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Publication numberUS3635827 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 18, 1972
Filing dateFeb 17, 1969
Priority dateMar 14, 1968
Also published asDE1692019A1
Publication numberUS 3635827 A, US 3635827A, US-A-3635827, US3635827 A, US3635827A
InventorsJakobi Gunter
Original AssigneeHenkel & Cie Gmbh
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Low-foam rinsing and washing agents for dish washers
US 3635827 A
Abstract
Low-foaming rinsing and washing compositions adapted for dishwashers consisting essentially of (A) from 70 percent to 98 percent by weight of water-soluble polyvinyl alcohols having a molecular weight of between 1,000 and 4,000, and (B) from 2 percent to 30 percent by weight of interface active compounds containing oxypropylene and/or oxbutylene radicals which may contain oxyethylene units, as well as aqueous solutions containing said low-foaming rinsing and washing compositions.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 2 Jakobi I LOW-FOAM RINSING AND WASHING AGENTS FOR DISH WASHERS [72] inventor: Gunter Jakobi, Hilcien, Rhine, Germany [73] Assignee: Henkel 8: Cie GmbH, Dusseldorf- Holthausen, Germany [22] Filed: Feb. 17, 1969 [21] Appl.No.: 799,933

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Mar. 14, i968 Gcrmany.......... ..l-i 6560i [52] US. Cl ..252/89, 252/321, 252/358,

' 252/DIG. l, 252/DIG. 2 [5i] ..Clld 1/68 [58] 252/89, 321,323,368,DIG. l, 252/DIG. 2

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Tarell ..2s2/s9 [151 3,635,827 [4s] Jan. 18, 1972 3,254,028 5/l966 Wixonm; ..252/89 3,382,] 78 5/1968 Lissant et al ..252/32l OTHER PUBLICATIONS Biehn et al., PVA osan emulsifying agent. lnd. & Eng. Chem. Aug. 1948 pages 1449- 1453 Primary Examiner-Leon D. Rosdol Assistant Examiner-William F. Schulz Attorney-Hammond and Litteli [57] ABSTRACT 1 9 m WWW.

THE PRIOR ART in an increasing measure, mechanical washing methods are being employcdtc wash china, glass, porcelain, ceramic, metal and synthetic articles. Detergents containing specific surface-active compounds are generally utilized. These deterso that they do not afiect the large a volume, caused and increased by the vigorous motion of the bath in the machine, leads to considerable trouble, as the foam mass decreases the mechanical effect of the liquid sprayed onto the articles to be cleaned and furthermore may cause the bath in the machine to run over.

Recently, developments in washing apparatus have been directed toward further increasing the intensity of the liquor motion as well as the water volume cycled per minute, and in this way to further improve the mechanical cleansing effect. As a result of such developments, it was found that conventional washing agents, such as higher molecular weight sulfates or sulfonates, caused too much foam. For this reason, in practice, nonionic surface-active agents such as ethylene oxide addition products to alkylphenols or polypropylene glycols, have been preferred. These products, as well, were found to have a relatively high foaming tendency in the ranges of concentration required for satisfactory wetting and cleansing effect when used in the modern dishwashing machines.

it has also been suggested to utilize combinations of effective wetting agents of the known type of ethylene oxide addition products, with foam-inhibiting agents, such as ethylene oxide-propylene oxide mixed adducts with fatty alcohols or alkylphenois. However, such combinations require relatively large additions of the foam inhibitors in order to decrease, to a reasonable extent, the tendency of the combination to foam.

A further considerable disadvantage of the named alltyiene oxide addition products is that they are not biologically decomposed to a sufficient extent. For this reason, they often play a part in the formation of foam on sluices, dams and overflows. Furthermore, such products often exhibit, even in small amounts of only a few mg./l., a distinct toxicity toward fish and other water organisms. Thus, they can represent a considerable and undesired burden on waste waters and their treatment.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION An object of the invention is the obtention of highly effective and extremely low-foaming dish and general purpose detergent combinations for dishwashers which do not cause any waste water problems due to their biological harmiessness.

