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Publication numberUS3635202 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 18, 1972
Filing dateJun 18, 1970
Priority dateJun 20, 1969
Also published asDE1931236A1, DE1931236B2
Publication numberUS 3635202 A, US 3635202A, US-A-3635202, US3635202 A, US3635202A
InventorsHohne Gerd, Issler Jorg, Roth Helmut, Strelow Gert
Original AssigneeBosch Gmbh Robert
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ignition arrangements for internal combustion engines
US 3635202 A
Abstract
A thyristor connected in circuit with the ignition capacitor is triggered to permit the capacitor to discharge at the same that a thyristor opening switch is turned off. Separate transistor circuits for triggering each of the thyristors are controlled by the operation of the engine-operated circuit interrupter.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Issler ct air [451 Jan. 18,1972

IGNITION ARRANGEMENTS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTTON ENGTNES Inventors: .iorg lssler, Stuttgart; Ger-d iiohne, Ludwigsburg; Gert Strelow; ll-lelmut Roth, both of Stuttgart, all of Germany Robert Bosch G.m.b.ll-l., Stuttgart, Germany Filed: June 1%, 1970 Appl. No.: 47,510

Assignee:

Foreign Application Priority Data June 20, 1969 Germany ..P 19 31 236.8

11.8. C1 ..1123/148 E, 315/209 Int. Cl ....lFi)2p 3/02, F02p 3/06 Field of Search 123/148 E [56] References Cited.

UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,331,362 7/1967 Mitchell ..l23/l48 E 3,196,313 7/1965 Quinn ..l23/l48 E 3,383,556 5/1968 Tamer ..123/148 E Primary Examiner-Mark M. Newman Assistant Examiner-Cort Flint AttorneyMichael S. Striker A thyristor connected in circuit with the ignition capacitor is triggered to permit the capacitor to discharge at the same that a thyristor opening switch is turned off. Separate transistor circuits for triggering each of the thyristors are controlled by the operation of the engine-operated circuit interrupter.

ABSTRACT 35 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures PATENIED JAN 1 8 mg SHEET 2 OF 3 INVENTORS I Jor'g ISSLER Gerd HCH N E Gert STRELOW Helmut RGTH OOP NQE

their ATTORNEY PATENIED JAN 1 8m sum 3 or 3 S RR wH O E T O NSHOTIDH EBHS-T. V ..L U W M PM W e e e JGGH theiPATTORiNEY IGNITION ARRANGEMENTS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention relates to ignition arrangements for internal combustion engines.

In a prior art ignition arrangement the output side of the spark coil is connected in an ignition circuit having at least one spark plug. The input side is connected in the ignition capacitor discharge circuit, which has an electronic discharge switch, and in a DC circuit having an electronic opening switch and connected directly to a DC source. To produce a spark at the plug the electronic discharge switch is triggered, while the opening switch is turned off. The electric energy stored in the ignition capacitor and the magnetic energy stored in the spark coil together produce the ignition voltage in the ignition circuit.

An arrangement of this kind ensures an effective ignition spark even if the spark plugs are badly fouled and the fuel-air mixture is poorly mixed.

Basic circuits for ignition arrangements of this kind are known (for example, see US. Pat. No. 3,280,809). They do not, however, ensure satisfactory control during the charging and discharging of the ignition capacitor. In one such ignition arrangement, which is electronically controlled, the control circuit for the discharge switch and the opening switch is so connected to the ignition capacitor that the charging current pulse to the latter can easily cause faulty: triggering.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION An object of the invention is an ignition arrangement that ensures satisfactory control when charging and discharging the ignition capacitor.

The invention consists essentially of the combination of spark coil means having an input side with primary winding means and an output side with secondary winding means, at

least one spark plug connected to the secondary winding means to receive induced electrical energy therefrom to cause the spark plug to spark, a discharge circuit connected to the primary winding means and including ignition capacitor means and electronic discharge switch means for periodically supplying electrical energy to the primary winding means by the discharge of the ignition capacitor means whenever the discharge switch means is conductive, a DC circuit connected to the primary winding means, a source of DC in the DC circuit, and voltage-operated electronic opening switch means arranged in the DC circuit and connected to the spark coil means so that a voltage thereof when the ignition capacitor means discharges causes the opening switch means to become nonconductive, whereby electric energy stored in the ignition capacitor means and magnetic energy stored in the spark coil means together produce the ignition voltage.

