which are generally received within the opening 200 and serve to strengthen the overall adapter 202. When viewed from the front, as depicted generally in FIG. 9, the adapter 202 would present a generally elliptical outer configuration. The adapter 202 could be secured to the mask or shield 14a by any suitable means such as, or example, by a suitable adhesive or mechanical fasteners as rivets employed along the skirt portions.

As shown in both FIGS. 7 and 8, the forward portion of the adapter 202 has a stepped annular radially inwardly directed flange 216 providing a seating surface for the rearwardly disposed mounting plate or member 40a. A circular aperture 218 is defined by the flange 216 so as to provide passage means enabling air to flow from within the mask or shield through the exhaust passage means, as at 176a, 178a and 186a.

The entire blower assembly is retained to the adapter 202 by the grille 156a. That is, both the rearward and forward mounting plates 36a and 40a are received within the cylindrical recess 220 and abutably held against flange 216 and locked in such position by having the straight ends 222 of wires 166a extend through aligned apertures 224 formed in both mounting plates 36a and 40a (typically illustrated in FIG. 9) and retained as by the push-on fasteners 144a. The grille wires 166a are bent as at 226 in order to thereby provide an abutment portion for engaging the forward face 228 of the adapter 202.

FIG. 7 also shows a further modification, that being the use of a plurality of spaced springs, one of which is shown at 48a, for resiliently urging the bearing mounting member 440 against the bearing 520. It should be mentioned that for purposes of clarity, the forward and rearward plates 36a and 40a in FIG. 7 have been rotated 90 from their true positions as shown in FIG. 9 in order to better illustrate the passage means 176a and 178a.

The various details relating to the batteries, battery carrying or mounting means and electrical leads and connections may be identical to that of FIGS. I-6 and therefore such is not repeated in FIGS. 7 and 8.

THIRD EMBODIMENT FIGS. 11 and 12 illustrate a third embodiment of the invention wherein a removable blower assembly is shown in assem bled relationship on what might be considered a specially formed helmet or shield. All elements in FIGS. 11 and 12 which are like or similar to those of the preceding Figures are identified by like reference numerals with a suffix b."

The embodiment of FIGS. 11 and 12 differ from, for example, the embodiment of FIGS. 2, 3 and 4 primarily in that the bearing-mounting surface 38b is formed integrally with the forward wall portion of the mask or protective shield 14b instead of being formed in a separate forwardly disposed mounting member such as 36 of FIG. 2. Further, the air-exhausting passage means such as at l76b and 178b are formed in the forward wall portion 230 of the shield 14b. In addition, a plurality of angularly spaced generally radially extending slots 232 and 234, respectively generally functionally equivalent to slots and 154 of FIGS. 3 and 5, are formed in the rearward mounting plate 40b and forward wall 230 of shield 14b. As illustrated the blower assembly is detachably retained to the shield 14b by the invention of the hooked ends 168k of wires l66b through the aligned slots 232 and 234 and then placed in locket-abutting engagement with the annular spring I70b in the same general manner as described in detail with respect to the embodiment of FIGS. 1-6. The various conductors and circuits may, of course, be the equivalent of that also disclosed in FIGS. 1-6 and more particularly in FIGS. 2 and 4.

FOURTH EMBODIMENT FIGS. 13 and 14 illustrate a fourth embodiment of the invention. All elements in FIGS. 13 and 14 which are like or similar to those of the preceding Figures are identified by like reference numerals with a suffix c."

The rearwardly disposed mounting plate 236 differs from those of the preceding Figures in that the batteries 238 and 240 are contained within cylindrical receptacles 242 and 244 which, as illustrated, may be formed integrally with a generally circular or annular disc body portion 246.

Generally centrally of the disclike body portion 246 is an integrally formed cuplike housing portion 42c containing a spring 480 and slidable bearing support 44c in the manner and for purposes as described with reference to corresponding elements appearing, for example, in FIG. 2. If the batteries 238 and 240 are to be arranged, for example, in electrically series relationship then one of the batteries such as 238 may be placed within receptacle 242 in a manner whereby its positive terminal or end 248 is in engagement with a suitable contact or conductor carried by the mounting plate 236 (as, for example, a portion of a printed circuit of the type as described with reference to FIGS. 2 and 4) while the negative end 250 thereof would be engaged with one end 252 conductive resilient battery holddown clamp 254 which is medially secured to the housing 42c as by a stud 256 and cooperating push-on type fastener 258.

