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Publication numberUS3636726 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 25, 1972
Filing dateAug 26, 1969
Priority dateAug 30, 1968
Also published asDE1943274A1
Publication numberUS 3636726 A, US 3636726A, US-A-3636726, US3636726 A, US3636726A
InventorsStuart Frederick Fox, Nathan Rosenfeld
Original AssigneeNathan Rosenfeld, Stuart Frederick Fox
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of cooling containers
US 3636726 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Rosenfeld et al. 1 Jan. 25, 1972 [5 METHOD OF COOLING CONTAINERS Referentes Ciled [72] Inventors: Nathan Rosent'eld, Unit 1 1, 459 Old South UNITED STATES PATENTS gm gj tj gfgi g t fifgg n lf 2,460,765 2/1949 Palaith ..62/294 9 '9 Bondi Beach, Ncw south wales 2026, 2,607,203 8/1952 -K1e st... ..62/276 both ofAustralia 3'269l41 8/1966 wuss 2/2 4 3,309,890 3/1967 Barnett... ...62/294 [22] Filed: Aug. 26, 1969 3,494,143 2/1970 Barnett ..62/294 [21] Appl 853007 Primary Examinerwilliam J. Wye

. Atlorney-Finnegan, Henderson &,Farabow [30] F oreign Application Priority Data 57 ABSTRACT Aug. 30, 1968 Australia ..42817/68 A container of beverage is conveniently cooled by the provi- [52] US. CL. ...62/294, 62/371, 62/457 sion of a small reservoir of a compressed nontoxic gas or non- [51] a F251 3]) toxic liquid in the interior of the beverage. The beverage is 53 Field fS h rapidly cooled when the gas is allowed to escape from the reservoir through a throttle, the device being generally in the form of a flat plate in the interior of the beverage.

7 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures METHOD OF COOLING CONTAINERS This invention relates to a cooling means for beverages and, in particular, to a self-cooling container for beverages.

The main object of this invention is to provide a simple, cheap but effective means of cooling containers for beverages.

This invention, therefore, provides a cooling means for beverages, which comprises an auxiliary vessel situated in the interior of a main vessel and connected to the outer wall of the main vessel by perforable means, which auxiliary vessel in turn comprises a flat plate of a heat-conductive metal integral with a reservoir of compressed nontoxic gas or a nontoxic liquid which boils vigorously at ambient temperature and standard pressure, which reservoir is connected to the perforable means by way of an elongated tube in the interior of the flat plate.

The beverage is chilled by the evaporation of the nontoxic liquid and the expansion of the nontoxic gas through the perforation in the container.

The flat plate is preferably elongated in the direction of the greatest dimension of the main vessel.

More preferably the elongated tube forms a zigzag pattern in the interior of the flat plate.

Yet more preferably the reservoir is connected to the elongated tube by means of a release valve or throttle.

In a particularly preferred embodiment a channel or fins are provided at the edge of the plate.

In a further particularly preferred embodiment the compressed nontoxic gas or nontoxic liquid is a chlorotluorohydrocarbon, for example, a Freon (Freon is a Registered Trade Mark).

The reservoir and heat-exchange tube are made of a metal of high thermal conductivity, for example, aluminum. However, the main vessel may be made of any suitable material, for example, chromium coated steel, aluminum or an inert plastic.

The amount of gas or liquid, used in the case of a beverage, is preferably sufficient to reduce the temperature of the beverage to about 40 F.

It is recognized that the efficiency of the heat-exchange might be increased by placing fins on the heat-exchange tube or by placing grooves in the surface of the flat plate described above.

The efficiency of the heat-exchange may also be increased by slowing the rate of passage of the cool gas through the heatexchange tube by, for example, packing the tube loosely with a metal wool." In this case the cold packing yet further in- FIG. 2a is a cross-sectional view of a more complex devic according to the invention.

FIG. 2b is a perspective view of the device shown in FIG. 2a.

In FIG. 1, numeral 2 designates a container of a beverage (for example, a can of beer); 5 designates an auxiliary reservoir of compressed nontoxic gas in contact with its liquid phase; 3 designates an elongated heat-exchange tube connecting the reservoir to the upper surface of the container; 4 designates a throttle; l designates a dimple on the upper surface of the container indicating the position of the elongated tube.

The container illustrated in this Figure is conveniently opened with a two-pronged punch, one prong of the punch being used to perforate the can at dimple l. The liquid boils as the pressure is released and the gas escapes through throttle 4 and perforated dimple l. The beverage in the main container is cooled by contact with the auxiliary reservoir and the heatexchange tube which are in turn cooled by the evaporation of the liquid in the reservoir and the expansion of the compressed gas through the throttle.

In FIGS. 2a and 2b, numeral 8 designates a tube in the form of a zigzag in the interior of a flat plate 7; 6 represents a ringtag device so positioned that it seals orifice 9 at the end of tube 8.

The operation of this container is essentially similar to that 7 described with respect to FIG. 1. The ring-tag when pulled unseals orifice 9 and leaves a further opening which allows a cooled liquid to be poured from the main container. Plate 8 presents a large heat-exchange surface to the liquid in the main container.

