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Publication numberUS3629971 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 28, 1971
Filing dateMar 4, 1970
Priority dateMar 4, 1970
Publication numberUS 3629971 A, US 3629971A, US-A-3629971, US3629971 A, US3629971A
InventorsAntell Earl O, Barcus Jack L, Gunther Gregory M, Kabot Warren D, Lewis J Stephen, Maurer Donald J, May Richard L, Osborne Brian G, Ryan John W, Schlau Floyd E
Original AssigneeMattel Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Drawing doll assembly
US 3629971 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Unite States Patent [21 Appl. No. [22] Filed [45] Patented [73] Assignee [54] DRAWING DOLL ASSEMBLY 12 Claims, 14 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. Cl 46/240,

46/116 [51] Int. Cl A63h 33/26 [50] Field of Search 46/1 l5,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,114,547 12/1963 Joslyn 46/240 x 1,809,162 6 1931 Egeiand 46/119 x 3,091,459 5/1963 Lindman 46/240 x Primary Examiner- Louis G. Mancene Assistant ExaminerRobert F. Cutting An0rneySeymour A. Scholnick ABSTRACT: Drawing apparatus including a doll with pivotable joints, a desk which can capture the shoes of the doll so that the dolls arms lie over the upper desk surface, a drawing instrument designed to be held by a hand of the doll to feed a crayon therefrom so that the doll can draw on paper laid on the upper surface of the desk, and a wand for movement by a child, the wand having a magnet that can be moved around a region beneath the upper desk surface to pull the drawing instrument and crayon therein along a sheet of paper on the desk. A template defining a design to be drawn is placed on the desk beneath a sheet of paper, so that movement of the crayon results in the template design being drawn on the paper. The drawing instrument includes a spring or flat plate of rubber with a hole through which a crayon can be inserted so that the crayon is held tightly in place, and so that the crayon tends to be fed outwardly with a predetermined force.

PATENTEDnmsmn 3529-871 SHEET 1 [1F 4 PATENTEDnacealsn 3529-871 SHEET 3 OF a PATENTED DEC28 [9n SHEET H []F 4 DRAWING DOLL ASSEMBLY BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to toy drawing apparatus.

2. Description of the Prior Art Dolls which can be animated in a realistic manner provide great entertainment for young children. One type of function which is especially entertaining is the drawing of pictures with crayons, since such an activity is often engaged in by small children and since the result of such an activity is a picture which can be viewed long after playing with the doll. Of course, children generally cannot draw well, so it would be even more difficult to have them manipulate a doll to draw well. A doll could be constructed with complex cams for automatically drawing a scene, but this generally results in a delicate mechanism that is easily broken, and a doll which cannot be readily played with independently of the drawing apparatus. In addition, the entertainment value decreases if the movements of the dolls drawing arm is not controlled by the child since that would make him realize even more, that he is not actually performing the drawing.

OBJECTS AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION An object of the present invention is to provide drawing apparatus for enabling a child to direct a dolls arm so as to draw a design of attractive appearance.

Another object is to provide crayon holding apparatus for holding and feeding a crayon stick.

In accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, toy drawing apparatus is provided which includes a doll, a drawing instrument which can be held in the dolls hand, a stand for holding the legs of the doll and holding a sheet of paper which the doll can draw on, and a wand with an outer end which can be held and moved by a child and an inner end with a magnet which can move beneath the top of the desk to pull the drawing instrument and hand of the doll over the paper. The desk is designed to hold a template with raised lines defining a design to be drawn, so that when the drawing instrument is moved back and forth over a sheet of paper that has been placed over the template, the design appears on the paper. The child determines the path of the drawing instrument by his movement of the wand, but so long as he moves the wand back and forth many times to cover most of the region above the template, the template design will appear on the paper.

The drawing instrument which can be held by the dolls hand, is designed to receive and feed out an ordinary crayon. The instrument includes a housing held by the doll and a spring or a platelike rubber member mounted on the housing and having a central hole for receiving a crayon. The crayon is normally installed so that about one-quarter inch ofit extends past the housing. When the housing is placed against a sheet of paper on the desk, the spring or rubber member deflects away from the paper, but supplies a constant outfeeding force to assure proper force of the crayon on the paper for accurately reproducing the design of the template.

