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Publication numberUS3629953 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 28, 1971
Filing dateSep 22, 1970
Priority dateSep 22, 1970
Also published asCA942942A, CA942942A1
Publication numberUS 3629953 A, US 3629953A, US-A-3629953, US3629953 A, US3629953A
InventorsFleming Myron T
Original AssigneeLansdowne Steel & Iron Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Material drying apparatus
US 3629953 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Myron T. Fleming Maple Glen, Pa.

[21] Appl. No. 74,332

[22] Filed Sept. 22, 1970 [45] Patented Dec. 28, 1971 [73] Assignee Lansdowne Steel 8: Iron Company Morton, Pa.

[54] MATERIAL DRYING APPARATUS 10 Claims, 10 Drawing Figs.

s21u.s.c1 34/158,

34/160, 34/162 511 Int.Cl. ..F25b13/00 [501FieldofSearch 34/155,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,362,087 1/1968 Brock 34/158 3,403,456 l0/l968 Smith 34/160 Primary ExaminerCarroll B. Dority, Jr. Attorney-Denny & Denny ABSTRACT: A material drying apparatus particularly intended for drying carpeting dyed by a wet process, the apparatus comprising a housing and means for continuously moving the carpeting along a predetermined path through the housing. The apparatus further includes a plurality of air conditioning and driving means for drawing air from the interior of the housing, heating it, and channelling it into upper and lower plenum chambers located on opposed sides of the carpeting. The apparatus may be selected to impinge heated air from each of the plenum chambers against opposed sides of the carpet for subsequent recirculation without passing therethrough or alternatively may be selected to drive air from one of the chambers through the carpeting. The air is driven through the carpet by means of a baffle system which extends or enlarges one of the plenum chambers into substantially airtight communication with one side of the carpet. Additional baffle means are provided to maintain the airtight communication between the carpet and the plenum chamber as the sup port means for the carpeting is moved to accommodate carpets of various widths. The baffle system also incorporates a wall system for permitting the dryer to operate along one length of the housing to drive heated air through the carpet, while concurrently operating to impinge air against both surfaces of the carpet along another length of the housing.

PATENTEnnaezalsn 3,629,953

sum 1 OF 6 M ygo/v 7', FLEM/NG J M1 Jimmy F/G.ZA

MATERIAL DRYING APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to a material drying apparatus. More particularly, the present invention is directed to an apparatus for moving a wet material through a housing and concurrently directing a drying medium into contact with the material to effect the drying thereof. The apparatus is particularly suited to drying carpets dyed by a wet process.

The apparatus is of the general type consisting of a housing and means for moving the material through the housing at a predetermined rate. The movement of the material through the housing is accomplished by means of tenter chains which are moved continuously along an endless path and which includes pins for gripping opposite side edges of the carpet. The carpet is also supported by a plurality of longitudinal spaced rollers against which the underside of the material is supported during movement through the housing and which assist in moving the carpet by being rotated at substantially the same speed as the tenter chains.

Two distinct methods of effecting the drying of the material in apparatus of the above noted type are known in the prior art. The first or impingement method consists in directing the drying medium by means of channels or ducts against either or both the face and back sides of the carpet to impinge against the material and be subsequently drawn away from it without passing therethrough. This method results in a relatively low heat transfer rate since only a small percentage of the drying medium reaches the internal portions of the carpet. This method is generally suitable for fabrics and materials of relatively small thickness and light piles.

The second or through circulation method consists of forcing the drying medium through the carpet. This is ordinarily accomplished by providing a substantially sealed chamber on one side of the carpet, the chamber being fed by means of nozzles with heated air under pressure. Substantially all of the heated air in such an apparatus is forced through the carpet. Contrary to the first or impingement method, the through circulation technique results in a relatively high heat transfer with consequent increased efficiency and decrease in drying time and is particularly suitable for drying thick carpet or a type having heavy piles.

While most carpeting material can be more advantageously dried by means of the through circulation method, a certain percentage of materials and carpets may be damaged thereby. As a result it is sometimes necessary for a manufacturer to forego the increased productive capacity of the through circulation apparatus in order to accommodate his entire selection of carpet weights and materials.

It is therefore an object to provide a material drying apparatus which may function by either the through circulation method or the impingement circulation method, at the option of the operator.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a drying apparatus which may be operated in either the impingement or through circulation mode and which may be switched from one mode of operation to the other quickly and easily without any complex alterations in the component parts of the apparatus.

