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Publication numberUS3637197 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 25, 1972
Filing dateJan 12, 1968
Priority dateJan 12, 1968
Publication numberUS 3637197 A, US 3637197A, US-A-3637197, US3637197 A, US3637197A
InventorsJames L Hudson
Original AssigneeJames L Hudson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gas charger for liquids
US 3637197 A
Abstract
This device charges a liquid, such as water, with a gas, such as carbon dioxide, at low pressure, and consists of a gastight tank to the cover of which is attached a snap-action vent valve, a water inlet fixture, a charged-water outlet fixture, a gas inlet fixture, and a gas supply valve operated in one direction by vertical springs anchored to the cover and in the opposite direction by the varying weight of a cup of lightweight material located below the water inlet. The gas supply valve is connected to a porous gas diffuser located near the bottom of the tank. When a liquid, such as water, to be charged with gas is caused to flow into the tank, it first drops into the cup so as to cause its weight to lower the cup and overcome the force of the vertical springs. As the tank fills with water, the cup loses sufficient weight by Archimedes' principle to permit the vertical springs to simultaneously raise it and swing a yoke, which in turn causes a vent valve lever to snap over "dead center" to close the vent valve while opening the gas supply valve to permit gas to flow downward to the porous gas diffuser and thence to flow upward through the liquid so as to charge it with gas.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Hudson [15] 3,637,19 1 Jan. 25, 1972 [54] GAS CHARGER FOR LIQUIDS James L. Hudson, 5950 Yorkshire Road,

Detroit, Mich. 48224 [22] Filed: Jan. 12,1968

[21] Appl.No.: 697,388

[72] Inventor:

[52] U.S. Cl. ..261/122, 261/D1G. 7, 1313/46 [51] Int. Cl. ..Blf 3/04 [58] FieldofSearch ..26l/121,75, 19, 76, 122, 115; 222/129.1; 137/451; 62/306; 138/46; 225/21; 99/275; 251/7 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,840,859 1/1932 Treanor ..261/75 2,081,029 /1937 Youngm. 261/carb 2,201,429 5/1940 Deibel 26l/carb 2,250,295 7/1941 Coleman. 261/carb 2,241,018 5/1941 Lloyd ..261/75 2,432,082 12/1947 Bilyeu ..138/46 2,441,419 5/1948 Hudson ....261/19 2,475,511 7/1949 Nicholson.. ...62/306 X 3,240,395 3/1966 Carver ..222/129.1 3,356,460 12/1967 King et a1 ..137/451 X 3,472,425 /1969 Booth et a1. ..222/129.l 610,062 8/1898 Koenig et al.. ..261/76 1,772,545 8/1930 Hilty 222/1292 2,086,000 7/1937 Roren ..225/21 2,383,946 9/1945 Tietig ..261/122 UX 3,248,098 4/1966 Cornelius... ..261/1 3,256,802 6/1966 Karr ..99/275 3,397,871 8/1968 Hasselberg... ...26l/75 3,411,540 11/1968 lanne1li.... ...251/7 X 2,549,311 4/1951 Hudson ..261/ X Primary Examiner-Tim R. Miles Attorney-Barthel and Begbee [5 7] ABSTRACT This device charges a liquid, such as water, with a gas, such as carbon dioxide, at low pressure, and consists of a gastight tank to the cover of which is attached a snap-action vent valve, a water inlet fixture, a charged-water outlet fixture, a gas inlet fixture, and a gas supply valve operated in one direction by vertical springs anchored to the cover and in the opposite direction by the varying weight of a cup of lightweight material located below the water inlet. The gas supply valve is connected to a porous gas diffuser located near the bottom of the tank. When a liquid, such as water, to be charged with gas is caused to flow into the tank, it first drops into the cup so as to cause its weight to lower the cup and overcome the force of the vertical springs. As the tank fills with water, the cup loses sufficient weight by Archimedes principle to permit the vertical springs to simultaneously raise it and swing a yoke, which in turn causes a vent valve lever to snap over dead center" to close the vent valve while opening the gas supply valve to permit gas to flow downward to the porous gas diffuser and thence to flow upward through the liquid so as to charge it with gas.