The novel features which are considered as characteristic for the invention are set forth in particular in the appended claims. The invention itself, however, both as to its construction and its method of operation, together with additional objects and advantages thereof, will be best understood from the following description of specific embodiments when read in connection with the accompanying drawing.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a circuit diagram of the ignition circuit;

FIG. 2 is a circuit diagram of the control circuit connected to the gates of the discharge and opening switches; and

FIGS. 3, 4, and 5 are three different embodiments of the spark coil and its connection to the opening switch.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The ignition arrangement of FIG. 1 is intended for an internal combustion engine, and comprises a spark coil 11, of which the output side, or secondary winding 12, is connected in the ignition circuit having a spark plug. Of course, there can be provided a series of spark plugs that an ignition distributor (not shown) connects at the correct moment to the ignition circuit, in a manner known in the prior art.

The input side of the spark coil has a main winding I4 and a storage winding 15, which together with the secondary 12 are wound on a common iron core I6. The main winding 14 is connected in a discharge circuit having an ignition capacitor 17. A discharge switch 18 opens and closes this circuit, and advantageously comprises a controlled rectifier, such as thyristor, of which the anode A1 is connected to the ignition capacitor 17 and the cathode KI is connected to the main winding 14. The junction 19 between the cathode and the main winding is connected to the positive line 20 of a direct current circuit. An operating switch 21 connects this line to the positive pole of a voltage source 22, which latter can be the battery of a motor vehicle. The junction 23 between the anode A1 and the ignition capacitor 17 is connected to the output 24 of a DC to AC converter 25, which is surrounded by a dot-dash line.

The DC to AC converter can be either a known singleended output converter or a known push-pull output converter. In the preferred example, a push-pull converter is chosen, the output of which comprises four diodes 27, 28, 29, and 30 connected in a bridge circuit 26. The two input terminals 31 and 32 of the bridge are connected to the secondary winding 33 of the converter transformer 34. The positive output terminal, or end, 24 is connected to the junction 23 and the negative output terminal, or end, 35 to a negative line 36 of the DC circuit. This line is connected to both the negative poleof the battery 22 and to ground. The secondary winding is wound on an iron core 37, which also carries a primary winding 38 and two feedback windings 39 and 40. A lead 41 connects together two ends of the feedback windings. The other ends of these two windings are connected by respective diodes 42 and 43 to the bases of 44 or 45 of the transistors 46 and 47. The emitters 48 and 49 of these transistors are connected together by a lead 50, which is also connected to the negative line 36 and to the anodes of two diodes 51 and 52. The diode 51, as well as the diode 42, is connected by its cathode to the base 44 of transistor 46; the cathodes of diodes 52 and 43 are connected to the base 45 of transistor 47. The collector 53 of transistor 46 is connected to one end of the primary 38, and the collector 54 of transistor 47 is connected to the other end. The primary 38 has a center tap 55, which is connected to the positive line 20.

Connected to the positive output terminal 24 of the DC to AC converter 25 is a monitoring circuit 56, surrounded by a dot-dash line. This circuit monitors the voltage present at the terminal 24, and shuts off the converter when the voltage ex ceeds a known value. To this end, the junction 24 is connected by a lead 57 and a resistor 58 to the base 59 of a transistor 60. This base is connected to the negative line 36 by a resistor 62 and, connected in series therewith, a resistor 63 shunting a resistor 61 having a negative temperature coefficient. The emitter 64 of transistor 60 is connected to the emitter 66 of transistor 67 and also connected to the anode of a diode 65 having its cathode connected to the negative line 36. The collector 68 of transistor 60 is connected by a resistor 69 to the positive line 20 and by a parallel-connected capacitor 70 and resistor 71 to the base 72 of transistor 67. A resistor 74 connects the collector 73 of this transistor to the base 76 of a transistor 75, the base being connected by a parallel connected capacitor 77 and resistor 78 to the positive line 20. The emitter 79 of transistor is directly connected to the positive line 20, and a resistor 81 connects the collector to the lead 41 of the DC to AC converter 25.

