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Publication numberUS3630415 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 28, 1971
Filing dateDec 1, 1969
Priority dateDec 11, 1968
Also published asDE1959925A1
Publication numberUS 3630415 A, US 3630415A, US-A-3630415, US3630415 A, US3630415A
InventorsManlio Maurelli, Louis Merrien, Bruno Morane, Charles Paoletti, Robert Sathicq
Original AssigneeOreal
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for storing a plurality of products separately and dispensing them simultaneously
US 3630415 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventors Bruno Morane Paris; Charles Paoletti, Aulnny Sous Rois; Manlio Maurelli, Vanda-n; Louis Merrlen, Fontenay Sous Rois; Robert Sathleq, Vllleplnte, all of France [21] App1. No. 881,079

[22] Filed Dec. 1, 1969 [45] Patented Dec. 28, 1971 [73] Assignee LOreal Paris, France [32] Priorities Feb. 7, 1969 [3 3] France Dec. 11, 1968, France, No. 177690 [54] DEVICE FOR STORING A PLURALITY OF PRODUCTS SEPARATELY AND DISPENSING THEM SIMULTANEOUSLY 1 1 Claims, 5 Drawing Figs.

[51] Int. Cl 367d 5/56 [50] Field 01 Search 222/129, 81,132,145, 389, 3, 5; 169/32, 27; 259/D1G. 20,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,630,942 3/1953 Shaffer 239/309 X 1,976,074 10/1934 lddings et a1. 169/32 3,273,762 9/1966 ONeill, Jr. 222/389 FOREiGN PATENTS 7,387 6/ 1906 Great Britain 169/32 Primary Examiner-M. Henson Wood, Jr. Assistant Examiner-Edwin D. Grant Attorney-Holcombe, Wetherill & Brisebois ABSTRACT: A device for storing a plurality of products separately and dispensing them simultaneously comprises an outer jacket, at least one fragile inner container and means for applying fluid pressure to said container to implode it.

I Patented ncfzs, 1971 5 SheetsSheet 1 FIG.2

Patented Dec. 28,1971 3,630,415

5 Sheets-Sheet 2" Patel -nted Dec. 28, 1971 3,630,415

3 Sheets-Sheet 5 DEVICE FOR STORING A PLURALITY OF PRODUCTS SEPARATELY AND DISPENSING THEM SIMULTANEOUSLY SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries and in the packaging of household products it is often desirable to use simultaneously two products which react with each other when brought into contact. It is obvious that, during storage, it is impossible to permit this contact without risk of producing during storage the reaction which should instead take place at the moment of use. These products are therefore commonly kept in separate packages but this approach has the disadvantage or requiring the user to bring the two containers holding the products to be dispensed into operation simultaneously.

- It is the object of the present invention to provide means for packaging and using under pressure at least two products adapted to be simultaneously dispensed as a mixture but which must be separately stored.

The device is filled by introducing at least one of the products to be dispensed into an outer jacket closed by a valve. At least one container having rigid sides holding at least one product to be dispensed simultaneously with the first product is then introduced into the outer jacket. The inner container or containers are, during storage, subjected to the same internal pressure as the outer jacket. An excess pressure is produced inside the outer jacket and outside the inner container when the products are to be dispensed, which pressure is sufficient to open the inner container or containers by implosion. The assembly is then shaken to mix the products from the container or containers and the outer jacket in a substantially homogeneous manner and the mixture is dispensed through the valve in the outer jacket in response to the internal pressure within said outer jacket.

In a first embodiment of the invention the container or containers placed inside the outer jacket are stationary and the container walls are weakened at one point. When the products to be stored therein are introduced, the pressure in the outer jacket is kept low enough so that the inner containers are capable of resisting this pressure. Preferably the contents are under atmospheric pressure. when the products are to be dispensed, a certain quantity of propellant gas, which may or may not be liquefied, is injected from a conventional cartridge through the valve in the outer jacket. Injection of the propellant gas increases the pressure inside the outer jacket so that the weakened zone in the container or containers within that jacket yields to the excess pressure. The user then turns the outer jacket upside down and shakes it to insure that the liquids initially contained in the container or containers and in the outer jacket are thoroughly mixed together. Finally, while still holding the jacket upside down, he actuates the valve to dispense the desired mixture.

