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Publication numberUS3638251 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 1, 1972
Filing dateJan 2, 1970
Priority dateJan 2, 1970
Publication numberUS 3638251 A, US 3638251A, US-A-3638251, US3638251 A, US3638251A
InventorsWeiss Sidney Matthew
Original AssigneeGriswold Eshleman The, Weiss Sidney Matthew
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combination bedsheet and pillowcase
US 3638251 A
Abstract
The disclosure relates to a combination bedsheet and pillowcase. A fitted-contour bedsheet is provided adjacent its head end with a transverse gore, either integral or as a separate panel, providing a pocket bulge at the head portion of the sheet. One or more pillows, depending on the configuration of the sheet, may be received between the mattress and the bedsheet within this pocket bulge, and, in one advantageous form of the invention, the front of the pocket tucks under the front edge of the pillow, providing the appearance of a conventional separate sheet and pillow arrangement. The fitted-contour sheet is self-holding on the mattress, so that the pillow or pillows are totally enclosed and secured in place. To particular advantage, the new combination bedsheet is constructed of knitted fabric, mechanically preshrunk in the length direction; in this way, a "no iron" sheet may be constructed using ordinary knitted cotton fabrics, which are to be preferred over synthetic or resin-fixed fabrics for the same purposes.
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United States Patent Weiss [451 Feb.1,l972

[54] COMBINATION BEDSHEET AND PILLOWCASE Sidney Matthew Weiss, c/o The Griswold- Eshleman Co. 625 Madison Ave., New York, N.Y. 10002 [22] Filed: Jan. 2, 1970 [21] Appl.No.: 190

[72] inventor:

Primary ExaminerBobby R. Gay Assistant ExaminerAndrew M. Calvert Attorney-Mandeville and Schweitzer [57] v ABSTRACT The disclosure relates to a combination bedsheet and pillowcase. A fitted-contour bedsheet is provided adjacent its head end with a transverse gore, either integral or as a separate panel, providing a pocket bulge at the head portion of the sheet. One or more pillows, depending on the configuration of the sheet, may be received between the mattress and the bedsheet within this pocket bulge, and, in one advantageous form of the invention, the front of the pocket tucks under the front edge of the pillow, providing the appearance of a conventional separate sheet and pillow arrangement. The fittedcontour sheet is self-holding on the mattress, so that the pillow or pillows are totally enclosed and secured in place. To particular advantage, the new combination bedsheet is constructed of knitted fabric, mechanically preshrunk in the length direction; in this way, a no iron sheet may be constructed using ordinary knitted cotton fabrics, which are to be preferred over synthetic or resin-fixed fabrics for the same purposes.

4 Clairns, 8 Drawing Figures PATENIEDFEBI m2 SHEET 1 BF 3 FIG. 2

INVENTOR.

. SIDNEY MATTHEW WEISS MM #W ATTORNEYS PATENTEB E I 2 3.638.251

same or a FIG. 4

INV/ENTOR. SIDNEY MATTHEW WEISS WUW ATTOR NEYS PATENTEDFEBI 1972' 3.638.251

SHEET 3 0F 3 FIG. 6

INVENTOR. SIDNEY MATTHEW WElSS ATTO NEYS COMBINATION BEDSHEET AND PILLOWCASE BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY OF INVENTION In a conventional bed makeup, the mattress typically is covered by a bedsheet, and one or more pillows, separately covered by individual pillowcases, are merely placed at the head end of the mattress, on top of the sheet. This conventional arrangement has certain attendant disadvantages, in that the bedsheet and pillowcases are separate items of purchase and require separate handling, laundering, etc. There have been several proposals made in the past for combining the bedsheet and pillowcase functions, but none has achieved significant commercial acceptance because the shortcomings of the proposed improvements have been as great as, or greater than, those of the more conventional arrangements. For example, some of the prior proposals for combining bedsheet and pillowcase functions have required relatively complicated fabric structures, thus adding materially to the overall cost. In addition, many of the prior proposals have been mechanically complicated, so as to have many of the handling disadvantageous characteristics of the more conventional arrangements.