The storage winding 15 of the spark coil Ill is connected to a DC circuit that, when the operating switch 21 is closed, is connected by the positive and negative lines 20 and 36 to the voltage source 22. The storage winding 15 has one end con nected to the junction 19 and therefore to the positive line 20. The other end is connected by an electronic opening switch 83 to the negative line 36. A limiting resistor 82 is advantageously connected in series with the switch 83, which consists of a voltage operated rectifier, preferably a thyristor, of which anode A2 is connected to the storage winding and the cathode K2 to the negative line 36.

The ignition arrangement works in the manner that, when a spark is produced, the discharge switch 18 conducts and the opening switch 83 does not conduct, so that the electrical energy stored in the ignition capacitor 17 and the magnetic energy stored in the spark coil 11 together cause the necessary sparking voltage in the ignition circuit. To accomplish this, a voltage in the spark coil 11, caused by the discharging of the ignition capacitor 17, renders the switch 83 nonconductive. This voltage opposes the voltage, supplied by the battery 22 and applied across the anode-cathode path A2-K2, which normally renders the switch conductive. This voltage from the spark coil nullifies the effect of the battery voltage. In the present embodiment, the opening switch 83 is turned off by a voltage induced in the storage winding 15 by the main winding 14. It has been shown to be advantageous if the main and storage windings 14 and 15 have at least approximately the same number of turns. The capacity of the ignition capacitor 17 is advantageously larger than the sum of the capacitances of the spark coil output side referred to the main winding 14.

Moreover, it is useful to shunt the opening switch 83 by a series connected resistor 84 and capacitor 85. It is also beneficial to shunt the switch with a voltage stabilizing component 86, such as a voltage dependent resistor, or with a capacitor 87 and resistor 88 connected in parallel and shown in broken line. A diode 89 can be connected as shown in the circuit so that it does not pass current when the switch 83 is turned off.

The control circuit shown in FIG. 2 has proved itself to be particularly suitable for the ignition arrangement of FIG. 1. The control electrode, or gate, S1 of the discharge switch 18 is connected by a first control resistor 90 to the positive line and by a first control capacitor 91 to a second control resistor 92, which is connected to the negative line 36. A capacitor 93 can be used to shunt the first control resistor 90, and a limiting resistor 94 can be connected between the first control capacitor 91 and the gate S1. The junction 95 between the second control resistor 92 and the first control capacitor 91 is connected to the positive line 20 through the emitter-collector path El-Cl of a first transistor T1. This path composes a first switching path. The base B1 of this transistor is so connected to the circuit interrupter 96 that when the latter is open the path El-Cl conducts. The circuit interrupter is coupled to an internal combustion engine, not shown.

One terminal of the circuit interrupter 96 is connected to the negative line 36, and the other terminal is connected to a resistor 97 connected to the positive line 20. This latter resistor allows the flow of a contact-clearing current. The interrupter terminal connected to the resistor 97 is also connected to the cathode of a decoupling diode 98, of which the anode is connected by a voltage-setting resistor 99 to a junction 100. This junction is located between a resistor 101 connected to the line 20 and a Zener diode 102, anode of which is connected to the line 36. A capacitor 103 advantageously shunts the Zener diode. The junction 104, located between the diode 98 and the resistor 99, is connected by a voltage-setting resistor 105 to the base B2 of a second transistor T2, of which the emitter E2 is connected to the anode of a stabilizing diode 106, the cathode of which is connected to the base B2. The collector C2 is connected to the-junction 100, and the emitter E2 is connected to the anode of a diode 107, which is connected by its cathode through a first charging resistor 108 to a second control capacitor 109 connected to the negative line 36. The emitter-collector path E2-C2 comprises a switching ath. p The first charging resistor 18 is shunted by a series-connected second charging resistor 110 and third control capacitor 111. The resistor 108 is also connected to the anode of a diode' 112, of which the cathode is connected through a discharge resistor 113 to the upper terminal of the circuit breaker 96. The negative terminal of the second control capacitor 109 is connected to the emitter E3 and collector C3 of a third transistor T3 by a respective resistor 115 and capacitor 114, which latter bypasses high-frequency interference. The other terminal of capacitor 109 is connected by a resistor 116 to the base B3. The emitter E3 is connected to the anode of a diode 117 connected to the base B3. A voltage-setting resistor 1 19 connects the collector C3 to the junction 100. Connected to the collector C3 is a differentiating capacitor 120, the other terminal of which is connected through a voltagesetting resistor 122 to the base 134 of a fourth transistor T4. This base is also connected to a voltage-setting resistor 123, connected to the junction 100, and to the cathode of a stabilizing diode 124 connected the line 36. The emitter E4 of the fourth transistor T4 is connected directly to the line 36, and the collector C4 both to a resistor 125 and to the base B5 of a fifth transistor T5. The resistor 125 is connected to the junction 100. The emitter E5 is connected directly to the line 36. The collector C5 is connected to a voltage-setting resistor 126, connected to the line 20, and to a voltage-setting resistor 127 connected to the base B1 of transistor T1. Each of the emitter-collector paths E3-C3, E4-C4, and ES-CS constitutes a switching path. The path B3-E3 is a control path.