A further object is the obtention of low-foaming rinsing and washing compositions adapted for dishwashers consisting essentially of (A) from 70 percent to 98 percent by weight of water-soluble polyvinyl alcohols having a molecular weight of between 1,000 and 4,000, and (B) from 2 percent to 30 percent by weight of interface active compounds based on aikyiene oxide adducts selected from the group consisting of l) a polyoxypropyiene glycol having an average number of xypropylene units of between l7 and 86, adducted with from 0 to 30 mol percent of oxyethylene units, the total number of oxypropylene and oxyethylene units in said adduct being 100 mol percent (2) a propylene oxide adduct of a hydrocarbon compound having from two to 10 carbon atoms and at least two reactive hydrogen atoms selected from the group consisting of aiitanes, benzene and aikylbenzenes, substituted with substituents selected from the group consisting of hydroxy, amino, and mixtures thereof, said propylene oxide adduct having an average number of oxypropylene units of between and 84, adducted with from 0 to 30 mol percent of oxyethyiene units, the total number of oxypropylene units and oxyethyiene units in said adduct being 100 mol percent and (3) an alkyiene oxide adduct of a high molecular weight lipophiiic radical of the formula:

wherein R represents a radical having from eight to 36 carbon atoms selected from the group consisting of alkyi, alkenyl, alkadienyl, monohydroxyalkenyl and alkylphenyl and Y represents a bridging link selected from the group consisting of 0, S, COO, NH, CON", and S0,Nl-l; adducted first with ybutylene, said oxycthylene being from 0 to 70 mol percent of the total amount of oxyalkylene units present; from 2 to oxypropylene and oxybutylene units being present in said adduct.

Another object of the invention is the obtention of aqueous solutions of the above low-foaming rinsing and washing compositions.

A yet further object of the invention is the development of a method of washing and rinsing solid articles which comprises forcefully contacting said solid articles with water containing from 0.01 to 0.5 grams per liter of the above low-foaming rinsing and washing compositions.

These and other objects of the invention will become more apparent as the description thereof proceeds.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Accordingly, the present invention relates to low-foaming rinsing and washing compositions adapted for dishwashers based on polyvinylalcohol and nonionic foam-suppressing agents, which is distinguished by a good compatibility with waste waters and harmlessness against fish and other water organisms.

in particular, these compositions are characterized by a content of (A) from 70 percent to 98 percent by weight of water-soluble poiyvinylalcohois having a molecular weight of between 1,000 and 4,000, and (B) from 2 percent to 30 percent by weight of interface active compounds with a content of from 2 to 90 oxyalkylene units selected from the group consisting of oxypropylene and oxybutylene and preferably a further content of l or more oxycthylene units where the amount of oxypropylene and oxybutylene units is at least 30 percent of the total amount of oxyalkylene units.

The claimed combination is extraordinarily low foaming even under extreme application conditions, both in household dishwashers as well as in commercial dishwashers. As a result of the high content of polyvinyialcohol, the compositions of the invention possess an excellent wetting effect with respect to hard surfaces such as porcelain, synthetics or metals. The combinations of the invention are particularly suitable as lowfoaming, clear, rinsing agents for dishes and silverware of all kinds, possibly with a preceding alkaline prewashing phase, as well as for washing and clear rinsing of drinking glasses and other glassware.