The other battery 240 would then be placed to have its positive end 260 in contact with end 262 of holddown clamp 254 while the negative end 264 of the battery would be held against, for example, a suitable electrical contact portion formed or carried over the top of a dimplelike portion 266 formed in the plate 246 within the confines of cylindrical receptacle 244.

The motor electrical leads 74c and 76c could then be, as is well known in the art, connected to the electrical contact portions, which are carried by plate 246 and in engagement with terminal ends 264 and 248 of batteries 240 and 238, and to a suitable pushbutton type switch assembly 268 carried generally by the housing portion 42c and having an actuating button 270 extending therefrom. Such switches as well as many other suitable types are well known in the art and therefore it is deemed unnecessary to describe them in any detail herein.

Although not specifically shown in FIG. 13, it should be apparent, in view of the previous Figures, that the forward mounting plate 36c is also provided with suitable exhaust passage means, such as illustrated at 176 and 178 of FIGS. 4 and 6, which are in general alignment with openings 180C and 1820 so as to provide for the flow of air from the interior of the helmet or shield 14c to the exterior thereof.

In view of the preceding, it can be seen that each of the embodiments described provides a blower assembly which can be quickly attached to an otherwise conventional welding helmet or the like for causing the flow of fresh air about the operator's head as well as exhausting such air in a stream forwardly of the shield so that the stream of air can be directed toward the work area. The relative attitude of the fan or blower, in each case, can be manually adjusted by means of the sleevelike spherical bearing, such as 52, and cooperating bearing support surfaces as 38 and 46. In this respect it should be mentioned that the frictional force between bearing support surfaces as 38 and 46 and bearing 52 is such as to hold the motor and fan assembly in any position or attitude to which it is selectively moved. The actual selective adjustment of the attitude thereof may be effected merely by grasping the projecting portion, as 66, of the fan assembly 62 and rotating the motor and fan assembly about the center of revolution of the cooperating bearing support surface.

The various components such as, for example. the forward and rearward mounting members 36 and 42 are preferably made of electrically nonconductive material such as a lightweight plastic thereby serving to both prevent electrical current flow therethrough as well as minimize the weight of the overall blower assembly.

In addition to the structures already discussed, other various means for detachably securing the blower assembly to the welding helmet or shield exist; for example, FIG. 10 fragmentarily illustrates one of such other fastening arrangements. In FIG. 10, all elements which are like or similar to those of FIGS. 1-9 and 11-14 are identified by like reference numerals with a suffix d." In the arrangement of FIG. 10 a plurality of angularly spaced apertures 270 are formed through the forward mounting number 36d which are of a size to accommodate the body portion 272 of a colletlike fastener 274. The apertures 270 are preferably located so as to cause the base end 276 of the respective fasteners 274 to be juxtaposed to the kneelike bend 278 of the grille wires 166d.

Accordingly, it can be seen that the various components comprising the blower assembly may be totally preassembled and then, as a subassembly, secured to the shield 14d by merely pressing the subassernbly, sufficiently to cause the resilient head-end 280 of fasteners 274 to pass through the respective cooperating receiving apertures 282 formed in the shield 14d generally about the central aperture 146d.

The embodiment of FIGS. 15-22 discloses a somewhat different switching arrangement. All elements in FIGS. 15-22 which are like or similar to those of the preceding Figures are identified by like reference numerals with a suffix f."

In the embodiment of FIGS. 15 and 16 the forward mounting plate or member 36f has suitably secured thereto an annular ringlike plate 290 which, preferably, has a curled flangelike portion 292 formed radially inwardly thereof. The generally axially extending grille wires l66f, as for example typically illustrated in F 1G. 19, may be brazed or welded to the annular plate 290 as at where the wire 166f engages the curled flange 292 and where the knee 278f engages the flat or main body portion 294 of the plate 290.

Preferably, the annular plate 290 has three generally equally angularly spaced locking portions, one of which is typically illustrated at 296 in FIGS. 16, 20 and 22. As best seen in FIGS. 20 and 22, each of the locking portions 296 is comprised of a somewhat raised or forwardly disposed bridgelike body section 298 which has generally radially directed grooves or indentations 300 and 302. A generally arcuate slot 304 is formed through the bridging section 298 so as to transversely pass through the indentations 300 and 302 and extend into an aperture 306 formed in the flat body portion 294 of plate 290. It should be noted that the width of slot 304 is significantly less than the diameter of aperture 306. A second slot 308 formed in member 36f and aligned with slot 304 also terminates at one end in an enlarged aperture 309. Additionally, an aperture 310 is formed through shield 14f so as to be in general alignment with apertures 306 and 309. The diameters of apertures 309 and 310 are also significantly larger than the width of slot 304.