When the circuit interrupter 96 is closed, the opening switch 83 is rendered conductive. To this end, the upper terminal of the interrupter is connected to the cathode of a decoupling diode 128, of which the anode is connected by a voltage-setting resistor 129 to the base B6 of a sixth transistor T6. A parallel-connected voltage-setting resistor 130 and high-frequency bypass capacitor 131 connect this base to the junction 100, to which the emitter E6 is also connected. The collector C6.is connected to a voltage-setting resistor 132, connected to the line 36, and to a fourth control capacitor 133. The other terminal of this capacitor is connected to a voltage-setting resistor 134, connected to the line 36, and to the anode of a charging diode 135. The cathode of the latter is connected to the line 36 through a series-connected fifth control capacitor 137 and third charging resistor 136. The series connection of the components 136, 137 is shunted by two series-connected resistors 138 and 139, of which the common junction 140 is connected to the base B7 of a seventh transistor T7 and through a capacitor 141 to the emitter E7, which latter is connected to the negative line 36. The collector C7 of the seventh transistor T7 is connected through two series-connected resistors 142 and 143 to the positive line 20. A common junction 144 of these latter two resistors is connected to the base B8 of an eighth transistor T8 and through a capacitor 145 to the positive line 20, which is also connected to the emitter E8 of a transistor T8. The collector C8 of a transistor T8 is connected to the minus line 36 through two scries-connected resistors 146 and 147, of which the common junction 148 is connected to the gate, or control electrode, S2 of the opening switch 83. The junction 148 is also connected through a capacitor 149 to the minus line 36. If necessary there can be provided, as in the present embodiment, a Zener diode 150 connected in parallel across the operating switch 21 and the battery 22. Each of the emitter-collector paths E6-C6, E7-C7, and E8-C8, constitutes a switching path. The path B8-E8 is a control path.

The ignition arrangement operates in the following manner. If the operating switch 21 is closed in order to start up the internal combustion engine, the DC to AC converter 25 begins to oscillate in a known manner and there appears at the output terminals 24 and 35 of rectifying bridge 26 a pulsating DC current, which charges the ignition capacitor 17 to a high voltage. This high voltage is controlled by the monitoring circuit 56. Before the high voltage can reach a dangerous value, the base 59 of a transistor 60 becomes so positive that the emitter-collector path 64-68 become conductive. As a consequence, the emitter-collector path 66-73 of the transistor 67 and therefore also the emitter-collector path 7980 of transistor 75 become nonconductive. The emitter-collector path 79-80 therefore breaks the connection between the positive line 20 and the lead 41, so that the DC to AC converter 25 is automatically shut off until the high voltage has fallen back to a normal value and the transistors 60, 67, and 75 are returned to their original states.