The special advantage of the combinations of the invention with respect to known low-foaming rinsing agents is that the requirement for nontoxicity with respect to fish and other water organisms is met to a satisfactory degree. Although poiyvinylalcohol used as the component A is only slightly biologically decomposed, it can yet be considered as physiologically harmless since it does not exhibit any toxic properties, whatsoever, toward those organisms which live in water. The interface active compounds of type B are biologically decomposed to a satisfactory degree, particularly where they have straight alltyi radicals and a relatively short polyoxyalkylene chain.

in proportion to the increase of length of the polyoxyaikyiene chain of the compounds of type B, the ability to biologically decompose decreases, however, at the same time the toxicity of the compounds decreases as well. Other poorly decomposable compounds are the alkylene oxide adducts with alkylphenois and the polypropylene giycols. Due to the fact, however, that the foaming tendency of the polyvinyialcohol can be suppressed effectively with the aid of very small amounts of foam-inhibiting alkylene oxide adducts of the type B, such compounds in practice do not cause waste water problems to any appreciable respect.

The water-soluble polyvinylalcohols having a molecular weight of between l,000 and 4,000 used as component A are known products and are used in the trade. They can be obtained, for instance, by means of hydrolysis of polyvinyl acetates of the corresponding degree of polymerization. Within the framework of this invention such water-soiuble polyvinylalcohols are preferred which have a hydrolysis degree of 85 percent to 90 percent and have molecular weights of approximately 1,000 to 3,000.

As compounds of group B propylene oxide polymers come into consideration such as are obtained by means of polymerization of propylene oxide or addition of propylene oxide to lower molecular weight aliphatic compounds containing at least two reactive hydrogen atoms, particularly hydroxyl or amino groups with approximately two to six carbon atoms or to corresponding compounds with six to l carbon atoms. The reaction is carried out according to known methods in the presence of alkaline catalysts, preferably under pressure. The corresponding propylene oxide polymers have molecular weights of 1,000 to 5,000 or from 17 to 86 oxypropylene units, preferably 1,700 to 4,!00. Preferably up to 30 mol percent of ethylene oxide is added as calculated on the basis of the total amount of alkylene oxides.

The propylene oxide polymers of the above type are preferably either polyoxypropylene glycols having an average number of oxypropylene units of between 17 and 86, corresponding to molecular weights of 1,000 to 5,000, and more particularly polyoxypropylene glycols having an average number of oxypropylene units of between 29 and 70, corresponding to molecular weights of [,700 to 4,100, adducted with from 0 to 30 mol percent of oxyethylene units, the total number of oxypropylene and oxyethyiene units in said polymer being I00 moi percent; as well as propylene oxide adducts of hydrocarbon compounds having from two to carbon atoms and at least two reactive hydrogen atoms, preferably selected from the group consisting of alkanes, benzene and aikylbenzenes, substituted with substituents selected from the group consisting of hydroxy, amino, and mixtures thereof, said propylene oxide adduct having an average number of oxypropylene units of between and 84, corresponding to molecular weights of 1,000 to 5,000, and more particularly having an average number of oxypropylene units of between 27 and 68, corresponding to molecular weights of l,700 to 4,100, said propylene oxide adducts being adducted with from 0 to 30 mol percent of oxyetltylene units, the total number of oxypropylene units and oxyethylene units in said adduct being 100 mol percent.

The propylene oxide polymers of type B are obtained in a known way by polymerization of propylene oxide to obtain poiyoxypropylene glycols or by the addition of propylene oxide to compounds having from two to 10 carbon atoms and at least two reactive hydrogen atoms. The polymerization and adduct formation is conducted in the presence of alkaline catalysts such as sodium hydroxide, sodium methylate and others. The compounds having from two to 10 carbon atoms which are adducted are aliphatic compounds having two to six carbon atoms such as ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, 1,6- hexanediol glycerine, sugar alcohols, ethylene diamine, alkanolamines, for example, ethanolamine, dipropanolamine, etc., as well as aromatic and aliphatic aromatic compounds having six to 10 carbon atoms, such as phenyiene diamine, pethanolaniline, etc., adduct of 4.5 mois of ethylene oxide to polypropylene glycol with a molecular weight of 1,750; the adduct of 7 or 16 mois of ethylene oxide to a polypropylene glycol with a molecular weight of 2,750; the adduct of 8.5 mois of ethylene oxide to a polypropylene glycol consisting of 56 oxypropylene radicals; the adduct of 35 mols of propylene oxide to glycerine; the adduct of 48 mois of propylene oxide and 7 mois of ethylene oxide to ethylene diamine, the adduct of 30 percent by weight of ethylene oxide to an polypropylene glycol with a molecular weight of950.