In accordance with the present invention, a novel, improved and extremely simplified combination bedsheet and pillowcase arrangement is provided which not only greatly simplifies and expedites the bedmaking operation, but also enables significant economies to be achieved in the purchase of bed linen. In the arrangement according to the invention, a bedsheet of largely conventional construction is modified in a unique and advantageous way to provide a pocket bulge at the head end of the sheet. When the bed is made up, a pillow or pillows may be inserted between the mattress and the sheet, in the region of the pocket bulge in the sheet. The arrangement is neat and attractive, and greatly simplifies and expedites the bedmaking operation. I

Significantly, while the modification of the bed sheet involves a modest additional manufacturing expense, the arrangement eliminates entirely the need for utilizing separate covers for the pillows. Accordingly, overall, important savings may be realized.

In one particularly advantageous form of the invention, the pocket bulge in the sheet is formed by a pair of pocket-forming flaps, provided in the head and foot portions of the sheet and having a generally convex edge contour. The head and foot portions are joined along an arcuate seam, defined by the convex edge contours, forming a deep pocket. Depth and configuration of the pocket are such that it may be tucked well underneath the front edge of the pillow. This is desirable in some cases to provide a more conventional appearance and to facilitate the tucking-in of a covering bedspread.

In any of its principal forms, the combination bedsheet may advantageously be constructed of plain cotton knitted fabric, while at the same time providing no iron characteristics. In this respect, synthetic fibers, such as polyesters, and also natural fibers impregnated with so-called permanent press resins, have come into widespread use for bedsheets, because such materials do not require ironing after laundering. The bedsheet construction of the present invention is significantly advantageous over such conventional no iron" sheets, in that the no iron characteristic is achieved while utilizing ordinary cotton knitted fabric. The cotton knitted fabric has been found to be a substantially more comfortable" material for this purpose, than synthetic fabrics or fabrics treated with significant amounts of permanent press resins.

For a more complete understanding of the invention, reference should be made to the following description and to the accompanying drawing.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. I is a perspective view of a "twin" size bed mattress having installed thereon the combination bedsheet and pillowcase of the invention.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary top plan view of the combination of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional view taken generally along line 33 of FIG. I.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary plan view illustrating construction details of a typical bedsheet according to the invention.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view, similar to FIG. I, illustrating the invention as applied to a double size bed mattress.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary plan view illustrating the principal components of an advantageously modified form of the invention.

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary plan view of a modified form of combination bedsheet and pillowcase constructed with the components of FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional view taken generally along line 8-8 of FIG. 7.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the drawing and initially to FIGS. 1-4 thereof, the reference numeral 10 designates generally a combination bedsheet and pillowcase according to the invention, which is applied over a standard bed mattress -ll (FIGv 3). In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the bedsheet I0 is of a fitted-contour construction, in itself well known. To this end, the sheet includes a large, generally rectangular surface cover area 12, corresponding generally in size and shape to the'top surface of the mattress, and head, side, and foot edge cover areas 13-16, of a size and shape generally corresponding to the dimensions of the edges of the mattress.

'As shown in FIG. 4, the edge cover areas typically may be provided with arcuately cut end edges 17, 18 which, when joined together by a corner seam 19 will tend to draw the lower edge extremities 20, 21 of the edge cover areas inward under the bottom of the mattress. This is particularly true at the corners of the mattress, as reflected at 22 in FIG. 2, and, depending on the particular geometry of the sheet and the materials of its construction, will be true to a lesser extent between the corners, as reflected at 23 in FIG. 3. This configuration causes the sheet to be self-holding on the mattress. The specific techniques for constructing a fitted-contour, selfholding sheet are well known and do not form part of the present invention. However, it is a significant aspect of the invention that the sheet be of the fitted-contour, self-holding type.

