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Publication numberUS3632173 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 4, 1972
Filing dateOct 21, 1969
Priority dateOct 21, 1969
Publication numberUS 3632173 A, US 3632173A, US-A-3632173, US3632173 A, US3632173A
InventorsReuter Brian R
Original AssigneeConsolidated Engineering Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pneumatic conveying apparatus automatically operable successively for weight responsive filling, and for activation, discharging, purging, against back pressure, and venting
US 3632173 A
Abstract
The disclosure is of pneumatic conveying apparatus that includes a pneumatic conveying pressure vessel with continuity from parent, now patented apparatus of U.S. Pat. No. 3,355,221. The pressure vessel is automatically operatable successively to actuate a fill valve to let air flowable materials thereinto and to close the fill valve and open the air valve to activate the material responsive to a signal proportionate in degree to a predetermined weight having been attained, then, successively as pressure falls to close air supply and open discharge, then to close discharge and open purge, then to open vent as back pressure from container being discharged into equals falling purge pressure, and then to start cycle again as atmospheric is approached.
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UnitedStates Patent Inventor Brian R. Reuter Houston, Tex.

Appl. No. 868,078

Filed Oct. 21, 1969 Patented Jan. 4, 1972 Assignee Consolidated Engineering Company Houston, Tex.

PNEUMATIC CONVEYING APPARATUS AUTOMATICALLY OPERABLE SUCCFSSIVELY FOR WEIGHT RESPONSIVE FILLING, AND FOR ACTIVATION, DISCHARGING, PURGING, AGAINST BACK PRESSURE, AND VENTING [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,032,367 3/1936 Kennedy et a1. 302/53 2,124,018 7/1938 Vogel-Jorgensen 302/53 2,221,741 1 1/1940 VogeI-Jorgensen 302/53 3,355,221 11/1967 Reuter 302/53 Primary Examiner-Richard E. Aegerter Assistant ExaminerH. S. Lane Att0rney-William E. Ford ABSTRACT: The disclosure is of pneumatic conveying apparatus that includes a pneumatic conveying pressure vessel with continuity from parent, now patented apparatus of US. Pat. No. 3,355,221. The pressure vessel is automatically operatable successively to actuate a fill valve to let air flowable materials thereinto and to close the fill valve and open the air valve to activate the material responsive to a signal propor- 2 Claims 10 Drawing Figs tionate in degree to a predetermined weight having been at- U.S. Cl 302/3, tained, then, successively as pressure falls to close air supply 302/52, 222/195 and open discharge, then to close discharge and open purge, Int. Cl 865g 53/00 then to open vent as back pressure from container being Field of Search 302/3, 17, discharged into equals falling purge pressure, and then to start 52, 53, 35; 222/193, 194, 195 cycle again as atmospheric is approached.

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IN ENTOK.

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ATTORNEY PAIENIEU JIII 4 I972 SHEET 5 IJF 5 IISVAC, GO HZ I PH.

CONTROL SWITCH I DPS N I TIMER CIRCUIT TIME DELAY LOCK IN FILL CYCLE PURGE LIGHT OPEN VENT VALVE VENT LIGHT FILL LIGHT OPEN FILL VALVE CLOSE FILL VALVE LOCK IN ACTIVATE CYCLE FILL VALVE TIME DELAY,ETC.

ACTIVATE LIGHT OPEN ACTIVATE VALVE CLOSE PURGE VALVE DISCHARGE LIGHT OPEN DI5CHAR6E VALVE- HOLD DISCHARGE CYCLE LOCK OUT FILL CYCLE LOCK OUT ACTIVATE CYCLE LIGHT, PUMP FILL LEVEL DETECTOR BRIAN R. REL/TEE INVENTOR ATTORNEY PNEUMATIC CONVEYING APPARATUS AUTOMATICALLY OPERABLE SUCCESSIVELY FOR WEIGHT RESPONSIVE FILLING, AND FOR ACTIVATION, DISCHARGING, PURGING, AGAINST BACK PRESSURE, AND VENTING The application is a continuation-in-part of Brian R. Reuter application Ser. No. 518,353, filed Jan. 3, 1966, and issued Nov. 28, 1967, as US. Pat. No. 3,355,221; also of application Ser. No. 686,018, filed Nov. 28, 1967, and now abandoned;

' a material which enters a processing pump or vessel when the also of application Ser. No. 822,126, filed May 6, 1969, which issued Jan. 22, 1970, U.S. Pat. No. 3,549,206.

The invention relates to a pressure vessel employable as a pump, and to methods of its use, in which the vessel discharges into a container, or through a discharge path with developed back pressure therein, whereby after automatically, filling, activating, discharging and purging steps, a vent is open as the back pressure equals falling purge pressure, thus insuring that the cycle drops to atmospheric to begin over again. It also relates to such a vessel weighed on a beam scale whereby a normally open weight-sensitive pressure switch is closed to actuate fill valve closure and the injection of activating air.

It is consequently a primary object of this invention to provide a pressure vessel employable as a pump which automatically, successively has fill valve opened, fill valve closed and air supply valve opened, air supply valve closed and discharge valve opened, discharge valve closed and purge valve opened, purge valve closed, as it drops equal to or below back pressure in discharge, and vent valve opened; vent valve closed as new cycle starts over again.

It is another object of the invention to provide a pressure vessel pump of this class which is weighed on a scale and, when filled to a predetermined net weight, operates a cycle of events including closing the fill valve and opening the air supply by means of a weight-responsive signal which closes a normally open pressure switch.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a pressure vessel pump of this class which is weighed on a load cell and when filled to a predetermined net weight operates a cycle of events including closing the fill valve and opening the air supply by means of a weight-responsive signal which opens a normally closed pressure switch.

It is another important object of this invention to provide a method of pressure vessel pump operation comprising the steps of filling a pressure vessel pump to a predetermined weight, emanating a signal at such weight which operates to close off further filling and to start air supply, upon air supply attaining a predetermined pressure closing air supply and opening discharge, upon pressure falling to a predetermined point, closing discharge and opening a purge line, upon purge pressure falling to equal back pressure, opening vent through which the pressure vessel vent discharges until falling to substantially atmospheric pressure to start cycle anew.