Another method for the preparation of suitable compounds of type B consists in the addition of 2 to 90 mois of propylene oxide and/or butylene oxide to higher molecular weight compounds with eight to 36 carbon atoms which contain reactive hydrogen atoms bonded through the heteroatoms 0, S and N. The higher molecular weight compounds may be aliphatic, aliphatic-cycloaliphatic or aliphatic-aromatic. The aliphatic compounds possess higher molecular weight radicals with eight to 36, and preferably 10 to 20 carbon atoms and are preferably of the formula:

R-Yl-l wherein R represents a radical having from eight to 36 carbon atoms selected from the group consisting of alkyl, alkenyl, alkadlenyl and hydroxy-aikenyl, H represents a replaceable hydrogen and Y represents a bridging link selected from the group consisting of:

The aliphatic-aromatic compounds possess higher molecular weight radicals with 12 to 22, and preferably i4 to l8 carbon atoms and are preferably of the formula:

R'-Y-ll wherein Y and H have the above-assigned values and R represents a radical having 12 to 22 carbon atoms selected from the group consisting of alkylphenyl, alkylnaphthyl, al

koxy-phcnyl and alkylcyclohexyl. The hydrocarbon radicals R and R may contain conventional substituents such as hydroxyl groups, halide atoms, or alkyl side chains.

Thus the following starting compounds for their preparation come into consideration: higher molecular weight aliphatic, aliphatic-cycloaliphatic or aliphatic-aromatic compounds, such as alcohols, alltylphenols, carboxylic acids, mercaptans, amines, carboxylic acid amides or alkanolamides, sulfonic acid amides, and the like with eight to 36, preferably 12 to 18 carbon atoms. The alkyl radicals can carry substitutes such as halogen atoms or can have side chains. Preferably such adducts are used which, in addition to oxypropylene and/or oxybutylene units, have ,oxyethylene units as well. The number of oxypropylene and/or oxybutyiene units should be at least 30 percent by moi of the total oxyalkylene units.

The alkylene oxide units to be added consist of 70 mol percent or less of ethylene oxide and at least 30 to mol percent of propylene oxide and/or butylene oxide. When various alkylene oxides are used, as a rule ethylene oxide is added in the first step and thereafter propylene oxide and/or butylene oxide is then added. The reaction is accomplished in the usual manner, for example, by utilizing pressure in the presence of alkaline catalysts.

Compounds of type B may also be prepared by reacting higher molecular weight aliphatic or aliphatic-aromatic compounds with compounds containing prepared polyoxyalkylene chains, for example, the esterification of higher molecular weight carboxylic acids with polypropylene glycols or the etherification of higher molecular weight alcohols with polypropylene glycols.

Examples for suitable compounds of group B are the follow ing: the adduct of 2 mois of propylene oxide to dodecyl alcohol; the adduct of 3 mois of propylene oxide to a fatty alcohol mixture of the chain length C to C the adduct of 3 mois of ethylene oxide and 3 mois of propylene oxide to dodecyl alcohol; the adduct of 2 mois of ethylene oxide and 4 mois of propylene oxide or of 3 mois of ethylene oxide and 3 mois of propylene oxide to a fatty alcohol mixture of the chain length C to C the adduct of 7 mois of ethylene oxide and i0 mois of propylene oxide or of 9 mois of ethylene oxide and 16 mois of propylene oxide to a fatty alcohol mixture of the chain length C to C the adduct of 10 mois of ethylene oxide and 20 mois of propylene oxide to a fatty alcohol mixture of the chain length C to C the adduct of 3 mois of ethylene oxide and of 4 mois of propylene oxide to a dodecylphenol having a straight alkyl chain; the adduct of 2 mois of ethylene oxide and 2 mois of propylene oxide to nonylphenol; the adduct of 7 mois of ethylene oxide and 5 mois of butylene oxide to nonylphenol; the adduct of i2 mois of a mixture containing 40 mol percent of ethylene oxide and 60 mol percent of propylene oxide to dodecyl alcohol; the adduct of 2 mole of ethylene oxide and 4 mols of propylene oxide to a coconut fatty acid mixture of the chain length C to C the adduct of 4 moi: of ethylene oxide and i2 mols of propylene oxide to a fatty acid amide mixture of the chain length C to are added into the washing and rinsing solution in the ("lilwashing machines by means of on automatic dosing device as is common for such purposes.