Ignition is begun by the opening of the circuit breaker 96, which causes the base B2 of the second transistor T2 to become sufficiently positive so that the emitter-collector path E2-C2 becomes conductive. The second control capacitor 109 charges through the resistor 101, the conductive emittercollector path Elf-C2, the diode 107, and both the first charging resistor 1118 and the second charging resistor 1111 and the third control capacitor 111. The base B3, therefore, becomes so positively biased that its emitter-collector path Eli-C3 becomes conductive. Consequently, the differentiating capacitor produces a negative voltage peak, which is conducted to the base 134 of the fourth transistor T4 and causes the emitter-collector path E4434 to become conductive. The voltage at the base B5 of the fifth transistor T5 becomes more and more conductive until its emitter-collector path ES-CS becomes positive and there is conducted to the base B1 of the first transistor T1 a potential which causes the emitter-collector path E1-C1 of the first transistor T1 to become conductive. The first control capacitor 91, which has previously been charged through the first control resistor 96, the limiting resistor 94, and the second control resistor 92, is now free to discharge through the first control resistor 91), the limiting resistor 94, and the conductive emitter-collector path E1C1 of the first transistor T1, so that the gate S1 of the discharge switch 18 becomes more positive in the cathode K1, and therefore the switching path Ail-K1 becomes conductive. The ignition capacitor 17 now discharges through the main winding 14, inducing in the secondary winding 12 an ignition voltage having a steep surge front. At the same time, there is induced in the storage winding 15 a voltage that opposes the voltage from the battery 22 and acts on the anode-cathode path A2442 of the opening switch 83 so that this path, which is also the switching path, is opened. From this moment on, the magnetic energy stored in the storage winding 15 also induces an ignition voltage in the secondary winding 12. It is important that the opposing voltage across the anode-cathode path A2-K2 occurs for a longer period of time than the deionization time of this path.

The ignition voltage in the spark coil 11 and the energy transfer are best if the voltage halfwave that first appears across the secondary winding 12, caused by the stored electrical energy, is negative, and if the subsequent voltage halfwave resulting from the change in charge of the electrical energy stored in the ignition capacitor 17 and from the stored magnetic energy, is positive. in this way it is possible to make these two voltage halfwave waves of approximately equal value. The consequent sparks at the spark plug 13, caused by the stored magnetic energy, are sufficiently strong.

The series-connected resistor 84 and capacitor 85 shunted across the opening switch 83 avoid dangerously high-voltage peaks when the opening switch is opened. The coupling of the storage winding 15 with the main winding 14 acts to protect the discharge switch 18. The voltage stabilizing component 86 prevents dangerously high voltages from appearing when the ignition circuit is opened. The same protection can be obtained from the parallel-connected capacitor 67 and resistor 88. The diode 89 prevents unnecessary damping of the ignition voltage.

If the circuit interrupter 96 is again closed, the emitter-collector path 132432 of the second transistor T2 is again nonconductive. The second control capacitor 109 is now free to discharge through the diode 112, a resistor 1 13, the circuit interrupter 96, and the negative line 36, as well as through the resistor 116, the base-emitter path Bit-E3 of the third transistor T3, and the resistor 115. The last-named discharge path, consisting of the resistor 116, the base-emitter path of the third transistor, and the resistor 115, ensures that the emitter-collector path E3-C3 remains temporarily conductive. in these conditions, opening of the circuit interrupter 96 caused by contact chatter cannot cause the differentiating capacitor to produce negative voltage peaks that will cause the discharge switch 18 to become conductive when it should remain nonconductive. The charging resistor 108, connected in series with the capacitor 109', ensures good protection against contact chatter of the circuit interrupter 96 even during greatly varying r.p.m.s of the internal combustion engme.

The series-connected second charging resistor 110 and the third control capacitor 111 ensure that the positive voltage at the base with respect to the emitter of the base emitter path B3-E3 rises very quickly, so that the emitter-collector path E3-C3 of this transistor is made conductive without appreciable delay.

The emitter-collector path E3-C3 of the third transistor is very quickly turned on, because the second control capacitor 1119 always remains somewhat charged through its connection to the junction 1110 by means of the resistor 118, the diode 117 and the resistor 116.

When the circuit interrupter 96 is closed, the base B6 of the sixth transistor T6 is so negatively biased that its emitter-collector path E6-C6 becomes conductive. As a consequence, the presence of the first control capacitor 133 ensures that a positive pulse appears at the anode of the charging diode 135. This pulse causes the flow of a charging current through the third charging resistor 136 and to the fifth control capacitor 137. This pulse also causes the base B7 of the seventh transistor T7 to become sufficiently positive so that the emitter-collector path E7-C7 becomes conductive. The base B8 of the eighth transistor T8 therefore becomes strongly negative and the emitter-collector path E8-C8 becomes conductive. The voltage consequently appearing across the resistor 147 causes the gate S2 to become positive with respect to the cathode K2, so that the switching path A2-K2 is once again triggered, and current from the source 22 once again can flow through it. If contact chatter of the circuit interrupter 96 should interfere with the triggering, the fifth control capacitor 137 temporarily supplies sufficient energy to the base B7 of the seventh transistor T7, so that the necessary triggering voltage at the gate S2 is maintained.