The doll which holds the drawing instrument has a chest portion of its torso which is pivotally mounted on the abdomen portion of the torso for free pivoting, so that the entire upper half of the doll pivots to follow movements of the hand and drawing instrument thereon over the paper. The doll is designed for play independently of the drawing apparatus. To this end, the dolls legs are pivotally mounted on the torso so they can be pivoted up to a sitting position. However, the legs can also be pivoted down and locked in a standing position for use with the drawing apparatus.

The novel features of this invention are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The invention will be best understood from the following description when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a side elevation view of toy drawing apparatus constructed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of the wand of FIG. I, taken on the line 2-2 thereof;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view of the drawing instrument of FIG. 1, taken on the line 3-3 thereof;

FIG. 4 is a view taken on the line 4-4 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a view taken on the line 55 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is a plan view of the upper surface of the desk taken on the line 6-6 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 7 is a view taken on the line 7-7 of FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a view taken on the line 8-8 of FIG. 6;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the foot-holding apparatus of the desk of FIG. 1;

FIG. I0 is a sectional view of the drawing instrument constructed in accordance with another embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 11 is a view taken on the line 11-11 of FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is a partial sectional side view of the doll of FIG. 1, showing the pivotal connection of the chest and abdomen portions of the torso;

FIG. 13 is a partial top sectional view of the doll of FIG. 1, showing the pivotal connections of the right arm thereof; and

FIG. 14 is a sectional view taken on the line l414 of FIG. 13.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS FIG. 1 illustrates drawing apparatus which includes a doll 10, a stand or desk 12 with an upper or writing surface 14, and a marking instrument I6 designed to be held by a hand of the doll and to mark a sheet of paper which has been placed on the writing surface 14 of the stand. A wand I8 is also provided which has an outer end 20 that can be held by a child and an inner end which holds a control magnet 22. The wand is normally in a position wherein it is inserted through a slot 24 in the desk immediately below the writing surface 14. The magnet 22 on the wand can then magnetically attract another magnet at the bottom of the marking instrument l6. Accordingly, the marking instrument 16 is magnetically attracted to, and follows the control magnet 22, and therefore follows movements of the child who holds the outer end of the wandv The hand of the doll l0 follows the marking instrument so the doll appears to be drawing. The marking instrument 16 may hold a crayon which moves along a sheet of paper that has been placed on the writing surface, to draw thereon as the child moves the wand.

In order to create an attractive design or drawing, a template is used behind a sheet of paper, so that the doll draws a design governed by the template, even though the movements of the dolls hand are governed by movement of the wand by the child. FIGS. 6 and 7 illustrate some of the apparatus at the upper end of the desk 12. The desk has an upper wall 26 with a recess 28 therein for receiving the template 30. A sheet of paper 32 is placed on top of the desk over the template, and is held down by four paper clips 34 that engage the four corners of the paper.

The template 30 is a sheet of plastic with raised lines thereon defining a shape to be drawn, such as the duck 36. If a stick of crayon or other marking material is moved back and forth over the portion of the paper 32 which is above the template 30, then the crayon marking material will be deposited on portions of the paper immediately above the raised lines. Accordingly, a design representing the duck 36=will appear on the upper surface of the paper. It may be noted that for paper of a thickness and stiffness within the range generally encountered, the pressure of the marking material should be within a limited range in order to draw an attractive pattern. If the pressure is too high, then portions of the paper not over a template line will be darkened, while if the pressure is too low then the lines over a template line will not be darkened sufficiently. The drawing instrument 16 is designed to hold a stick of marking material such as a crayon and apply the proper amount of force to create an attractive pattern corresponding to a template under the paper.

FIGS. 3-5 illustrate details of the marking instrument 16 which holds a stick of crayon or other marking material that draws on paper. The marking instrument 16 includes a shell or housing 38 designed to be held by the hand of the doll, a coil spring 40 held within the housing, and a magnet 42 which is also held within the housing, the magnet serving as a part of the housing to reduce the size of hole through which the crayon is fed. The instrument is designed to hold a crayon 44 and urge it downwardly towards the sheet of paper 32 over the template 30. When the crayon 44 is urged toward the template 30 with sufficient force, it marks the paper darkly only over a raised line 30L of the template.