In a second embodiment of the invention, the outer jacket is equipped with a mobile piston which is initially positioned in its lower part. The containers within the jacket are mounted on this piston and their walls comprise a zone of least resistance. A certain quantity of a propellant gas is introduced into the lower part of the outer jacket beneath the movable piston. This gas may or may not be liquefied. In this embodiment the fluids to be stored are introduced into the outer jacket and into each of the containers carried by the movable piston. Pressure within the outer jacket is low enough that the walls of the inner containers are capable of resisting it. Preferably the pressure is atmospheric.

When the fluids in this device are to be dispensed, the propellant gas is introduced beneath the movable piston. This drives the movable piston toward the top of the outer jacket until there is an equal pressure on both sides of the movable piston and increases the pressure around the containers on the upper face of the piston so as to rupture the zones of least resistance in the walls of these containers. The user then turns the jacket upside down, shakes it to mix the various constituents, and actuates the valve to dispense the desired mixture.

In a variation of the second embodiment of the invention, the movable piston may itself constitute a container and the shape of this container may be such that it cooperates with a fixed member mounted in the outer jacket to better insure the mixing of the contents which are to be simultaneously dispensed. In order to introduce the propellant gas beneath the movable piston it is possible to use a gas cartridge which is independent of the apparatus, which cartridge supplies the outer jacket through a valve of the bottom thereof. However, it is generally preferable to enclose the propellant gas in a chamber at the bottom of the outer jacket, (at the end opposite the valve). This chamber is provided with a pin which may be operated from outside the jacket and brings the chamber into communication with the inside of the jacket. The propellant gas may advantageously be a mixture of Freon l 1 and Freon 12 which mixture is capable of producing inside the jacket a gauge pressure of the order of 2.5 kg./cm. at 20 C. It is obvious that it is also possible, within the scope of the invention, to leave the outer jacket free of fluids to be dispensed while enclosing therein at least two containers, each of which holds one of the products to be simultaneously dispensed.

It will be appreciated that the advantage of the above described device resides partly in the simplicity with which it may be filled and operated and partly in the fact that the container holding the product is not subjected to any internal pressure during storage. Finally, the material of which the device is made is very simple and inexpensive.

In a first variation of the first embodiment of the invention the container or containers inside the outer jacket are stationary and the device is operated by emptying the cartridge of pressurized gas into the outer jacket through the valve thereon.

In an especially advantageous form of this first variation the device according to the invention is essentially characterized by the fact that the rigid inner container is a bulb made of an easily broken material which bulb is inserted in the outer jacket leaving a small annular zone between the walls of the bulb and the inner wall of the jacket, which zone contains at least one of the products to be dispensed in liquid form while the bulb floats in this liquid.

In the aforementioned embodiment the bulb constituting the rigid enclosed container has walls of very thin glass. The outer jacket comprises a chamber which holds a liquified pressurizing gas. This chamber may be provided with a pin by means of which is may be brought into communication with the interior of the outer jacket. In a second variation of the second embodiment of the invention the container or containers are mounted on a movable piston which is slidable within the outer jacket, and this jacket is provided at its lower end with a chamber which holds a propellant gas which may be brought into communication with the inside of the outer jacket by any suitable means and in particular by means of a pin. When the outer jacket contains only a single inner container this container may itself be so shaped as to act as a movable piston.

In an advantageous variation of this second embodiment the container according to the invention is essentially characterized by the fact that the rigid closed container is formed from a bulb made of a fragile easily broken material, which is attached to the upper surface of a movable piston which is slidable inside the outer container. The face of this piston is positioned near the bottom of the outer jacket and the upper face carries at least one of the products to be distributed.

