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Publication numberUS3633777 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 11, 1972
Filing dateOct 26, 1970
Priority dateOct 26, 1970
Publication numberUS 3633777 A, US 3633777A, US-A-3633777, US3633777 A, US3633777A
InventorsEstes Clancy E, Snelling Murdock M Jr
Original AssigneeTaylor Machine Works
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cargo container handling assembly
US 3633777 A
Abstract
A cargo container handling assembly intended to be removably fitted to the fork carriage of a typical forklift vehicle for facilitating lifting and relocating standardized freight handling containers. The handling assembly includes structure for side shifting the container mating structure to expeditiously compensate for an offcenter relationship between the container and the vehicle, yieldably suspended container mating structure allowing out of level containers to be picked up, slewing structure enabling the operator to controllably and properly seat the container mating structure to the container while the lift truck is not perpendicularly situated with respect to the container, i.e., without bumping or touching the sides thereof. Further, the handling assembly includes structure for stabilizing the container after it has been picked up so as to obviate objectionable swinging of the container as the vehicle moves. Stabilization is accomplished completely within the structure of the handling assembly, i.e., the container does not rest against nor is it touched by any structure other than the usual twistlocks, thus negating external damage to the container while in transit.
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United States Patent Inventors Murdock M. Snelling, Jr.; Primary E.raminer-Gerald M. Forlenza Clancy E. Estes, both of Louisville, Miss. Assistant Examiner-Robert J. Spar Appl. No. 83,907 Attorney-John R. Walker, Ill Filed Oct. 26, 1970 Patented Jan. I], 1972 Assignee Tayhr Machine works ABSTRACT: A cargo container handling assembly intended Louisvme' Miss to be removably fitted to the fork carriage ofa typical forklift vehicle for facilitating lifting and relocating standardized freight handling containers. The handling assembly includes CARGO CONTAINER HANDLING ASSEMBLY structure for side shifting the container mating structure to ex 8 Claims, 8 Drawing Figs. peditiously compensate for an offcenter relationship between 52 us. Cl 2l4/62l am .vehlcle' Yieldably Suspended f 214/730 294/67 mating structure allowing out of level containers to be picked [S l Int. Cl t B66! 9/14 slewing structure enablmg the operator commnably and [50] Field of Search I I I l 1 214/630 properly seat the container mating structure to the container 621 DB 67 6 while the lift truck is not perpendicularly situated with respect to the container, i.e., without bumping or touching the sides 5 References Cited thegeiof. Furrther, the handlfing asshembtly includkesdstructure for sta ||z|n t e container a ter it as een ic e up so as to UNITED STATES PATENTS obviate o bjectionable swinging ofthe container as the vehicle 2807493 9/1957 Ryan F 2l4/620X moves. Stabilization is accomplished completely within the 2'750'060 6/1956 214/620 structure of the handling assembly. ie, the container does not 3Ol5'407 Fesmn'e el 294/67 DA rest against nor is it touched by any structure other than the 3499'563 3/1970 214/62 usual twistlocks, thus negating external damage to the con 3,513,997 5/1970 Heyer et al. 2 [4/77 R miner while in transit 3.552557 1/l97l Green 214/620 PATENTED JAIN 1 mg SHEET 2 0F 4 PATENTEU JAN? n72 SHEET 6 0F 4 FIG. 5

INVENTOR. CLANCY E. ESTES BY MMQDOCK M .SNELL/NQJR.

CARGO CONTAINER HANDLING ASSEMBLY BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION l. Field of the Invention This invention relates to lifting devices and is particularly directed toward a forklift mounted handling assembly for facilitating lifting standardized freight handling containers.

2. Description of the Prior Art A container lift frame adapted for use with lift trucks is taught by the Forry et al. U.S. Pat. No. 3,499,563. It discloses an upright frame attached to the lifting mechanism of the forklift and the frame rigidly supports a pair of outwardly extending arms for pivotally supporting a pair of independently pivoting beam members having the standardized container-engaging means secured thereto for mating with the standardized corner fittings formed into the upper corners of the cargo container. When practicing the 563 patent, it is necessary for the operator of the vehicle to approach the container perpendicularly in order to properly position the lift beams above the container. Any error in judgment on the part of the operator must be corrected by jockeying the vehicle fore and aft until the perpendicular positioning is achieved. Additionally, the 563 patent is limited in picking up and out of level container in that the lift beams are free to rotate in one vertical plane about the point fixed by a clevis pin, the axis of the clevis pin being parallel with the longitudinal axis of the container. Accordingly, an out of level container having the one end thereof situated at an elevation other than that of the opposite end probably could not be picked up or released by a level situated lift truck.