4 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures Pmmmmsme mama? INVENTOR JAMES L HUDSON ATTORNEYS PATENIED M25197? 3463mm? WWW FIGZ

INVENTOR JAMES L. HUDSON ATTORNEYS GAS CHARGER FOR LIQUIDS When the gas-charged liquid is dispensed from the tank by the force of the gas at the top thereof, the fall of the liquid level past the liquid-filled cup causes it to become suspended in gas. As a result, itregains enough weight to pull the valve yoke downward so as to close the gas supply valve to stop the flow of gas to the diffuser while opening the vent valve to permit the gas pressure within the tank to drop, whereupon the tank refills with water as the gas escapes through the vent valve to the atmosphere.

Optionally provided where the water main pressure is inadequate to operate the device satisfactorily is a water booster pump operated by an electric motor controlled by a normally open pressure-responsive switch connected to the vent valve and operated to pump water under additional pressure to the tank when the gas pressure therein increases sufficiently to shift the diaphragm of the pressure switch and close the motor energization circuit, Where normal water main pressure exists, this device is completely self-contained and automatic without the need for either a motor or a pump.

In the drawings:

FIG. I is a vertical section through the tank of a gas charger for liquids, according to one form of the invention, with the water-receiving control cup shown in central vertical section and the remainder of the parts in side elevation;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the gas charger shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3, is a central vertical section through the upper por tion of the device of FIG. 1, taken along line 3--3 therein;

FIG. 4 is a vertical section through the upper portion of the tank of the gas charger, with the internal parts shown in end elevation; and

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of an optical pressure-controlled water supply booster pump for optional use with the liquid gas charger of FIGS. I to 4 inclusive.

Referring to the drawings in detail, FIG. 1 shows a gas charger, generally designated 10, consisting of an elongated cup-shaped tank, generally designated 12, adapted to contain the liquid, such as water, to be charged with gas, such as carbon dioxide, and closed by a flanged cover plate 14 bolted or otherwise secured to the top of the tank 12. The gas'charger is so constructed according to the invention that all of its components are attached to the cover plate 14 so as to be capable of being withdrawn as a self-contained unit from the tank 12. The cover plate 14 is drilled and threaded with a gas inlet port 16, a liquid inlet port 18, and a liquid outlet port into which are threaded pipe fittings 22, 24 and 26 respectively for gas supply, water supply and water discharge respectively. The cover plate 14 (FIG. 3) is also drilled centrally at 27 to receive the casing 28 of a tubular vent valve 30 tightly secured therein and threaded at its upper end to receive agas vent fitting 32 to which is connected a coiled small-bore vent flow retarding tube 34 (FIG. 1). Connected to the gas supply fitting 22 is a tubular coupling 36, to the lower end of which is secured one end of a coiled small bore gas supply tube 38, the other end of which is secured to a coupling 40(FIG. 4) to which is connected the rearward or upper end of a flexiblegas supply tube 42 of resilient material, such as resilient polyethylene synthetic plastic. The coupling 40 is bolted to the under side of the cover plate 14.

The gas supply tube 42 passes through a pinch valve 44 on its way downward to a connection 46 below the bottom disc 48 which supports a porous metallic diffuser disc 50 containing a multiplicity of tiny holes leading into a gas chamber (not shown) located between the bottom disc 48 and the diffuser disc 50. The bottom disc 48 is in turn secured near the lower end of a vertical gas-charged liquid discharge pipe 52, the lower end itself being open to the liquid chamber 54 within the tank I2. The upper end of the liquid discharge pipe 52 is secured by a threaded coupling 56 (FIG. 3) to the lower end of the threaded liquid discharge port 20 in the cover plate 14.

The pinch valve 44 (FIG. 4) which controls the flow of gas through the flexible gas supply tube 42 consists of a tubular casing 58 (FIGS. 1 and 4) which is bored longitudinally for the reception of a reciprocable valve plunger 60, the upper end of which is pushed into and out of pinching engagement with the gas supply tube 42 by the forward end extension 62 of one of the arms 64 of a U-shaped valve-operating yoke 66 having a bridge portion or connection portion 68. The arms 64 are pivoted at 70 near their forward ends 62 to slotted spaced parallel posts 72 secured to and depending from the cover plate 14. As a consequence, downward or clockwise swinging of the yoke arms 64 around their pivots 70 pushes the pinch valve plunger 60 upward into pinching engagement with the gas supply tube 42 to shut off the flow of gas therethrough.

Near its junction with the sidearms 64, the bridge portion 68 of the valve-operating yoke 66 is drilled to receive the hooked inner ends of tension coil springs 74 (FIGS. 3 and 4), the forward ends of which are hooked over the grooved outer ends of a cross pin 76 which extends transversely through the drilled forward ends of a channel vent valve operating lever 78. The rearward end of the operating lever 78 is pivoted at 80 to an L- shaped bracket 82 secured to and depending from the lower end of the tubular valve casing 30.