A locking pin 312, as best shown in FIGS. 20, 21 and 22, is provided for cooperation with each of the locking portions 296. As typically illustrated in FIGS. 20 and 21, the locking pin 312 may be comprised of a relatively large base 314 and a relatively smaller head 316 joined together by a shank portion 318 of a diameter smaller than the head 316. The relative sizes of shank 318, head 316, apertures 309,310 and 306 and width of slot 304 are such as to permit the free passage of head 316 through the apertures 309, 310 and 306 as well as the free passage of shank 318 through the slots 304 and 308. Also, as best seen in FIGS. 20, 21 and 22, a suitable coil or belville spring 320 is provided about shank 318 in a manner so as to be between the rearward surface of shield portion 14] and base 314.

As should be apparent, in view of the above, the forward and rearward mounting plates or members 36f and 40f, along with the components and motor and fan assembly carried thereby, may be easily assembled as a subassembly by passing the free hook ends 168] of the grille wires l66f through the slots 15 3f and 232f (of members 36f and 40f) and engaging such hook ends 168f with the retainer or locking spring 170 Once the subassembly is so constructed it can be secured to the cooperating mask or shield 14f merely by applying the subassembly thereto in a manner whereby the rearward mounting plate 40f is generally received within the aperture 146f of shield 14f and whereby each of the heads 316 of the locking pins 312 is received through apertures 309 and 306 of mounting member 36f and locking plate 290. After the above is accomplished, the entire subassembly is rotated clockwise (as viewed in either FIGS. 16 or 22) thereby causing the head 316 of locking pin 312 to ride generally along the outer ramplike surface 322 causing the head 316 to be moved somewhat forwardly and spring 320 to be somewhat compressed. Continued clockwise rotation results in the head 316 engaging and sliding along or relative to a section of the bridging portion 298 until such relative motion therebetween causes the head 316 to be pulled (by spring 320) into the detent portion 302. When this occurs, the subassembly is ready for operation to the extent that it is secured to the helmet or shield 14f. Even though not specifically shown, it is nevertheless contemplated that the locking pins 312 may be carried in a generally caged fashion by the shield 14f so as to prevent such pins 312 from in any way falling out of the apertures 310 when a blower subassembly is not secured thereto. Such means for caging or holding fasteners are many and varied and well known in the art.

The embodiment of FIGS. l5-22 also contemplates another feature; that is, providing for an electrical switching arrangement which, in effect, closes and opens the motor circuit in response to rotation of the blower subassembly.

For example, when the blower subassembly is situated as to have the lockpins 312 seated in recesses or detents 302, the blower subassembly 12f would be locked to the shield 14f but the blower or fan motor would not be energized. However, upon further rotation of the subassembly 12f in the clockwise direction, until lockpins 312 become seated in recesses or detent 300 suitable related electrical switching means would become closed causing the motor 56fto be energized. Conversely, if it was desired to deenergize motor 56f, the subassembly 12f would be rotated counterclockwise until the lock or holding pins 312 again seated in recess 302.

One such switching means could be comprised of suitable conductors (whether of the printed circuit variety or other) 324, 326, 328, 330 and 332 as generally schematically illustrated in FIGS. 16, 17 and 18. For ease of presentation, let it be assumed that each of such conductors is of the printed circuit type; with this being assumed, conductor 324, along with cooperating terminallike contacts 334 and 336 could be formed on the forward surface 338 of shield 14f; conductors 326 and 328 could be formed on the rear surface 340 of forward mounting member 36fso as to respectivelyjoin terminallike contacts 342, 344 and 346, 348 also formed on the same rear surface 340; and conductors 330 and 332 could be formed on the forward surface 350 of rear-mounting member 40] so as to respectively join terminallike contacts 352, 354 and 356,358 also formed on surface 350.