A somewhat common attempt to solve the problem of picking up a container when the lift truck is not perpendicularly situated with respect to the container comprises attachments to the lifting assembly which fit loosely and can be slewed to an alignment position by bumping the container and thereby moving the attachment on its supports. Practice of this procedure obviously results in external damage to the containers which shortens the serviceable life of the container.

Other handling assemblies have been developed which utilize a suspended frame and allows out of level containers to be picked up, i.e., irrespective of the direction of the out of level situated container with respect to the lift truck. However, a common problem which prevails with handling assemblies of the conventional or prior suspended type is that the container is free to swing while the vehicle is moving, resulting in external damage to the container. In attempting to minimize the swinging of the container, the operator usually tilts the lift mast rearwardly, allowing the container to rest against adjacent structure of the vehicle which again results in external damage to the container.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention is directed towards overcoming the disadvantages and problems relative to previous handling assemblies for forklift vehicles. The concept of the present invention is to provide a cargo container handling assembly which may be removably fitted to the fork carriage of a typical forklift vehicle for facilitating lifting and relocating standard freight handling containers. The handling assembly of the present invention includes previously known structure for side shifting the container mating structure so as to compensate expeditiously for an off center relationship between the container and the vehicle, yieldably suspended container mating structure permitting an out of level situated container to be picked up or releasably positioned by a level situated lift vehicle, slewing structure enabling the operator to controllably and properly seat the container mating structure to the container while the lift truck is not perpendicularly situated with respect to the container, i.e., without bumping or touching the sides thereof. Additionally, the handling assembly includes structure for stabilizing the container after it has been picked up so as to obviate objectionable swinging of the container as the vehicle travels. Stabilization is accomplished completely within the structure of the handling assembly, i.e., the container does not rest against nor is it touched by any structure other than the usual twistlocks, thus negating external damage to the container while in transit.

Further, the handling assembly includes an electrical signaling system which is well known and senses both seating of the container mating structure to the container, as well as the twisting of all twistlocks to the fully locked position.

Further, the structure of the handling assembly of the present invention is designed to provide for expeditious reconfiguration to the standard fork carriage, thus providing greater versatility for the lift vehicle.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is a side elevational view of the cargo container handling assembly of the present invention in combination with a forklift vehicle having a tiltable lift mast showing the container mating structure engaging or lifting a container.

FIG. 2 is a front elevational view of the cargo container handling assembly of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the cargo container handling assembly of the present invention.

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken as on the line lV-IV of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken as on the line V-V of FIG. 3 showing the container mating structure slewed aft.

FIG. 6 is identical to FIG. 5 except the container mating structure is shown slewed in a forward direction.

FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken as on the line VllVll of FIG. 5 showing a portion of the container mating structure and its associated guide and stabilizing structure.

FIG. 8 is a partial side elevational view of the cargo container handling assembly of the present invention showing the container mating structure supporting a container and the mast of the vehicle is tilted aft so as to depict the interrelationship of the stabilizing structure, the container and the vertical frame structure adjacent the lift mast.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The cargo container handling assembly 1 I of the present invention is shown in FIG. I of the drawings attached to the fork carriage assembly I3 of a forklift vehicle 15, the times (not shown) first having been removed from the fork carriage I3. A container 17 is shown in FIG. I of the drawings suspended from the handling assembly 11.

It should be understood that the handling assembly II is intended for handling containers, as for example, those conforming to standard specifications as established by the United States of America Standards Institute, e.g., a container measuring 8 8 20 feet having a gross weight capacity of 44,800 pounds. The Institute published a pamphlet entitled Speciiications for Freight Containers and is designated "M. H. 5.1-l962."This pamphlet is available upon request from the Institute whose address is 10 East 40th Street, New York.

