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Publication numberUS3636991 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 25, 1972
Filing dateDec 3, 1969
Priority dateDec 3, 1969
Publication numberUS 3636991 A, US 3636991A, US-A-3636991, US3636991 A, US3636991A
InventorsWebster Adrian D
Original AssigneeSpectra Strip Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for punching terminal loops from multiple wire cable
US 3636991 A
Abstract
The method and apparatus for punching terminal loops from multiple wire flat ribbon cable in which the wires are pulled bodily relative to their own loose insulation as the loops are formed to avoid wire drawing and reduction in cross section of the wire. The loops extend at right angles to the plane of the cable and are longitudinally and transversely spaced in groups in a staggered pattern. The loops are started adjacent the middle of the cable and are progressively formed toward each end, with immediately preceding loops forming anchoring points holding the wires, while new groups of loops are being pressed out toward the opposite ends. The wires are bodily slid within their insulating jackets from the ends to provide material for the newly formed loops. Punches and dies are mounted on slides movable in opposite directions from the center of the machine and cable and the slides are indexed in positions for punching a new group of loops and for anchoring an immediately preceding formed group by properly spaced lights which are indexed with a photocells on a slide. The cycle of operations repeats through the final groups of loops adjacent the ends of the cable whereupon the slides are returned to their central position and the cable is withdrawn, its ends sheared, and a new cable blank inserted into punching position.
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United States Patent Webster I METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PUNCHING TERMINAL LOOPS FROM MULTIPLE WIRE CABLE [72]- lnventor: Adrian D. Webster, Huntington Beach,

Calif.

[73] Assignee: Spectra-Strip Corporation, Garden Grove,

Calif.

[22] Filed: Dec. 3, 1969 21 App1.No.: 881,730

Primary ExaminerLowell A. Larson Attorneyl. Morley Drucker 51 Jan. 25, 1972 [57] ABSTRACT The method and apparatus for punching terminal loops from multiple wire flat ribbon cable in which the wires are pulled bodily relative to their own loose insulation as the loops are formedto avoid wire drawing and reduction in cross section of the wire. The loops extend at right angles to the plane of the cable and are longitudinally and transversely spaced in groups in a staggered pattern. The loops are started adjacent the middle of the cable and are progressively formed toward each end, with immediately preceding loops forming anchoring points holding the wires, while new groups of loops are being pressed out toward the opposite ends. The wires are bodily slid within their insulating jackets from the ends to provide material for the newly formed loops. Punches and dies are mounted on slides movable in opposite directions from the center of the machine and cable and the slides are indexed in positions for punching a new group of loops and for anchoring an immediately preceding formed group by properly spaced lights which are indexed with a photocells on a slide. The cycle of operations repeats through the final groups of loops adjacent the ends of the cable whereupon the slides are returned to their central position and the cable is withdrawn, its ends sheared, and a new cable blank inserted into punching position.

19 Claims, 20 Drawing Figures PATENTED JAN25 i972 SHEU 1 (IF 8 INVENTOR 4004M M4=5575 BY a Z g mmmm I 4 1 mm m PATENIED M25872 SHEET 3 OF 8 mam-1 LQNN mNN INVENTOR.

PATENTEU m2 51972 SHEET l 0F 8 40674 D, Wiasrfe @M 6% M24 METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PUNCIIING TERMINAL LOOPS FROM MULTIPLE WIRE CABLE CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION The method and apparatus of this invention form the conductor disclosed and claimed in the copending application of Donald D. Lang, Ser. No. 859,258, filed Sept. 19, 1969, having a common assignee herewith, and the method defined herein is a further development of the method disclosed and claimed in said application.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. This invention relates to a method and apparatus for forming terminal loops in multiple wire cables used, for example, in switching equipment of automatic telephone systems and the like.

2. Multiple wire cables with spaced terminals of different form than that disclosed herein are known in the patents to McBerty, U.S. Pat. No. 1,054,784, and Deakin, U.S. Pat. No. 2,433,346. The McBerty patent shows a woven multiconductor ribbon in which the weaving is interrupted at staggered points to expose bare portions of the wire as terminals. The Deakin patent shows a multiple wire, flat cable having loops in the wires which are bent to extend to the ribbon edge. Both the products and the method of forming are distinct from those disclosed and claimed herein. Likewise, neither patent shows anything resembling the apparatus disclosed and claimed in this application.

The copending application of Donald D. Lang, above identified, discloses the product formed by the method and apparatus in this application and also a broad method of forming it which could be performed either by machine or manually, and with the use of the simple tools described in that application.