A further object is to provide a carpet drying apparatus suitable for operation in either the impingement or through circulation mode and concurrently capable of handling carpeting of various widths.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the drawings,

FIG. IA is a plan view of the drying apparatus, showing the feed end of the machine and approximately one-half of the housing;

FIG. 1B is a plan view similar to FIG. 1 showing the delivery end of the machine and the half of the housing not shown in FIG. IA;

FIG. 2A is an side elevation of the drying apparatus showing the feed end of the machine and approximately one-half of the housing;

FIG. 2B is a side elevation similar to FIG. 2A showing delivery end of the machine and the remaining one-half of the housing not shown in FIG. 2A;

FIG. 3A is a view taken on the line 3-3 in FIG. 2A showing approximately one-half of the total width of the machine and illustrating the air delivery means for drying the carpet with the adjustable bafiles and dampers in positions for through circulation of the drying medium and the direction of flow of drying medium during operation in this mode;

FIG. 3B is a view similar to FIG. 3A taken on the line 3-3 in FIG. 2A and illustrating the half of width of the machine not illustrated in FIG. 3A with the adjustable baffles and dampers also in the position for through circulation and the direction of flow of the drying medium during operation in this mode;

FIG. 4 is a view taken on the line 4-4 in FIG. 3A, with a section of the vertical baffles broken away to illustrate a longitudinal section of the machine including the carriage for the tenter tract, and the drive means for adjusting the track for various widths of carpet;

FIG. 5 is a view taken along the line 5-5 of FIG. 3A showing the upper and lower ducts with the relief baffles in the position for operation in the through circulation mode and illustrating the flow of drying medium during operation in this mode;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged view of a portion of the machine taken on the line 66 in FIG. 4 and illustrating the adjustable baffles, and dampers in positions suitable for drying the carpet by means of impingement circulation and illustrating the flow of drying medium during operation in this mode; and

FIG. 7 is an enlarged view taken along the line 7-7 in FIG. 6 and illustrating in more detail the shape of the nozzles and the adjustable relief baffles in the upper duct.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Referring to the drawings, the drying apparatus is seen to comprise generally a substantially closed outer housing 10 through which an elongated piece of carpet I1 is continuously moved between a feed end 13 and a delivery end 14. The housing 10 may be elevated and supported by a structural system 16 of interconnected beams. The housing 10 is generally closed and is defined by a bottom wall 17, sidewalls l8 and 19, entrance wall 20 and exit wall 21. The entrance and exit walls 20 and 21 contain openings across substantially their entire width to permit entrance and egress of the moving carpet 11.

The housing is further defined by a top wall 23 containing a series of movable doors 24 and handles 25 for opening and closing the doors. The doors 24 may be opened to permit a random flow of air into the housing 10 or alternatively exhaust fans (not shown) may be mounted adjacent the open doors 24 to permit an exchange of air between the interior of the housing 10 and the outside thereof.

The top wall 23 ofthe housing 10 also contains a plurality of openings above which are mounted a series of enclosures 30 arranged in pairs along the length of the housing 10, each of the enclosures 30 containing an air conditioning and driving assembly 33. The air conditioning and driving assemblies 33 each consist of a centrifugal fan 29, the shaft of which is driven by a motor 28, a lint filter 31, and a heating coil unit 32. The enclosures 30 may be supported by a bridge means 34, as illustrated generally in FIGS. 3A and 3B.

As a result of the difference in pressure created by the rotating blades of the fans 29, air from the interior of the housing 10 is drawn through the filters 31 and heating coil units 32 located in each of the enclosures 30, driven by the moving blades of the fans 29 and channeled by the interior of the enclosures 30 into either an upper plenum chamber 39 alone or both the upper plenum chamber 39 and a lower plenum chamber 49, FIGS. 3A and 38, depending upon the mode of operation selected, as will be explained in greater detail hereinafter. The upper plenum chamber 39 is defined by an upper main duct 40 which extends over substantially the entire face of the carpet 11. The chamber 39 is in communication with the enclosures 30, FIGS. 3A and 33, by means of upper feed ducts 41a and 41b which allow the hot air moved by the fans 29 to travel into the upper plenum chamber 39, thereby increasing the pressure of the air contained therein.