The forklift vehicle 15 preferably has the usual capability of tilting the mast I9 thereof fore and aft and raising and/or lowering of the fork carriage assembly I3, e.g., a plurality of rollers 23 runningly and ridingly engaging the mast 19. The handling assembly 11 includes an outer carriage assembly 25 which may be controllably driven laterally to and fro so that the lifting structure of the handling assembly II may be shifted from side to side, for purposes yet to be described.

The fork carriage assembly 13 supports the outer carriage assembly 25 in the usual manner, i.e., a plurality of rollers 27 carry the outer carriage assembly 25 on the fork carriage assembly 13, as the actuating means, e.g., a double-acting hydraulic cylinder 29, is selectively activated.

It should be pointed out that the fork carriage I3, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, generally comprises an upper horizontal member character-referenced by the numeral 13 and the letter suffix a," a lower horizontal member, characterreferenced by the numeral 13 and the letter suffix b, a righthand vertical member character-referenced by the numeral 13 and the letter suffix c, and a right-hand vertical member character-referenced by the numeral 13 and the letter suffix d.The members 13a, 13b, 13c and 13d are arranged sub stantially as illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 and are rigidly attached one to the other, as by welding or the like.

Further, the outer carriage assembly 25 generally comprises an upper horizontal member character-referenced by the numeral 25 and the letter sufi'ix a, a lower horizontal member character-referenced by the numeral 25 and the letter suffix b,"a right-hand vertical member character-referenced by the numeral 25 and the letter suffix "c, a left-hand vertical member character-referenced by the numeral 25 and the letter suffix "d," and a pair of roller support arms characterreferenced by the numeral 25 and the letter suffix 2" (only one is shown). The members 25a, 25b, 25c, 25d and 25:: are arranged substantially as illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 and attached one to the other, as by welding or the like.

A pair of stanchions 31, 33 are carried by the outer carriage assembly 25, and are fixedly attached thereto in any wellknown manner, e.g., welding or the like. Fixedly attached adjacent the upper ends of the stanchions 31, 33 is an upper horizontally disposed rectangular frame assembly 35, best viewed in FIG. 3.

The stanchions 31, 33, being identical one with the other, preferably are formed from steel box beams. The stanchions 31, 33 straddle and extend upwardly from the lower horizontal member 25!: and are fixedly attached thereto as by welding or the like. The upper horizontal member 250, having a length substantially equal to the length of the member 25b, has one end thereof fixedly attached, as by welding or the like, to the stanchion 31 and the other end thereof fixedly attached, as by welding or the like, to the stanchion 33, as best viewed in FIGS. 1 and 2.

Referring now to FIG. 3 of the drawings wherein it may be seen that the upper frame assembly 35 is of rigid and open frame work construction and includes a pair of main support beams 37, 39 symmetrically arranged adjacent the midsection of the frame 35. The main support beams 37, 39, being formed from tubular steel or the like, have a length greater than the width of the frame 35 so that the one end of the beams 37, 39 extends beyond the perimeter of the frame 35, substantially as illustrated in FIG. 3. Frame assembly 35 also preferably includes forward longitudinal member 41; longitudinal midmember 43; leftand right-hand longitudinal members 45, 47; left and right end members 49, 51; and left and right diagonal members 53,55.

It should be understood that gusset plates (not shown) may be positioned adjacent the junction of the above members and fixedly attached thereto, as by welding or the like, in order to provide additional rigidity to the frame 35, a mundane task to those skilled in the art.

The frame 35 is attached to the stanchions 31, 33, utilizing a frame knee construction, i.e., the upper end of the stanchions 31, 33 terminate at an angle approximating 45 and the protruding ends of the beams 37, 39 likewise terminate at an angle approximating 45. Additionally, the respective ends of the stanchions 31, 33 and the beams 37, 39 are contiguously joined by respective intermediate boxlike members 57, 58 and are fixedly attached thereto, as by welding or the like.

The handling assembly 11 also includes a lower rectangular frame 59 yieldably suspended from the upper frame 35 by a plurality of suspension means 61, e.g., one means 61 being positioned adjacent each corner of the frames 35, 59. The lower frame 59 has a dimension substantially identical to the dimension of the upper frame assembly 35 and preferably is the -foot United States of America Standards Institute spreader assembly manufactured by RPC Division, Midland- Ross Corporation, Roxboro, N.C. Accordingly, a detailed description of the frame 59 may be obtained from the above source. However, certain improvements to the frame 59 form a part of the present invention, and these improvements will herein be fully described.