The present application discloses and claims an improved method and apparatus for efi'ecting formation of staggered terminal loops in a multiple wire cable starting from its midpoint and pulling the wires for material for the loops bodily in their insulating jackets from each end of the cable to form the loops without wire drawing and reduction in cross section of the wire.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION As disclosed in the above-identified copending application of Donald D. Lang, the individual wires of the cable have loose-fitting insulating jackets of, for example, polyvinyl chloride, and the flat ribbon cable may be formed by bonding together the insulating jackets of a plurality of parallel wires into a flat ribbon configuration in the manner, for example, disclosed and claimed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,005,739, granted Oct. 24, I96 l for METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAK- ING MULTICONDUCTOR CABLE. The wires of the cable have terminal loops pressed therefrom at right angles to their insulation by an external punch operating from the side opposite the formed loop. The wires are pulled bodily down the center of their own insulation from an end of the cable so that loops are formed without wire drawing and reduction in cross section.

To insure that the wires are slid from the same end of the cable as the loops are consecutively formed, each formed loop becomes an anchor point while the next succeeding loop is being formed, thereby insuring that the wires are pulled bodily from the end of the cable toward which the loops are progressing. The previously formed loops in the groups are anchored by engaging them with punches and dies similar to the punches and dies which form the loops and spaced therefrom a fixed distance corresponding to the spacing along the wires of the terminal loops.

The loops are first punched at the middle of the cable by first punching a pair of immediately adjacent groups of loops at the center and thereafter punching the next groups of loops toward the opposite ends. The punches and dies are mounted in paired sets movable independently toward the opposite ends of the cable in steps corresponding to the spacing between the groups so that the inward sets of punches and dies enter the terminal loops formed by the outer sets of punches and dies to anchor the same in position while the outer sets thereafter punch the next group of terminal loops toward the ends of the cables, thereby pulling the wires from the cable ends to provide the material for the loops without wire drawing. The operation of the inner and outer punches is timed so that the inner punches engage in the immediately previously formed loops before a new group of loops is formed by the outer set of punches and dies.

The sets of punches and dies are indexed in position by properly spaced lights on the machine which cooperate with a photocell movable with a set of punches and the operation proceeds automatically, once started, until the end of the cable is reached, whereupon the sets of punches and dies, now at the opposite ends of the cable, are automatically returned to the central position ready to start at the center of a new cable blank in which loops are to be formed.

The cables are mounted on a supporting frame and a completed cable is withdrawn from the machine and positioned for automatic trimming of the excess insulating jacket material from its ends. The frame has provisions for supporting a new cable blank while a cable is having terminal loops formed therein and, after shearing of the formed cable, the frame is manipulated to insert the new cable blank into the machine, whereupon the loop forming operation may be started thereon.

Punching movements of the sets of punches and dies is controlled by the application of pneumatic pressure to operating cylinders, and the sequence of operation of the inner and outer sets of punches is controlled by flow control valves. The sets of punches and dies are mounted in oppositely moving pairs in side-by-side relation on slides which are moved by an oppositely threaded, rotating screw operated by clutch and brake control from an operating motor.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is a front elevational view of the apparatus according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the apparatus of FIG. 1 in a different position;

FIG. 3 is a detail view of an operating switch on the line 3- 3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged vertical sectional view on the line 4-4 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4a is a detail view on the line 4a4a of FIG. 4;

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 4 with the parts in different positions;

FIG. 6 is a vertical sectional view on the line 66 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 7 is a diagrammatic representation of the cable carrier frame in terminal loop punching position;

FIG. 8 is a view similar to FIG. 7 but with the cable carrier frame retracted;

FIG. 9 is a view similar to FIGS. 7 and 8 with the carrier frame in cable-trimming position;

FIG. I0 is a view showing a paired set of loop-forming punches taken on the line 10-10 of FIG. 6;

FIG. 11 is a vertical sectional view through a punch and die taken on the line l1l1 of FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is an enlarged view of a punch pressing a terminal loop in a cable wire;

FIG. 13 is an expanded view of the plates of a die;

FIG. 14 is a detailed view of a die plate showing the openings therein;

FIG. 15 is a sectional view through a punch taken on line FIG. 19 is a pneumatic diagram for the machine.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION The apparatus of the present invention and by which the method of the invention may be carried out is mounted on an inverted, U-shaped base channel 21. A pair of end supporting plates 22 and 23 and a central supporting plate 24 are mounted on the upper surface of the base channel by welding, bolting or other means to be rigid therewith. Rigidly mounted in the plates 22-24 and extending longitudinally of the machine are parallel rods 25 and 26 on which are slidably mounted blocks 27 and 28 mounted, respectively, between the plates 22 and 24, and 23 and 24.