It is a further and additional object of this invention to provide a method of pressure vessel operation of this class which employs a scale-actuated signal, responsive to the filling pressure vessel pump receiving a predetermined net weight therein, to close circuitry for discontinuing filling and beginning the admission of activating air.

It is yet another and additional object of this invention to provide a method of pressure vessel operation of this class which employs a load cell-actuated signal responsive to the filling pressure vessel pump receiving a predetermined, net weight therein, to open circuitry for discontinuing filling and beginning the admission of activating air.

As a primary object the weight-responsive form of invention sets out to provide a means for automatically controlling the cyclic measured entry, activation, full discharging and purge discharging of a material which enters a processing pump or pressure vessel; also to provide for the closing of the fill valve which admits the material being affected by predetermined controlling force or condition, as the material arriving at a predetermined weight in the vessel, or reaching a predetermined level in the vessel or flowing into the vessel for a predetermined time; also to provide for the final return of the vessel is supported on a hopper scale designed to reflect the weight of the material in the vessel in terms of pressure to activate the closing of the fill valve from the hopper, directly upon the deposit of a predetermined weight of material in the vessel.

It is also another important object of this form of the invention to provide solids pumps of this class which are designed to close the fill valve from hoppers responsive to forces or conditions other than the passage of time during which the material enters the vessel from the hopper.

Other and further objects of the invention carried over from the preceding application will be apparent when the specification herein is considered in connection with the drawings described hereinbelow:

FIG. 1 is an elevational view, partially diagrammatic, showing an embodiment the invention adapted to weigh the material being handled and to respond to weight therein as reflected in terms of pressure to actuate the closing of the fill valve;

FIG. 2 is an isometric view of apparatus on which a pressure vessel pump is mounted when the fill valve is to be closed responsive to weight indication;

FIG. 3 comprises development views in isometric, showing details of girder chair construction on which the legs of the pressure vessel pump, shown in FIG. 2, are mounted;

FIG. 4 is an isometric view of beam scale mechanism and associated apparatus for imparting weight-responsive signals, the housing or cover therefor shown in FIG. 2, having been removed;

FIG. 5 is a transverse sectional elevation through a girder chair, as indicated taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 is a sectional elevational view, partially diagrammatic, of the proportionate force transmitter for reflecting weight in terms of pressure, as shown exteriorally in isometric view in FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a sectional elevational view showing details of shackle and nose-on beam connections, as taken along line 77 of FIG. 2, and thus looking rearwardly;

FIG. 8 is a sectional elevational view taken along line 12 12 of FIG. 7 looking to the left;

FIG. 9 is a pressure vessel pump shown in elevation, and partially diagrammatically, and to smaller scale than the pressure vessel pump shown in FIG. 1, shown connected to discharge material into a catalyst regenerator 236 developing a back pressure, and shown with valves applicable to such condition; the pressure vessel pump being shown as weighed by a scale; and

FIG. 10 is an electrical diagram of the circuitry required for operating a pressure vessel or pump to discharge into a container exerting back pressure in the line discharging thereinto, as into the pressure vessel or pump shown in FIG. 1 as equipped with vent line and vent valve operator, and as shown employing check valve in purge line; and as mounted on scale shown in FIGS. 2-8, inclusive; a panel box being shown on the side of the pressure vessel for carrying most of the circuitry and operative apparatus. Other and further objects will be apparent, as considered in connection with the drawings, in which:

Referring now to the drawings in which like reference numerals are applied to like elements in the various views, a material container, housing, pump or activator 10 is shown in FIG. I comprised of a shell 11 including a cylindrical main body with upper end closed by a top comprised of a spherical segment or dome 12a and a bottom comprised of a spherical segment or lower closure 12b, the container being constructed after the general manner of conventional pressure vessels, and designed with safety factors, to withstand the highest pressures that may be developed therein.

The pressure vessel or container is supported on legs 14 which upstand from a conventional base or grout, not shown. A gas-permeable membrane or diaphragm l3 separates the container into an upper, or material plenum l5, and a lower, or gas plenum 16.

The dome 12a has an inlet flange or neck 17 connected centrally into the top thereof with an inlet gate valve or fill valve 18 being mounted thereon. A flexible nipple 19 is shown connecting the fill valve 18 with a discharge flange 20 from a hopper 21, the nipple being shown as a flexible member for carrying out an optional function, to be hereinbelow described.

A valve operator 23 is shown diagrammatically, as disposed to open and close the gate valve 18, a piston 230 being shown provided in the valve operator 23, with instrument air admissible under the piston 230 through a conduit 23b to open the fill valve, and with instrument air being admissible through a conduit 23c above the piston 23a to close the fill valve. Obviously, the conduits 23b and 23c must be in a closed compressed air circuit with a pressurized reservoir, or otherwise selectively supplied with compressed air, to carry out their respective functions.

A compressed gas conduit 25 is shown connected into the lower end closure 12b of the shell or pressure vessel 11 and such compressed gas inlet line 25 has a gas inlet valve 26 therein, which is shown connected to be opened and closed by a valve operator 27, constructed and equipped in correspondence with the valve operator 23.

Also, a discharge outlet pipe 28 extends downwardly through the dome 12a to terminate in a pickup end 28a disposed slightly above the gas permeable or air permeable membrane 13. A valve 29 is shown connecting this discharge outlet pipe 28 with a discharge conduit 30 disclosed as having a flexible nipple 31 therein downstream from a purge line connection nipple 32, the flexible nipple 31 being for an altemative purpose to be hereinbelow described.

The discharge valve 29 is shown operated by a valve operator 33, which is indicated as being constructed, and as having connections thereto, in correspondence with the fill valve operator 23.