The upper main duct 40 has a series of nozzles 42 extending substantially across the width thereof and spaced along the length of the housing 10. The nozzles 42 are located in the wall of the duct 40 adjacent the carpet 11 and direct heated air from the upper main duct 40 into contact with the face of the carpet 11. Spaced longitudinally in the duct 40 between alternate nozzles 42 and also extending widthwise are a plurality of sets of relief baffles 43. The relief baffles are mounted in openings in the lower wall of the duct 40 and operate to either open or close these openings as desired by the operator of the drying apparatus. As illustrated in FIGS. 3A, 3B and FIG. each set of baffles 43 is mounted on a common rotatable shaft 44 which extends across the entire width of the duct 40, each of the shafts 44 having attached thereto an arm 47 which extends outside of the duct 40. The arms 47 may be connected together by a common bar 54 running the entire length of the machine and accessible to the operator for opening and closing the relief baffles 43 in unison. As will be explained in greater detail below, the purpose of the relief baffles 43 is to allow an increased volume of heated air to pass through the upper main duct 40 during operation of the dryer in the through circulation mode, thereby preventing an undesireable increase in pressure of the air contained therein.

The lower plenum chamber 49 is defined substantially by a lower main duct 50 which extends beneath substantially the entire back side of the carpet 11. The lower plenum chamber 49, is also in communication with the enclosures 30 via a series of lower feed ducts 51a and 51b which allow the hot air moved by the fans 29 to travel into the lower plenum chamber 49, thereby increasing the pressure of the air contained therein. The lower feed ducts 51a and 51b have mounted thereacross a series of adjustable baffles 57a and 57b which are rotatable by means of a shaft to cut off the flow of air from the fans 29 to the lower plenum chamber 49. The position of the baffles 57a and 57b is determined by the desired mode of operation of the drying apparatus.

The lower main duct 50 has a series of nozzles 52, similar in function and arrangement to the nozzles 42 in the upper main duct 40 for directing heated air into contact with the back side of the carpet 11.

The carpet 11 is moved through the housing from the feed opening to the delivery opening by means of tenter chains 48a and 48!: which are guided in tenter tracks 46a and 46b, respectively, and driven along an endless path by a motor 55. Each of the tenter tracks 46a and 46b extends through and beyond the entire length of the housing 10 and is located approximately midway between the top and bottom walls thereof, each tract located near a side of the housing 10. The tenter chains 48a and 48b include pins 56 for engaging the selvage edges of the carpet I] for conveying it through the dryer.

In order to accommodate carpeting of various widths, the tenter tracks 46a and 46b are supported for movement relative to each other across the width of the housing 10. For this purpose, the tenter track 46:: is mounted on a plurality of carriages 66a which ride on crossbeams 69 of the structural support system 16, FIGS. 3A, 4 and 5, the crossbeams 69 being located at spaced intervals along the length of the housing 10. In a similar manner, the tenter track 46b is mounted on a plurality of carriages 66b which ride the opposite sides of the crossbeams 69, FIG. 33. Each of the carriages 66a forms a cooperating pair with a corresponding carriage 66b located near the opposite end of the same crossbeam 69. The carriages 66a and 6612 include wheels 70a and 701; which roll onthe support beams 69.

A series of shafts 68 are journaled at their terminal ends in bearing in the vertical support posts 72 which are also part of the structural support system 16. The shafts 68 have oppositely threaded terminal portions 73a and 73b which engage respectively in internally threaded openings in the body portions 76a and 76b of the carriages 66a and 66!: respectively. The shafts 68 are driven by means of overhead mounted motors 77 through linkages 79 and sprockets 78 mounted on the terminal ends of the shafts 68. By means of this arrangement, rotation of a shaft 68 in one direction effects movement of the pairs of carriages 66a and 66b toward one another while rotation of the shafts 68 in the opposite direction effects movement of the carriages 66a and 66b traversely of the housing and in directions away from each other. While the shafts 68 are shown as being driven by individual linkages 79 and motors 77 it is, of course, possible to operate all of the shafts 68 simultaneously by providing a single motor and a suitable common transmission linkage to drive the sprockets.