Rotatably mounted in the plates 22-24 is a lead screw 29 having oppositely threaded half portions 31 and 32 on opposite sides of the central plate 24. Rigidly secured to and depending from the blocks 27, 28 are supporting plates 33 and 34. Upon the plates 33, 34 are mounted threaded blocks 35, 36 into which the screw halves 31 and 32 are threaded so that the blocks 35, 36 act as travelling nuts on the screw 29, movable in opposite directions as the screw is rotated to move the blocks 27, 28 therewith in opposite directions. The screw 29 has a pulley 37 on its end connected by a link belt or the like 38 to a pulley 39 on the output side ofa clutch and brake control 41 which is coupled at 42 to an electric motor 43.

Rigidly mounted on the top of the slide block 27 are a pair of pivot posts 44 and 45 on which are pivotally mounted lever arms 46 and 47 intermediate their ends. Rigidly mounted on the top ofthe slide block 28 are a pair of pivot posts 48 and 49 on which are pivoted a pair of lever arms 51 and 52 intermediate their ends. At the back of the slide block 27 are mounted supporting brackets 53, 54 and at the back of the slide block 28 are mounted supporting brackets 55 and 56. On the brackets 53-56 are mounted four pneumatic operators 57, duplicating the one shown in FIG. 4 on the bracket 55. The pneumatic operators 57 have extending upwardly therefrom piston connected actuators 58, 59, 60 and 61, pivotally connected to the rear ends of the levers 46, 47, 51 and 52. On each of the actuators 58-61 are rigidly secured plates 62 on which are mounted stop rods 63 carrying stop nuts 64 and 64a cooperating with the brackets 53-56; 64 limiting the upward movement and 64a the downward movement of the actuators 58-61, as shown more particularly in FIG. 4.

On the forward ends of the lever arms 46, 47, 51 and 52 are pivotally mounted punch-operating rods 65, 66, 67 and 68, respectively, to the lower ends of which are pinned punch plates 69, 70, 71 and 72. The punch plates are slidably mounted for vertical movement on guide posts 73 rigidly mounted in and depending from the slide blocks 27 and 28. Rigidly mounted on and depending from the punch plates 69-72 are punch blocks 74 carrying rigid punches 75 and resiliently mounted stripper plates 76. This structure is shown in FIG. 4 and is duplicated for each ofthe punch plates 69-72.

At the bottom of each of the supporting plates 33, 34 is pivotally mounted a die carrier 77, 78. Each of the die carries 77, 78 carries a pair ofdies 79 thereon, each located beneath a punch block 74, in the manner shown in FIG. 4. Pivotal downward movement of the dies 79 is limited by stops 81 carried on the blocks 35, 36. The die carriers 77, 78 are held in their upward position, as shown in FIG. 4, by means of eccentrics 82, 83, 84 carried on a shaft 85 journaled in the end plates 22 and 23 and in intermediate blocks 86 and 87 mounted on the top of the base channel 21, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 4. The shaft 85 has an arm 88 rigidly extending therefrom to which is pivotally connected the actuator 89 ofa pneumatic operator 91, pivoted at 92 in a bracket rigidly mounted on the base channel 21. As the actuator 89 is extended and retracted, it rotates the shaft 85 and therewith the eccentrics 82-84 to move the die carriers 77, 78 between the upper position of FIG. 4 and the lower position of FIG. 5. The cavities ofthe die 79 are in communication with an air passage 93 fed by pneumatic tubing 94, as will be hereinafter explained.

Rigidly secured to and depending from the supporting plate 33 is a bracket 95 which carries a photoelectric cell 96 and an electric switch 97. Rigidly secured between the plates 22 and 24 is a supporting rod 98 on which are mounted, in spaced relation, a plurality of light blocks 99 shown in detail in FIGS. 4 and 4a. The light blocks 99 are adjustably spaced on the rod 98 by means of nuts 101 and have openings 102 in line with the path of movement of the photoelectric cell 96 in which are placed light bulbs 103. The front ofthe blocks 99 are provided with adjustable light shading plates whose edge 105 determines the point at which the light from the bulb 103 actuates the photoelectric cell 96 to effect conduction thereof. The light blocks 99 and lights 103 are spaced longitudinally of the rod 98 the distance between the terminal loops in adjacent groups in the cable and control movements of the slide blocks 27 and 28 to the spacing between groups, as will be explained hereinafter. The light blocks 99 have operating projections 106 thereon for actuating the switch 97 for a purpose to be explained.

Mounted on the base channel 21 are a pair of longitudinally spaced, vertical, forwardly extending, supporting plates 107 and 108 having in opposed faces horizontal supporting slots 109 communicating with vertical slots 111. Within the supporting slots 109 ride forward rollers 112 and rear rollers 113, supporting a rectangular frame 114 designed to carry the wire cable. For this purpose the frame 114 carries on forward and rear opposite corners longitudinally extending brackets 115 and 116 each carrying a pair oflongitudinally extending spring arms 117 and 118 between which is clamped the multiple wire, flat ribbon cable 119. The spring arms 117 and 118 are provided with groups of spaced holes offset in staggered rela tion at 121 in FIG. 2 through which the punches 75 extend in pressing out the terminal loops from the wires.