A purge line 34 extends between the purge line connection nipple 32 and the material plenum or chamber and has a purge valve 35 therein to control its opening and closing, a valve operator 36 being shown connected to the purge valve 35 for this purpose, such valve operator 36 being constructed, and having connections in correspondence with the fill valve operator 23. However, it may be pointed out, in this regard, that the purge valve 35 should be a normally open valve, whereas, the fill valve 18, gas inlet valve 26, and discharge valve 29 are normally closed valves.

As shown in FIG. 1, the gas, as compressed air, which activates and transports the material which enters the container, shell, or pressure vessel 11, arrives from its source, as a compressor or pressurized reservoir, and passes through a strainer 83, and a globe valve 84, on its way to being regulated as to the pressure at which it is to be supplied. Thus the gas is first measured by a high-pressure gauge 85, in the top of a gauge pipe 85a, which upstands from the main gas line 25, through which the strained gas passes on downstream. A smaller sized bypass line 25a, extends between the gauge pipe 85a, and the aforesaid pressure-regulating valve 86, in the main conduit 25, and has a pilot-regulating valve or regulator 87 therein, thus to permit a finer and more responsive control of the pressurized gas on its way to the pressure vessel 11. A bypass line 87a conveys the reduced pressure gas from the pilot regulator 87, and connects with an upstanding gauge pipe 88 above the main conduit 25, a low-pressure gauge 89, being mounted on top of the gauge pipe 88 to indicate the lowered pressure of the gas.

A conduit 90 extends from the lower closure 12b, to conduct pressurized gas from the gas plenum 16, to the control box 40, there to bear upon and cause switch actuation, to be hereinbelow described.

Such switch-actuating gas, from within the pressure vessel 11 enters the conduit and passes through a strainer 91 therein, and on to the panel box 40, a gauge 92 being provided to indicate the pressure of the actuating gas as it passes downstream of the strainer 91 on its way to the panel box pressure-sensitive switches, as aforesaid. The instrument air required by the pressure-sensitive switches, as contradistinguished from the actuating air or gas, and any other air or gas required to actuate any of the apparatus, including that required to operate the valve operators shown in FIG. I may be brought to the panel box 40 through a conduit 93 for selective distribution. Also, the power conductors 41, 42, from a source of electrical power, as a 60 cycle, AC voltage source, may be brought to the panel box 40 through an insulated conductor cord 95.

In FIG. 1 respective conduits 23b, 27b, 33b and 36b connect (323b, 327b, 333b, 336b), into the respective fill, compressed gas, materials delivery and purge valve operator cylinders 23, 27, 33 and 36, under the respective piston heads 23a, 27a, 33a and 36a, respective conduits 23c, 27c, 33c and 36c, connect into such cylinders above the respective piston heads therein. Thus, conductor cords or sleeves 23d, 27d, 33d, and 36a, for the respective conduits for the respective valve operator cylinders aforesaid, are provided to extend from the control or panel box 40, where conventional instrument air, as from the instrument air conduit 93, may pass through respective conventional solenoid-actuated valves, not shown, as operated by the aforesaid solenoids 48, 60, 66 and 63, to admit the operative air, gas or fluid, selectively into the conduits 23b or 230 into the conduits 27b or 270, into the conduits 33 b or 33c, and into the conduits 36b or 36c selectively to open or close the aforesaid fill valve 18, compressed gas valve 26, materials delivery valve 29, and purge valve 35.

The respective valve operators 23, 27, 33 and 36, may be used to operate the respective fill valve 18, compressed gas delivery valve 26, material delivery valve 29, and purge valve 35, but it is often not necessary, in the case of light duty installations, and/or in the case of the valves 26, 29 and 35, that special valve operators may be required for their operation. In such cases the solenoids 60, 66 and 63 may thus be connected directly to the respective valves 26, 29 and 35, to effectuate their operation.

As to the gas-permeable membrane 13, this may be variously constituted to carry out various requirements. The membrane 13, may be a flexible diaphragm as of a heavily woven cloth, as of cotton, or of a synthetic or plastic cloth as of nylon or dacron. Also instead of being flexible the membrane may be rigid or substantially rigid. Thus it may be of woven metal, or of noncorrosive woven metal, such as stainless steel, to combat corrosion. Also it may be of a porous ceramic, also to avoid corrosion, as well as to provide a stable membrane. An additional advantage is there being selectivity in the synthesis of the membrane resides in the fact that a wider range of materials can be handled to pass through the membrane under the most advantageous conditions where this selectivity is available.

An embodiment of the invention is shown in FIGS. l-8, in which the pump 10 is mounted on a floor stand scale hopper, FIGS. 2-8 and adapted to transfer a batch of material when the batch weight entering the pump attains a predetermined weight. The hopper scale 80 is thus adapted to reflect weight in terms of pressure.

The floor stand hopper scale 80 on which the pump 10 is shown mounted in FIG. 1, provides for each leg 14 of the pump 10, a girder chair 79. The support block 127 of each girder chair 79 has a pivot block 139a pin-connected to extend therebelow, centrally thereof, and an inverted V-shaped groove in the lower surface of the pivot block 129a is provided to seat upon the beveled edge of a pivot bar 140a, (FIG. 5) which extends upwardly from a cross-connecting rod 141 between two longitudinally spaced-apart, transversely inwardly extending lugs 142a, 142b, the outer ends of the lugs being rigidly connected to a respective main lever pipe 143.

The hopper scale 80 thus provides a pair of these lugs 142a, 142b for each girder chair 79 and corner stand 144, to be hereinbelow described.

Each corner stand 144 supports the weight transferred thereto from a pump leg 14, as the corner stands 144 in turn seat upon the floor or grout. For this reason, each comer stand 144 is slotted in direction longitudinally of the pump or machine to receive a pivot block 1391) pin-connected thereinto. Each pivot block 135b, as thus mounted, has a V- shaped groove extending longitudinally, centrally thereof, to provide a seat for the bevel edge or blade edge of a pivot bar 14% which is carried by a cross-connecting rod 141k which extends between the two lugs 142a, 142b.