When the forward and rearward mounting members 36]" and 40f are assembled, contact 344 and 352 engage each other so as to complete a circuit from terminal contact 354 to contact 342 while contacts 348 and 356 engage each other so as to complete a circuit from terminal contact 358 to contact 346. Terminal contacts 354 and 358 may, in turn, be electrically connected to the battery much in the same way as if they had replaced terminals 122 and 128 of mercury switch 124 of FIG. 4 and were connected directly to conductors 94 and 130 or the functional equivalents thereof.

The locations of contacts 342, 346 and 334, 336 are such, as shown in FIG. 16, as to prevent engagement therebetween whenever the subassembly 12f is in the position shown in FIG. 16 or rotated clockwise to a position whereat the locking pin 312 is seated in first recess 302. However, upon further rotation whereat holding pin 312 becomes seated in recess 300, contact 342 on forward member 36f engages contact 334 on shield 14f and contact 346 on forward member 36f engages contact 336 on shield 14f thereby completing a circuit through conductor 324 causing energization of electric motor 56f.

It is also contemplated that in certain situations, as possibly best exemplified by the embodiment of FIGS. 15-22, that the batteries 108f and 110f may be dispensed with and replaced by separate batteries provided in a position remotely situated with respect to the subassembly 12f. For example, such batteries 359 could be held in suitable housing or container portions carried by the helmet as typically illustrated in phantom line at 360 of FIG. 1 so as to be on opposite sides of the helmet and generally on the opposite side of the pivot 24 with respect to the blower assembly. The circuitry interconnecting the batteries 359 to the motor assembly could be comprised of, for example, printed circuit means leading from the battery terminals to the terminal contacts 334 and 336 with conductor 324 being eliminated.

Although not specifically shown in FIGS. 15-22, it should be apparent that forward and rearward mounting members 36f and 40f are provided with suitable air-exhausting passage means in accordance with the teachings of the previous Figures.

Although only a select number of embodiments and modifications of the invention have been disclosed and described, it is apparent that other embodiments and modifications of the invention are possible within the scope of the appended claims.

Iclaim:

1. A blower assembly adapter for use in combination with a welding helmet or the like having an operators face protecting mask with aperture means formed through said mask forwardly thereof, comprising an electrically driven motor, a fan assembly operatively connected to said motor so as to be rotatably driven thereby, detachable mounting means for mounting said motor and fan assembly to said mask so as to position said fan assembly generally forwardly of said aperture means, said detachablemounting means being effective for positioning said fan assembly in any of a plurality of varying attitudes with respect to said mask in order to enable said fan assembly to direct a stream of air in a selected direction corresponding to a selected one of said plurality of attitudes, and fastener means for securing said detachable mounting means to said mask.

2. A blower assembly adapter according to claim I, wherein said detachable mounting means comprising a platelike member adapted to be situated generally rearwardly of said mask.

3. A blower assembly adapter according to claim 1, including a shroudlike protective grille generally surrounding said fan assembly and operatively connected to said mask.

4. A blower assembly adapter according to claim 1, wherein said detachable mounting means comprises a platelike member adapted to the situated generally in alignment with said aperture means, including means carried by said detachable mounting means for receiving and containing electrical batteries for supplying electrical potential to said electric motor.

5. A blower assembly adapter according to claim 1, wherein said detachable mounting means comprises a platelike member adapted to be situated generally in alignment with said aperture means, including a battery-mounting member carried by said platelike member for receiving and carrying at least one electrical battery for supplying electrical potential to said electric motor.

6. A blower assembly adapter according to claim 1, wherein said fan assembly is positionable in said any of said plurality of varying attitudes about cooperating pivot means, and wherein said detachable mounting means comprises pivot supporting means for pivotally supporting said pivot means.

7. A blower assembly adapter according to claim 6, wherein said pivot means is carried by said electrically driven motor, wherein said motor is provided with a rotatable output shaft, and wherein said fan assembly is operatively connected to said rotatable output shaft.

8. A blower assembly adapter according to claim 1, wherein said detachable mounting means comprises a platelike member adapted to be situated generally in alignment with said aperture means, including a shroudlike protective grille generally surrounding said fan assembly, wherein said grille includes fastening portions extending through and rearwardly beyond said platelike member for operatively engaging said platelike member.