The carpet 11, in addition to being supported between the pins 56 of the tenter chains 48a and 48b, rests also on a plurality of roller 60 which extend widthwise across the housing 10 and are spaced at suitable intervals along its length so as to prevent sagging and distortion of the carpet 11. The rollers 60 are driven via sprockets 58 and a transmission linkage 59 by a motor 55, which simultaneously drives the tenter chains 48a and 48b.

The upper plenum chamber 39 may be selectively extended or enlarged into substantially air tight communication with the face of the carpet 11 by means of an adjustable baffle system to thereby force the heated and pressurized air escaping from the nozzle 42 through the carpet 11. This baffle system comprises a plurality of walls which form a substantially airtight seal between the face side of the carpet 11 and the exterior walls of the upper main duct 40 and includes two generally rectangular end partitions 61, FIGS. 2A and 2B, which attach to opposite end walls of the upper duct 40 and run across the width thereof, extending downward from approximately midway of the duct 40 to an area immediately adjacent the top of the tenter tracks to provide a substantially airtight seal between the housing 10 and carpet 11. A pair of end partitions 62, similar in shape to the end partitions 61 extend upward from the lower main duct 50 adjacent the back side of the carpet l1.

Referring to FIGS. 3A and 3B, the baffle system for extending or enlarging the upper plenum chamber 39 further comprises the fixed vertical walls 84a and 84b, the fixed horizontal plates 86a and 86b, carried by said vertical walls 84a and 84b, movable sealing sheets 71a and 71b carried by the tenter tracks 48a and 48b, the hinged baffles a and 85b carried by the fixed vertical walls 84a and 84b, and the flanges 87a and 87!) extending from opposed sides of the upper main duct 40.

Referring to FIGS. 3A, 3B and 4, the fixed vertical walls 840 and 8412 are carried by the vertical support columns 72, spaced from opposite sides of the upper main duct 40, and extend continuously along the entire length of the duct 40 intersecting the end partitions 61 at their terminal portions. The vertical wall 84a has hinged thereto a series of rectangular baffles 850, each baffle being adjustable to either of two positions, depending upon the desired mode of operation of the dryer. A similar series of hinged baffles 85b are carried by the vertical wall 84b. When the dryer is to be operated in the through circulation mode, FIGS. 3A, 3B and 4, the movable baffles 850 and 851: are rotated upward toward the upper main duct 40 and held in contact with the flanges 87a and 87b which extend from the opposed sides of the upper duct 40. The movable baffles 85a and 85b may be held closed by means of spring biased books 88 with attach to projections 89:: and 8% on the sidewalls of the upper main duct 40. The flanges 87a and 87b extend along the entire length of the upper duct 40, intersecting with the end partitions 61 at their terminal ends.

In order to maintain the upper plenum chamber 39 in airtight communication'with the faceof the carpet 11 during operation in the through circulation mode FIG. 3A and 38 despite movement of the tenter tracks 66a and 66b to accommodate carpeting of various widths, a plurality of sheets 71a and 71b are attached to and are movable concurrently with the tenter tracks 48a and 48b respectively. The movable sheets 71a and 71b are generally I-shaped having upper and lower horizontal portions connected by a vertical portions with the upper horizontal portions of the sheets, as seen in FIGS. 3A, 3B and 6, carried by the lower surfaces ofthe tenter tracks 48a and 48b respectively, and the lower horizontal portions of the sheets extending parallel to and immediately above the horizontal plates 86a and 86b. The upper horizontal portions of the movable sheets terminate on one edge immediately adjacent the longitudinal edges of the carpet II to form a substantially airtight seal therewith. The sheets 71a and 71b run along substantially the entire length of the carpet 10 with theloggitudinal end portions of@emovable sheets terminating immediately adjacent the end partitions 61 tojointly form a substantially airtight seal therewith. Suitable openings (not shown) are provided in the vertical portions of the movable sheets 71a and 71b along the length thereof through which the rollers 60 pass, said openings having a suitable diameter to prevent substantial air leakage therebetween. The lower horizontal portions of the movable sheets 71a and 71b cooperate with the horizontal plates 86a and 86b which are carried by the vertical walls 84a and 84b, respectively, and extend between the nozzles 52 of the lower main duct 50, to jointly form a substantially airtight seal therebetween during movement relative to each other. The sheets 86a and 86b do not extend across the entire width of the lower duct 50 but are space apart symmetrically with respect to the center of the drier to form a central opening for permitting the recirculation of air to the interior of the housing 10 after it has been driven through the carpet II. It is thus seen that when the movable baffles 85a and 85b are in the positions shown in FIGS. 3A, 3B and 4, a substantially closed surface extends between the exterior of the upper main duct 40 and the face of the carpet 11 which forces heated air exiting from the nozzles 42 therethrough.