The coil spring 40 has an upper turn 46 which abuts the walls around an opening 48 at the top of the housing, and has three coils at its lower or inner end 50. Most of the coils of the spring, including those at the upper end 48 are round, and are of a diameter slightly greater than the greatest diameter of standard crayons which can be inserted through the opening 48 at the top of the housing. The inner turns 50, however, are wound in a square configuration, as shown in FIG. 5, the sides of the square being small enough so there is an interference fit with the crayon 44. Thus, a crayon inserted through the top opening 48 can be moved down until it starts passing through the square turns at 50. The crayon can be forced through the square turns 50, but it requires some force to do so, and therefore there is an interference fit between the coils at 50 and the crayon, The crayon can be forced further through thehousing so that it projects through a hole 52 in the magnet 42, and pro jects downwardly past the bottom of the housing 38.

If the crayon 44 is initially installed so that it projects more than about one-quarter inch below the housing, and the housing is then laid on a sheet of paper, the crayon will be pushed upwardly. After the crayon deflects the inner end 50 of the spring about one-quarter inch up away from the magnet 42, the crayon will begin slipping on the spring turns 50. If the marking instrument 16 is lifted off the paper, the inner end 50 of the coil spring will move down against the magnet 42, and the lower end of the crayon will then project about onequarter inch below the lower surface of the magnet 42. Thereafter, whenever the marking instrument is laid on a sheet of paper, the crayon is pushed out with a force which is held within a relatively narrow range. This force is sufficient to assure good marking on a paper of ordinary thickness and flexibility.

The marking instrument 16 can be loaded by merely pushing the crayon 44 through the top end 48, along the passageway whose ends are at the holes 48, 52 at the top and bottom of the instrument and which is surrounded by the spring. The crayon is pushed down until it projects at least about one-quarter inch below the magnet 42. The crayon will thereafter automatically be moved upwardly to the correct height. The crayon can be loaded from either the top or bottom end of the instrument, and even a very small length of crayon, which can reach from one-quarter inch below the magnet to the square turns 50, can be utilized. It may be appreciated that other types of crayon holders could be employed such as a type which utilizes a plunger above the crayon to push it downwardly. However, such a holder would have to be substantially taller than an ordinary crayon stick. In addition, such a holder could not easily be loaded from the top. The present crayon holder is very simple, small in height, and easily utilized by a child.

The magnet 42 in the marking instrument is identical in size and shape to the magnet 22 in the wand 18. However, one of the magnets is magnetized with the walls of its center hole in a north magnetic polarity and its rim of south magnetic polarity, while the other magnet is magnetized in the reverse manner. Each magnet is held by a lip portion 54 or 56 in the marking instrument housing or wand housing, respectively.

The doll 10 which is utilized in the drawing apparatus is designed to be played with independently of the desk or marking instrument, like an ordinary doll. However, when it is held on the desk 12, it performs realistic drawing movements. When performing drawing movements, the chest and shoulders of the doll substantially follow movements of the marking instrument 16 as it moves left and right over a sheet of paper. However, the head 60 does not move appreciably. Referring to FIG. 1, this is accomplished by pivotally mounting the chest or upper torso portion 62 of the doll on the abdomen or lower torso portion 64 in a manner that allows free pivoting of the chest portion 62 on the abdomen portion 64. The head 60 is held on the abdomen portion 62 so it does not move with the chest portion. The easily pivoted chest portion and stationary head provide a realistic simulation ofa small child, and tends to eliminate a mechanical appearance that would be present if the entire chest and head moved as a unit.

