Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3633839 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 11, 1972
Filing dateJan 29, 1970
Priority dateJan 29, 1970
Publication numberUS 3633839 A, US 3633839A, US-A-3633839, US3633839 A, US3633839A
InventorsClark William Russel
Original AssigneeEddystone Machinery Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Winding sheet material with threading device
US 3633839 A
Abstract
In a multidrum winder for sheet material, commonly called a cloth winder, in which a roll of sheet material first winds on a shell supported on the entering drum and then winds on a shell supported on the takeoff drum or on the middle drum and the takeoff drum, improved threading devices are provided to assure that the forward cut end of the sheet material will not only start a reverse bend around the new or rear shell, but will continue backwards following the outside of that shell. In one form of the invention pneumatic jets are provided blowing the forward cut end against the new or rear shell at the side remote from the takeoff drum. In other forms of the invention the forward cut end of the sheet material is secured to the new shell as by adhesive tape or by staples.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor William Russel Clark Jenkintown, Pa. [21] Appl. No. 6,856 [22] Filed Jan. 29, 1970 [45] Patented Jan. 11, 1972 73] Assignee Eddystone Machinery Company Chester, Pa.

[54] WINDING SHEET MATERIAL WITH THREADING DEVICE 3 Claims, 9 Drawing Figs.

[52] U.S. Cl 242/56 R, 242/66, 242/74 [51] Int. Cl B65h 19/20, B65h 19/28 [50] Field of Search 242/56, 56 A, 56.2, 56.6, 56.9, 58.1, 64, 65, 66, 74

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,477,657 11/1969 Norbisrath 242/56 2,537,588 l/l951 Husson 242/56 2,361,795 10/1944 Roesen 242/56 3,049,311 8/1962 Birch, Sr 242/56 3,066,882 12/1962 Havens et a1. 242/56 3,134,553 5/1964 De Gelleke 242/56 3,276,710 10/1966 Zernov et al 242/56 X 3,365,992 1/1968 Dreher 242/56 X FOREIGN PATENTS 750,112 6/1956 Great Britain 242/56 841,213 7/1960 Great Britain 242/56 Primary ExaminerStanley N. Gilreath Assistant Examiner-Werner H. Schroeder Attorney-Jackson, Jackson & Chovanes ABSTRACT: In a multidrum winder for sheet material, commonly called a cloth winder, in which a roll of sheet material first winds on a shell supported on the entering drum and then winds on a shell supported on the takeoff drum or on the middle drum and the takeoffdrum, improved threading devices are provided to assure that the forward cut end of the sheet material will not only start a reverse bend around the new or rear shell, but will continue backwards following the outside of that shell. In one form of the invention pneumatic jets are provided blowing the forward cut end against the new or rear shell at the side remote from the takeoff drum. In other forms of the invention the forward cut end of the sheet material is secured to the new shell as by adhesive tape or by staples.

PATENTED JAN! 1 1972 3633:3359

SHEET 2 BF 3 WINDING SHEET MATERIAL WITH THREADING DEVICE DISCLOSURE OF INVENTION The present invention relates to a winder for sheet material, such as cloth, plastic, paper or foil, provided with threading means.

A purpose of the invention is to apply pneumatic jets redially toward the new shell on the third or fourth or the third and fourth quadrants of the first turn of the new roll so as to make the sheet material adhere smoothly to the new or rear shell and avoid wrinkles or laps.

A further purpose is to secure the forward cut end to the new shell during its first turn by applying adhesive tape to the new shell and the sheet material or by metallic fastening means such as staples.

Further purposes appear in the specifications and the claims.

FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic longitudinal vertical section of a winder for sheet material according to the invention, the section being taken just inside the frame at the end.

FIG. 2 is an enlargement of a portion of FIG. 1 slightly modified for convenience in illustration and showing the pneumatic jets engaging the forward end of the sheet material on the side remote from the takeoff drum.

FIGS. 3 to 6 illustrate in diagrammatic longitudinal vertical section a modified form of the device of the invention in which adhesive tape is applied to the shell and the forward cut end of the sheet material.

FIG. 3 shows the shell with the applicator in remote position.

FIG. 4 shows the shell and applicator with the sheet material right after the cut as the forward cut end is moving around the second quadrant of the first turn, while the applicator is moving downward.