Referring now to FIGS. 2, 5 and 6, wherein it may be seen that the suspension means 61 comprises a pair of lugs 63, 65, a pair of chain shackles 67, 69, and a flexible member, e.g., a length of link chain 71. The downwardly directed lug 63 is positioned adjacent the comer of the frame 35 and is fixedly attached thereto in any well-known manner, such as welding or the like. The upwardly directed lug 65 is positioned adjacent the corner of the frame 59 and is fixedly attached thereto in any well-known manner, such as welding or the like. The upper shackle 67 receives the one end or link of the chain 71 and is shackled to the lug 63 in a typical manner, e.g., a clevis pin extending through the usual apertures in the shackle 67 and an aperture 73 concentrically positioned in the lug 63. The lower shackle 69 receives the other end or link of the chain 71 and is shackled to the lug 65 in the usual manner, as just described for the shackle 67.

The suspension means 61 permits easy mating of the lower frame 59 to the container 17 which may be out of level, i.e., the container 17 having one end at an elevation other than the level of the opposite end while the lift vehicle is sitting on substantially level terrain. The suspension means 61 of the present invention provides easy mating of the frame 59 to the container 17 regardless of the direction of out of level, i.e., the lefi end may be higher or lower than the right end, or the front side may be higher or lower than the back side, or a corner may be higher or lower than the diagonally opposite corner.

The handling assembly 11 of the present invention also includes a pair of slewing means 75, 77, as best viewed in FIGS. 3,5 and 6. Since the slewing means 75 is substantially identical to the slewing means 77, a detailed disclosure of the slewing means 75 conveniently will be intended to encompass the slewing means 77. The controls and interconnecting plumbing are well known to those skilled in the art and therefore deleted from the drawings. The slewing means 75 generally comprises a pair of flexible elongated members, e.g., wire ropes 79, 81, a pair of sheaves 83, 85, a bracket 87, and actuating means, e.g., a double-acting hydraulic cylinder 89.

From FIG. 4 of the drawings, it may be seen that the bracket 87 includes a platelike base portion 91, a pair of upwardly directed platelike members 93, 95, having a substantially parallel spaced-apart relationship and fixedly attached to the base portion 91, as by welding or the like. Members 93, are slightly set in from the edge of the base portion 91 so as to form a track-engaging surface 97. The members 93, 95, formed from plate steel or the like have fixedly attached thereto, as by welding or the like, a pair of platelike members 99, 101.

The bracket 87 is slidably attached to the member 51 by a track 103. The track 103, being formed from a pair of elongated opposing angleiron members or the like, is arranged substantially as depicted in FIG. 4, and the one edge thereof is fixedly attached to the member 51, as by welding or the like.

The bracket 87 is actuated to and fro along the track 103 by the hydraulic cylinder 89. The cylinder 89 is secured to the structure in a typical manner, i.e., the cylinder body being attached to rigid structure such as the member 47 and the piston or actuating rod being attached to the bracket 87.

One of the ends of the respective wire ropes 79, 81 are fixedly attached to a pair of wedge sockets 105, 107 (see FIGS. 5 and 6). The wedge sockets 105, 107 are pivotally attached respectively to a pair of lugs 109, 111 in the usual manner, i.e., the lugs 109, 111 and the sockets 105, 107 have suitably aligned apertures for receiving a pivot pin. The lugs 109, 111, being positioned adjacent opposite corners of the frame 59 substantially as depicted in FIGS. 5 and 6, are fixedly attached thereto in any well-known manner, such as welding or the like. The other ends of the respective wire ropes 79, 81 are respectively fixedly attached to a pair of elongated rodlike members 113, 115, the rodlike members terminating with a threaded portion for receiving adjusting nuts 117. The platelike members 9'9, 101 are provided with an aperture for respectively receiving the rodlike members 113, 115 and the nuts 117 are threadedly received by the members 113, 115 so that tightening of the nuts 117 against the members 99, 101 applies thrust to the members 113, 115 thereby applying the desired tension on the wire ropes 79, 81.