The following specific embodiments of the invention are ilw; the adduct f 4 mols of propylene oxide to dodecyismlne; 5 iustrative thereof. it is obvious, however, that other expedients the adduct of 2 mols of ethylene oxide and 3 mols of may be employed and the specific embodiments are not to be propylene oxide to tetradecylrnercaptan. deemed iimitative in any manner.

Of particular interest are, in particular, the adducts of ethylene oxide and propylene oxide to higher molecular EXAMPLES might f 9 v yt the fatty aimhol 10 The foam behavior of different cleansing and rinsing admixducis l shot} alkl'lene Wide fi are employed tures was examined for comparison purposes in a special foam due 1 biologicaldeci-lmpclsablmyexamination apparatus. The following table exhibits the ex- The individual components. the 8 rinsing tremely good foam behavior of the compositions of the invenagents of the invention-amount to approximately 70 l 5 tiom percent to 98 percent by weight of component A and 2 percent to 30 percent by weight of component B. in practice it was in particular that mixtures from 85 percent to 95 percent by weight of component A and 5 percent to percent by weight of component B are particularly suitable.

When the mixtures are used for the washing of dishes, particularly of drinking glasses, concentrations of approximately 0.05 to 0.5 gnu/liter. preferably 0.1 to 0.4 gmJliter in the cleaning fluid are required. if employed as rinsing agent subsequent to an alkaline washing phase, approximately 0.01 to 0.25 gmJlltcr, preferably 0.02 to 0.1 gmJiiter are used. To a certain degree the concentrations are dependent upon the hardness of the water and the type of dishes. When washing or rinsing, utilizing hard and salty waters, or with plastic dishes, greater amounts of the rinsing agents are required.

Usefuiiy, the compositions of the invention are prepared in the form of aqueous concentrates with a content of approximately l0 percent to percent by weight of mixtures of components A and B. By variation of the amount of the components, the concentrates can be adjusted in such way that they possess a good temperature stability and do not tend to precipitate or separate into layers. Usefully, the concentrates The foam apparatus as used was constructed in similu manner as a modern dishwasher operating according to the jet spray system. By means of a pump about 170 liters of water per minute were rotated and sprayed into the metering chamber by means of a rotating spray-arm provided with nozzles. Foam heads from 0 to 280 mm. may be measured -in reproducible manner, whereas larger'foam volumes can no longer be measured accurately, and, therefore, they are indicated in the table as 280. The liquor temperature during the tests was C., the hardness of the water used was l6 dB and the duration of the foam test lasted 5 minutes. The reading of the foam height was done immediately after the machine came to a standstill and 30 seconds after the machine had come to a stop.

The foam apparatus is described in "Fette, Seifen, Anstrichmittel," 66(1964]. page 529.

The abbreviations used in the table have the following meanings:

E0 mole of ethylene oxide PrO mole of propylene oxide The letters A and B represent the component types in the compositions in accordance with the preceding.

TABLE Foam height in mm.