FIG. 5 shows the applicator having just applied adhesive tape to the shell ahead of the forward cut end and engaged in applying the adhesive tape to the outside of the sheet material immediately behind the forward cut end.

FIG. 6 illustrates the applicator in the process of retraction, illustrating the cutoff of the strip of adhesive tape.

FIGS. 7 and 8 show a modification of the device of the invention in which metallic fastenings (staples) are applied to the sheet material immediately back of the forward cut end.

FIG. 7 is a diagrammatic fragmentary rear elevation showing the staple applicators.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged section of FIG. 7 on the line 88.

FIG. 9 is a side elevation of a pneumatic stapler which is preferred instead of the mechanical stapler shown in FIG. 8.

In the prior art, drum winders for sheet material such as cloth, plastic, paper and foil are usually of the two-drum type, as shown for example in Aulen U.S. Pat. No. 2,676,764, granted Apr. 27, 1964 for Web Winder; Aulen U.S. Pat. 2,619,298, granted Nov. 25, 1952 for Web Winder; or Aulen U.S. Pat. No. 3,061,221, granted Oct. 30, 1962 for Winding Machine; or of the three-drum type as shown by Aulen U.S. Pat. No. 3,045,940, granted July 24, 1962 for Three-Drum Winder.

In two-drum winders and three-drum winders, once the roll has wound to a certain size on the entering drum, it is shifted to the takeoff drum in a two-drum winder or to the middle drum and the takeoff drum in a three-drum winder and wound to its full size. In the present invention as a matter of preference 1 illustrate a three-drum winder, but it will be understood that the invention can be applied equally well to a two-drum winder.

When the roll winding wholly or partly on the takeoff drum has reached its full size, the sheet material is cut by raising a cutter between the entering drum and the takeoff drum in a two-drum winder, or between the entering drum and the middle drum in a three-drum winder. The knife or cutter may be of any suitable character and the nature of the cutter is not critical in the present invention.

On the cutter frame or gate, which carries the knife or cutter, are threading fingers which encounter the forward end of the cut sheet material which must be started on the new roll. Prior to the cut a new or rear shell has been turning on the sheet material as it passes over the entering drum. The threading fingers provided by the cutter frame tend to make the forward cut end reverse direction and climb along the outer surface of the new or rear shell.

In order to make the sheet material continue around the surface of the new or rear shell, threading devices shown in Aulen U.S. Pat. No. 2,676,764, above referred to, are applied against the new or rear shell on the side remote from the takeoff drum. In the Aulen patent these are belts which are turning with the new or rear shell and which cause the forward end of the sheet material to continue along the surface of the shell as it forms the third quadrant and part of the fourth quadrant of the first turn of the new roll.

The device of Aulen U.S. Pat. No. 2,676,764 has proved to be quite effective for ordinary cloth, plastic, foil and paper. However, more recently sheet materials are being wound on cloth winders which are much more stiff and nonresilient, and which require the application of additional force to make them form a smooth first turn on the new roll, avoiding wrin kles, overlaps and unevennesses. These difficult materials include carpets and other floor coverings, heavy plastics and papers, and thicker and stiffer foils.

The present invention contemplates applying a bending force against the sheet material to hold it in place against the outside of the new or rear shell by pneumatic jets, or actually fastening the sheet material to the new or rear shell as by adhesive tape or metallic fastenings.

The winder of the invention as conventionally illustrated comprises a frame 20 having three parallel horizontal shafts 21, 22, and 23 each of which is driven in the same direction by suitable driving means. The shaft 21 is supported in the frame by suitable bearings and has keyed thereon a horizontal entering drum 24. The shaft 22 is journaled on the frame in suitable bearings and has keyed thereon a horizontal middle drum 25. The shaft 23 is journaled on the frame in suitable bearings and has keyed thereon a horizontal takeoff drum 26. A suitable driving interconnection is provided between the drums which are parallel to one another. The takeoff drum will desirably be lower than the entering drum and the middle drum in the preferred embodiment. The winding machine above the entering drum has upwardly moving receiving pivot jaws 27 which are downwardly urged by piston and piston rod combinations 28 in pneumatic cylinders 30 supported on the sides in the frame. The upwardly moving receiving pivot jaws 27 pivotally support the pivot of the spitz bar of the new or rear shell 31.