However, when the dryer is operated in the impingement mode, FIG. 6, the hinged baffles 850 and 85b are in a position substantially in contact with the vertical baffle walls 84a and 84b. In this position air passages 82 are created between the face of the carpet 11 and the interior of the housing 10 on opposed sides of the duct 40 which prevent the buildup of sufficient pressure adjacent the face of the carpet 11 to force the heated air escaping from the nozzles 42 therethrough. Instead, the heated air is drawn along the low resistance air passages 82 to the interior of the housing 10 for recirculation back into the enclosures 30.

The dryer may be divided into separate independent sections, each of which may operate independently ofthe other in either of the desired modes. For example, the dryer may be divided into two equal halves by a pair of solid upper and lower zone partitions 53, shown in FIGS. IA and 2A, the first of which extends across the entire width of the housing 10, from the side 18 to the side 19 and extends from the top wall, 23, down through the upper main duct and terminates immediately adjacent the upper surface of the support and conveying means for the carpet 11. A suitable flexible extension (not shown) may be carried by the upper zone partition 53 to extend downward either immediately adjacent the top surface of the carpet or in contact with the carpet depending on the degree of airtightness desired. The lower partition would be similar to the first, extending across the entire width of the housing 10, and disposed below the carpet 11, extending upward from the bottom wall 17 through the lower main duct 50 and terminating immediately adjacent the lower surface of the carpet support and conveying means. The zone partitions 53 may be located most conveniently along a plane which is intermediate two of the several panels 850 on one side of the upper duct 40 and is likewise intermediate two of the panels 8512 adjacent the other side of the duct 40.

In operation, the carpeting II to be dried is fed into the entrance opening in the entrance wall 20 of the housing 10 and conveyed therethrough by engagement of the tenter pins 56 with the side edges of the carpeting. As the carpeting moves through the housing 10, air is drawn by the moving blades of the fans 29 through the lint filters 31 and heating coil units 32 and into the enclosures 30.

Considering first the operation of the entire dryer in the through circulation mode, the relief baffles 43 in the upper duct 40, the hinged baffles a and 85b, and the block-off baffies 57a and 57b in the lower feed ducts 51a and 51b are moved to the positions shown in FIGS. 3A and 38. Under these conditions, heated air is moved under pressure into the upper plenum chamber 39, defined by the upper main duct 40, and exits from the both nozzles 42 and relief baffles 43 in the direction of the carpet 11. As a result of the position of the hinged baffles 85a and 85b, the heated air is forced through the carpet 11, and recirculates by traveling toward the sides of the housing 10 along the upper surface of the lower duct 50 between the nozzles 51. It should be noted that the heated air which goes through the carpet 11 immediately adjacent the tenter chains 48a and 48b is prevented initially from traveling between the lower nozzles 51 by the horizontal plates 86a and 86b. This air escapes by following a path between the plates 86a and 86b and the back side of the carpet 11 toward the center of the drier and egresses via the central opening between the plates 86a and 86b, as shown by arrows in FIG. 3A. During the operation of the dryer in the through circulation mode, air is prevented from entering the lower plenum chamber 49 by the disposition of the block-off baffles 57a and 57b in the lower feed ducts 51a and 51b. While substantially all of the air leaving the upper plenum chamber 39 is forced through the carpet 11, a certain negligible leakage of air may occur through the clearances between the spaced walls of the baffle system. This leakage, however, does not affect the overall operation of the drier.

If during the operation of the drier in the through circulation mode the tenter tracks are moved widthwise relative to each other for the purpose of accommodating a different size carpet the substantially airtight seal between the plenum chamber 39 and the face of the carpet I] is maintained by the close clearance between the movable horizontal sheets 71a and 71b, attached to the carriages 66a and 66b, and the stationary horizontal plates 86a and 86b which close off the spaces between the nozzles 52 on the lower duct 50. The central opening between the horizontal baffle plates 86a and 86b is chosen to be sufficiently small to accommodate the smallest width of carpeting to be dried.