In the case of the advantageous embodiment which has just been described the bulb attached to the upper surface of the piston is preferably made of thin glass like that of an electric light bulb. This bulb is attached to a fluidtight collar on the upper surface of the piston. The piston consists of a cylinder of flexible material inside which is a ring of open-cell foam material. A cartridge containing a liquefied pressurizing gas is positioned in the center of this ring. The bottom of the outer jacket is provided with a pin which may be actuated by the user, and is capable of perforating the wall of said cartridge to liberate the gas therein when the base of the piston is close to the bottom of the outer jacket.

When the device according to the invention is used for dyeing hair, for example, an aqueous solution of an oxidation dye is placed inside the outer jacket and the necessary quantity of an oxidizing agent such as hydrogen peroxide is introduced into the inner container.

In order that the invention may be better understood, five embodiments thereof will now be described, purely by way of illustration and example, with reference to the accompanying drawings on which:

FIG. 1 shows schematically in axial section one embodiment of the device according to the invention in which the outer jacket encloses a single stationary container;

FIG. 2 shows schematically in axial section an embodiment of the invention in which the outer jacket encloses a movable piston carrying two containers;

FIG. 3 shows in axial section an embodiment of the container according to the invention in which the outer jacket encloses a single movable container which acts as a movable piston;

FIG. 4 shows schematically in axial section an embodiment of the device according to the invention in which the inner container is a bulb of thin glass; and

FIG. 5 shows schematically in axial section an embodiment of the invention in which the container is a glass bulb attached to the top of a movable piston.

Referring now to the drawings, and especially to FIG. 1; it will be seen that reference numeral 1 indicates the outer jacket as a whole and reference numeral 2 indicates the dispensing valve at the top of this jacket. A cylindrical container 4 having a weakened zone 5 at its top if mounted on the base 3. The container 4 holds a fluid 6 which is to be dispensed. The outer jacket 1 holds a fluid 7 which is also to be dispensed. The device shown in FIG. 1 is filled at atmospheric pressure.

When this device is to be used, a cartridge is applied to the valve 2. This cartridge contains a pressurizing gas which is a mixture of Freon l l and Freon 12 which is capable of producing a gauge pressure of 1.5 kg./cm. at 20 C. The valve 2 and the valve 10 of the cartridge 8 are actuated to transfer the liquefied gas into jacket 1. When the pressure of the pressurizing gas is applied to the zone 5 of the container 4, this zone ruptures and the container 4 implodes. When the pressurizing gas has been completely transferred, the cartridge 8 is withdrawn, the jacket 1 is turned upside down, and shaken to insure mixing of the fluids 6 and 7. Then, while holding the jacket 1 upside down, the valve 2 is actuated to dispense the mixture of 6 and 7 in response to the pressure of the pressurizing gas which has been injected into the jacket.

Referring more particularly to FIG. 2, it will be seen that the second embodiment of the invention also comprises an outer jacket 1 provided with a valve 2 at its upper end.'The base 3 of the jacket 1 carries a chamber 11 holding a pressurizing gas 12. The chamber 11 holds a pin 13 the end 14 of which will pierce a diaphragm in order to bring the inside of the chamber 11 into communication with the inside of the jacket 1. In the jacket 1 is a movable piston 15 which carries two identical containers 16 and 17. These containers are substantially cylindrical and have weakened zones 16a and 17a respectively at their upper ends. These containers are mounted on the piston 15 and hold the fluids 16b and 17b respectively. The outer jacket also holds, above the piston 15, a fluid 18 which is likewise to be dispensed.