It may be seen that each comer stand 144 provides a fulcrum which extends longitudinally of the hopper scale mounted pump 10, the lug units 1420, 14% which extend parallel to each other and transversely of the machine being mounted on such fulcrums, with the girder chairs 79 which transmit the load of the respective pump legs 14 thereabove being disposed inwardly of the fulcrums with relation to the longitudinal axis of the machine. Thus the main lever pipes 143, on the opposite or outer sides of the fulcrums from the impressed loads, will tend to be lifted upwardly but for restraining or counterbalancing forces.

Referring again to the girder chair construction, each support block 127 is shaped substantially as a tee, with a hole bored through each end of the crossarm 127a, to receive a pin 145 therethrough. A chain link 146 is fitted over the pin 145 just outwardly of the crossarm 1274, a washer just outwardly of each chain link 46, and a retention pin is passed through the outer ends of each pin 145 to hold the washers and chain links 146 assembled to the support block 127.

For reasons of clarity the washers and retention pins are not shown in FIGS. 2, 3 and 5. A connection bar 147 is extended through the chain links 146 on each pin 145 and connected, as by machine screws 148 into the legs 149 of each girder chair 79, whereby the seat plate 150 of the girder chair is assembled in spaced relation above its support block 127. The retention pins on the ends of the pins 145 are disposed to leave some play therealong for the washers and chain links 146. Also, the connection bars 147 may have location lugs 131 on their underside on either side of the respective chain links 146, and slightly spaced therefrom. Thus, when the legs 14 of a vessel 10 seat upon the girder chains 79 it may be said that the girder chairs 79 may float with relation to the lug units 142a, 14211 on whose cross-connecting rod pivot bars 140 they are mounted, thus to pass along the load imposed by the vessel 10 to the floor stand hopper scale 80 in a balanced manner.

When the weight of the vessel 10 is balanced upon the four girder chairs 79 with the comer stands 144 providing what could be termed fulcrums, but for balance, there would be the greatest tendency to lift the main lever pipes 143 outwardly of the comer stand fulcrums 144. On the other hand, the main lever pipes 143 extend forwardly of the girder chairs and have the outer ends of respective transverse beam plates 1520, 152b, connected across the front ends thereof. The beam plates 1520, 152b are connected centrally across the front of the beam scale 80 by nose-irons, to be hereinbelow described,

, which are carried by a bracket shackle assembly 155, also to be hereinbelow described.

The bracket shackle assembly 155, as shown in FIGS. 7 and 8, comprises an outer U-shaped bracket 153 and an inner U- shaped bracket 154, with the upper ends of both brackets receiving the outer ends of a swivel pin 156 therethrough, the pin 156 also passing through the body 157 of a swivel assembly 160, as the swivel body 157 between the upper arms of the inner U-shaped bracket 153.

The shackle body 157 includes an upstanding member 158 into which is connected a connection bolt 159 which passes downwardly through the base 161 of a swivel link 160. The S- hook 162 which extends downwardly from the draft shackle 163 of the beam scale 165, as disposed in the beam box 170, is urged downwardly by the weight of the hopper scale 80, which transmits the weight of the vessel 10 to the beam scale 165.

This transmission of load or force components may be understood by a further consideration of FIGS. 7 and 8, as oriented by reference to FIG. 2. The inner end of the beam plate 152a is notched upwardly to receive an upper nose-iron holder 164a, which carries a specially hardened nose-iron 166a therein, having a downwardly disposed bevel edge. An upper clamp plate 167a fits downwardly over the nose-iron holder 164a, and around the inner end of the beam plate 152a, and bolts or screws 168 connect these members as the bolts extend from one side of the clamp plate 167a to the other side thereof.

Also, the inner end of beam plate T152b is notched downwardly to receive a lower nose-iron holder 164b, which carries a specially hardened nose-iron l66b therein, having a downwardly disposed bevel edge. A lower clamp plate 167b fits upwardly over the nose holder 164b, and around the end of the beam plate 152b, and bolts or screws 168 connect these members as the bolts extend from one side of the clamp plate 167b to the other side thereof.

The upper, inner U-shaped bracket 154 mounts an upper swivel block 169a thereon, with a bolt 171a passed upwardly through the foot of the bracket into the swivel block providing a vertical pivot axis of swing, as the head of the bolt 171a below the bracket 154 holds the swivel block 169 in assembly. The upper nose-iron 166a fits into a beveled groove in the upper face of the swivel block 169a to complete the assembly of right transverse beam plate 152a and bracket shackle assembly 155. Also, the lower or outer U-shaped bracket 153 mounts a lower swivel block 16% thereon, also with a bolt 17 lb passed upwardly through the foot of the bracket into the swivel block providing a vertical pivot axis of swing, as the head of the bolt l71b below the bracket 153 holds the swivel block 16% in assembly. The lower nose-iron 166!) fits into a beveled groove in the upper face of the swivel block 169b to complete the assembly of left transverse beam plate l52b and bracket shackle assembly 155.

As thus assembled the combination of knife-edge connections and swivel connections of the complementary transverse beam plates or bars 152a, l52b and bracket shackle assembly 155, is such to balance out any irregularities and keep the downward pull on the S-hook 162 substantially in proportion to the weight of the material in the vessel with the weight balanced out. With reference to FlG. 4, the balance of forces and construction can be considered on the premise that the weight on the draft shackle 172 is such, with tare weight adjusted, as to bear a direct proportion to the effect weight of material in the vessel 10 at any instant.