30 see. On alter Cone, standstand- Examplo Composition of mixture gum/liter still still is A. Polyvlu lalcohol viscosity 0! s47 sola- 0.12 280 280 gm) at 20 0., 8 c p., hydrolysis degree: 1b A. Izilyvlnyl alcohol according to la 0.12 B. Fatty a10oholCn-Qi|+8EO+8PrO 0. 008 5 0 2. A. Poi inyittlcoaol according to Is 0.12 B. 0xo aicohol-O +ii1ii0+8PrO 0. 024 70 5 8 A. Polyvin laicohot according to Is 0.12 B. Nouylp enol+0E0+2Pr0 0.010 30 0 4 A. Poi via iaieohol accordln to la 0.12 B. Fei ty sibouot-ct-owsao -rtrro 0.008 20 0 6a A. Polyvinylalcohoi (viscosity at M? solu- 0.12 280 28 3%? )at 20 0;, 15 op., hydrolysis ticgres:

p. 5b A. 01 via lalcohol accortilu tolia 0.12 B. F8tyflli0h01-u-0ii+3E .+4Pt0 0.00 10 0 0"... A. Poi inylalcohoiaccordlng to its. 0.12 B. Entit alcohal-On-Urs'i'iiE0-i-18Pr0 0. 000 16 v 0 7a A. Pol in lalcohol viscosity alas? soluo. 12 280 280 glam}? 28 C 25 c p., hydrolysis tiegrcet 7b A. i t tiyvinyialcohol according to 7a 0.12 B. Fatty alwh0l-C -Cn-l-3E0+3Pr0 0.008 0 8 A. P'tlyvinylalcohol according to 7a 0.12 H B. Nouylpheno1+12E0+30PrO 0.008 20 0 9 A. Polyvin lalcoitol according to la 0.12 15 0 B. Dodecyl mine-l-sliro 0.009 0 A. Polyvlnylalcohol according to la 0.12 B. Fatty BIDQhOI-Cu-Crri-BPIO 0.009 10 0 '1 A. Poiyvinylalcohol according to 111.. 0.12 Y B. Fatty aIcohoI-O -G HPrO 0.009 20 0 12 A. Pol vln lalcohoi according to la 0.12 B. Polgprogylons glycol (MW 2,250)+6E0 0. 009 10 0 t 1 0.12 18 A Polyvinylaicohol according o a 0.009 15 0 B Polypropylene glycol (MW 1,760) +4.5E0.

EXAMPLE l4 A liquid rinsing agent suitable for commercial dishwashers had the following composition:

20 percent Polyvinylalcohol (viscosity of a 4 percent solution at 20 C., 3 cp., hydrolysis degree: 88 percent) 2 percent Fatty alcohol--C,,C +3 EO-i-3 PrO 78 percent Water At application temperatures of between 50 C. and 90 C., the product developed practically no foam. it was dosed in concentrations of 0.4 to 0.6 g./liter into the rinsing water subsequent to the alkaline main washing of the dishes. Dirt free, shining dishes were obtained.

EXAMPLE IS A very low-foaming detergent for household dishwashers had the following composition:

l0.0 percent by weight of poiyvinylalcohol (viscosity of a 4 percent solution at 20' C., 15 cp., hydrolysis degree: 86 percent) 0.6 rgrcent by weight of fatty alcohoi-C,-C +5 EO+4 Pr 89.4 percent by weight of water At an application concentration of 0.5 to L5 gm.liiter, an unobjectionable washing and clear drying effect was obtained.

EXAMPLE [6 For the rinsing of drinking glasses and other dishes in a household dishwasher a mixture of the following composition was particularly suitable:

10 percent of poiyvinyialcohol (l5 cp., hydrolysis degree:

86 percent) 0.5 percent of fatty alcohol--C,,-C +5 EO-i-l 3 PrO 89.5 percent of water.

At application concentrations of 0.4 to 0.6 gJliter an unobjectionable washing and clear drying effect was obtained without the occurrence of disturbing foam buildup.