The arm 66 of the doll is constructed with an upper arm portion 68 that is freely pivotable on the chest portion 62, a lower arm portion 70 that is freely pivotable on the upper arm portion, and a hand 72 that is freely pivotable on the lower arm portion 70. As a child moves the wand 18 toward and away from the doll to move the marking instrument 16, the arm portions can pivot to allow the hand to easily move to follow the marking instrument. When a child moves the wand left and right across the paper, the arm portions can pivot to follow it, but they also move the chest portion 62 so that it pivots left and right to partially follow the marking instrument,

The legs 74 of the doll must be held in relatively fixed position during drawing. As shown in FIG. I, this is accomplished by a pair of shoe-receiving fixtures 76 at the bottom of the desk that engage the shoes 78 of the doll to hold it in place. In addition, an abutting member 80 of the desk, which extends to the doll from a position near the upper end of the desk, abuts the upper leg portion of the doll. The doll is provided with a short dress 82 that extends down to a level above the location at which the abutting portion 80 contacts the doll leg, to assure accurate location of the doll. Relatively accurate location of the doll with respect to the desk has been found necessary in order to allow the doll to move its hand freely over the entire area of the template in a realistic manner. FIG. 9 illustrates some of the details of the shoe-receiving fixtures 76, which have toe-holding portions 84 that encircle the front of the foot, and walls 86 that surround the bottom of the heels of the shoe. The shoe-holding fixtures 76 are constructed to enable the doll to be quickly and easily installed or removed therefrom.

FIGS. 12-14 illustrate some of the details of the joints of the doll 10, As shown in FIG. 12, the abdomen portion 64 has an upwardly extending cone-shaped member 90 that extends through holes in ribs 92, 94 and 96 of the chest portion 62. The holes in the ribs of the chest portion are large enough to allow for free rotation of the chest portion 62 on the abdomen portion 64. The head 60 is pivotally mounted on the upper end of the cone-shaped portion 90, so that it does not move back and forth as the chest moves back and forth, but generally continues to face straight ahead, or at any other position to which it has been turned.

The upper arm portion 68, best shown in FIG. 13, is pivotally coupled by a pin 98 to the chest portion 62. The lower arm portion 70 is pivotally coupled by a pin [00 that extends through the upper arm. The hand 72 is pivotally coupled by a pin 102 that extends along the lower arm portion. The index finger 104 and thumb 106 are formed on the hand 72 to receive the narrowed upper portion of the marking instrument 16. The hand 72 is constructed of a resilient plastic material such as a polysol, so that the slot between the index finger and thumb can be widened to receive and firmly hold the marking instrument. Thus, the doll is similar to ordinary dolls which are played with independently of other mechanisms, except that the hand and chest portions can pivot more freely with respect to each other and to the abdomen portion. In addition, the head is pivotally coupled to the abdomen portion so that it does not necessarily pivot with the chest portion as the chest portion pivots left and right to follow the hand of the doll.

The clips 34 which hold down a sheet of paper have the form shown in FIG. 8. Each clip has a resilient U-shaped portion which extends around an edge 26E of the upper wall of the desk. An inner end of the clip is held at 110 to the desk, while an outer end 112 can press down against the sheet of paper 32. In order to keep the outer end 112 pressed downwardly, a pin 114 near the outer end is inserted through a hole 116 in the desk. The pin 114 has ledges 118, 120, which can engage the lower ends of the walls of the hole 116 to hold down the clip. Release of the clip is effected by pulling up on the center portion thereof.

In order to set up the apparatus for drawing in the manner shown in FIG. 1, the shoes 78 of the doll are inserted in the shoe-receiving fixtures 76 of the stand 12. A template 30 with the design which it is desired to draw, is placed in the recess in the upper wall of the desk, and a sheet of paper 32 is placed over the template. The sheet of paper may be held down by pieces of tape at its corners, or by the clips 34. In order to ready the marking instrument 16, a crayon is pushed through the top opening therein until it projects at least a quarter inch past the lower end of the rest of the instrument. The marking instrument 16 is then placed in the hand 72 of the doll and allowed to rest on the paper which has been placed on the upper surface of the desk. The wand 18 is permanently installed with its inner end within the desk, so its outer end is ready to be grasped by a child.

A child grasps the outer end of the wand and moves it left to right and toward and away from the doll so that the marking instrument 16 has moved over every portion of the template. It may be noted, referring to FIGS. 6 and 7 that the region within which the inner end of the wand can move is limited by a downwardly depending lip 122 formed in the upper wall of the desk. This prevents a child from moving the wand so far that the marking instrument cannot follow (the doll may hold it back) whereby the magnets of the wand and marking instrument may become separated so that movement of the wand does not drag the marking instrument with it. After the child has moved the wand repeatedly beneath the template, the template design will have been marked on the sheet of paper. The child then removes the sheet of paper. The child can easily remove the doll to play with it independently of the rest of the apparatus. Also, the child can hold the marking instrument 16 in his own hand and repeatedly move it over the template to draw thereon.