The vertical slots 111 are normally closed by slides 122, which however have openings 123 adapted to be aligned with the slots 111 to permit passage of the wheels 112 or 113 therethrough. The slides 122 have inwardly projecting forward pins 124 and rearward pins 125 thereon extending through slots 126 in the supporting plates 107 and 108. The cable carrying frame 114 has pins 127 and 128 projecting oppositely therefrom in positions to engage the pins 124 and 125 on the slides 122. Immediately above the vertical slots 111 the supporting plates 107 and 108 carry switch operators 129 adapted to operate switches 131 and 132. The operation of the frame 114 is illustrated in FIGS. 7-9 and will be explained more fully hereinafter.

Means are provided for trimming the excess insulation from the ends of the completed cable, shown more particularly in FIGS. 1,4 and 16. The cutting lines are shown at 133 and 134 in FIG. 4 as determined by the stationary cutting blades 135 and movable cutting blades 136. The stationary cutting blades 135 are mounted on blocks 137 supported on vertical plates 138 suspended from the base channel toward each end thereof in the positions shown in FIG. 1. The movable blades 136 are mounted on hinged arms 139 pivotally connected to actuators 141 of pneumatic operators 142. Energization of the pneumatic operators 142 is controlled by the switches 131 and 132, as will be explained hereinafter.

FIG. 10 shows a pair of punch blocks 74 as they are mounted together from the punch plates 69-72 under a slide block 27 or 28. The position of the cable 119 is dotted in and the punches 75 as spaced along the cable 119 and transversely thereofin staggered relation. The stripper plate 76 is shown in FIG. 11 as mounted on movable posts 143 in the punch block 74 and biased downwardly by compression springs 144. FIG. 11 also shows on an enlarged scale the cooperation between the punches 75 and the dies 79 with the cable 119 therebetween.

The operation of the punches 75 cooperating with the die openings is shown in FIG. 12 where the punch end 145 has passed through the cable insulation 146 to engage a wire 147 and form a loop 148 therein within the die cavity 149.

The die is shown in FIGS. 11 and 13 to be made up ofa plurality of plates 151 having die openings 149 therein which are spaced longitudinally in adjacent plates so that when assembled in the position ofFlG. 11, the die openings 149 assume a staggered relation corresponding to the staggered relation of the punches 75 in FIG. 10. The plates 151 have openings 152 therethrough communicating with the die openings 149 and overlapping with the openings of adjacent plates, as at 153, so as to permit the air entering through passage 93 to pass from plate to plate and from opening 149 to opening 149 whereby air entering the manifold chamber 154 from passage 93 will pass successively through the die openings 149 and serve to blow out pieces of insulation which may be cut from the cable from the die openings.

FIG. 17 illustrates a portion ofa finished cable 119 in which terminal loops 148 have been punched in staggered relation in groups spaced longitudinally of the cable.

Switches 161, 162 and 163 shown on the apparatus and on the wiring diagram of FIG. 18 are manually operated switches. A machine-operated switch is shown in FIG. 3 at 164 operated by a pair of arms 165 and 166 rigidly mounted on the pivoted arm 46 to be moved therewith to actuate the switch 164 respectively to off" and on positions. Other machineoperated switches are shown on the apparatus and in FIG. 18 at 165-169. Also included in the wiring diagram of FIG. 18, are a relay 160 with normally open and closed contacts, a relay 170 with a double-throw contact for the clutch and brake control, a motor-reversing relay 171, a relay 172 with a normally open contact, a time-delay relay 173 with a normally open contact, a relay 174 with normally open and normally closed contacts, a relay 175 having a normally open contact controlling a solenoid-valve operating coil 176, a relay 177 having a normally open contact, a relay 178 having a normally closed and two normally open contacts, a relay 179 having normally open and normally closed contacts, a relay 180 having a normally closed contact, and a time-delay relay 181 having a normally open contact controlling a second solenoidvalve operating coil 182.

The pneumatic diagram shown in FIG. 19 comprises an air pressure source 183 regulated to a predetermined value by regulator 184, and feeding to two solenoid valves, one at 185 having the operating coil 176, and the other at 186 having the operating coil 182. The valve 185 controls the flow of air pressure to the opposite ends of the cylinders of operators 57 and 91, while the valve 186 controls the application of fluid pressure to the single end of the cutter operators 142, these being returned to unactuated position by return springs 187.

The operators 57 are provided with flow control adjustable valves 188, 189, 190 and 191, which control the return rate of flow from above the pistons of the operators, and therefore control the speed of downward movement of the punches which they operate. The flow control valves 188-191 are bypassed by check valves 192 to permit rapid flow of air pressure entering above the pistons of the operators 57. The air beneath the pistons of the operators 57 is exhausted through the die blow out passages 93.