The shank of the draft shackle 172, shown in FIG. 4, from which the S-hook 162, shown in H6. 8, extends downwardly, is mounted upon a primary lever 173 within the beam box 170, an end of the primary lever 173 extending into an inverted yoke or bearing bracket 174 upon the floor or base 175 of the beam box. At its opposite end the primary lever 173 extends slidably into a double-yoke member 176 with a pin 177a through the lower, inverted yoke portion 176a supporting the primary lever therein. The upper yoke portion 176b of the double-yoke member 176 receives an end of a secondary lever 178 therein, as retained bya pin 177b thereabove, and a bracket member 179 providing an inverted yoke 179a receives the secondary lever 178 therein in manner to provide a second fulcrum, the bracket member 179 being rigidly connected to an upstanding backing plate 180, as by a machine bolt 179e, the bracket member 179 being affixed to the beam box floor 175. Also, a retainer pin l79b is shown passed through the bracket member 179 below the secondary lever 178.

A tare weight 181 is disposed upon the right or free end of the secondary lever 178 to balance out the tare weight of the vessel 10, as may be accomplished in conventional manner. Now, considering motion, as the weight (equivalent to material weight in vessel) acts downwardly on the draft shackle 172, the left end of the primary lever 173 moves downwardly, and the left end of the secondary lever 178, connected to the same double-yoke member 176), also moves downwardly, whereby the part of the secondary lever 178 to the right of the fulcrum supplied by the inverted yoke 179a, moves upwardly. This results in an upwardly urging force being exerted on a plunger 182 in the lower end of a proportionate force transmitter 183, as will be hereinbelow described.

The proportionate force transmitter 183 has the mission of receiving filtered instrument air at some predetermined pressure, as 30 p.s.i., via the conduit 90a from a filter regulator 195. Then, by proper pressure reduction adjustment and calibration, the force applied upwardly through the pushrod 182 results in the air leaving the proportionate force transmitter 183 at pressure of say 3 p.s.i. as filling begins, up to say 12 p.s.i., when filling has been completed, to set in motion the closing of the fill valve 23, FIG. 1.

The proportionate force transmitter 183 comprises a body including a pilot housing 183a, a diaphragm assembly or exhaust ring 189, a pilot ring 188, a damper housing 183b, and a pushrod housing 1830. A bushing 193 is threaded through a locknut 198 and into the pushrod housing 183e, centrally thereof, with a ball bushing 196, within the bushing 193, comprising the element which actually establishes the journal for the pushrod 182.

A spring 187 receives a spring seat 184 thereon and a retaining ring in a groove near the head of the pushrod 182 seats upon the spring seat 184, as the spring 187 urges the head of the pushrod 182 upwardly against the under sides of a diaphragm support disc or round plate 197 under a lower damper diaphragm 199a which extends across space between interior of pushrod housing 183a and damper housing 183b, and outwardly between the aforesaid damper and pushrod housings 183b, 1830.

An upper damper diaphragm 1991; between pilot ring 188 and damper housing 183b extends across space therebelow in the damper housing 1831: which connects by means of a vertical passage 201 with the space therebelow above the lower damper diaphragm 199a.

A restriction screw 202, having a transverse hole 203 therein, extends transversely into the damper assembly 183b and is adjustably threadable thereinto thus to adjust the amount of opening or passage space between the air space above and the air space below the adjustment screw 202. Thus the action, of upward thrust of the pushrod 182, upon the air or compressed gas within the damper housing 183b, may be adjustably dampened, as the filling of the pressure vessel on a weight indicator results in a constantly increasing and normally fast acting force urging upwardly on the pushrod 182.

Centrally of the upper damper diaphragm 199b, a pin 204, with round head upwardly, extends downwardly therethrough to be retained by a ring 206, as one that may be press-fitted around the pin 204 with upper surface of ring glued to the under side of the diaphragm 19%. The pinhead or flange is disposed below a leaf spring 207 mounted within space within the pilot ring or lead spring housing 188, a bushed bore 208 extending downwardly through the housing 188 to communicate with the space therebelow around the leaf spring 207 and above the upper damper diaphragm 19%. The leaf spring 207 carries a ball member centrally therein to be urged against by the pinhead or flange to close a bore 208 to prevent overtravel of the pressure switch in the circuitry starting valve closure, upon the pressure vessel 10, FIG. 1, teaching predetermined fill level.

A needle valve 210 extends into a transverse bore 209 in the pilot ring or leaf spring housing 188, with such bore including the needle valve seat therein, and at innermost end such bore joins a bore downwardly from space under the lower diaphragm 211a of the exhaust ring or diaphragm assembly 189.

A port 212 is provided to pass downwardly in the leaf spring housing 188 to communicate with the transversely extending needle valve bore 209 outwardly of the needle valve elements and inwardly of the packed head of the needle valve. A setscrew is shown provided in a threaded bore in the leaf spring housing 188, to communicate with the needle valve bore 209 to bear against the stem of the needle valve to maintain it as adjusted. The fluid (instrument air) to the needle valve 210 has passed through a screen or strainer 205 disposed in a cored passage 217 in the exhaust ring 189a of the diaphragm assembly 189, and upstream from the exhaust ring and diaphragm assembly body 189 it has passed through a passage 214 in the pilot body, base or top 1830, between the inlet 215a from the conduit a, and an opening through the upper diaphragm 2l1b of the aforesaid diaphragm assembly 189.

The exhaust ring 1890 of the assembly 189 has a transverse port 216 therethrough to communicate with the space just inward thereof, and between the upper and lower diaphragms 211b, 2110. Centrally, the assembly 189 provides a lower disc or plate 218 upon the diaphragm 211a, and spaced thereabove by spacers, an upper, annular plate 219 under the diaphragm 211b. A spring base and valve seat 220 bears upon the upper diaphragm 2l1b and extends centrally therethrough to be retained by keeper means inwardly of the annular plate 219.

The inlet 215a in the pilot top or housing 188a communicates inwardly with a vertical counterbore 221 with a bore 222 concentric therewithin providing a valve seat for a tandem valve 224 with lower valve element to seat upon the valve seat 220 through the upper diaphragm 2111). A spring 190, within a low pressure or discharge space 225, bears downwardly upon the spring base and valve seat member 220 and upwardly against the pilot base or top body 1830 within the discharge space 225. A retaining screw 226 is threadably adjustable into the counterbore 221 and is recessed to receive the upper end of a spring 227 therein, the lower end bearing upon a shoulder provided on the tandem valve 224 the upper seating member thereof.