As stated above, reservoir 5 can be integral with flat plate 7, allowing circulation of the beverage to be cooled around both plate and reservoir.

What we claim is:

1. A self-cooling container for beverages comprising:

a main vessel, an auxiliary vessel situated in the interior of the main vessel, perforable means connecting an outer wall of the'main vessel to the auxiliary vessel, said auxiliary vessel comprising a reservoir, a fiat plate of a heat-conductive metal integral with said reservoir and an elongated tube in the interior of the flat plate connecting the reservoir to the perforable means, said reservoir containing compressed nontoxic gas or a nontoxic liquid which boils vigorously at ambient temperature and standard pressure.

2. A self-cooling container as-claimed in claim 1, wherein the flat plate is elongated in the direction of the greatest dimension of the main vessel.

3. A self-cooling container as claimed in claim 2, wherein the elongated tube forms a zigzag pattern in the interior of the flat plate.

4. A self-cooling container as claimed in claim 3, further including a release valve or throttle connecting the reservoir to the elongated tube.

5. A self-cooling container as claimed in claim 4, wherein a channel or fins are provided at the edge of the plate.

6. A self-cooling container as claimed in claim 4, wherein the compressed nontoxic gas or nontoxic liquid is a chlorotluoro-hydrocarbon.

7. A self-cooling container as claimed in claim 6, wherein the amount of chlorofluoro-hydrocarbon is sufficient to reduce the temperature of the beverage in the main vessel to about 40 F.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3803867 *Aug 31, 1972Apr 16, 1974S WillisThermodynamic beverage cooling unit
US3862548 *Nov 1, 1973Jan 28, 1975Ladany Shaul PPortable device for cooling liquids
US3987643 *Jan 22, 1975Oct 26, 1976Willis Samuel CThermodynamic beverage cooling unit
US4597271 *Feb 14, 1985Jul 1, 1986Asher NofContainer for self-cooling the liquid contents thereof
US4669273 *May 7, 1986Jun 2, 1987Liquid Co2 Engineering Inc.Self-cooling beverage container
US4679407 *Dec 10, 1985Jul 14, 1987Kim Ho KBeverage container with enclosed cooling means
US4688395 *Jul 1, 1986Aug 25, 1987Superior Marketing Research Corp.Self-contained cooling device for food containers
US4736599 *Dec 12, 1986Apr 12, 1988Israel SiegelSelf cooling and self heating disposable beverage cans
US4784678 *Apr 6, 1987Nov 15, 1988The Coca-Cola CompanySelf-cooling container
US4802343 *Jul 1, 1987Feb 7, 1989The Coca-Cola CompanySelf-cooling container
US4911740 *Aug 2, 1988Mar 27, 1990Schieder Hans BCooling using pressurized container
US4925470 *Apr 14, 1989May 15, 1990Chou Tien FaBottom ejection type instant cooling easy-opener with amusement effect
US5201183 *Apr 29, 1992Apr 13, 1993Ramos John FCooling device for beverage cans
US5214933 *Jan 29, 1992Jun 1, 1993Envirochill International Ltd.Self-cooling fluid container
US5331817 *May 28, 1993Jul 26, 1994The Joseph CompanyPortable self-cooling and self-heating device for food and beverage containers
US5394703 *Dec 9, 1993Mar 7, 1995Microcold Technologies, Inc.Self-chilling food or beverage container
US5555741 *May 18, 1995Sep 17, 1996Envirochill International Ltd.Self-cooling fluid container with integral refrigerant chamber
US5655384 *May 24, 1995Aug 12, 1997The Joseph CompanyHeat exchange unit
US6102108 *Jan 27, 1999Aug 15, 2000Chill-Can International, Inc.Heat exchange unit having thermally conductive discs having preferential flow paths
US6128906 *Feb 10, 1999Oct 10, 2000Chill-Can International, Inc.Outer container constructed of non-metallic material, inner container constructed of metal secured to outer container; inner container houses material which when activated alters temperature of food or beverage housed therein
US6619068 *Feb 27, 2002Sep 16, 2003Icetec, Inc.Self-cooling beverage container
US6907750 *May 13, 2004Jun 21, 2005Icetec, Inc.Cosmetic container having a cooling device
WO1990001660A1 *Jul 31, 1989Feb 22, 1990Hans B SchiederPressure responsive valve in a temperature changing device
WO1994028362A1 *Apr 5, 1994Dec 8, 1994Joseph CoA portable self-cooling and self-heating device for food and beverage containers
WO1996027110A1 *Feb 28, 1995Sep 6, 1996Joseph CoA self-chilling food or beverage container
WO1997038271A1Apr 3, 1997Oct 16, 1997Joseph CoCombined valve cup and bottom assembly for self-cooling container
WO1997045684A1 *May 9, 1997Dec 4, 1997Stefano CaramelliQuick cooling of beverages within closed vessels
WO2000043274A2Jan 18, 2000Jul 27, 2000Joseph CoSelf-cooling or self-heating food or beverage container having heat exchange unit with external protective coating
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/294, 62/457.9, 62/457.1, 62/371
International ClassificationF25D3/10
Cooperative ClassificationF25D2331/805, F25D3/107
European ClassificationF25D3/10C