Those circuit components that are connected to the junction 100 do receive a lower voltage than that present on the line 20 and therefore at the source 22. This lower voltage, however, is stabilized and therefore even if the voltage at the source 22 varies, the ignition arrangement of the present invention operates in a dependable and satisfactory manner. The capacitor 103 bypasses interference pulses.

The Zener diode 150 is an additional protection against the voltage peaks that appear in the electrical circuit of the vehicle and are caused by other equipment. connected to the circuit.

Another embodiment of the ignition arrangement is shown in FIG. 3, wherein a single main winding 14 fulfills the functions of the main winding 14 and of the storage winding 15 of the embodiment shown in FIG. 1. The lower end of the main winding 14 is connected to both the ignition capacitor 17 and to the anode A2 of the opening switch 63. A limiting resistor 82 is advantageously connected between the lower end of the winding 14 and the anode A2. The connection to the opening switch 63 can also be made by means of tap 15 which is connected to the winding 14 at some point between its two ends. This embodiment is shown in FIG. 4. In still another embodiment, shown in FIG. 5, the main winding 14 is continued by supplementary winding 14 beyond the tap point, and the lower end of the supplementary winding is connected to the opening switch 83.

It will be understood that each of the elements described above, or two or more together, may also find a useful application in other types of circuits differing from the types described above.

While the invention has been illustrated and described as embodied in ignition arrangements for internal combustion engines, it is not intended to be limited to the details shown, since various modifications and structural changes may be What is claimed as new and desired to be protected by Letters Patent is set forth in the appended claims:

1. In an ignition arrangement for internal combustion engines, comprising in combination, spark coil means having an input side with primary winding means and an output side with secondary winding means; at least one spark plug connected to said secondary winding means to receive induced electrical energy therefrom to cause the spark plug to spark; a discharge circuit connected to said primary winding means and including ignition capacitor means and electronic discharge switch means for periodically supplying electrical energy to said primary winding means by the discharge of said ignition capacitor means whenever said discharge switch means is conductive; a DC circuit connected to said primary winding means; a source of DC in said DC circuit; and voltage-operated electronic opening switch means arranged in said DC circuit and connected to said spark coil means so that when said ignition capacitor means discharges a voltage is produced which causes said opening switch means to become nonconductive whereby a voltage is induced in said ignition coil which is dependent on the sum of the electrical energy stored in said ignition capacitor means and the magnetic energy stored in said spark coil means.

' 2. A combination as defined in claim 1, wherein said opening switch means comprise voltage-operated controlled electronic rectifier means connected in said DC circuit to be normally closed by said DC source, and wherein said spark coil means are connected to said controlled electronic rectifier means so that said voltage of said spark coil means opposes the action of said DC source on said controlled electronic rectifier means to cause the latter to become nonconductive.

3. A combination as defined in claim 2, wherein said ignition capacitor means and said discharge switch means are connected in series, and said primary winding means include main winding means shunting said ignition capacitor means and said discharge switch means, and said opening switch means comprise an anode connected to said main winding means and a cathode, a negative voltage comprised by said DC circuit, and wherein said cathode is connected to said negative voltage.

4. A combination as defined in claim 3, including a positive voltage in said DC circuit, and wherein one end of said main winding means is connected to said positive voltage, and further including storage winding means comprised by said primary winding means and connecting said one main winding means end to said anode.

5. A combination as defined in claim 4, wherein said main winding means and said storage winding means have an at least approximately equal number of turns.

6. A combination as defined in claim 4, wherein the sum of the capacitances of said output side referred to said main winding means is less than the capacity of said ignition capaci- [01' means.

7. A combination as defined in claim 4, including seriesconnected resistance means and capacitor means shunted across said opening switch means.

