Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3635367 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 18, 1972
Filing dateDec 29, 1969
Priority dateDec 28, 1968
Publication numberUS 3635367 A, US 3635367A, US-A-3635367, US3635367 A, US3635367A
InventorsMorita Kazuyuki, Nakajima Satoshi
Original AssigneeEisai Co Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Containers with hangers and method of preparing the same
US 3635367 A
Abstract
A method of manufacturing container provided with a flexible hanging member including an annular flat rim and a hanger with its roots connected to the rim. The rim is firmly secured to the bottom of the container by means of a hollow jacket heat shrunk around the main body of the container and on the rim.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Morita et al.

[451 Jan. 18,1972

[54] CONTAINERS WITH HANGERS AND METHOD OF PREPARING THE SAME [72] Inventors: Kazuyuki Morita, Gifu-ken; Satoshi Nakajima, Bisai-shi, both of Japan [73] Assignee: Eisai Kabushiki Kaisha, Tokyo-To, Japan [22] Filed: Dec. 29, 1969 [21] Appl. No.: 888,763

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Dec. 28, 1968 Japan ..43/95925 [52] U.S.Cl. ..2l5/l00 A, l56/86,2l5/12R, 248/359 [51] Int. Cl ..B65d 25/22 [58] FieldofSearch ..2l5/1OOA, 100R, 12R,38 A; 156/86; 248/359, 360, 318; 220/94 R; 206/DIG. 8

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Davis 515% u x 2,989,785 6/1961 Stahl ..l56/86 X 3,110,554 11/1963 Yazumi ..215/12RUX 3,400,481 9/1968 Christenson ..156/86 X 3,417,539 12/1968 Hirohama ..215/38 A X 2,635,604 4/1953 Fredrickson... ..248/359 X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 440,039 1/1927 Germany ..248/360 Primary Examiner-Donald F. Norton Attorney-Robert E. Burns and Emmanuel J. Lobato [5 7] ABSTRACT A method of manufacturing container provided with a flexible hanging member including an annular flat rim and a hanger with its roots connected to the rim. The rim is firmly secured to the bottom of the container by means of a hollow jacket heat shrunk around the main body of the container and on the rim.

4 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures CONTAINERS WITH HANGERS AND METHOD OF PREIARINGTI-IE SAME BACKGROUND or THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to a container and more particularly to a container or bottle coated with a heatshrinkable synthetic resin jacket which is utilized to secure the bottom of the container a hanging member including a flat annular rim and an integral hanger.

Bottles for medical uses such asused for blood or other liquid transfusion and vials arepositioned upsidedown when they are used so that it is necessary to provide suitable hanger at the bottom thereof.

Heretofore such hangers, usually made of aluminum, lead, alloys thereof or tinned plate, were attached to suitable depressions or grooves on the bottle manually before filling liquid in the bottles. Consequently, to attach hangers to the bottles, considerable labor was required. In addition, since it has been necessary to form such depressions or grooves during molding of the bottles together with scales, thus increasing the cost of manufacturing. Further, such a prior method requires an additional step of applying labels.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is, therefore, an object of this invention to providea novel container having a hanger at its bottom which. can be attached thereto very simply by an automatic machine.

Another object of this invention is to provide a container having a novel hanger which is not expensive to manufacture and can be readily applied to the bottom of the container.

Yet another object of this invention is to attach a hanger to the bottle by a simple method.

According to this invention there is provided a hanging member comprising a flat annular portionor rim and an armate hanger extending along the inner periphery of the annular portion. The opposite ends or roots of the hanger are integrally connected to the annular portion. Normally the rim and hanger are in the same plane. Such a hanging member may be readily prepared by stamping'a flexible sheet of plastic or rubber. The bottle having the hanging member mounted on the bottom thereof is slipped in a cylindrical jacket of a heatshrinkable synthetic resin in such a manner that the upper edge of the jacket extends somewhat beyond theplane of the hanging member. Then heat is applied to the jacketsof heat-. shrinkable resin to cause it to shrink around the body of the bottle. Portions of the jacket extending above the hanging member is caused to shrink upon the entire or atleast the outer peripheral portion of the rim whereby the hanging member is firmly secured to thebottom of the bottle. .Since the hanger normally lies inthe same plane as the rim it does not obscure in any way handling of the bottle. However, to hang the bottle in the upside-down position, the hanger is raised from the bottom of the bottle to serve as a hanger orv handle.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING In the accompanying drawing:

FIG. I is a plan view of a hanging memberfor a container according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevation view of a heat-shrinkable jacket; FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a bottleafter application of the jacket; and

FIG. 4 is a similar perspective view with the hanger raised.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the accompanying drawing, more particularly to FIGS. 3 and 4, there is shown a bottle or container 1 for medical use provided with an outer jacket 2 and a hanging member 5 secured to the bottom of the bottle in a manner to be described hereunder. As shown in FIG. 2, the jacket has a generally cylindrical configuration with its upper portion ble synthetic resin such as polyvinyl chloride, irradiated polyethylene and the like. The inner diameter of the jacket 2 is only slightly larger than the outer diameter of the bottle. As shown in FIGS. 1 and 3, the hanging member 5 comprises a flat annular rim 3 and an arcuatehanger 4 extending along the inner periphery of the rim, the roots of the hanger 4 are integral with the annular rim 3. Such a hanging membercan be readily prepared by stamping a sheet or relatively flexible material such as polyethylene, vinyl chloride and rubber. As shown-in FIGS. 1 and 3, the rim and the hanger 4 are normally in the same plane. To attach the hanging member to the bottom of the bottle, the hangingmember is placed on the bottom of the bottle and a jacket is then slipped over the assembly until the constricted portion 2a rests on the hanging member. Alternatively, the hanging member may be placed on the inner shoulder defined by the constricted portion. Therefore, the assembly is heated to cause the jacket to shrink around the periphery of the body of the bottle and on the entire or at least the peripheral portion of the rim 3 to firmly secure the-hanging member in place.

Following examples show methods of fabricating the packed bottles of this invention.

. EXAMPLE 1 Hanging members, each -mm. diameter, and 2 mm. thick, and including an annular rim and an integral hanger, as shown in FIG. 1 were stamped from a polyethylene sheet. Cylindrical jackets were also prepared from a heat-shrinkable synthetics resin, polyvinyl chloride, for example, each one of the jackets having a diameter of I35 mm., a length of 180 mm. and a thickness of 0.1 mm. The upper portion of the jacket is openended and was subjected to a preliminary heat-shrinking treatment to form a constricted portion 2a.'ln this example, the hanging member was placed on the inner shoulder formed by the constricted portion 2a while SOD-ml. bottles for medical liquid transfusion were mounted in upside-down positions on a conveyor having stainless bases provided with openings adapted to receive necks of the bottles.'While bottles were being successively conveyed by the conveyor, jackets with hanging members were slipped over respective bottles and the assemblies were passed through a hot air tunnel having a length of cm. and in which the temperature was maintained at about 200 C. The speed of the conveyor was selected such that the temperature of the assembly is sufficiently elevated to cause the jacket to shrink to firmly enclose the bottle and the hanging member in about 10 seconds.

EXAMPLE 2 In this example, a plurality of pedestals, each having a height of about 15 cm. and a diameterconsiderably smaller than that of thebottom of the bottle were mounted on a conveyor at a definite spacing. Then bottles {of the same dimensions as in example I were mounted on respective pedestals in upright positions with hanging members'interposed between pedestals and the bottom of the bottles Then a cylindrical jacket of heat'shrinkable material having a diameter of mm., a thickness of 0.2 mm. and a length longer than the height of the bottle was slipped over each bottle with the lower edge-of the jacket projected downward beyond the bottom of hanging member. Thereafter the conveyor was passed through a hot air tunnel having a length of 90 cmfand atempet'ature of C. to cause the jacket to shrink, in a manner as above described.

EXAMPLE 3 The same process steps as in example 2 were followed except that a strip of irradiated polyethylene, mm. wide and 0.1 mm. thick, was loosely wrapped around each bottle. After a predetermined number of convolution has been formed, the strip was severed and the severed end was bonded to the outer convolution by welding. Hot water at 90" C. was then sprayed upon each assembly for 20 seconds to cause the irradiated slightly constricted as at 2a and is molded from a heat-shrinka- 75 polyethylene film to shrink.