From FIGS. 3, 5 and 6 of the drawings, it may be seen that extending the hydraulic cylinder 89 (FIG. 5) drives the bracket 87 forward, applying tension on the wire rope 79 which in turn pulls the left end of the lower frame 59 rearwardly, i.e., the direction of pull being reversed by the wire rope 79 being received by the sheave 83. Conversely, retract ing the cylinder 89 (FIG. 6) drives the bracket 87 rearwardly which applies tension on the wire rope 81, thus pulling the lower frame 59 forwardly, i.e., the direction of pull being reversed by the wire rope 81 being received by the sheave 85.

From the foregoing, it will readily be seen that the slewing means 75, 77 provides the operator of the vehicle with the capability of slewing the lower frame 59 so as to permit proper seating thereof with the container 17 when the longitudinal axis of the lift vehicle 15 is not perpendicularly situated with respect to the longitudinal axis of the container 17, i.e., slewing is positively controlled remotely without bumping or touching the container 17. in other words, either side of the lower frame 59 can be remotely moved forward or backward independent one from the other or both sides can be moved forward or backward together.

The handling assembly 11 also includes a pair of guide means 119, 121 fixedly attached, as by welding or the like, to the lower frame 59 (FIG. 7). Since the guide means 119 is a mirror image of the guide means 121, a detailed disclosure of the guide means 119 will be intended to encompass the guide means 121. The guide means 119 comprises two substantially identical platelike members 123, 125 (FIGS. 6 and 7), formed from plate steel or the like having a shape substantially as depicted in FIG. 7. The member 123, being positioned as illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 7, i.e., adjacent the upper edge of the frame 59, is fixedly attached to the frame 59 in any wellknown manner, such as welding or the like. The member 125, being aligned directly beneath the member 123, is fixedly attached adjacent the lower edge of the frame 59 in any wellknown manner, such as welding or the like. The guide means 119 also includes a vertically disposed guide plate 127 for engaging the stanchion 31 as the frame 59 moves rearwardly.

From FIG. 7 of the drawings, it can be seen that the two guide plates 127, i.e., one for the guide means 119 and one for the guide means 121, cams the frame 59 laterally so that it is positioned centrally thereofwhen the frame 59 is moved rearwardly by the slewing means 75, 77 or when the mast 19 is tilted rearwardly (FIG. 8), for reasons yet to be disclosed.

The handiing assembly 11 also includes a pair of stabilizing means 129, 131 fixedly attached respectively in any wellknown manner, such as welding or the like, to the guide means 119, 121. The stabilizing means 129, 13] stabilize the frame 59 against the stanchions 31, 33 so as to prevent swaying of the container 17 when the vehicle 15 is in motion and at the same time preclude physical contact between the sides of the container 17 and the stanchions 31, 33 and/or other adjacent structure of the vehicle, thus obviating physical damage to the exterior of the container 17.

The stabilizing means 129 is identical to the stabilizing means 131 and comprises an elongated steel bar being vertically disposed and having the upper ends thereof fixedly at tached in any well-known manner, such as by welding or the like, to the respective guide means 119, 121. The upper ends of the respective stabilizing means 129, 131 are substantially flush with the upper plates 123 and are fixedly attached thereto, as by welding or the like. The stabilizing means 129, 131 are respectively fixedly attached in like manner to the lower platelike members 125 and extend downwardly therefrom so that the longitudinal axes thereof are substantially perpendicular to the plane of the frame 59. The respective stabilizing means 129, 131 contiguously engage the stanchions 31, 33 when the frame 59 is moved rearwardly, as described above.

It should be pointed out that the frame 59 includes a pair of downwardly directed bumpers 133, 135, positioned adjacent the respective ends thereof, as best viewed in FIG. 2. Additionally, the frame 59 includes the usual twistlocks 137 adjacent each comer thereof. The construction of the bumpers 133, and the twistlocks 137, as well as the actuating mechanism for the twistlocks 137, is well known to those skilled in the art and is contained in the previously mentioned United States of America Standards Institute pamphlet M. H. 5.14962 entitled "Specifications for Freight Containers."

it should be appreciated that operating a forklift vehicle 15 of the size required to lift containers having the specifications previously described. so as to align the minute twistlocks 137 into the respective sockets provided in the container 17 is not easily accomplished, even by an experienced operator. Accordingly, the handling assembly 11 of the present invention provides the operator with the means for making necessary minute adjustments for errors in any direction and within reasonable limits of magnitude after his initial approach to the container 17. First, the suspension means 61 yieldably suspending the lower spreader frame 59 provides quick and positive mating of out of level containers, e.g., the frame 59 will nest with the container 17 when one end of the container is 12 inches higher than the other. It should be pointed out that the operator is provided with the usual electrical signaling system which gives a positive indication that all locks are secured i.e., the system senses both the twisting of the locks and the seating of the frame 59 on the container 17.