When the device shown in FIG. 2 is to be used, the pin 13 is turned to rupture the diaphragm, thus bringing the inside of the chamber into communication with the inside of the jacket I. The vapor tension of the liquefied gas 12 exerts pressure against the lower surface of the movable piston 15 which then compresses the gas initially contained in the upper part of the jacket 1. The containers and the jackets were initially filled at atmospheric pressure and the gas in the upper part of the jacket 1 is thus at atmospheric pressure. The movement of the piston therefore increases the pressure in the upper part of the jacket 1 so that the weakened zones 16a and 17a give way, which results in the implosion of the container 16 and 17. The user then turns the device upside down and shakes it to insure mixing of the fluids 16b, 17b and 18. He holds the device in this position while the inixture is being dispensed through the valve 2.

The embodiment illustrated on FIG. 3 is similar to that shown on FIG. 2 but comprises a single movable container which itself constitutes a movable piston. The jacket of FIG. 3 comprises an outer casing 1 provided with a dispensing valve 2 at its top. The base 3 of the jacket supports a chamber 11 equipped with a pin 13, the upper end 14 of which is adapted to perforate a diaphragm and thereby bring the interior of the chamber 11 into communication with the inside of the outer jacket 1. Above the chamber 1 is a movable container 19. This container is cylindrical in shape and its outer diameter is equal to the inner diameter of the jacket 1. It is closed at its top by a diaphragm 20. Its central portion is conical as shown at 21. The jacket 1 carries at its upper end a stationary member 22, the outer diameter of which is equal to the inner diameter of the container 19. The member 22 is provided with a centering shoulder 23 at its upper end and a central recess 24 which is substantially complementary to the conical part 21 of the container 19. The recess 24 is closed at its bottom by a diaphragm 26. The member 22 comprises a groove 25 which extends longitudinally along its outer wall, over the shoulder 23 and thence along a radius of the member 22 so that its inner end registers with the valve 2.

The device shown in FIG. 3 is filled at atmospheric pressure. One of the fluids to be dispensed is introduced into the container 19 which is then closed by means of the diaphragm 20; The second fluid to be dispensed is introduced into the recess 24 in the member 22 which is then closed by the. diaphragm 26.

When the device shown in FIG. 3 is to be used, the pin 13 is actuated to bring the inside of the chamber 11 into communication with the inside of the outer jacket 1. A pressure substantially equal to the pressure of the pressurizing gas in the chamber 11 is then exerted on the lower surface of the container 19. In response to this pressure, the container 19 moves toward the upper part of the jacket 1 and this movement causes the container 19 and conical member 21 to compress the air between the diaphragms 20 and 26 thus exerting a pressure thereon which causes them to rupture. The fluids initially contained in the container 19 and the recess 24 are thus brought into contact. The user then shakes the device to insure a suitable mixture of these two fluids and dispenses the desired mixture by pressing on the valve 2. The mixture passes out through the groove 25 and the valve 2. The arrangement of the groove makes it possible to insure that the product distributed is an excellent mixture of the two products initially stored separately.

An example of the products which may be stored in a device according to the invention will now be given. For this example the device shown in FIG. 3 of the drawings is used. The chamber 11 is filled with a mixture of Freon l l and Freon l2 which is capable of producing a gauge pressure of 1.5 kg./cm. at 20 C. Forty cm. of the following mixture is introduced into the container 19:

nonylphenol condensed with 4 molecules of ethylene oxide 23 g. nonylphenol condensed with 9 molecules of ethylene oxide 25 g. copra diethanolamide 6 g. butylglycol 2 g. propylene glycol l6 5. 20% ammonia 12 ml. paratolylene diamine 0.9 g. para-aminephenol 0.9 g. m.diamine-anisol sulfate 0.06 g. m.aminophenol 0.2 g.

resorcinol 0.5 g. nitroparaphenylene diamine 0.002 g. hydroquinone O.l0 g. sodium salt of diethylenetriamino-penta-acctic acid LS g. sodium bisulfite 1.2 ml. water. q.s.p. I00 g.

After having inserted the container 19, closed by its diaphragm 20, in the bottom of the jacket 1, 40 cm. of 6 percent hydrogen peroxide is introduced into the recess 24 in the member 22 and fills the greater part of this recess. The device is used as indicated above and when the two liquids are mixed the resulting mixture is dispensed through the valve 2. When this is applied to 70 percent white hair, the result is a chestnut shade.