By adjustment of restriction screw 202 the force exerted by the pushrod 182 against the fluid above the diaphragm 199a is dampened so that there is no chatter and intermittent closing and then opening of the bushed bore 208 by the ball valve element carried by the leaf spring 207. The needle valve 210 is so moved to regulate the reduced pressure instrument air that is permitted to enter the space between the upper damper diaphragm 19% and the lower diaphragm 211a, that the fluid in this space is converted to act as a fluid piston. Also the leaf spring 207 is adapted to be raised by the pin 204 in the diaphragm 19% to close off further movement of the diaphragm assembly 211a, 2llb at the end of travel to close the pressure switch that actuates switch arm 46a to close the fill valve.

As to the downstream fluid in the space 225, this is supplied instrument air past the upper valve element of the tandem valve 224 to show a predetermined reduced pressure, say 3 p.s.i., with the pressure vessel empty. Then, the travel produced by the fluid piston upon the diaphragm assembly 211a, 21 lb being known, needle valve adjustments sets the instrument air constituting the fluid piston at each pressure that this travel is obtained, the space 225 fluid thus being pressurized up to say 12 p.s.i. as an aforesaid pressure sensitive switch actuates flll valve closure.

In case of excess pressure in instrument air supply line 90a, 215a lifting tandem valve 224, (as adjusted seated by spring 227 under retaining screw 226), the tendency to build up the low fluid pressure in space 225 is counterbalanced by the fact that the lower valve element of the tandem valve 224 will be lifted off the seat in the valve plate 220 to let the excess fluid bleed off through the plates 219, 218 and out the passage 216.

Reference may now be made to FIGS. 9-10, inclusive, added in support of the part of the invention submitted as new by this application. Also, back reference may be made to FIGS. 1-8 in further support of FIG. 9 and FIG. 10. A pressure vessel or pump 10 is disclosed in FIG. 1, which shows a vent conduit 31a extending from the top closure or dome 12a of the pump 10, to a vent valve 230 from which rises a vent pipe 231 to discharge via a connection nipple 232 into the hopper 200, against atmospheric pressure usually prevailing in hopper. Optionally, the discharge may be into the atmosphere, as indicated by reference numeral 233.

The vent valve 230 is shown as opened and closed by a valve operator 234 with piston 234a therein moved outwardly to open the valve 230, as pressure fluid enters conduit 234b behind the piston 234a to move it outwardly, the pressure fluid outwardly of the piston 234a being returned to the panel box 40 by way of conduit 234c. Closing of the valve 230 by the valve operator 234 obviously entails reversal of direction of fluid movement.

Also, in FIG. 1 there is shown a check valve 235 in dotted lines between the purge valve 35 and the nipple 32 in the discharge line 30, disposed downstream of the discharge valve 29.

As shown more or less diagrammatically in FIG. 9, a pressure vessel or pump is shown weighed for predetermined net weight by a beam scale 80, shown in fragmentary detail in this view. Plant air is indicated as entering the bottom of the vessel 10 via the compressed air line 25. Also, the material, granular or pulverulent material is admitted from the hopper 200 to the pump 10 by means of the upper fill valve 18a, flexible nipple 19, and lower fill valve 18. The discharge from the pump 10 is indicated as being by way of the discharge valve 29 and discharge conduit 30 to discharge the material upwardly into a catalyst regenerator tower 236.

A purge conduit 34 is indicated as having the purge valve 35 therein and downstream therefrom the check valve 235, which has its conventional ball valve to be urged seated in direction of the pump 10, by back pressure which may build up in the conduit 30 from direction of the catalyst regenerator tower 236 to act to seat the check valve 235 against the pressure in the purge conduit 34 upstream from the ball valve.

The pump 10 is shown as having a vent conduit 31a therefrom to the vent valve 230, as shown in FIG. 4, with a vent pipe 231 to vent either into the atmosphere or into the hopper 200, which is generally at substantially atmospheric pressure. These alternate vent outlets are indicated by elements 232, 233, FIGS. 1 and 9. Having set forth the background for operation of the pump 10 when discharge is to be made against back pressure, and when the net weight of material, as batches, from the hopper 200 into pump 10 is to be impressed upon a scale 80, reference may now be made to FIG. 10 which sets forth the electrical circuit diagrams for the apparatus mainly in the panel 40, FIGS. 1, 2 and 9.

A normally open control switch 237 in the positive power line 241, having the fuse 239 therein, is closed. Current is thus admitted through normally closed switch 243 of latch relay 258a, 258k; also through normally closed vent pressure switch P8 or 247; also through normally closed fill pressure switch FPS or 248; and also through conductors 241a, 24lb to double-pole, double-throw switch 250 and relay LR or 251 of timer latch relay 251, 252. Also current is admitted to flow in the TIMER CIRCUIT containing TDR or time delay relay 276, which urges TDS or TIME DELAY switch 277 closed, thus energizing the clutch 278 to start the MOTOR 280 or M that runs according to the preselected numbers of hours batches of material are to be successively delivered by the pump 10.

The energized timer latch relay 251 now actuates the closing of normally open switch 253a of the switches 253a, 253b and thus the fill light or green light G or 254 goes on and the solenoid 255 in the panel 40 actuates valve operators 23, 23d to open fill valve or fill valves 18a, 18, FIG. 4. Also the solenoid 256 in the panel 40 actuates the valve operator 234, FIG. 4, to open VENT VALVE 230, and the VENT LIGHT or white light W or 257 goes on. Material now enters the vessel 10 from the hopper 200.

The increasing weight of material upon the diaphragm 13, FIG. 1, causes the secondary lever 178, FIG. 4, to bear upwardly on the plunger 182 which extends downwardly from the proportionate force transmitter 183 so that the pressure signal passing through the outlet conduit 90b from the proportionate force transmitter 183 is equivalent to p.s.i., which, by the way the transmitter 183 has been regulated, corresponds with the predetermined net weight of a batch of material to be received in the vessel 10 before the fill valve(s) are to be closed.