8. A combination as defined in claim 4, including voltage stabilization means shunted across said opening switch means.

9. A combination as defined in claim 4, including resistance means and capacitor means connected in parallel and shunted across said opening switch means.

10. A combination as defined in claim 8, including diode means for connecting said voltage stabilization means to said opening switch means.

11. A combination as defined in claim 3, wherein one end of said main winding means is connected to said ignition capacitor means and to said anode.

12. A combination as defined in claim 11, including supplementary winding means comprised by said primary winding means and connecting said one main winding means end to said anode.

13. A combination as defined in claim 3, wherein said main winding means has a tap intermediate its ends and connected to said anode.

14. A combination as defined in claim 3, including limiting resistance means connected between said anode and said main winding means.

15. A combination as defined in claim 4, wherein said discharge switch means comprise controlled electronic rectifier means connected to permit said ignition capacitor means to discharge through said main winding means when said discharge switch controlled electronic rectifier means is conductive.

16. A combination as defined in claim 15, including a DC to AC converter having an input connected to said source of DC, and having an output with positive and negative terminals, the negative terminal being connected to said negative voltage; and wherein said discharge switch controlled electronic rectifier means has a cathode and an anode, said cathode being connected to said positive voltage, and said anode and said ignition capacitor means being connected to said positive output terminal.

17. A combination as defined in claim 16, wherein said DC to AC converter is push-pull and said output thereof includes a bridge rectifier.

18. A combination as defined in claim 17, including automatic monitoring circuit means connected to the output of said DC to AC converter for monitoring the voltage at said output and shutting off said DC to AC converter whenever said output voltage exceeds a predetermined value.

19. A combination as defined in claim 2, including engineoperated circuit interrupter means connected in said DC circuit for controlling the charge and discharge of said ignition capacitor means.

20. A combination as defined in claim 19, wherein said DC circuit comprises a positive voltage and a negative voltage, and said discharge switch means comprise controlled electronic rectifier means having gate means and connected to permit said ignition capacitor means to discharge through said main winding means when said discharge switch controlled electronic rectifier means is conductive; and including first control resistance means connecting said gate means to said positive voltage; series-connected first control capacitor means and second control resistance means connecting said gate means to said negative voltage; a first transistor, a first switching path comprised by said first transistor and rendered conductive by the opening of said circuit interrupter means, said first switching path being connected between said positive voltage and the junction between said first control capacitor means and said second control resistance means.

21. A combination as defined in claim 20, including a second transistor, and a second switching path comprised by said second transistor and rendered conductive by the opening of said circuit interrupter means; a second control capacitor means connected at one end to said negative voltage, said second switching path being connected between said positive voltage and the other end of said second control capacitor means, whereby said second control capacitor means charges when said second switching path conducts and discharges when said second switching path is nonconductive; a third transistor, and a third switching path comprised by said third transistor and connected to be rendered conductive when said circuit interrupter means is open and when the latter is closed until shortly before it again opens by the charging and discharging of said second control capacitor means; differentiating means connected to said third switching path for producing voltage peaks when said third switching path becomes conductive; and wherein said first transistor means is connected to said differentiating means so as to render said first switching path conductive when said voltage peaks are produced.

22. A combination as defined in claim 21, wherein said circuit interrupter means are connected between said negative voltage and the base of said second transistor.

23. A combination as defined in claim 22, including a first charging resistance means connected between said second control capacitor means and said second switching path.

24. A combination as defined in claim 23, including first diode means series connected with said first charging resistance means to permit charging current to flow to said second control capacitor means.

25. A combination as defined in claim 23, including seriesconnected second charging resistance means and third control capacitor means shunting said first charging resistance means.

26. A combination as defined in claim 25, including seriesconnected second diode means and discharge resistance means connected between said other end of said second control capacitor means and said circuit interrupter means where the latter is connected to said base, for permitting said second control capacitor means to discharge when said second switching path is nonconductive.

27. A combination as defined in claim 26, wherein said third transistor comprises a control path; first and second resistance means connecting respective ends of said control path to said one end and said other end of said second control capacitor means; third diode means connected in parallel with said control path so as not to pass discharge current from said second control capacitor means; and third resistance means connecting the anode of said third diode means to said positive voltage.