Considering now the operation of the drier in the impingement mode, the relief baffles 43, the hinged baffles 85a and 85b, and the block-off baffles 57a and 57b in the lower feed ducts 51a and 51b are moved to the positions shown in FlG. 6. Under these conditions, heated air is driven by the fans 29 into both the upper plenum chamber 39 and the lower plenum chamber 49. Heated air under pressure exits from the nozzles 52 of the lower main duct 50 into contact with the back side of the carpet 11, and is deflected back, along the upper surface of the lower main duct 50 between the nozzles 52 toward the sides of the housing 10, the recirculation to the fans 29. Heated air which impinges on the back side of the carpet 11 in the area adjacent the horizontal plates 86a and 86b must initially travel toward the central opening between these plates before retracing a path toward the sides of the housing 10 between the nozzles 52 and also between the plates 86a and 86b and the upper surface of the lower duct 50.

In a similar manner, heated air exits from the nozzles 42 in the upper main duct 40. The relief baffles 43 are closed at this time, FIG. 7, since a reduced volume of air is being directed into the upper main duct 40 as a result of the open baffles 57a and 57b, which bypasses air to the lower main duct 50, as discussed above. The heated air leaving the nozzles 42 impinges upon the face of the carpet II and continues along the path of least resistance-to the interior of the housing 10, this path being along the air pass age 82. As a result of the escape of heated air via the air passage 82, insufficient air pressure is maintained in the area adjacent the face of the carpet I] to force the heated air therethrough.

If it is desired to operate each half of the dryer independently of each other in different modes, it is only necessary to rotate the movable baffles 85a and 85b, the blockoff baffles 57a and 57b and the relief baffles 43, located to one side of the zone partitions 53 as shown in FIGS. 3A and 33, while rotating the mentioned baffles to the other side of the partitions 53 as shown in FIG. 6. Under these conditions, the carpet 11 may be dried by alternate methods of circulation along the length of the housing 10.

The separation of the dryer into two independent sections by the partitions 53 is, of course, illustrative since any number of independent sections may be created by the addition of other appropriately placed zone partitions.

It is to be understood, that while reference has been made to particular shaped component parts in describing this invention, numerous modifications may be made without departing from the principles of the invention. For example, the exact shape of the nozzles in the lower and upper main ducts may be changed to suit particular conditions without changing the overall operation of the dryer. Similarly, the spacing of the rollers, tenter track supports and air conditioning assemblies, etc., can be varied to suit the particular needs.

It should also be understood that the upper plenum chamber 39 may be operated in either the through circulation mode or the impingement mode independent of the lower plenum chamber 49. For example the cutoff baffles 570 and 57b may be positioned as shown in FIGS. 3A and 38 at the same time that the movable baliles 43, 85a and 85b are in the positions shown in FIG. 6. The effect of such settings would be to have heated air impinging on the face of the carpet alone, in effect creating a single surface impingement rather than a double surface impingement which results when the lower plenum chamber is also utilized.

Having described my invention, what I claim is:

1. Apparatus for treating materials such as carpeting comprising, an elongated, generally enclosed housing, transport means for supporting and moving said carpet through said housing, a first plenum chamber extending substantially the length of the housing, disposed on one side of said carpet and spaced therefrom, said carpet being in air communication with said housing on its other side, pressure generating means for drawing air from said housing and channelling it under pressure into said first plenum chamber, first air guiding means for directing air from said chamber into contact with said carpet, and means for selectively forcing air from said first chamber through said carpet and recirculating it to said housing, or for impinging air from said chamber against said one side of the carpet and recirculating it to said housing without passing through said carpet.

2. The combination recited in claim 1 wherein said means comprises baffle means located intermediate said one side of said carpet and said first plenum chamber for selectively extending said plenum chamber into substantially airtight communication with said one side of said carpet or for providing an air passage to said housing in communication with said chamber and said side of said carpet.

3. The combination recited in claim 2 wherein said transport means includes at least one pair of tracks for tenter chains running lengthwise of the housing, adjusting means for moving said tracks widthwise of the housing relative to each other, and wherein said baffle means includes a first wall movable with said widthwise movement of said tracks and a second stationary wall mouiited immediately adjacent said first wall for maintaining a substantially airtight seal therewith during movement of said tracks.