The preceding specific embodiments are illustrative of the practice of the invention. it is obvious, however, that other expcdients known to those skilled in the art may be employed without departing from the spirit of the invention.

I claim:

I. Low foaming rinsing and washing compositions adapted for dishwashers consisting essentially of (A) from 70 percent to 98 percent by weight of water-soluble polyvinyl alcohols obtained by hydrolysis of polyvinyl acetates, having a hydrolysis degree of between 85 percent and 90 percent and having a molecular weight of between 1,000 and 4,000, and (B) from 2 percent to 30 percent by weight of interface active compounds based on alkylene oxide adducts selected from the group consisting of l) a polyoxypropylene glycol having an average number of oxypropylene units of between 17 and 86, adducted with from 0 to 30 mol percent of oxyethylene units, the total number of oxypropylene and oxyethylene units in said adduct being l00 moi percent (2) a propylene oxide adduct of a hydrocarbon compound having from two to ID carbon atoms and at least two reactive hydrogen atoms selected from the group consisting of alk'anes, benzene and alkyibenzenes, substituted with substituents selected from the group consisting of hydroxy, amino, and mixtures thereof, said propylene oxide adduct having an average number of oxypropylene units of between and 84, adducted with from 0 to 30 mol percent of oxyethyiene units. the total number of oxypropylene units and oxyethylene units in said adduct being 100 mol percent and (3) an alkylene oxide adduct of a hig molecular weight lipophilic radical of the formula:

R-Y-H wherein R represents a radical having from eight to 36 carbon atoms selected from the group consisting of alkyl, alitenyl, al-

kadienyl, monohydroxyalltenyl and allrylphenyl and Y represents a bridging link selected from the group consisting of O, S, COO, NH, CONH, and SO,Nl-l; adducted first with oxp'ethylenc units and thereafter with oxyalkylene units se ccted from the group consisting of oxypropylene and oxybutyiene, said oxyethylcne being from 0 to 70 moi percent of the total amount of oxyaiityiene units present; from two to 90 oxypropylene and oxybutylene units being present in said adduct.

2. The low-foaming rinsing and washing compositions of claim 1 wherein said water-soluble polyvinyl alcohols of component A are polyvinyl alcohols having a molecular weight of between 1,000 and 3,000.

3. The low-foaming rinsing and washing compositions of claim 1 wherein said component B is a polyoxypropyiene glycol having an average number of oxypropyiene units of between 29 and 70, adducted with from 0 to 30 mol percent of oxyethylene units, the total amount of oxypropylene and oxyethylene units in said adduct being 100 mol percent.

4. The iow foaming rinsing and washing composition of claim 1 wherein said component B is a propylene oxide adduct of a hydrocarbon compound having from two to l0 carbon atoms and at least two reactive hydrogen atoms selected from the group consisting of alkanes, benzene and alkylbenzenes, substituted with substitutents selected from the group consisting of hydroxy, amino, and mixtures thereof, said propylene oxide adduct having an average number of oxypropylene units of between 27 and 68, adducted with from 0 to 30 moi percent of oxyethylene units, the total number of oxypropyiene and oxyethylene units in said adduct being lOO moi percent.

5. The low-foaming rinsing and washing compositions of claim 1 wherein said component B is an alkyiene oxide adduct of a high molecular weight lipophilic radical of the formula:

wherein R represents a radical having from eight to 36 carbon atoms selected from the group consisting of alkyl, alkenyl, alkadienyl, monohydroxyalkenyl and alkylphenyl and Y represents a bridging link selected from the group consisting of O, S, COO, NH, CONH, and SO NH: adducted first with oxyethylene units and thereafter with oxyalkyiene units selected from the group consisting of oxypropylene and oxybutylene, said oxyethylene being from 0 to 70 mol percent of the total amount of oxyalkylene units present; from 2 to 90 exypropyiene and oxybutylene units being present in said adduct.