It is obvious that the devices according to the invention, such for example as those shown on FIGS. l-3, may be utilized to hold all sorts of cosmetic, pharmaceutical or household cleaning products, such as regenerating capillary conditioning lotions, bleaching mixtures for the hair, skin dyes, permanent waving compositions, fixing agents, depilatories, and pharmaceutical products obtained from lyophylizled powders. Moreover one of the products to be distributed in one of the containers or in the outer jacket may be a solid powder or a paste.

Referring more particularly to FIG. 4, it will be seen that the outer jacket 1 carries at its upper end a dispensing valve 2and is closed at its lower end by a base 3 which carries a chamber having an upper wall 19. This wall 19 is connected to the base 3 all around the periphery of that base and is attached to the jacket 1 by a double crimp. The chamber defined between the walls 3 and 19 holds a pressurizing gas 20. At the center of the base 3 is a pin 13, the end 14 of which is adapted to perforate the wall 19.

The outer jacket 1 holds aliquid 7 which may be an aqueous solution of oxidation dyes adapted to color the hair. The liquefied propellant gas 20 may be butane or a gas of the Freon type. When the liquid 7 is an aqueous solution, the gas 20 should be incapable of reacting with water.

Inside the jacket 1 is a substantially spherical glass ball 21. This ball is provided with a neck 22 through which a liquid 23 has been introduced. When the liquid 7 is an aqueous solution of oxidation dyes for the hair, the liquid 23 is an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide. The liquid 23 does not completely fill the ball 21. The diameter of the ball is slightly less than the inner diameter of the cylinder which constitutes the outer jacket 1. The ball 21 is made of glass having a thickness of about 0.25 mm.

The device shown in FIG. 4 is used in the following manner. The pin 13 is caused to perforate the wall 19. The pressurizing gas escapes into the jacket 1. The pressure which develops in the jacket 1 causes the ball 21 to implode. The device is then shaken to insure homogenous mixture of the liquid 7 and 23 and the valve actuated to dispense this mixture in response to the pressure of the pressurizing gas.

Referring now to FIG. 5, it will be seen that the outer cylindrical jacket 1 carries a dispensing valve 2 at its upper and is closed at its lower end by a base 3. A pin 13 is mounted in the middle of the base 3. The lower end of a piston 24 is positioned near the base 3. This piston 24 carries a flexible skirt 25 made of polyethylene. Inside the cylinder formed by the skirt 25 is an annular ring 26 made of foamed open-cell polyurethane. In the central opening encircled by the ring 26 is a cartridge 27 holding a liquefied pressurizing gas 28. The liquefied gas may be butane or a Freon. At the top of the piston 24 is a collar 29 encircling a central projection 30. The collar 29 carries a flange 31 at its upper end. In the annular zone between the collar 29 and the projection is the neck 32 of a glass bulb similar to'those conventionally used in the manufacture of incandescent electric lamps. This bulb 33 is seated in a fluidtight manner on the projection 30 and held in place by the flange 29. It holds a liquid 34. In the outer jacket 1 above the piston 24 is a liquid 35. When the liquid 35 is an aqueous solution of oxidation dyes for use on the hair, the

li uid 34 may be an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide.

his device is operated in the following manner:

The wall of the cartridge 27 is perforated by the pin 13. The pressurized gas 28 expands in the volume between the base 3 and the lower part of the piston 24. The resulting pressure forces the piston 24 in the direction of the valve 2 so as to compress the fluids above that piston. This produces an implosion of the bulb 33. The device is then shaken to mix the liquids 34 and 35. Subsequent operation of the valve 2 dispenses the resulting mixture in response to the pressure generated by the pressurizing gas 28 and transmitted through the piston 24.