Although the invention has been described in terms of bottles or vials for medical use it is to be understood that the invention can also be applied for various containers for different applications having different configurations.

When compared with prior containers having hanging members of aluminum or the like which are received in depressions or grooves on the surface of the containers, the novel containers have following advantages.

l. Hanging members can be fixed to containers by automatic machines.

2. Since containers are not required to be formed with depressions or grooves for receiving hangers of aluminum or the like, they can be molded more readily, thus reducing the cost of manufacturing.

3. The shockproofness of the bottom of the bottles is improved by the hanging member and jacket covering the bottom.

4. By printing scales on the jacket it is not necessary to form scales on the surface of the mold, thus eliminating the necessity of positioning the bottles always in a definite orientation so as not cover the scale by the label, whereby the workability is improved.

5. By printing labels on the jacket, the step of applying the labels to the bottles can be eliminated.

6. Since the packed bottles have no projections they can be ready packed in cartons.

7. Degradation of the content can be prevented by shielding external light. By using light-shielding jackets contents of the bottles which are affected by light can be well protected. In addition, inspection of the bottle whether the liquid therein contains foreign matters or not is easy.

We claim:

1. A container comprising, on the bottom of said container a hanging member including an annular flat rim having substantially the same outer diameter as said bottom and a flexible arcuate hanger extending along the inner periphery of said rim, the hanger having roots integrally united to said rim, and a heat-shrinkable jacket heat shrunk around the body of said container and on said flat rim to firmly secure said hanging member to said container.

2. The container according to claim 1 wherein said hanger member comprises a flexible material selected from the group consisting of synthetic resins and rubber.

3. A method of preparing a container with a hanger comprising the steps of providing a container to which a hanger is to be secured to the bottom thereof, applying a hanging member to the bottom of said container, said hanging member including a flat rim having substantially the same outer diameter as said bottom and having a flexible arcuate hanger extending along the inner periphery of said rim, the roots of said hanger being integrally united to said rim, applying a heatshrinkable hollow jacket in position enclosing said container and said hanging member with a portion of said jacket overlying said hanging member, and heating said jacket to shrink it around said container and on at least the peripheral portion of said rim to firmly secure said hanging member to said container.

