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Publication numberUS3633659 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 11, 1972
Filing dateJan 16, 1970
Priority dateJan 20, 1969
Also published asDE2001725A1
Publication numberUS 3633659 A, US 3633659A, US-A-3633659, US3633659 A, US3633659A
InventorsOhlsson Jarl-Erik
Original AssigneeSisenca Sa
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roof constructions
US 3633659 A
Abstract
A roof construction comprises interconnected corrugated panels and an insulated outer roofing, and the channels formed between the outer roofing the the corrugations of the panels are connected to a ventilating system for ventilating the roof.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 98/31,4O C, 32, 33 R, 33 A, 37, 39, 43; 165/50,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,601,905 7/1952 Anderegg 98/31 X 2,733,649 2/1956 LeBarron 98/33 X 3,049,067 8/1962 Claude 98/31 3,223,018 12/1 965 Tucker, Sr.... 98/31 3,368,473 2/1968 Sohda et al. 98/31 Primary ExaminerManueI A. Antonakas Attorney- Karl W. Flocks ABSTRACT: A roof construction comprises interconnected corrugated panels and an insulated outer roofing, and the channels formed between the outer roofing the the corrugations of the panels are connected to a ventilating system for ventilating the roof.

PATENTED JAN? 1 1372 SHEET 1 UF 2 INVENTOR JARL-ERIK OHLSSON BY )(HRL U Foe (5 ll TTORNEV PATENTEU JAN? 1 m2 SHEET 2 [IF 2 ROOF CONSTRUCTIONS This invention relates to a roof construction of the type comprising interconnected sheet metal panels with preferably trapeziform corrugations, and an insulated outer roofing placed directly on said panels so as to be supported by them. The roof construction according to the present invention is characterized in that the channels formed between the outer roofing and the corrugations of the panels are connected to a ventilating system for ventilating the roof. With the use of very simple means the invention thus provides a ventilation of the roof, whereby either moisture or heat is carried away.

The invention will be more fully described in the following, reference being made to the accompanying drawings which illustrate some embodiments, chosen by way of example, of the roof construction.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a transverse cross section of part of a building equipped with one embodiment of the roof construction;

FIG. 2 is a longitudinal cross section, on a greater scale, of the roof construction in connection with a duct thereof;

FIG. 3 is a view of the joint between two corrugated sheet metal panels in the roof construction;

FIG. 4 is a view of a modified embodiment of the corrugated sheet metal panels of the roof construction;

FIG. 5 is a transverse cross section of a building equipped with another embodiment of the roof construction.

The roof construction comprises interconnected corrugated sheet metal panels 1 which in the embodiments shown are supported by I-beams 2 extending longitudinally of the building. The corrugated sheet metal panels 1 support an insulated outer roofing 3 placed directly on said panels. The outer roofing 3 comprises an insulation 4 and roll roofing 5 placed thereon, but it is self-explanatory that the outer roofing may be of any other design whatever.

The corrugations of the panels 1 might be given the form of waves, but in a preferred embodiment the corrugations are trapeziform. Normally, the crests and troughs of the corrugations will be of the same size, as is seen from FIGS. 2 and 3. In certain cases, however, it may be suitable to give the crests of the corrugations a considerably smaller width than the troughs, as will appear from FIG. 4.

According to the invention, the channels 6 formed between the outer roofing 3 and the corrugations of the panels 1 are connected to a ventilating system for ventilating the roof. To avoid unnecessary losses, the joints between the individual panels 1 must be tight. A sealing strip 7 for use in the joints is shown in FIG. 3. This sealing strip 7 which is of plastics or like material, is formed as a thin band which at the two longitudinal edges merges into a tubular profile.

In the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, the channels 6 formed between the outer roofing 3 and the corrugations of the panels 1 are in communication with a duct 8 for supplying the air for the ventilation of the roof. This duct 8 in turn is in communication with the ambient air via a duct system 10 equipped with heating means 9. Said heating means 9 also comprises a fan or like apparatus for producing a certain excess pressure in the duct 8, and the excess pressure is maintained in that the duct 8 is connected via throttling means 11 to the various channels 6. The throttling means 11 will thus ensure that the air is distributed in a given manner between the channels 6.

As will be seen from FIG. 2, the throttling means 11 may consist of preferably angularly bent pipes or small apertures.