Between the entering and the middle drum there are at the sides of the machine suitable guideways 32 which guide a cutter frame or gate 33 which has at its upper end a knife or cutter 34 inclined toward the direction from which the sheet material comes and also mounting upwardly directed threading fingers 35 as well known in the art. The guideways 32 are preferably slightly inclined toward the direction from which the sheet material comes.

While the sheet material is winding on the takeoff drum and the middle drum or on the takeoff drum, a new or rear shell 31 is placed in the jaws 27 above the entering drum and turns with the entering drum and the sheet material on it just prior to cutting. This new or rear shell can be inserted manually or by rails 40 pivoted at 41 on the frame. At the time of cutting, the gate or cutter frame 33 rises with the knife or cutter and the threading fingers 35 tend to make the forward end of the sheet material 43 reverse its direction following the surface of the new or rear shell 31. The roll 44 then winds as in conventional winding practice on the entering drum until it increases in size and is ready for transfer.

Transfer to the takeoff drum or to the takeoff drum and the middle drum is preferably made by transfer arms 45 pivoted on shaft 46 on the frame extending down to a position below the pivot ends 47 of the shell. The transfer arms 45 can be manipulated by a lever or the like or can be operated, for example, by a pneumatic cylinder, not shown. As the roll 44 moves forward to a position above the middle drum, the roll pivots come in contact with letdown arms 48 which are pivoted on shaft 22 and operated pneumatically. Pneumatic cylinder 50 pivoted on the frame at 51 has a piston and rod combination 52 which is pivotally connected at 53 with lever 54 keyed on shaft 55 journaled on the frame at 56. The shaft 55 also has keyed thereon at opposite ends levers 57 which are pivotally connected at 58 to adjustable links 60 which pivotally connect at 61 to intermediate positions on the letdown arms 48.

When the letdown arms have completed their operation, the roll 44 rests against and turns with the takeoff drum 26 and the middle drum 25. At this position pivot jaws 62 sliding in guideways 63, which extend diagonally upwardly and forwardly at the front of the machine, engage the pivot ends 47 of the roll 44. Each of the pivot ends is either upwardly or downwardly urged by a piston rod 64 which has a piston acting in a pneumatic cylinder 65 which is pivoted on the frame at 66. It will be evident that the location of the pivots with respect to the jaws will be changed depending on whether the pressure is to be exerted upwardly or downwardly.

When the roll 44 of sheet material is wound to a size suitable to doffing, it has, of course, pushed the pivot jaws 62 up along the guideway 63 against or with the action of cylinders 65. At this point cutting is to be accomplished. In order to doff and load the roll of sheet material on a truck, hoist or the like, a cloffing roll 67 is actuated, placed below the roll of sheet material, and pivoted on an axis 68 parallel to the axis of the roll 44, on bearing supports 70 which are mounted on piston rods 71 connected with pistons acting in pneumatic cylinders 72 on the frame. The jaws 62 must be raised at the time of doffing.

Referring now to the device shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, a series of threading arms extend across the machine mounted on shaft above the drums and not shown, positioning spray nozzles 81 directed radially toward the new or rear shell over the third quadrant, the fourth quadrant or the third quadrant and the fourth quadrant of the first turn of the sheet material 82 so as to apply a radial pressure to hold the sheet material against the new shell. The pressure of air or other gas used in the jets will suitably be of normal commercially obtainable range, such as 5 to 200 p.s.i.g.

In some cases, especially where the sheet material is relatively stiff and also slippery, there is difficulty in forming a smooth first turn around the new or rear shell and for this purpose I describe in FIGS. 3 to 6 a preferred embodiment of the invention using adhesive to secure the sheet material to the new shell. As there illustrated, a double-acting pneumatic ap plicator cylinder suitably mounted on the frame above the new or rear shell 31 has a piston and rod combination 91 which supports at various positions across the width of the machine a series of applicators 92. A roll of adhesive tape 93 is mounted on the device at each location and pressure adhesive tape 94 is pulled off the roll and fed around the outside of a pressure roller 95 pivotally mounted at the lower end of the applicator. The pressure roller 95 has keyed thereto a gear 96 which carries a radially extending planetary bracket 97 which has pivotally mounted at its outer end a planetary feed roller of a character well known in the art which will not adhere to the adhesive on the adhesive tape. The gear 96 meshes with a vertically extending rack 100 mounted on a bracket 101 which is separately supported and retracts out of the way once the adhesive tape has been applied.