The flow control valves 188-191 are first adjusted so that the operator 91 will move the eccentrics 82-84 to their upward position supporting the dies before the punches engage the cable. The flow control valves are then adjusted so that the inner lever arms 47 and 51 will be first moved by their operators 57 to move their punches 75 into the die openings 149 before the punches operated by the outer lever arms 46 and 52 are engaged with the wires of the cable to press loops 148 therefrom. Thus, the sequence of operation is to first operate 91 to raise the dies into upper position, then lower the punch plates 70 and 71 and the punches mounted thereon, and finally lower punch plates 69 and 72 and the punches mounted thereon. This method of operation, according to the present invention, is desired so as to always pull the wires within their insulating jackets from an end of the cable. Thus, in the initial punching operation, the punch plates 70 and 71 are moved downwardly to press out the groups of loops 148 immediately adjacent the center of the cable 119. In so pressing out the loops, the wires 147 are pulled longitudinally Within their insulating jackets from the opposite ends of the cable. Subsequent to this operation, the punch plates 69 and 72 are moved downwardly to form the next groups of terminal loops 148 toward the opposite ends of the cable, again pulling the wires 147 through their insulating jackets 146 from the opposite ends of the cable. The next operation raises all the punch plates and lowers all the dies, and moves them on their slide blocks 27 and 28 one step toward the opposite ends of the cable, thereby moving the punches on the punch plates 70, 71 into indexing relation with the last formed group of terminal loops. Thereafter, the dies are raised into position and the punch plates 70 and 71 move downwardly to lock in the last formed terminal loops and thereafter the punch plates 69 and 72 are lowered to press out new groups of terminal loops toward the opposite ends of the cables, again pulling the wires 147 only from the opposite ends of the cable. The process continues step by step to the end of the cable, whereupon longitudinal movement of the punches and dies is reversed, and they are returned to the center of the machine to operate on a new cable blank. The formed cable is now withdrawn from the punching position by pulling the frame 114 to the rear; the formed cable is trimmed and a new cable is inserted into punching position, as will be explained in the machine operation sequence.

In operation, the flow control valves 188-191 are first adjusted to secure the desired sequence of operation, that is, upon energization of the solenoid 176 of valve 185 to first completely move the operator 91, then completely move the punch plates 70 and 71 downwardly by the two inner operators 57 and thereafter completely move the punch plates 69 and 72 downwardly by the outside operators 57.

The apparatus is turned on by closing switch 163 which energizes the motor 43 and the clutch brake control 41 from the direct current source therefor, shown as a battery in FIG. 18. Switch 162 is closed to place power from the supply line 195 to the pushbutton switch 161, and also on line 196 to the circuit for valve-operating solenoid 182. The other supply line is designated 197 and a control line is designated 198. Unless previously loaded on the frame 114, a cable blank 119 of a length greater than the desired finished product by the amount the wires are to be pulled within their insulation to form the loops 148 is loaded between the spring plates 117 and 118, as shown in FIG. 5, and then the frame moved forwardly into the punch position shown in dotted lines therein. At this time, the die carrier will be lowered and the punch block raised, also as shown in FIG. 5. With the frame 114 in forward position, safety switches 168 and 169 will be closed.

The start switch 161 is now closed momentarily, thereby energizing the operating coil of relay 172 through the switches 168 and 169, whereupon its normally open contact closes to place a holding circuit around the momentary switch 161, and thereby energizing control line 198. This energizes the light transformer through the normally closed contact of relay 179 so that lights 103 are illuminated. The coil of time delay relay 173 is energized and, after its time setting of, for example, 2 seconds duration, it closes its contact and energizes the circuit of the photoelectric cell 96. Due to the fact that the lamps 103 are already illuminated, as soon as the photoelectric cell circuit is energized, relay operates to open its contact, thereby preventing energization of relay 174, whereby the brake unit of the clutch and brake control 41 remains energized. The screw 29 does not rotate and the slide blocks 27 and 28 remain stationary.

When the contact of relay 173 closes, relay 175 is energized to close its contact and energize the solenoid 176 of valve 185. Valve now applies air pressure beneath the pistons of the operators 5 7 and to the right-hand side of the operator 9]. According to the sequencing setup of the valves 188-191, the operator 91 moves immediately to move the eccentrics 82-84 upwardly and therewith the die supports 78 and the dies 79 thereon. The pistons of the operators 57 also start to move upwardly but with the inner two operators 57 moving faster so that the punch plates 70 and 71 and the punches thereon come down first to press out the groups of terminal loops 148 immediately adjacent the center of the cable 119. The two outer operators 57 operate after the two inner operators to lower the punch plates 69 and 72 and the punches thereon to form outside groups of loops 140. In each instance, the wires 147 are drawn bodily longitudinally of the insulating jackets 146 to form the loops 148 without wire drawing and without reduction in cross section of the wires.