6. The low-foaming rinsing and washing compositions of claim 5 wherein said alkylene oxide adduct is the addition product of from 2 to 30 mois of propylene oxide to an alcohol having from eight to 22 carbon atoms selected from the group consisting of fatty alcohols and aikyiphenois.

7. The low-foaming rinsing and washing composition of claim 5 wherein said alkylene oxide adduct is the addition product of from 2 to 20 mois of ethylene oxide and from 2 to 30 mois of propylene oxide, to an alcohol having from eight to 22 carbon atoms selected from the group consisting of fatty alcohols and aikylphenols, wherein at least 30 mol percent of said alkyiene oxides is propylene oxide.

8. The low-foaming rinsing and washing compositions of claim 1 wherein said component A is present in an amount of from percent to 98 percent by weight and said component B is present in an amount of from 2 percent to 15 percent by weight.

9. Aqueous concentrates containing from 10 percent to 30 percent by weight of the low-foaming rinsing and washing compositions of claim 1.

10. The method of washing and rinsing solid articles which comprises forcefully contacting said solid articles with water containing from 0.0i to 0.5 grams per liter of the low-foaming rinsing and washing compositions ofciaim 1.

s s s s

Patent Citations
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Reference
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4002490 *Feb 20, 1975Jan 11, 1977Nalco Chemical CompanyPaint spray booth chemical treatment
US4070298 *Jul 26, 1976Jan 24, 1978Olin CorporationDefoaming detergent additive
US4187121 *May 17, 1978Feb 5, 1980Henkel Kommanditgesellschaft Auf AtkienReaction product of an aldose and a polyglycol ether
US4272394 *Nov 19, 1979Jun 9, 1981Basf Wyandotte CorporationPolyoxyalkylenes
US4280919 *Apr 29, 1980Jul 28, 1981Basf AktiengesellschaftDishwashing composition
US4306987 *Dec 29, 1980Dec 22, 1981Basf Wyandotte CorporationLow-foaming nonionic surfactant for machine dishwashing detergent
US4333845 *Sep 8, 1980Jun 8, 1982Grow Group, Inc.Coating composition thinner for decreasing pollution resulting from the application of a coating composition
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US4797127 *Mar 17, 1988Jan 10, 1989Air Products And Chemicals, Inc.Low foaming, high weaving efficiency polyvinyl alcohol size composition
US4836951 *Mar 9, 1987Jun 6, 1989Union Carbide CorporationAutomatic dishwasing detergents
US4844833 *Sep 19, 1988Jul 4, 1989Kaken Kogyo, Co., Ltd.Polyvinyl alcohol, expandable microcapsules
US4845140 *Mar 11, 1988Jul 4, 1989Air Products And Chemicals, Inc.Waxless polyvinyl alcohol size composition
US4867900 *Sep 27, 1988Sep 19, 1989Kaken Kogyo, Co., Ltd.Release agents
US5017303 *May 1, 1989May 21, 1991Kaken Tech Co., Ltd.Paint peeling composition and paint peeling method
US6484734 *Jul 14, 1999Nov 26, 2002Ecolab Inc.Multi-step post detergent treatment method
US6694989Oct 2, 2002Feb 24, 2004Ecolab Inc.Using a potable rinse or a dilute solution of an aqueous food grade rinse aid to rinse alkaline washed kitchen ware; two step rinse insures complete and sanitary cleaning of the ware
EP1028150A2 *Apr 8, 1999Aug 16, 2000TUFTY GmbHProtective and gloss layer from water-soluble polymers for preserving against fouling
Classifications
U.S. Classification510/221, 510/475, 516/191, 510/506, 516/132, 510/220, 510/514, 510/499, 568/623, 510/228
International ClassificationC11D1/722, C11D3/37
Cooperative ClassificationC11D3/3753, C11D3/0026, C11D1/722
European ClassificationC11D1/722, C11D3/37C3, C11D3/00B5