The applicator is normally much further remote from the new shell than suggested by the position of FIG. 3 but prior to the cut it is advanced to the position of FIG. 3 with the bracket 101 and the rack 100. In FIG. 3 the adhesive tape is wrapped around the pressure roller 95 for most of one turn and it has a free end 102 which is held by the planetary feed roller 98.

In FIG. 4 the piston and rod combination 91 have advanced, more adhesive tape has been fed from the roll 93 and the planetary feed roller 98 has been turned one quadrant counterclockwise by gear 96 engaging rack 100. At this position the cut in the sheet material has been completed and the forward cut end 82 of the sheet material is beginning to advance over the second quadrant of the first turn of the new roll on the new or rear shell 31.

In FIG. 5 the pressure active adhesive layer on the free end of the adhesive tape 102 has adhered to the shell immediately before the forward cut end 82 of the sheet material has reached this point, and the piston and rod combination 91 have advanced further so that the planetary motion produced by rack 100 has moved the planetary feed roller 98 out of the way and brought the pressure roller 95 into engagement with the adhesive tape having the adhesive layer downward immediately above the forward cut end 82 of the sheet material. A strip of sheet material thus is extending circumferentially and in adhesive contact first with the shell and then with the forward cut end of the sheet material to anchor the sheet material to the shell.

In FIG. 6 the piston and rod combination 91 has retracted, the shell has turned farther around the entering drum and a long strip of adhesive 103 extends upward more or less tangentially from the point at which the adhesive tape engages the outside of the sheet material. At this point a cutter 104 cuts off the adhesive tape and the entire application mechanism including the applicator, the rack, and the cutter 104 is retracted out of the way. The adhesive tape strips are rolled down against the outside of the sheet material by the entering drum.

In some applications of the invention, the procedure of the invention can be used to apply tape having adhesive on both faces to a shell automatically prior to making the cut. This represents a considerable saving in time over the present manual tape application.

In the form shown in FIGS. 7 and 8, instead of fastening the forward cut end of the strip material to the new or rear shell by adhesive tape, penetrating metallic fasteners, in this case staples, are applied at intervals along the width of the machine. These are quite suitable as the shell is ordinarily made of fiber board or wood. A threading arm supported in any suitable way as, for example, by a shaft at the top of the frame (not shown), has mounted at intervals staplers 111 which are lowered into position at the time the staples are to be applied immediately after the cut, and which apply staples 112 through the forward cut end of the sheet material and radially into the new or rear shell 31 just as the forward cut end comes to a position at which adherence to the shell at the first turn is important, that is, near the beginning of or during the third quadrant of the first turn. The staplers can be energized in unison and synchronized to follow the cut by actuating mechanism 113 as well known. The stapler may be a commercial stapler, such as Bostitch, manufactured by Textron Company.

In the preferred embodiment of the stapler, as shown in FIG. 9, when the staplers come down to engage the sheet material near its forward cut end and fasten it to the new or rear shell, a feeler 114 slightly ahead of the head 115 on stapler 111 opens air valve 116 to operate pneumatic stapler 111. The feeler 114 has a cut out portion through which space the staple 112 is applied. This stapler is manufactured by Senco Products, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio, called 1. B. Series.

In view of my invention and disclosure, variations and modifications to meet individual whim or particular need will doubtless become evident to others skilled in the art, to obtain all or part of the benefits of my invention without copying the structure and method shown, and Itherefore claim all such insofar as they fall within the reasonable spirit and scope of my claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A winder for sheet material using shells and comprising a pair of horizontal spaced parallel drums turning in the same direction, one of which is an entering drum and the other of which is a takeoff drum, means for pivotally supporting a forward shell in rotatable position while the sheet material is wound thereon and while the outer circumference of the roll being wound and the forward shell are turning at least in part with the takeoff drum, means for pivotally supporting a rear shell in contact with the sheet material above the entering drum and turning with the entering drum, and cutting means rising from below the sheet material between the drums to cut the sheet material and bend the forward cut end over the rear shell, in combination with automatic means for attaching the forward cut end of the sheet material to the rear shell immediately after the cut, in which the automatic means for attaching comprises means for applying adhesive tape, having adhesive on one side only, to the rear shell forward of the forward cut end and to the sheet material near the forward cut end.