When the operating arms 165 opens switch 164 as the lever arms 46 moves upwardly, thereby deenergizing the solenoid 176, the valve 185 reverses position under its spring bias to apply pressure to the top of the operators 57 and to the lefthand side of the operator 91 to retract the actuators 58-61 of the operators 57 and to extend the actuator 89 of the operator 91. This moves the punches to their upper position of FIG. 5, and moves the die holders to their lower position in the same figure, thereby releasing both the punches and the dies from the formed loops 148.

As the lever arm 46 rotates back, adjacent the end of its stroke it recloses switch 164 and closes switch 165. Switch 165 energizes relay 179, thus opening its normally closed contacts and deenergizing the lamp transformer to extinguish the lamps 103. This in turn deencrgizes photoelectric cell 96 to deenergize relay 180 whose normally closed contact now closes to energize the operating coil of relay 174, which operates to energize relay 177 whose normally open contact closes to energize relay 170, thereby releasing the brake and engaging the clutch of control 41 so that the screw 29 rotates to move the slide blocks 27 and 28 toward the opposite ends of the machine. As the side blocks move out, switch 97 is operated by the projection 106 on the adjacent light block 99 and cuts off the energization of relay 179, whereby the light transformer is reenergized to illuminate the lights 103. The screw 29 continues to rotate and the slides 27 and 28 move outwardly until the photoelectric cell 96 comes in alignment with the next light 103 which, as stated, is located at a distance to align the inner sets of punches with the groups of terminal loops previously formed by the outer sets of punches.

When photoelectric cell 96 is illuminated, relay 180 is energized to open its contact and deenergize relay 174 which, in reverse sequence, deenergizes relay 170 to reenergize the brake and deenergize the clutch of control 41 whereupon the slides 27, 28 come to rest. Relay 175 is again energized, solenoid 176 of valve 185 is reenergized, and air pressure is again applied to the lower end of the operators 57 and to the righthand end ofthe operator 91.

The cycle of operation repeats with the die holders 77, 78 being first raised and then the punch plates 70, 71 lowered to lock the last formed groups of loops 148 in the innermost dies and punches. The outermost punches subsequently lower with punch plates 69 and 72 to form new groups ofloops 140, and switch 164 is again operated to deenergize the solenoid 176 whereupon the valve 185 operates to return the punches and dies to their open positions. At-the end of the stroke switch 164 is again closed, as is switch 165, to again start rotation of the screw 29 and movement ofthe slide blocks 27 and 28 outwardly.

This cycle of operation is repeated up to the formation of the final groups of terminal loops 148 adjacent the ends of the cable 119, and then instead of switch 97 being operated, the slide blocks continue on until switch 166 is operated, energi2 ing relay 178 to keep the brake ofthe control unit 41 deenergized and, at the same time, energizing the motor reversing relay 171 which, since the lamps are no longer on, affects return movement of the slide blocks 27 and to the middle of the machine. Just before the photoelectric cell 96 gets to the most central lamp 103, switch 167 is operated to put the lamps 103 back on so that when the photoelectric cell 96 reaches this last lamp, the slide blocks 27 and 28 are brought to a stop in the middle of the machine, as shown in FIG. 1. When switch 167 was operated, it energized relay 160 which opens the circuit to the energizing coil of relay 175 to prevent solenoid 176 of valve 105 from being energized.

While the cable in punching position was having the terminal loops 148 pressed therefrom, preferably a new cable blank was inserted between the resilient plates 117, 118 at the back of the frame, that is, at the left as viewed in FIG. 4. With punching of the cable completed, the frame 114 is pulled rearwardly to the full-line position of FIG. 5, corresponding to the diagrammatic representations of FIG. 7. In this movement, the roller 113 moves past the vertical slot 111 which is closed off by the slide 122. However, toward the extreme rear movement of the frame 114, the pins 128 engage the pins on the slide 122 and move it rearwardly as well, to index the opening 123 with the slot 111. Therefore, when the roller 112 is placed above the slot 111, as in FIG. 5 and FIG. 8, the roller 112 moves downwardly through the opening 123 and the slot 111, and the roller 113 moves forwardly until the frame 114 assumes a vertical position, as shown in FIG. 9. At this time, the rollers 113 engage the switch operators 129 to close the switches 131, 132. This energizes the operating coil of the time delay relay 181, which after its predetermined time setting of, for example, 5 seconds, closes its contact to energize the solenoid 132 of valve 186. Valve 186 is therefore operated to introduce air pressure to the operators 142, which thereupon extend their actuators 141 to move the cutting blades 136 against the stationary cutting blades 135, thereby trimming the excess insulation from the ends of the formed cable 119. After the trimming operation, the rollers 113 on frame 114 are moved forwardly in the slots 109 and the rollers 112 move vertically upward in the slots 111 until they enter the horizontal slots 109, whereupon the frame 114 is pushed forwardly into punching position with the new cable blank in position to have terminal loops punched or pressed therefrom. In the extreme forward movement of the frame, the pins 127 engage the pins 125 to move the slides 122 forwardly to bring the opening 123 out of alignment with the vertical slot 111 to therefore prevent the now rearward rollers 112 from dropping into the vertical slots 111.