28. A combination as defined in claim 27, a fourth transistor, and a fourth switching path comprised thereby, said fourth transistor being connected to said differentiating means so that said voltage peaks thereof render said fourth switching path nonconductive; a fifth transistor, and a fifth switching path comprised thereby, said fifth transistor being connected to said fourth transistor so that said fifth switching path is rendered conductive in dependence on said fourth switching path being rendered nonconductive; and wherein said first transistor is connected to said fifth switching path so that said first switching path is rendered conductive when said fifth switching path conducts.

29. A combination as defined in claim 28, including fourth resistance means series connected between said gate means and said series-connected first control capacitor means and said second control resistance means 30. A combination as defined in claim 19, wherein said circuit interrupter means are connected in said DC circuit to cause said opening switch means to conduct when said circuit interrupter means closes.

31. A combination as defined in claim 30, wherein said DC circuit comprises a positive voltage and a negative voltage, and said circuit interrupter means are connected between said positive and negative voltages; and including a transistor having a base and a switching path controlled thereby, said base being connected to said circuit interrupter means at the junction between the latter and said positive voltage and biased to permit conduction through said switching path when said circuit interrupter means are closed; control capacitor means having first and second terminals, said switching path being connected between said positive voltage and said first terminal; charging diode means having an anode connected to said second terminal; series-connected further control capacitor means and charging resistance means connected between the cathode of said charging diode and said negative voltage.

32. A combination as defined in claim 31, including a further transistor, and a control path and a further switching path comprised thereby, said control path being connected to the cathode of said charging diode means so that said further switching path is rendered conductive when said switching path IS conductive; and a still further transistor having a control path and a switching path, said further switching path being connected to said control path of said still further transistor so that said switching path of the latter is rendered conductive when said further switching path conducts: two series-connected resistance means having first and second terminals, said first terminal thereof being connected to said negative voltage, and said switching path of said still further transistor being connected between said positive voltage and said second terminal of said two series-connected resistance means; and gate means comprised by said opening switch means and connected to the junction between said two seriesconnected resistance means.

33. A combination as defined in claim 29, wherein said circuit interrupter means is connected to said DC circuit to cause said opening switch means to conduct when said circuit interrupter means closes, and said DC circuit comprises a positive voltage and a negative voltage, and said circuit interrupter means are connected between said positive and negative voltages; and including a sixth transistor having a base and a sixth switching path controlled thereby, said base being connected to said circuit interrupter means at the junction between the latter and said positive voltage and biased to permit conduction through said sixth switching path when said circuit interrupter means are closed; fourth control capacitor means having first and second terminals, said sixth switching path being connected between said positive voltage and said first terminal; charging diode means having an anode connected to said second terminal; series-connected fifth control capacitor means and third charging resistance means connected between the cathode of said charging diode means and said negative voltage; a seventh transistor, and a control path and a seventh switching path comprised thereby, said control path being connected to the cathode of said. charging diode means so that said seventh switching path is rendered conductive when said sixth switching path conducts; an eighth transistor having a control path and an eighth switching path, said seventh switching path being connected to said control path of said eighth transistor so that said eighth transistor path is rendered conductive when said seventh switching path-com ducts; two series-connected resistance means having first and second terminals, said first terminal thereof being connected to said negative voltage, and said eighth switching path being connected between said positive voltage and said second terminal of said two series-connected resistance means; and gate means comprised by said opening switch means and connected to the junction between said two series-connected resistance means; common resistance means connecting said positive voltage to said second, third, fourth, and sixth switching paths; and voltage stabilization means connected between said negative voltage and the junction between said common resistance means and said second, third, fourth, and sixth switching paths.

34. A combination as defined in claim 33, including capacitor means shunting said voltage stabilization means.

35. A combination as defined in claim 34, including fifth resistance means connected between said circuit interrupter means and said common resistance means, a base comprised by said second transistor, and decoupling diode means connected between the respective said base of said second and sixth transistors and the junction between said circuit interrupter means and said fifth resistance means.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification123/598, 315/209.0CD
International ClassificationF02P3/00, F02P3/08
Cooperative ClassificationF02P3/0884, F02P3/005
European ClassificationF02P3/00B, F02P3/08H2