Secondly, the operator is provided with a capability for side shifting the frame 59, thus permitting an adjustment when the lift truck 15 is not directly centered in relation to the container 17. The frame 59 can be side shifted a considerable distance, e.g., 9 inches to either side.

Thirdly, the operator is provided with the capability of slewing the frame 59 so he may properly seat the frame 59 even when the longitudinal axis of the lift vehicle 15 is not perpendicularly aligned with the longitudinal axis ofthe container 17. Each end of the frame 59 can be moved, e.g., 9 inches forward or 4 inches backward, independent of the other end, or both ends can be moved forward or backward together.

Fourthly, stability of the container 17 is assured while the truck 15 is in motion, i.e., the mast 19 is tilted rearwardly and the left and right slewing means may be operated to bring both ends of the frame 59 rearwardly, thus contiguously engaging the stabilizing means 129, 131 respectively with the stanchions 31,33.

Fifthly, the container 17 is always protected because it is held at a spaced-apart relationship from the lift vehicle 15, even while being transported. An important feature of the present invention is that the container 17 is never touched except by the twistlocks 137.

Sixthly, the handling assembly 11 is designed so that it may be quickly removed from the fork carriage 13 and/or reconfigured to a conventional forklift, thus providing greater versatility for the vehicle 15.

Although the invention has been described and illustrated with respect to a preferred embodiment thereof, it is not to be so limited since changes and modifications may be made therein which are within the full intended scope of the invention.

lclaim:

1. The combination with a forklift vehicle having a lift mast, of a cargo container handling assembly for facilitating lifting standardized freight handling containers, said assembly comprising an upper substantially horizontally disposed frame assembly, means supporting said upper frame assembly from said mast, a lower substantially horizontally disposed rectangular frame assembly, elongated, flexible, vertically extending means yieldably suspending said lower frame assembly below and from said upper frame assembly so as to permit an out of level situated container to be picked up by a level situated lift vehicle, said lower frame assembly including grasping means adjacent each corner thereof for grasping and locking the upper four corners of the container thereto, and slewing means adjacent each end of said handling assembly for slewing said lower frame assembly relative to said upper frame assembly.

2. The assembly of claim 1 in which said means supporting said upper frame assembly from said mast comprises an inner fork carriage assembly movably mounted on said mast for vertical movement, an outer carriage assembly movably mounted on said inner carriage assembly for horizontal movement, and a pair of vertical stanchions supported on said outer carriage and to which said upper frame assembly is attached.

3. The assembly of claim 2, in which is included stabilizing means interacting between said lower frame assembly and said stanchions for stabilizing said lower frame assembly against said stanchions when the mast of the lift vehicle is tilted back towards the vehicle so as to prevent swaying of the container when the vehicle is in motion while at the same time precluding physical contact between the sides of the container and said stanchions and the adjacent structure of the vehicle.

4, The assembly of claim 2 in which is included guide means for guiding said lower frame assembly centrally thereof as said lower frame assembly is moved rearward towards said stanchions to engage said stabilizing means.

5 The assembly of claim I in which said slewing means comprises a pair of flexible elongated members respectively having the one ends thereof attached adjacent opposite corners of said lower frame assembly, a pair of sheaves attached adjacent opposite corners of said upper frame assembly respectively receiving said flexible members intermediate thereof, a bracket slidably attached to said upper frame as sembly having the other ends of said flexible members attached thereto, and actuating means attached to said upper frame assembly slidably driving said bracket selectively to and fro so as to apply tension to one of said flexible members for slewing said lower frame assembly in one direction and to apply tension to the other of said flexible members for slewing said lower frame assembly in the opposite direction.