In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1, the channels 6 are connected at their lower ends to the duct 8 via the throttling means 1]. Otherwise, the said ends are closed by means of an L-profile or like element. On the other hand, the upper ends of the channels 6 are open so as to communicate with the interior of the building proper.

Ambient air is thus sucked in and heated, for which reason it has a low relative moisture content. At the ventilation of the roof the dried air thus carries away the moisture and at the same time prevents moist air from penetrating into the insulation 4 of the roof.

In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 5, the channels 6 formed between the outer roofing 3 and the corrugations of the panels 1 have their upper ends (which are situated for instance at the roof peak) connected to a duct 12 for leading away the air ventilating the roof. The lower ends of the channels 6 are in communication with the interior of the building equipped with the roof construction for supplying air thereto.

In normal cases the duct 12 cooperates with a fan or like apparatus for the ventilation air. To obtain a definite distribution of the air between the various channels 6 the latter are connected via throttling means 13 to the duct 12.

The roof construction illustrated in FIG. 5 is primarily adapted to carry away the heat supplied to the roof by the sunrays indicated by the arrows 14. The air is taken from the interior of the building and, after being heated, is caused to escape through the air outlets 15 on the roof of the building.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patents is:

1. A roof construction comprising interconnected sheet metal panels having trapeziform corrugations, an insulated outer roofing placed directly on said panels positioned to be supported by them wherein the insulation of said outer roofing is facing said panels and bears directly against them, channels formed between the insulation and said corrugations of said panels connected by a duct system to the ambient air outside the building with said air supplied over heating means to said channels between said insulation and said corrugations of said panels for ventilating said insulation.

2. A roof construction as claimed in claim I, wherein said duct system includes a duct cooperating with said channels and connected via throttling means to said channels so as to produce a predetermined distribution of the air between said channels.

3. A roof construction as claimed in claim 2, wherein said channels are connected with their one ends to said duct while the other ends of said channels are in communication with the interior of the building equipped with the roof construction.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2601905 *Mar 2, 1948Jul 1, 1952Pierce John B FoundationDehumidification system for buildings
US2733649 *Apr 25, 1952Feb 7, 1956 Apparatus and method for preventing
US3049067 *Nov 14, 1958Aug 14, 1962Claude Janine LysianeSound-absorbing and heat-resisting wall construction
US3223018 *Nov 5, 1963Dec 14, 1965Radina TuckerBuilding structure with air circulation means
US3368473 *Nov 20, 1964Feb 13, 1968Sohda YoshimiRoof and wall construction
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4214510 *Sep 14, 1978Jul 29, 1980Ward Bruce KVent and baffle unit
US4290247 *Jul 26, 1979Sep 22, 1981Alderman Robert JFluid flow insulation system
US4295415 *Aug 16, 1979Oct 20, 1981Schneider Peter J JrEnvironmentally heated and cooled pre-fabricated insulated concrete building
US4296798 *Nov 13, 1978Oct 27, 1981Horst SchrammIntegrated house
US4371031 *Oct 25, 1979Feb 1, 1983Aeromator Trading Co. AbArrangement for air conditioning control in buildings
US5746653 *Sep 20, 1996May 5, 1998Solar Attic, Inc.Air distributor or collector
US5950326 *Feb 3, 1995Sep 14, 1999Scott; James BarryMethod and apparatus for renewing a roof system
US6705939 *May 31, 2001Mar 16, 2004Roger R. RoffMethod and apparatus for reducing respiratory illnesses among occupants of buildings
US7143557 *Dec 23, 2002Dec 5, 2006Ayers Jr W HowardStructural vent assembly for a roof perimeter
US7610729Nov 16, 2006Nov 3, 2009Ayers Jr W HowardStructural vent assembly for a roof perimeter
US7735267Aug 1, 2007Jun 15, 2010Ayers Jr W HowardStructural vented roof deck enclosure system
US8024894May 12, 2010Sep 27, 2011Ayers Jr W HowardStructural vented roof deck enclosure system
EP2080849A1 *Jan 17, 2008Jul 22, 2009Polimeni S.r.l.Roof, in particular for houses
EP2366845A1 *Oct 20, 2010Sep 21, 2011Orion FinancementActive thermal insulation method and device for implementing said method
WO1998012484A1 *Sep 17, 1997Mar 26, 1998Edward G PalmerAn air distributor or collector
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/56, 454/186
International ClassificationE04D13/17, E04D13/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04D13/17
European ClassificationE04D13/17