This pressure signal that passes from the proportionate force transmitter 183 via the conduit b, FIG. 4, is indicated by the reference numeral 90b being applied to the pressure switch NOPS or 258a, which is indicated as being normally open, FIG. 10. This switch 90b is closed upon this predetermined preset l5 p.s.i. being attained as batch load is built up on the diaphragm 13, as aforesaid. This energizes the latch coil 258a of the fill latching relay 258a, 258b, to open the normally closed relay switch 243 and close the normally open relay switch 244. This operates to CLOSE FILL VALVE and also serves to lock in ACTIVATE CYCLE, the whole fill circuitry being broken. Thus the solenoid 256 closes the vent valve 230, FIGS. 1 and 9, and the white light 257 goes out. Also the solenoid 255 closes the fill valve(s) l8 and 18a, as aforesaid, and the green light 254 goes out.

As the relay switch 244 closes circuit from the positive side, parallel positive conductor 259 carries circuit to the FILL VALVE TIME DELAY relay TDR designated 261, which, after a preset time interval, closes the time-delay relay TDRS or switch 262, whereby the solenoid 263 in the panel 40 operates to shift fluid direction to the valve operator 27, FIG. 1, to OPEN ACTIVATE VALVE or the valve 26, (FIGS. 4 and 9), to admit plant air into the gas plenum chamber beneath the diaphragm 13, FIG. 1, thereby to activate the material, or full batch, that is supported above the diaphragm, as aforesaid. Also, as the solenoid 263 has operated to open the compressed air supply or plant air valve 26, at the same time, the solenoid 264, adjacent thereto in the panel 40, has shifted fluid direction to the valve operator 36, FIG. 1, to CLOSE PURGE VALVE 35. Thus, at this point the fill valve(s) 18a, 18, the vent valve 230, the purge valve 35, and the discharge valve 29 are all closed, while the plant compressed air is entering the vessel 10 to build up pressure therein, and to activate the granular or pulverulent material, or set it in violent motion above the diaphragm 13. Circuit has also been completed so that the blue light B or 265 is turned on as the ACTIVATE LIGHT.

The pressure continues to rise in the vessel until a pressure of say 35 p.s.i., is attained therein, whereupon the discharge pressure switch DPS indicated by reference numeral 266 closes, as has been predetermined. As this switch 266 closes, circuit is completed through the red DISCHARGE LIGHT R or 267, which comes on, and through the solenoid 268, in the panel 40, which changes fluid direction to and from the valve operator 33 to OPEN DISCHARGE VALVE 29, FIGS. 1 and 9.

Also, circuit through the control relay 270 is closed to energize this relay to HOLD DISCHARGE CYCLE by closing the normally open switch 269a of the pair of switches 269a, 26%. Also, the control relay 270 operates to close the normally open switch 271a of the pair of switches 271a, 271b, thereby circuit is completed through the purge pressure switch PPS or 272 which is set to close at a lower pressure, say 28 p.s.i., than the discharge pressure switch 269a. Thus, at this point the purge pressure switch PPS or 272 is open, as indicated in dotted lines in FIG. 10. Therefore it is closing circuit through the time latch (LR) relay 252, whereby this relay is actuated to put the contacts of the time latch relay switches 253a, 253b in their original positions with switch 253a open, thus to LOCK OUT FILL CYCLE.

The material now flows out through the open discharge valve 29 and through the discharge conduit 30 to the predetermined point of delivery, as up into the catalyst regenerator 236. As the materials are in good part removed from the vessel 10, the pressure therein starts to drop, and falls to the preset pressure at which the purge pressure switch PPS or 272 is set to close to full line position shown in FIG. 16. As this occurs, the unlatch coil 258b of the fill latch relay 2580, 258b, is energized to put the fill latch relay contacts 243, 244 back into their original position, with contacts of switch 243 closed, contacts of switch 244 open to LOCK OUT ACTIVATE CY- CLE.

Since the vent pressure switch 247 is still open, the amber light A or PURGE LIGHT 273 comes on when the contacts of switch 243 are latched closed, and since the purge valve 35 is a normally open valve, the falling pressure sweeps clean the purge line 34 and discharge line 30 until such time as the back pressure in the discharge line 30, acting through the purge line 34, builds up back pressure to seat the check valve 235. When the pressure in the vessel now falls to say p.s.i. the vent pressure switch 247 closes, to full-line position shown in FIG. 16, thus activating the solenoid 256 to change fluid direction in the panel 40 to OPEN VENT VALVE 230, FIGS. 1 and 9, the light W or VENT LIGHT in parallel circuit also turning on. Then the residual material may be vented through the vent pipe 231 and through its upper end 232 to the atmosphere, or into the hopper 200 by way of the alternate vent path 233.

When the pressure drops to say 0.5 psi. the fill valve pressure switch 248 may close, thus activating the solenoid 255 to open the fill valve(s) 18, 18a once more, again to start the fill cycle, the green light 254 going on.

The timer 275 has TIMER CIRCUIT which is preset, when started, to run for any predetermined time interval it may be desired to deliver batches of material of predetermined weight, to any preselected container, as to the catalyst regenerator tower 236. When the control switch 237 is first closed, with the double-pole, double-throw switch 250 in the position shown in FIG. 10, the time-delay relay TDR, or 276, closes the timer switch 277 which actuates the motor clutch 278 into driving engagement, so that the Motor M, or 280, runs for the period of its preset cycle, while circuit is complete through the latch relay LR or 251 so that it can operate once during each single-batch handling period to close the normally open switch contact 253a, as aforesaid.