Intermediate its forward and rearward pivot pins 76 and 80 but considerably nearer the latter, the channel lever 78 is drilled transversely to receive a vent valve operating pin 84 which passes through the correspondingly drilled lower end of a vent valve plunger 86, the upper end of which carries an externally ribbed valve head 88. The valve head 88 reciprocates in a longitudinal bore 90 within the tubular vent valve casing 28 (FIG. 3), and is provided at its upper end with a resilient insert 92 of synthetic material, such as synthetic rubber known commercially as Neoprene. The insert 92 is moved by the valve plunger 86 into and out of engagement with the valve seat 94 near the lower end of a cup-shaped vent valve plug 96 which is drilled for the reception of the vent flow retarding tube 34. The open lower end of the vent flow retarding tube 34 is flush with the vent valve seat 94 so as to be opened and closed by the insert 92 in the upper end of the valve head 88 as the vent valve plunger 86moves up and down.

The bridge portion 68 of the U-shaped yoke 66 is drilled at its midpoint to receive an eye 98 (FIG. I) secured to the upper end of a short vertical rod 100, the lower end of which is drilled and threaded internally to receive the correspondingly threaded reduced diameter portion I02 on theupper end of a vertical cup-supporting rod 104, to the lower end of which is secured a splash disc I06. The rod 104 a short distance below the threaded portion 102 is drilled transversely at 108 for the passage of a cross rod 110 (FIG. 3). The cross rod 110 passes through spacer tubes 112 and through diametrically aligned holes 114 in the cylindrical sidewall 116 of an elongated valve control cup, generallydesignated 118, closed at its lower end by a bottom wall 120 spaced below and away from the disc 106 (FIG. 1). The cup 118 is preferably of lightweight material, such as lightweight synthetic polyethylene plastic,with its upper end opening 122 disposed below and in alignment with the water inlet port 20. At its opposite outer ends, the cross "rod 110 is drilled to receive the hooked lower ends of tension springs 124, the upper ends of which are secured to brackets 126 bolted to the under side of the cover plate 14.

Ordinarily, the water pressure in the city water mains is sufficient to operate the gas charger ltll. If, however, this water pressure is inadequate, the booster arrangement, generally designated 130 shown in FIG. 5, is added thereto. The booster 130 consists of a normally open pressure switch 132 having a diaphragm chamber (not shown) connected by a fitting 134 to the lower end of a gas tube 136, the upper end of which is connected to the gas vent coupling 32 in a manner similar to the vent flow retarding tube 34. The contacts of the diaphragmoperated switch member (not shown) within the pressure switch 132 lead outward to terminals 138. The pressure switch 132 is conventional and its details are beyond the scope of the present invention. From the terminals I38, wires lead downward to the corresponding terminals of an electric motor I42 and current supply terminals 144 on the switch 132 are connected to an electric current supply line 146.

The motor 142 is drivingly connected to a rotary water pump 148 having inlet and discharge ports 150 and 152 respectively. A water supply pipe 154 is connected to the water supply port 150 of the pump 148, whereas a water discharge pipe 156 leads from the water discharge port 152 to a connection with the water supply fitting 24 (FIG. 1) mounted on top of the cover plate 14 of the gas charger 10.

In the operation of the gas charger 10, let it be assumed that the fitting 24 is connected to a source of water at sufficient pressure to dispense with the need for the booster 130 of FIG. 5, that the fitting 22 is connected to a source of compressed gas, such as carbon'dioxide and that the fitting 26 is connected to the faucet or other device for dispensing the gas-charged liquid produced by the gas charger 10. At this time, both the tank 12 and the cup 118 are empty, and the vent valve 30 is in its closed position by the upward pull of the springs 124 so that its plunger 86 is in its raised position. When the operator turns on the water, it flows through the fitting 24 downward into the cup 118 immediately below it (FIG. 1) against the splash disc 106, filling the cup with water. The weight of the cup and water therein pulls the rods 100 and 104 downward from their connection with the cross rod 110. This action simultaneously swings the valve-operating yoke 66 downward around its pivots 70, the end extension 62 of one arm 64 thereof pushing the pinch valve plunger 60 upward within its casing 58, closing the pinch valve 44 by pinching the flexible gas supply tube 42 and opening the vent valve 30, as described below.