4. The combination recited in claim 3 wherein said adjusting means includes a plurality of pairs of carriages in said housing, each pair mounted on a common trackway, and a shaft having opposite] threaded terminaldportions engagingjn the carriages where y rotation of san shaft in opposite directions results in the movement of the carriages in said pairs widthwise of the housing toward and away from each other.

5. The combination recited in claim 1 further including a second plenum chamber disposed on the other side of said carpet, second air-guiding means for directing air from said second chamber into contact with said other side of said carpet, and regulating means for selectively cutting off the flow of air from said pressure generating means to said second plenum chamber.

6. The combination recited in claim 5 wherein said pressure generating means comprises a plurality of enclosures mounted lengthwise of the housing in air communication with said housing and said first and second plenum chambers, each of said enclosures having an air circulating means mounted therein for collectively maintaining air pressure in said chambers.

7. The combination recited in claim 3 wherein said baffle means further includes a third wall extending from said second wall, said third wall including a plurality of portions running lengthwise of the housing and movable into and out of engagement with said chamber to complete a substantially airtight seal between one side of said carpet and said first chamber.

8. Apparatus for treating material such as carpeting comprising, an elongated generally enclosed housing, transport means for supporting and moving said carpet through said housing, first and second plenum chambers extending substan tially the length of the housing, spaced therefrom and located on opposed sides of said carpet, a plurality of air-conditioning and circulating means for moving air under pressure into said chambers,'movable air-directing means for channelling air along a first length of said housing into both of said plenum chambers for impingement against opposed sides of said carpeting and for recirculation of said housing without passing through said carpeting, and for channelling air along a second length of said housing from said first plenum chamber through said carpeting while preventing the flow of air from said second plenum chamber.

9. The combination recited in claim 7 further including a plurality of feed ducts along the length of the housing for channelling air from each of said plurality of air-conditioning means to a portion of said second chamber, and wherein said movable air-directing means includes rotatable cutoff walls located in each of said feed ducts for selectively preventing air along a length of said housing from travelling from said air conditioning means into said second chamber, and baffle means for extending portions of said first plenum chamber along a length of said housing into substantially airtight communication with said carpet.

10. The combination recited in claim 9 wherein said transport means includes at least one pair of tracks for tenter chains running lengthwise of the housing relative to each other, and wherein said baffle means includes first wall means running substantially the length of said first plenum chamber and movable with said widthwise movement of said tracks and second stationary wall means mounted immediately adjacent said first wall means for maintaining a substantially airtight seal therewith during movement of said tracks.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US3403456 *Feb 14, 1967Oct 1, 1968White Consolidated Ind IncImpingement type drying apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3743474 *Oct 12, 1971Jul 3, 1973Textile Syst IncCarpet drying method
US3861062 *Jun 15, 1972Jan 21, 1975Rueti Ag MaschfArrangement for drying a fabric
US4777737 *May 11, 1987Oct 18, 1988John WolensApparatus for drying garments
US6722393 *May 22, 2002Apr 20, 2004Highland Industries, Inc.On loom dryer
US6814948Aug 21, 2000Nov 9, 2004Mitsubishi Jukogyo Kabushiki KaishaExhaust gas treating systems
US7997003 *Apr 11, 2006Aug 16, 2011Lindauer Dornier Gesellschaft MbhMultistage continuous dryer, especially for plate-shaped products
US8074370 *Oct 27, 2008Dec 13, 2011Thomas MonahanHorizontal centrifugal device for moisture removal from a rug
US9714479 *Jun 4, 2014Jul 25, 2017Teresa CatalloHeat setter for delicate and/or sensitive knit fabrics
US20080282575 *Apr 11, 2006Nov 20, 2008Lindauer Dornier Gesellschaft MbhMultistage Continuous Dryer, Especially For Plate-Shaped Products
US20150354120 *Jun 4, 2014Dec 10, 2015Teresa CatalloHeat setter for delicate and/or sensitive knit fabrics
EP0843801A1 *Aug 8, 1996May 27, 1998E.I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyMethod for bulking tuftstring carpets
EP0843801A4 *Aug 8, 1996Jul 8, 1998 Title not available
Classifications
U.S. Classification34/646, 26/96, 228/203, 26/92, 26/91
International ClassificationF26B13/10
Cooperative ClassificationF26B13/10
European ClassificationF26B13/10