It will, of course, be appreciated that the foregoing embodiments have been described purely by way of illustration and example and may be modified as to detail without thereby departing from the basic principles of the invention as defined by the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. Device for separately storing and simultaneously distributing a plurality of products comprising an outer jacket having a valve at one end, at least one inner container having rigid walls within said jacket, and means for producing a fluid pressure within said jacket sufficient to implode at least one wall of said inner container and permit mixing of the contents of said container with the contents of said jacket outside said container.

2. Device as claimed in claim 1 in which said container has a weakened portion in its wall to facilitate said implosion.

3. Device as claimed in claim 1 in which said valve is adapted to admit pressurizing fluid supplied by a cartridge as well as to dispense the contents of said jacket and container.

4. Device as claimed in claim 1 comprising a chamber within said jacket holding a pressurizing fluid, and means for rupturing said chamber.

5. Device as claimed in claim 1 in which said container is a ball made of a fragile material which floats in the contents of thejacket.

6. Device as claimed in claim 5 in which aid ball is made of thin glass.

7. Device as claimed in claim 1 in which said at least one inner container is mounted on a piston which is slidable within said jacket.

8. Device as claimed in claim 7 in which said at least one inner container is a bulb made of a fragile material and said piston supports, on the side carrying said bulb, at least one of the products to be dispensed.

9. Device as claimed in claim 7 in which said piston is made of a flexible material and comprises a skirt holding a ring of resilient foamed material encircling a cartridge containing a pressurizing gas, and said jacket carries means for rupturing said cartridge.

10. Device as claimed in claim 1 comprising a plurality of inner containers, one of which constitutes a piston which is slidable within said jacket and carries means facing the other container and adapted to enter said other container when they are brought together.

11. Device as claimed in claim 10 in which said containers are provided with opposed rupturable diaphragms and one container is dimensioned to enter the other as they are brought together to force both diaphragms into said other container, and comprising a projection in said other container positioned to be contacted by said diaphragms when they enter said second container.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4399158 *Jan 4, 1982Aug 16, 1983General Foods CorporationPressurized container providing for the separate storage of a plurality of materials
US4524078 *Mar 29, 1982Jun 18, 1985General Foods CorporationPressurized container providing for the separate storage of a plurality of materials
US4593836 *May 10, 1984Jun 10, 1986Societe AvitexDouble chamber aerosol container
US4627986 *Mar 29, 1982Dec 9, 1986General Foods CorporationAutomatic mixing upon opening, carbonated beverages
US5020694 *Mar 16, 1989Jun 4, 1991Chesebrough-Pond's, Inc.Multi-cavity dispensing container
US5082146 *Apr 24, 1989Jan 21, 1992Swiss Aluminium Ltd.Container for mixing and ejection of two components contained therewithin
US5289949 *Jun 22, 1992Mar 1, 1994Chesebrough-Pond's Usa Co., Division Of Conopco, Inc.Multi-cavity dispensing refill cartridge
US5332124 *May 17, 1993Jul 26, 1994Chesebrough-Pond's, Usa Co., A Division Of Conopco, Inc.Multi-cavity dispensing refill cartridge
US5335827 *Dec 22, 1992Aug 9, 1994Chesebrough-Pond's Usa Co., A Division Of Conopco, Inc.Multi-cavity dispensing refill cartridge
US5439137 *Apr 6, 1993Aug 8, 1995L'orealMethod for forming an extemporaneous mixture of at least two liquid or pasty components, and pressurized can for implementing such a method
US6824079 *Jan 24, 2003Nov 30, 2004S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Aerosol dispenser assembly and method of reducing the particle size of a dispensed product
US7014127 *Sep 3, 2003Mar 21, 2006S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Aerosol dispenser assembly having low volatile organic compound (VOC) content
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/129, 137/68.23, 141/19, 141/17, 137/68.3, 169/73, 141/20
International ClassificationB65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/425, B65D83/752, B65D83/666, B65D83/64, B65D83/687
European ClassificationB65D83/68B2, B65D83/66D, B65D83/64, B65D83/752