The downward swinging of the valve operating yoke 66 by its flexible connection through the tension springs 74 to the cross pin 76 on the vent valve operating lever 78 swings past dead center thereof, namely from above the longitudinal axis thereof to below that axis, whereupon the tension of the spring 74 causes the vent valve operating lever 78 to swing suddenly downward with a snap action. This snaps the vent valve plunger 86 and ribbed head 88 thereof downward away from the vent valve seat 94 so as to open the vent valve 30 to the atmosphere through the vent valve 30 to the atmosphere through the vent flow retarding tube 34. Meanwhile, the operator has turned on the gas control valve (not shown) which controls the flow of gas from the carbon dioxide cylinder or other gas supply source to the gas supply fitting 22.

The continued flow of water after filling up the cup 118 overflows its rim 122 (FIG. 1) and consequently fills the tank chamber 54 with water or other liquid being charged with gas. As the water level in the chamber 54 of the tank 12 continues to rise past the water-filled cup 118, the latter gradually loses weight by Archimedes principle until it is no longer heavy enough to counteract the upward force exerted by the tension suspension springs 124. As a result, the springs 124 pull upward on the cross rod 110 and the central rods 104 and 100 connected to it, whereupon the central rods 104 and 100 push upward on the bridge portion 68 of the valve-operating yoke 66, thereby swinging the anchorages of the springs 74 on the cross pin 76 again past dead center or the axis line of the vent valve operating lever 78, snapping the vent valve plunger 86 and its ribbed head 88 upward so that its resilient insert 92 is forced into sealing engagement with the vent valve seat 94, closing the vent valve 30.

Simultaneously with the closing of the vent valve 30, the upward swinging of the valve-operating yoke 66 around its pivots 70 causes the end extension 64 on one arm thereof to move downward (FIG. 1) whereupon the pinch valve plunger 60 also moves downward in its casing 58, releasing its pinching action upon the resilient gas supply tube 42. The gas pressure within the gas supply tube 42 rounds out the tube from its previously pinched condition above the pinch valve plunger 60, causing the gas, such as carbon dioxide, to flow freely downward through the gas supply tube into the chamber between the bottom disc 48 and porous diffuser disc 50. The gas streams outward and upward through the water or other liquid within the tank chamber 54 from the myriad of tiny pores in the diffuser disc 50, thereby charging the water with the gas.

When the operator opens the faucet or other valve in the pipe (not shown) connected to the gas-charged water outlet fitting 26, such as when filling tumblers with soda water, the gas pressure beneath the cover plate 14 acting against the top surface of the liquid within the tank chamber 54 forces the gas-charged liquid upward through the open end of the liquid discharge pipe 52 and outward through the fitting 26 to the place where it is being dispensed. The consequent fall in the liquid level within the chamber 54 of the tank 12 after repeatedly drawing upon the gas-charged liquid therein eventually leaves the liquid-filled cup 118 above the liquid level outside it, whereupon it regains its weight and the weight of the water within it.

The weight now pulls down on the central rods 104 and to again shift the valve operating yoke 66 downward so as to again close the pinch valve 40 and cut off the incoming gas flow while opening the vent valve 30 to discharge the gas in the upper end of the tank chamber 54 while it is being refilled with water or other liquid from the liquid supply fitting 24.

The booster of FIG. 5 is used in exceptional circumstances where the local water supply pressure is inadequate. Under such circumstances, the gas tube 136 is connected to the upper end of the fitting 32 to which the vent gas flow retarding tube 34 is connected. The pressure of the gas being vented from the vent valve 30 and fitting 32 exerted upon the diaphragm (not shown) within normally open pressure switch 132 closes the latter and causes the electric motor 142 to be energized through the lines 140 from the electric current supply line 146. The now-rotating shaft of the motor 142 drives the rotary hydraulic pump 148 to force the water received from the water supply pipe 154 under increased pressure upward through the discharge pipe 156 into the water supply fitting 24 to which it is connected under the above mentioned circumstances. The remainder of the operation of the gas charger 10 when equipped with the booster 130 is the same as that described above without it. The cessation of the flow of gas under pressure through the gas tube 136 and the venting thereof through the vent tube 34 permits the diaphragm within the pressure switch 132 to move back to its original position and consequently move the switch contacts of the pressure switch 132 into open-circuit position. This action deenergizes the motor 142 and halts operation of the hydraulic pump 148 so as to cease its supplying water or other liquid under increased pressure to the water supply fitting 24.