When the frame 114 moved rearwardly from the punching position, the safety switches 168 and 169 opened to deenergize the entire electrical system except for the cable trimming circuit. When the frame is reinserted into punching position, reversed top for bottom as previously described, switches 168 and 169 are again closed preparatory to starting a new terminal loop punching process when the pushbutton switch 161 is again momentarily depressed.

While a certain preferred method and apparatus according to the present invention have been specifically illustrated and described, it will be understood that the invention is not limited thereto as many variations will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

Iclaim:

1. The method of forming a plurality of base terminal loops spaced along the length of an insulated conductor which comprises:

providing a wire conductor with a loose-fitting insulating jacket within which the wire is bodily movable;

punching two terminal loops from the wire out through its insulation adjacent the center of the conductor, the wire being pulled bodily within its insulation from opposite ends to supply material for the loops; punching two additional terminal loops in the same manner and spaced from the original loops towards the ends of the conductor while anchoring the original two loops in punch position so as to pull the wire to form the new loops only from the opposite ends of the conductor; and

punching additional terminal loops in the same manner at spaced intervals along the length of the conductor while anchoring each immediately previously formed loop in punch position so as to pull wire to form the new loops only from the ends of the conductor.

2. The method of forming base terminal loops on a multiple wire flat ribbon cable comprising:

providing a plurality of parallel wire conductors with loose fitting insulating jackets within which the wires are bodily movable and which are arranged as a flat ribbon cable;

punching two groups of terminal loops in the wires through their insulating jackets adjacent the center of the cable, the loops of each group being in longitudinally and transversely spaced relation in a staggered pattern, and the wires being pulled bodily within their jackets from opposite ends to supply material for the loops;

punching two additional groups of terminal loops in the same manner and spaced from the original two groups of loops toward the ends of the cable while anchoring the original two groups of loops in punch position so as to pull the wires to form the new loops only from the opposite ends of the cable; and

punching additional groups of terminal loops in the same manner at spaced intervals along the length of the cable while anchoring each immediately previously formed group of loops in punch position so as to pull wires to form the new loops only from the ends of the cable.

3. The method defined in claim 2 including:

cutting an original cable blank to the length greater than that of the desired formed cable by at least the amount the wires are withdrawn from their jackets; and

trimming the excess insulation from the ends of the formed cable.

4. The method defined in claim 2 including:

punching the additional groups of terminal loops along the length of the cable progressively from the center toward the opposite ends of the cable so that the newly formed groups of loops are always on the cable end sides of the immediately previously formed groups of loops.

5. The method defined in claim 2 including:

punching the terminal loops with dies on one side of the cable and groups of staggered punches on the opposite side of the cable;

separating said dies and punches from the cable and terminal loops;

moving said dies and punches relative to the cable to a position to anchor the immediately previously formed groups of loops preparatory to punching new groups of loops; and

contacting said dies and groups of punches with the cable to form the anchoring and punching operations recited.

6. The method defined in claim 5 including:

positioning the dies relative to the cable before engaging the punches therewith; and

engaging the punches with the immediately previously formed groups of loops in anchoring relation before punching the new groups of loops from the cable wires.

7. The method defined in claim 6 including:

terminating the punching of additional groups of terminal loops adjacent the opposite ends of the cable; and

returning said dies and punches to their positions adjacent the center of the cable to operate upon a new cable blank.

8. The method defined in claim 7 including:

trimming the excess insulating material from the ends of the cable left after pulling the wires therefrom to form the material for the terminal loops.

9. Apparatus for forming base terminal loops on a multiple wire flat ribbon cable comprising:

means for supporting a multiple wire flat ribbon cable in punching position;

first and second punch means disposed on one side of said cable;

means mounting said first and second punch means for punching movement toward said cable to punch terminal loops therefrom and for bodily movement in opposite directions from the center toward the ends of the cable;

third and fourth punch means mounted alongside said first and second punch means on the same side of the cable and movable both in punching operations and in simultaneous bodily movement, respectively, with said first and second punch means;

die means on the opposite side of said cable cooperating with said punch means in the formation of terminal groups in the cable wires;

said die means being movable with the punch means longitudinally of the cable and being movable toward the cable to receive the punch means in the loop-forming operation;

means for effecting movement of the die means toward the cable into position to receive the punch means;

and means for effecting movement of the punch means toward the cable in the sequence of the first and second inner punch means in advance of the operation of the third and fourth outer punch means.