9. A blower assembly adapter according to claim 1, wherein said detachable mounting means comprises a platelike member adapted to be situated generally in alignment with said aperture means, including a shroudlike protective grille generally surrounding said fan assembly, wherein said grille includes fastening portions extending through and rearwardly beyond said platelike member, said fastening portions including hooklike portions, and including a resilient annular abutment member interposed between said hooklike portions and a rearward surface of said platelike member, said annular abutment member being adapted to be engaged with both said hooklike portions and said rearward surface.

10. A blower assembly adapter according to claim 1, including electrical-switching means carried by said detachable mounting means for selectively opening and closing related electrical circuitry leading to said electrically driven motor.

11. A blower assembly adapter according to claim 1, wherein said detachable-mounting means comprises first and second mounting members, each of said mounting members being adapted to be situated generally in alignment with said aperture means, including pivot means about which said fan assembly is rotated to any of said plurality of varying attitudes, wherein said first mounting member is adapted to be situated rearwardly of said second mounting member, wherein said first mounting member comprises a first pivot support portion adapted to pivotally support said pivot means, wherein said second mounting member comprises a second pivot support portion adapted to pivotally support said pivot means, and wherein said fastener means is effective for securing said first and second mounting members to each other and to said mask.

12. A blower assembly adapter according to claim 11, including a protective grille generally surrounding said fan assembly and secured to at least said first mounting member.

13. A blower assembly adapter according to claim 11, in-

cluding a protective grille generally surrounding said fan assembly and fixedly mounted with respect to at least said first mounting member, wherein said fastener means comprises portions of said grille extending beyond said first mounting member, and including retainer means operatively engaging said extending portions of said grille to prevent unintentional movement of said extending portions relative to said first mounting member.

14. A blower assembly adapter according to claim 11, wherein said pivot means comprises a bearing member having at least a portion of a spherical surface, wherein said bearing member is carried by said electrically driven motor, wherein said motor includes a rotatable output shaft, wherein said fan assembly is operatively connected to said rotatable output shaft, and wherein said first and second pivot support portions have surfaces complementing said spherical surface for engagement therewith.

15. A blower assembly adapter according to claim 11, wherein said first mounting member comprises a housing portion, wherein said first pivot support portion is slidably received within said housing portion, and including resilient means for resiliently urging said first pivot support portion toward said second pivot support portion and against said pivot means.

16. A blower assembly adapter according to claim 15,

wherein said pivot means comprises a bearing member having at least a portion of a spherical surface, wherein said bearing member is carried by said electrically driven motor, wherein said motor includes a rotatable output shaft, wherein said fan assembly is operatively connected to said rotatable output shaft, and wherein said first and second pivot support portions have surfaces complementing said spherical surface for engagement therewith.

17. A blower assembly adapter according to claim 16, wherein said first pivot support portion includes an abutment surface formed thereon, said abutment surface being adapted to be at times engaged by an abutment portion moveable with said motor in order to thereby provide an angular limit to the attitude which said fan assembly can assume.

18. A blower assembly according to claim 11, including lost-motion-connecting means effective to operatively connect said first and second mounting members to said mask, said lost-motion-connecting means being further effective to permit rotation of said first and second mounting members relative to said mask, and locking means effective to lock said first and second mounting members relative to said mask after said first and second mounting members have been rotated to a selected position.

19. A blower assembly according to claim 18, wherein said lost-motion-connecting means permits the rotation of said first and second mounting members to a number of positions relative to said mask, and including switch means effective to become closed and thereby energize said electrical motor upon said first and second mounting members being rotated a selected one of said number of positions.

20. A blower assembly adapter according to claim ll, wherein an electrical switch for making and breaking an electrical circuit to said motor is carried by said first mounting member, and wherein said first and second mounting members include air-exhausting passage means formed therethrough.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3788777 *Jun 29, 1972Jan 29, 1974Fichter Kg FaMiniature electric fan
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US4498202 *Feb 24, 1983Feb 12, 1985Yamamoto Kogaku Co., Ltd.Helmet equipped with ventilator
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US4743173 *May 8, 1985May 10, 1988Papst-Motoren Gmbh & Co. KgSlide beating unit for small size fan
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US5404874 *Mar 8, 1993Apr 11, 1995Micronel AgDevice for connecting a fan to a face mask filter
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Classifications
U.S. Classification128/205.25, 2/8.6, 417/361, 2/427, 228/57, 416/244.00R, 417/234, 417/411, 2/171.3
International ClassificationA61F9/04, A61F9/06
Cooperative ClassificationA61F9/068
European ClassificationA61F9/06L