FIGS. 10 and 11 show a marking instrument 1'30 constructed in accordance with another embodiment of the invention. The marking instrument 130 includes a shell or housing 132 and a platelike holding member 134 of resilient material such as rubber. The member 134 is of substantially square shape, and has four holes 136 which are held by bosses 138 formed in the housing. The holding member 134 has a central hole 140 which is smaller than the smallest diameter of crayon normally encountered. This smallest diameter is the diameter of the crayon after a paper covering thereon has been removed and the diameter of the crayon has been slightly further reduced by deformation during handling while the crayon is warm. The crayon may have an original diameter such as one-quarter inch and a minimum normal diameter of three-sixteenths inch. When a crayon within this range of sizes is pushed through the hole 140, the walls of the hole can be deflected to allow the crayon to move therethrough.

The resilient holding member 134 is maintained taut so that it is spaced a distance D of about one-quarter inch from the upper surface of a magnet 142, which is disposed over a lower opening 144 in the housing. When a crayon 44 is installed by moving it through the opening 146 at the upper end of the housing, and is pushed through the resilient member 134 and a hole 148 in the magnet, it projects downwardly from the housing in the manner shown in FIG. 10. If the crayon projects downwardly below the magnet 142 by more than about onequarter inch, then upon laying the marking instrument 130 on a level surface, the crayon 44 will be pushed upwardly. As the crayon moves up, it moves the walls of the hole 144 in the resilient member upwardly also. However, the resilient member cannot move upwardly past ribs 150 formed in the housing. The lower end of the ribs 150 is spaced a distance D above the resilient member 134 by a distance such as onequarter inch. Thus, after the crayon 44 has been pushed up by laying the marking instrument on a level surface, the resilient member 134 is still deflected upwardly by one-quarter inch. The resilient member 134 therefore applies a known force to the crayon which tends to feed it downwardly towards the paper being drawn upon.

During initial installations of a crayon 44, it is possible for the crayon to push down the resilient member 134 so that it tends to be extruded through the hole 148 in the magnet 142. To prevent extrusion, the resilient member is provided with a downwardly depending flange 152 which abuts the magnet and prevents the resilient member from entering the hole in the magnet. The marking instrument can engage crayons of a variety of diameters, such as crayons of greater diameter than normal. In any case, the downward feeding force of the resilient member 134 does not depend substantially upon the diameter of the crayon, but only upon the distance D between the bottom of the ribs and the normal position of the resilient member as shown in FIG. 10.

Thus, the invention provides a drawing apparatus which can be quickly set up by a child, and which enables a child to draw attractive designs. The designs appear to be drawn by a doll, and yet a child causes the motion by moving his hand in a manner similar to the strokes which the doll performs, by moving a wand back and forth. The doll performs the drawing operations in an entertaining and realistic manner, by turning its chest from side to side to follow the marking instrument in its hand. The doll can be quickly removed from the rest of the apparatus to be played with independently of it, and can be quickly reinstalled. The marking instrument can be quickly installed and removed from the doll, and crayons of a variety of diameters can be quickly and easily installed in the marking instrument.

Although particular embodiments of the invention have been described and illustrated herein, it is recognized that modifications and variations may readily occur to those skilled in the art and, consequently it is intended that the claims be interpreted to cover such modifications and equivalents.

What is claimed is:

1. Drawing doll apparatus comprising:

a doll with an arm constructed for free movement relative to predetermined other portions of said doll;

marking means coupled to the hand of said doll arm to move therewith;

a stand with a writing surface for holding material to be marked;

means movable beneath said writing surface of said stand, for magnetically attracting said marking means to pull it along said material to be marked on said writing surface;

said doll having upper and lower torso portions freely pivotally coupled to each other and a head coupled to said lower torso portion, whereby said head tends to remain stationary while said upper torso portion pivots.