Iclaim:

l. A gas charger for liquids, comprising a tank having a gas inlet port, a liquid inlet port and a gas-charged liquid outlet port adapted to be connected respectively to a source of compressed gas, to a source of liquid to be charged by the gas, and to a gas-charged-liquid dispensing device, said tank also having a 'gas vent port, a normally open gas supply valve and a normally closed gas vent valve connected in flow-controlling relationship respectively with said gas inlet port and said gas vent port, an open top liquid receptacle movably mounted in said tank for reciprocal vertical movement and disposed in communication with said liquid inlet port to receive liquid therefrom as said liquid enters said tank, said liquid overflowing from said receptacle when full raising the liquid level in said tank, a gas diffuser disposed in the lower part of said tank and connected to said gas supply valve, a gas flow retarding device interposed between said gas inlet port and said diffuser, said gas flow retarding device includes an elongated tubular means having a resilient portion therein for controlling the flow of gas to said diffuser, said gas supply valve including a plunger movable into and out of pinching gas flow terminating relationship with said resilient portion of said tubular means responsive to the position of said receptacle in said tank, and means responsive to the rise of the water level in said tank to immerse said liquid receptacle therein for closing said gas vent valve and opening said gas supply valve by moving said plunger out of pinching gas flow terminating relationship with said resilient portion of said elongated tubular means.

2. A gas charger for liquids according to claim 1, wherein a gas flow retarding device is connected to said gas vent valve.

37 A gas charger for liquids according to claim 1, wherein said means includes a movable valve-operating member operatively connected to said liquid receptacle and operatingly connected to said gas supply valve and also operatively connected to said gas vent, spring means coupled to opposite sides of said receptacle for aiding in supporting said receptacle in an upright raised position when said liquid level in said tank is above a predetermined level, wherein said movable valve-operating member opens said gas vent and closes said gas supply valve.

4. A gas charger for liquids comprising a tank having a gas inlet port, a liquid inlet port and a gas-charged liquid outlet port, a gas diffuser disposed in the lower part of said tank including a porous member having myriad microscopic holes therein, a conduit connecting said diffuser to said gas inlet

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4008163 *Mar 13, 1972Feb 15, 1977Ingels Glenn RMethod of preparing a saturated fluid mixture
US4093681 *Dec 13, 1976Jun 6, 1978Eaton CorporationMotorless carbonator
US4520950 *Jun 29, 1982Jun 4, 1985Cadbury Schweppes Public Limited CompanyIn-home drink dispenser
US4555371 *Jun 29, 1982Nov 26, 1985Cadbury Schweppes, PlcCarbonator for a beverage dispenser
US4745853 *Jun 2, 1987May 24, 1988The Coca-Cola CompanySystem for improving carbonation in post-mix dispenser carbonators
US6767009 *Dec 17, 2001Jul 27, 2004The Coca-Cola CompanyCarbonator with targeted carbonation level
US20030111745 *Dec 17, 2001Jun 19, 2003Ziesel Lawrence B.Carbonator with targeted carbonation level
WO1986004785A1 *Feb 12, 1986Aug 28, 1986Paul Alfred MicallefCarbonating device
Classifications
U.S. Classification261/122.1, 138/46, 261/DIG.700
International ClassificationB01F3/04
Cooperative ClassificationY10S261/07, B01F3/04808
European ClassificationB01F3/04C8G
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 26, 1994ASAssignment
Owner name: SPECIALTY EQUIPMENT COMPANIES, INC., ILLINOIS
Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:GENERAL ELECTRIC CAPITAL CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:006847/0013
Effective date: 19940120
Jan 26, 1994AS17Release by secured party
Owner name: GENERAL ELECTRIC CAPITAL CORPORATION
Owner name: SPECIALTY EQUIPMENT COMPANIES, INC. SUITE 1 6581 R
Effective date: 19940120
Jan 24, 1991ASAssignment
Owner name: GENERAL ELECTRIC CAPITAL CORPORATION, ILLINOIS
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SPECIALTY EQUIPMENT COMPANIES, INC., A DE CORP.;REEL/FRAME:005617/0535
Effective date: 19880914
Apr 13, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: SPECIALTY EQUIPMENT COMPANIES, INC.
Free format text: LICENSE;ASSIGNOR:GERLACH INDUSTRIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004701/0709
Effective date: 19861110
Owner name: SPECIALTY EQUIPMENT COMPANIES, INC.,STATELESS
Mar 7, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: GERLACH INDUSTRIES, INC., 85 AND NEW CUT ROAD, SPA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:TANNETICS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004236/0530
Effective date: 19831117