4. A method of manufacturing a container with a hanger comprising, providing a container on which a hanger is to be secured on the bottom thereof and a heat-shrinkable hollow, open-ended jacket preheated to form an inwardly directed construction defining a shoulder inwardly of said jacket adjacent one of the open ends of the jacket, placing a hanging member in said jacket on said shoulder said hanger member having a rim and an arcuate hanger with roots thereof integral with said rim, placing said jacket over said container with said hanger member disposed on the bottom of said container, applying heat to the jacket to shrink it around said container and on said rim to firmly secure said hanging member to said container.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2270018 *Nov 1, 1940Jan 13, 1942Sylvania Ind CorpClosure
US2635604 *Jan 21, 1950Apr 21, 1953Abbott LabContainer
US2989785 *Jun 25, 1959Jun 27, 1961William F StahlMethod of forming plastic containers
US3110554 *Jun 5, 1961Nov 12, 1963Mitsubishi Plastics IndMethod for labeling packages
US3400481 *May 23, 1966Sep 10, 1968Berkley & Company IncNylon fishing rod winding
US3417539 *Oct 6, 1966Dec 24, 1968Juji HirohamaMethod of forming a container closure
*DE440039A Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3878960 *Oct 5, 1973Apr 22, 1975Platmanufaktur AbGlass container with a shrunk-on plastic protective cover
US4168783 *May 9, 1977Sep 25, 1979Wheaton IndustriesIntravenous bottle holder
US4187276 *May 15, 1978Feb 5, 1980Owens-Illinois, Inc.Method of making a plastic package
US4306662 *Sep 17, 1980Dec 22, 1981Heinz Plastic Mold Co.Intravenous bottle holder
US4412624 *Apr 2, 1982Nov 1, 1983Takeda Chemical Industries, Ltd.Hanging member for hanging a container in an inverted position
US4413741 *Dec 16, 1981Nov 8, 1983Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Hanger assembly for bottles
US4460143 *Dec 16, 1981Jul 17, 1984Fujisawa Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.Vial suspender
US5086952 *Sep 12, 1988Feb 11, 1992Diversey CorporationDetergent container
US5135125 *Feb 15, 1991Aug 4, 1992Tapecon, Inc.Hanging label
US5483999 *Mar 15, 1993Jan 16, 1996Merit Medical Systems, Inc.Waste collection system for containment and disposal of contaminated fluids
US5490658 *Mar 2, 1995Feb 13, 1996Avery Dennison CorporationLabel hangers for intravenous bottles
US5738381 *May 3, 1996Apr 14, 1998Treleaven; Carl W.For displaying information regarding a container
US5782495 *Jan 11, 1996Jul 21, 1998Westlake Ventures, L.L.C.For displaying information regarding a bottle
US5823503 *Aug 21, 1996Oct 20, 1998Thomas Packaging CorporationHanger for hanging an intravenous feeding bottle
US5829788 *Apr 30, 1997Nov 3, 1998Laurence-Underwood Company Co., IncLabel with hanging handle
US5878901 *Feb 21, 1997Mar 9, 1999Pharmagraphics (Midwest), L.L.C.Composite hanger and label incorporating the same
US6015470 *Jan 28, 1998Jan 18, 2000Pharmagraphics (Midwest), L.L.C.Hanger label
US6082777 *Jul 20, 1998Jul 4, 2000Pharmagraphics (Southeast), L.L.C.Hanger label
US6102441 *Apr 14, 1998Aug 15, 2000Pharmagraphics (Midwest)Hanger label
US6110553 *Dec 23, 1998Aug 29, 2000Pharmagraphics (Southeast), L.L.C.Composite hanger and label incorporating the same
US6296223Jun 8, 1999Oct 2, 2001Pharmagraphics (Southeast) L.L.C.Hanger label
US6349974Jun 17, 1999Feb 26, 2002Pharmagraphics (Southeast), L.L.C.Hanger label
US6350502Jan 28, 2000Feb 26, 2002Pharmagraphics (Southeast), L.L.C.Composite hanger and label incorporating the same
US6361010Aug 2, 2000Mar 26, 2002Pharmagraphics (Southeast), L.L.C.Hanger label
US6387202Aug 26, 1999May 14, 2002Pharmagraphics (Southeast) L.L.C.Composite hanger and label incorporating the same
US6457747Mar 20, 2000Oct 1, 2002Pharmagraphics (Southeast) L.L.C.Hanger label
US6506467Nov 28, 2001Jan 14, 2003Pharmagraphics (Southeast), L.L.C.Composite hanger and label incorporating the same
US6644613Sep 26, 2001Nov 11, 2003Pharmagraphics (Southeast), L.L.C.Hanger label
US6719017Jan 10, 2002Apr 13, 2004Merit Medical Systems, Inc.Waste collection system for containment and disposal of contaminated fluids
US7086545Jul 16, 2003Aug 8, 2006Ajava Pinata, L.L.C.Suspended containers
US7799008Mar 7, 2007Sep 21, 2010William HendricksBottle for delivering nutrients to an enteral feeding tube
US8522997 *Jun 2, 2010Sep 3, 2013Thermos L.L.C.Stopper and lanyard loop combination for a beverage container
US20110297678 *Jun 2, 2010Dec 8, 2011Marvin LaneStopper and lanyard loop combination for a beverage container
USRE36258 *May 21, 1997Jul 27, 1999Ccl Label, Inc.Label hangers for bottles
DE10311067A1 *Mar 13, 2003Sep 30, 2004Schreiner Group Gmbh & Co. KgAufhängevorrichtung
WO2004080511A1 *Feb 9, 2004Sep 23, 2004Margraf AlexanderSuspension device
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/399, 248/311.3, 156/86, 248/690, 215/12.2
International ClassificationA61M5/14
Cooperative ClassificationA61M5/1417
European ClassificationA61M5/14R4