2. Doll drawing apparatus comprising:

a stand having a surface and means for holding material to be marked against said surface;

a doll and holding means releasably holding a portion of said doll in fixed relation to said stand, said doll having an arm movably mounted thereon whereby the hand of said arm is universally movable over and adjacent said surface;

marking means removably mounted on said hand and engageable with material on said surface, said marking means including a magnetically attractable portion; and

manually movable magnetic means below but adjacent said surface and universally movable substantially parallel to said surface.

3. Apparatus as defined in claim 2 wherein said holding means comprises means for engaging and holding the legs of said doll, said stand simulating a desk.

4. Apparatus as defined in claim 2 wherein said magnetically attractable portion and said magnetic means each comprises a permanent magnet.

5. The drawing doll apparatus described in claim 2 wherein:

said means for magnetically attracting said marking means includes an elongated wand member having a handle at one end for grasping by a child and a magnet at the other end; and

said marking means includes a magnet.

6. The drawing doll apparatus described in claim 2 including:

at least one template with raised lines, on said writing surface.

7. The toy drawing apparatus described in claim 2 wherein:

said doll has legs which can hold shoes; and said holding means comprises a foot rest portion which includes means for releasably engaging said shoes to fix the position of said doll when it is drawing on said sheet of paper.

8. The toy drawing apparatus described in claim 2 wherein:

said doll has chest and abdomen portions pivotally coupled to each other to allow the chest portion to pivot to follow movements of the arm coupled to said marking means while the abdomen portion remains substantially stationary.

9. The toy drawing apparatus described in claim 2 wherein:

said marking means includes a resilient member for holding a crayon, said resilient member having a hole smaller than said crayon to expand around a crayon forced through said hole so as to firmly grasp said crayon, and said resilient member mounted to resiliently deflect away from a template on said stand to urge said crayon toward said template.

10. The toy drawing apparatus described in claim 2 wherein:

said making means comprises a housing having holes defining ends of a passageway for passing a crayon therethrough, and a coil spring disposed around said passageway, one end of said coil spring being formed for an interference fit with a crayon inserted through said spring.

11. The toy drawing apparatus described in claim 2 wherein:

said marking means comprises a housing having a passageway for passing a crayon therethrough, and a member of elastic material with a substantially flat center portion biased to a predetermined position to resiliently deflect toward and away from said template, and with a hole whose walls can deform to receive a crayon of larger size than the undeformed size of said hole.

12. The doll described in claim 2 wherein:

said doll has shoes; and

said holding means inciudes first means for capturing said shoes of said doll and second means for abutting the upper leg areas of said doll between the abdomen and knees.

UNITED STATES PATENT @FHCE QERTWMATE E QQRRE CHQN Patent No. 3, 629,971. Dated December 28 1971 Earl O. Antell, at al.

Inventor(s) It: is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 6, line 8, "making" should read marking Signed and sealed this 7th day of November 1972.

{SEAL} Attest:

EDWARD M ,FLETCHER, JR, Attesting Officer" ROBERT GOTTSCHALK Commissioner of Patents ORM (10-69) USCOMM-DC fi0376-P69 u.s. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OYFICE: 9G9 O-35G-334

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US1809162 *May 26, 1930Jun 9, 1931Egeland Peter AAdvertising display mechanism
US3091459 *Oct 5, 1959May 28, 1963Mag Powr Games IncMagnetic game
US3114547 *Feb 15, 1962Dec 17, 1963Luchland CompanyMagnetic game and toy
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3834070 *Jan 26, 1973Sep 10, 1974Marvin Glass & AssociatesDoll carrying a marking means and accessory with movable marking surface
US3892087 *Jun 26, 1974Jul 1, 1975Marvin Glass & AssociatesDoll carrying a marking means, with paint receptacle and accessory having movable marking surface
US4312151 *Sep 22, 1980Jan 26, 1982Henry OrensteinControllable response systems
US5134778 *Apr 13, 1990Aug 4, 1992Maccarthy PatrickDesign-making instrument
US5425664 *Oct 1, 1993Jun 20, 1995Coffey; Judith A.Magnet painter toy
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/135, 446/146
International ClassificationA63H13/00, A63H13/15
Cooperative ClassificationA63H13/15
European ClassificationA63H13/15