10. The apparatus defined in claim 9 including:

means for moving said punch means together adjacent the center of a cable blank,

means for first operating the first and second inner punch means to punch terminal loops in the cable wires adjacent the center of the cable while drawing wires for the loops from the ends of the cable; and

means for subsequently punching terminal loops by operation of the third and fourth punch means while said first and second punch means remain in punching position to anchor the loops formed thereby whereby wire for the loops punched by the third and fourth outer punch means is pulled from the ends of the cable.

11. The apparatus defined in claim 10 including:

means for moving the die means and punch means away from the cable after operation of the third and fourth punch means,

means for moving the first and third, and the second and fourth punch means and the die means cooperating therewith in opposite directions from the center toward the ends of the cables,

means for stopping said punch means with the first and second punch means in alignment with the terminal loops formed by the third and fourth punch means,

means for thereafter moving the first and second punch means and the die means cooperating therewith into engagement with the terminal loops previously punched by the third and fourth punch means whereby to anchor said terminal loops, and

means for thereafter moving said third and fourth punch means to punch additional terminal loops from the cable while pulling wires to form the loops from opposite ends of the cable.

12. The apparatus defined in claim 11 in which the means for stopping said punch means with the first and second punch means in alignment with the terminal loops punched by the third and fourth punch means comprises:

cooperating spaced lights and a photocell for stopping movement of the punch means after a distance corresponding to the spacing between the terminal loops formed by the respective first and third, and second and fourth punch means.

13. The apparatus defined in claim 9 including:

said first and third punch means, and said second and fourth punch means being mounted, respectively, on common carrier means, and

said die means cooperating with said punch means being also mounted on said common carrier means; and

means for simultaneously moving said carrier means in opposite directions longitudinally of the cable.

14. The apparatus defined in claim 13 including:

piston-and-cylinder operating means for said punch means individual thereto and also mounted on the carrier means to be bodily movable therewith.

15. The apparatus defined in claim 9 including:

supporting means for said die means extending longitudinally of the cable when in punch position, and movable into and out of position supporting the die means adjacent the cable for punching operation.

16. The apparatus defined in claim 9 including:

llll

means for operating supporting means for the die means in synchronism with the operation of the punch means so that the die means is moved into supported position to receive the punch means prior to operation of any punch means into engagement therewithi B7. The apparatus defined in claim 9 including air blast means cooperating with said die means for blowing insulating particles cut from the cable from the die apparatus.

18. The apparatus defined as in claim 9 including: a movable frame upon which said cable is mounted in supported relation; means supporting said frame for movement into and out of cable punching position;

trimming means for the ends of the cable;

and means for swinging said frame while supported in the apparatus to position the ends of the cable adjacent the trimming means for a trimming operation removing excess insulation from the ends of the cable.

19. The apparatus defined in claim 18 including:

means for automatically operating said trimming means after said frame has swung into the position locating the ends ofthe cable at the trimming means.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3871072 *Dec 12, 1973Mar 18, 1975Amp IncMethod and apparatus for varying the relative length of a plurality of leads by forming bights in selected leads
US3939552 *Nov 26, 1974Feb 24, 1976Amp IncorporatedMethod and apparatus for feeding a pair of wires
US3956822 *Oct 15, 1974May 18, 1976Amp IncorporatedMethod and apparatus for positioning individual leads utilizing an improved template
US4020548 *Aug 25, 1976May 3, 1977Western Electric Company, Inc.Forming and stripping of conductors
US4130934 *Dec 6, 1977Dec 26, 1978Amp IncorporatedMethod for terminating high density cable
US4326764 *Feb 21, 1980Apr 27, 1982Amp IncorporatedConnector for terminating high density cable
US4757845 *Apr 20, 1987Jul 19, 1988Amp IncorporatedMethod and apparatus for bending wires
US4860801 *Mar 15, 1988Aug 29, 1989Amp IncorporatedMethod and apparatus for bending ribbon cables
Classifications
U.S. Classification140/105, 29/828, 29/874, 174/72.0TR
International ClassificationH01B7/08, B21F1/06, B21F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationH01B7/0884, B21F1/06
European ClassificationH01B7/08R, B21F1/06
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Jun 12, 1992ASAssignment
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Owner name: ELTRA CORPORATION, A CORP. OF NY
Free format text: CERTIFIED COPY OF MERGER FILED IN THE OFFICE OF SECRETARY OF STATE OF DELAWARE ON JUNE 6, 1980, SHOWING MERGER AND CHANGE OF NAME OF ASSIGNOR;ASSIGNOR:ATREL CORPORATION (INTO);REEL/FRAME:003992/0237
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