2. A winder for sheet material using shells and comprising a pair of horizontal spaced parallel drums turning in the same direction, one of which is a takeoff drum, means for pivotally supporting a forward shell in rotatable position while the sheet material is wound thereon and while the outer circumference of the roll being wound and the forward shell are turning at least in part with the takeoff drum, means for pivotally supporting a rear shell in contact with the sheet material above the entering drum and turning with the entering drum, and cutting means rising from below the sheet material between the drums to cut the sheet material and bend the forward cut end over the rear shell, in combination with automatic means for attaching the forward cut end of the sheet material to the rear shell immediately after the cut, in which the automatic means for attaching comprises means for stapling the sheet material to the rear shell adjacent the forward cut end.

3. A method of winding sheet material on an entering drum and a takeoff drum, which comprises passing the sheet material above the entering drum in contact with it and winding a roll of sheet material at leas partially on the takeoff drum, positioning a new shell against the sheet material above the entering drum and turning the new shell by the motion of the sheet material and the entering drum, cutting the sheet material between the drums and bringing the forward cut end of the sheet material around the new shell and automatically inserting penetrating fasteners through the sheet material into the rear shell after the cut.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2361795 *Jul 16, 1943Oct 31, 1944Wood Newspaper Mach CorpWeb winding
US2537588 *Aug 27, 1946Jan 9, 1951Eddystone Machinery & Mill SupWeb winder
US3049311 *Oct 22, 1959Aug 14, 1962Birch Brothers IncApparatus for web winding
US3066882 *Mar 21, 1960Dec 4, 1962Dow Chemical CoRoll starting method and mechanism for a rewinder
US3134553 *Jan 17, 1961May 26, 1964Cameron Machine CoTucking means for a web-winding machine
US3276710 *Oct 30, 1964Oct 4, 1966Zerand CorpMeans and method for forming a butt splice in a running web
US3365992 *Sep 23, 1965Jan 30, 1968Donald F. DreherWeb severing apparatus
US3477657 *Jan 30, 1968Nov 11, 1969Spezial Papier Mas Fab AugustApparatus for measuring and winding a given length of ribbon onto a spool
GB750112A * Title not available
GB841213A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3770542 *Aug 25, 1971Nov 6, 1973Johnson & JohnsonAdhesive tape and method
US3883084 *Sep 6, 1973May 13, 1975Nishimura Seisakusho CoFilm wrapping apparatus
US3994448 *Dec 9, 1975Nov 30, 1976N. Schlumberger & CieDevice for forming an initial bight of a roving around a bobbin in an automatic textile winding machine
US4204650 *Jan 23, 1978May 27, 1980Magnat Corp.Apparatus for replacing rotating mandrels on which a web is wound
US4408727 *Apr 14, 1980Oct 11, 1983Jagenberg Werke AgMethod and apparatus for the automatic severing and reattachment of a web
US4422588 *Sep 28, 1981Dec 27, 1983The Black Clawson CompanySlitter-rewinder system
US4519553 *Jul 2, 1984May 28, 1985International Business Machines CorporationMultiple spindle winding apparatus
US4635869 *Oct 15, 1985Jan 13, 1987King Instrument CorporationApparatus and method for initiating a tape winding operation
US5620544 *Jun 7, 1995Apr 15, 1997Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyTape roll liner/tab, application apparatus and method
US5885391 *Mar 5, 1997Mar 23, 1999Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyTape roll liner/tab application apparatus and method
US6264130Sep 13, 1999Jul 24, 2001Faustel, Inc.Duplex web roll winding and splicing apparatus
US6405969Feb 28, 2000Jun 18, 20023M Innovative Properties CompanyCoreless adhesive tape winding mandrel and method
US6617007Jan 5, 1999Sep 9, 20033M Innovative Properties CompanyTape roll liner/tab, application apparatus and method
US7857929 *May 22, 2007Dec 28, 2010The Yokohama Rubber Co., Ltd.Method of producing pneumatic tire
WO1987002343A1 *Nov 13, 1985Apr 23, 1987King Instrument CorpApparatus & method for initiating a tape winding operation
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/527.2, 242/532.3, 242/542.3, 242/532.4, 242/532, 242/584, 242/542
International ClassificationB65H19/28, B65H19/22
Cooperative ClassificationB65H19/2253, B65H19/28, B65H2301/41361
European ClassificationB65H19/28, B65H19/22B4