Then when the motor times out, the switch 279 is thrown open, to break circuit through the motor 280, the switch 250 then being moved to up position by the timing out of the motor 280, thus circuit cannot be made through the fill-cycle lock in relay LR or 251 to actuate it. Thus when the motor 280 times out, the fill-valve solenoid 255 cannot be energized to open the fill valve until the motor running cycle has been reset, and until the double-pole double-throw switch 250 is manually returned to the position shown in FIG. 10. At this time the motor 280 is again reset to run for some selected cycle exit ending over a number of batch transferring operations by the pressure vessel 10.

A fail safe or warning safe guard is provided against the pump or pressure vessel 10 being over filled by an entering batch. This resides in a PUMP FILL LIGHT, as a white light W or 281, and a motor M or 282 or LEVEL DETECTOR, these being connected in parallel circuits which extend between the negative power line 242 and the positive side conductor 2411:. A normally open switch 2830 is shown in circuit with the white light W or 281 and a normally closed switch 283k therein. The motor 282 may have conventional paddle means thereon to be contacted by the material of a batch rising to the safeguarding level of the motor 282, whereby the paddle is stopped. Then, conventionally, there may be overtravel of parts related with the motor shaft, as the paddle mounting part stops, so that by this over-travel or lost motion movement, the nonnally closed switch 283k is opened to stop the motor 282, while the normally open switch 283a is closed, to turn on the white light 281 or W to indicate that the material set for a batch rises too high in the pressure vessel or pump.

The various structural features are by way of illustration and not by way of limitation, and the claims herein that complete the application are definitive.

Iclaim:

1. Material transporting apparatus comprising a pressure vessel including a gas permeable diaphragm bridging the lower part of said vessel above the bottom thereof and dividing it into a material plenum thereabove, and a gas plenum therebelow, a fill valve to admit flowable material through the top of said vessel into said material plenum to upstand from said diaphragm, a compressed gas inlet connection including a as valve into said gas plenum, a discharge connection from t e upper part of said material plenum including a discharge valve disposed in said discharge connection, a purge bypass connecting said material plenum and said discharge connection downstream from said discharge valve, a purge valve disposed in said purge bypass, also a check valve therein downstream of said purge valve and adapted to be urged closed in direction of said purge valve by back pressure acting thereagainst from downstream thereof, a vent discharge from said vessel including a vent valve, means responsive to the weight of material in said vessel, circuitry including said weight responsive means and being automatically operable to open said fill valve, said circuitry then being actuated by said weight responsive means to close said fill valve, then to close said purge valve while opening said gas inlet valve to admit pressurized gas substantially uniformly through said diaphragm and to activate said material to a high state as the pressure rises in excess of a predetermined high pressure to actuate said pressure sensitive control means to open said discharge valve for said material to pass upwardly and onward through said discharge connection, the pressure falling below a predetermined lower pressure to actuate said pressure sensitive control means to close said discharge valve and said gas inlet valve and to open said purge valve, the compressed gas at falling pressure purging through said purge bypass including said purge valve and said check valve, and onwardly through said discharge connection, the pressure continuing falling to a still lower predetermined level to act through said circuitry to close said purge and to open said vent valve, said check valve guarding against back pressure urging gas bearing purge material back up said purge connection, the residual compressed gas purging upwardly through said vent discharge, and the pressure falling to approximately atmospheric whereby to open said fill valve, as aforesaid.

2. The method of transporting pulverulent material comprising the steps of passing material through an inlet into a closable container onto a gas permeable diaphragm, generating a signal responsive to a predetermined weight of material in said container, closing said material inlet when said signal is generated, closing a bypass conduit from a discharge conduit to the container, and with the container to pass upwardly therethrough to activate the material therein and opening the discharge conduit from the container while closing gas admission, as the pressure in the container drops to predetermined value closing the discharge and opening the bypass conduit to bypass the material to be purged through the bypass and back into the discharge conduit downstream from the container, and as the pressure in the container falls to a still lower predetermined value, employing a check valve in the bypass conduit between bypass conduit closure and discharge conduit to protect against back pressure from the discharge conduit downstream thereof, closing the bypass and opening a vent through which residual pressurized gas and any residual material may be vented as the container pressure returns to substantially atmospheric, then repeating the cycle of steps aforesaid.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3857554 *Jan 30, 1973Dec 31, 1974Peters Ag ClaudiusSteel conversion
US3884453 *Mar 14, 1973May 20, 1975Pennsylvania Engineering CorpBottom blown steel converter and means for controlling injection of powdered material with process gasses therein
US4182383 *Jun 23, 1978Jan 8, 1980General Electric CompanyFluidized bed powder discharge and metering method and apparatus
US4619531 *Nov 14, 1984Oct 28, 1986Dunstan & Partners Pty. Ltd.Batching plant
US8012422 *Mar 23, 2005Sep 6, 2011W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn.System and process for injecting catalyst and/or additives into a fluidized catalytic cracking unit
US8926907 *Mar 16, 2011Jan 6, 2015W. R. Grace & Co.-ConnSystem and process for injecting catalyst and/or additives into a fluidized catalytic cracking unit
US8967919Jul 28, 2011Mar 3, 2015W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn.System and process for injecting catalyst and/or additives into a fluidized catalytic cracking unit
US9504975Jul 28, 2011Nov 29, 2016W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn.System and process for injecting catalyst and/or additives into a fluidized catalytic cracking unit
US9637325Oct 18, 2012May 2, 2017W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn.Systems for injecting catalysts and/or additives into a fluidized catalytic cracking unit and methods of making and using the same
US20070189935 *Mar 23, 2005Aug 16, 2007Geoge YalurisSystem and process for injecting catalyst and/or additives into a fluidized catalytic cracking unit
US20110203970 *Mar 16, 2011Aug 25, 2011W.R. Grace & Co.-Conn.System and process for injecting catalyst and/or additives into a fluidized catalytic cracking unit
Classifications
U.S. Classification406/15, 222/195, 406/25, 406/124
International ClassificationB65G53/66, G01G13/00, B65G53/34
Cooperative ClassificationG01G13/00, B65G53/66
European ClassificationG01G13/00, B65G53/66