6. The combination with a lift vehicle having a lift mast, ofa cargo container handling assembly for facilitating lifting standardized freight handling containers, said assembly comprising a inner fork carriage assembly movably mounted on said mast for vertical movement, an outer carriage assembly movably mounted on said inner carriage assembly for horizontal movement, a pair of vertical stanchions supported on said outer carriage, an upper substantially horizontally disposed frame assembly fixedly mounted on said pair of vertical stanchions adjacent the upper ends thereof and extending forwardly therefrom, a lower substantially horizontally disposed rectangular frame assembly, means yieldably suspending said lower frame assembly from said upper frame assembly so as to permit an out of level situated container to be picked up by a level situated lift vehicle, said lower frame assembly including grasping means adjacent each corner thereof for grasping and locking the upper four corners of the container thereto, and slewing means adjacent each end of said handling assembly for slewing said lower frame assembly relative to said upper frame assembly said slewing means comprising a pair of flexible elongated members respectively having the one ends thereof attached adjacent opposite corners of said lower frame assembly, a pair of sheaves attached adjacent opposite corners of said upper frame assembly respectively receiving said flexible members intermediate thereof, a bracket slidably attached to said upper frame assembly having the other ends of said flexible members attached thereto, and actuating means attached to said upper frame assembly slidably driving said bracket selectively to and fro so as to apply tension to one of said flexible members for slewing said lower frame assembly in one direction and to apply tension to the other of said flexible members for slewing said lower frame assembly in the op posite direction.

7. The assembly of claim 6 in which is included stabilizing means interacting between said lower frame and said stanchions for stabilizing said lower frame against said stanchions when the mast of the lift vehicle [5 tilted back towards the vehicle so as to prevent swaying of the container when the vehicle is in motion while at the same time precluding physical contact between the sides of the container and said stanchions and the adjacent structure of the vehicle,.

8. The assembly of claim 7 in which is included guide means for guiding said lower frame centrally thereof as said lower frame is moved rearward toward said stanchions to engage said stabilizing means

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3870180 *May 21, 1973Mar 11, 1975Taylor Machine WorksApparatus for connecting a spreader assembly to a vehicle lift
US4093090 *Nov 29, 1974Jun 6, 1978Rpc CorporationSpreader for lifting containers
US4149747 *Mar 31, 1975Apr 17, 1979Rpc CorporationGrappler spreader for closely stacking cargo containers
US4201511 *May 24, 1978May 6, 1980Potain Poclain Materiel (P.P.M.)Device for handling containers
US4354794 *Aug 11, 1980Oct 19, 1982Towmotor CorporationCarriage assembly
US4482285 *Aug 12, 1982Nov 13, 1984Raygo, Inc.Load carrier assembly
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US7014234 *May 14, 2002Mar 21, 2006Peter Walker WalkerIntegrated corner casting locking mechanism for shipping containers
US8177463Mar 9, 2011May 15, 2012Peter J WalkerSystem for connecting and disconnecting containers from a base
US20030214143 *May 14, 2002Nov 20, 2003Peter WalkerSystem for securing a container
US20090252569 *Mar 23, 2009Oct 8, 2009Walker Peter JSystem for securing containers with multiple embodiments
US20110155614 *Jul 10, 2009Jun 30, 2011Peck & Hale, L.L.C.Universal container locking system
US20110217139 *Sep 8, 2011Walker Peter JSystem for connecting and disconnecting containers from a base
US20150030422 *Feb 19, 2013Jan 29, 2015Elme Spreader AbSide lift spreader
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Classifications
U.S. Classification414/608, 294/81.4
International ClassificationB66F9/18
Cooperative ClassificationB66F9/186
European ClassificationB66F9/18H
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 10, 1992ASAssignment
Owner name: BARCLAYS BUSINESS CREDIT, INC.
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:TAYLOR MACHINE WORKS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:006085/0809
Effective date: 19911228
Apr 10, 1992AS06Security interest
Owner name: BARCLAYS BUSINESS CREDIT, INC. A CORPORATION OF CT
Effective date: 19911228
Owner name: TAYLOR MACHINE WORKS, INC.
Apr 7, 1983AS06Security interest
Owner name: BARCLAYSAMERICAN/BUSINESS CREDIT, INC., 2302 WEST
Effective date: 19830303
Owner name: TAYLOR MACHINE WORKS, INC., A MI CORP.
Apr 7, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: BARCLAYSAMERICAN/BUSINESS CREDIT, INC., 2302 WEST
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:TAYLOR MACHINE WORKS, INC., A MI CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004117/0444
Effective date: 19830303