In the simplest and most advantageous form of the invention, the sheet 10 may be constructed substantially throughout in the same manner and according to the same dimensions, etc., as a conventional fitted-contour sheet. However, in accordance with one aspect of the invention, there is incorporated in the otherwise conventional sheet a gore panel 24 which extends transversely in the surface cover area 12 of the sheet. The gore panel 24 is of a narrow, elongated form, tapered at both ends, and forms a pocket bulge 25 in the head portion of the sheet. The location and disposition of the gore panel 24 is such that the width of the pocket bulge 25 (measured in the lengthwise direction of the sheet as a whole) is sufficient to readily accommodate one or more pillows of conventional proportions. For example, the pocket bulge typically may have a width of 20 to 24 inches, measured approximately from the lower edge 26 of the gore panel to the head end edge 27 of the mattress.

As reflected in FIG. I, the length and width of the gore panel 24, bear a general relationship to the configuration of a pillow. It will be understood, however, that the relationship need not be a precise one in view of the substantial distortability of the pillow and the conforming ability and, desirably, elasticity of the sheet fabric itself. In a combination bedsheet for a typical twin size bed, the gore panel may be on the other of 28 to 30 inches in length (measured in the widthwise direction of the bedsheet as a whole) and a width on the order of 4 to 5 inches. The mattress to which a sheet of this size is applied may be on the order of 36 inches in width, in which case the gore panel will be somewhat narrower than the mattress, as reflected in FIGS. 1 and 2.

In the form of the invention illustrated in FIG. 2, the bedsheet is either constructed in two principal parts, or is initially constructed as a conventional fitted-contour sheet and then severed transversely; in either case separate head and foot parts 28, 29 are provided. The head and foot parts 28, 29 of the sheet advantageously will abut substantially along a straight line. The sections thus may be secured together along straight seams 30, 31 at the sides. In the center portion of the sheet, the two sections are joined by means of the interposed gore panel 24 along arcuate upper and lower seams 32, 26, to provide the desired pocket bulge 25 in the head portion 28 of the sheet.

If desired, of course, the sheet may be constructed by simply slitting the surface cover area 12 of the sheet between the points 33, 34, and inserting the gore panel 24 in place. This would eliminate the side seams 30, 31.

Referring now to FIG. 5, there is illustrated a combination bedsheet and pillowcase according to the invention, ofa construction suitable for a larger mattress, such as for a double bed. In its essentials, the mattress cover 50 of FIG. may correspond to the construction of the smaller sheet of FIGS. 1-4. However, the sheet 50 is constructed to form a pocket bulge 51, in the head end section 52, which has sufficiently large dimensions to easily accommodate two to four pillows. For this purpose, an elongated gore panel 53 may be provided. For a typical double bed size sheet, the gore panel 53 may have a length on the order of 60 inches or so (measured widthwise of the sheet as a whole). The width of the gore panel may remain on the order of 4 to 5 inches, as in the case of the smaller sheet.

In the double bedsheet illustrated in FIG. 5, the gore panel 53 is shown to have a relatively uniform width over its entire length, except at each end where the gore panel tapers to a point. However, if desired, the gore panel for a double bedsheet may be neckeddown in the center area to provide, in effect, a separate pocket bulge for each of the pillows.

Referring now to the form of the invention shown in FIGS. 6-8, the reference numerals 60, 61 designate head and foot portions, respectively, of a combination bedsheet and pillowcase. Most typically, these sections will be formed of plain cotton knitted fabric, but woven and other fabric constructions may also be utilized. As shown in FIG. 6, the head and foot portions 60, 61 are provided along their confronting edges with pocket-forming flaps 62, 63. The flaps are centrally located in the sheet sections and may have a length on the order of 28 to 30 inches, for example, for a twin bed size sheet. The free length of the flaps may be on the order of 4 to 5 inches at their maximum.

As in the case of the modifications of FIGS. l-5, the head and body sheet sections 60, 6] are provided with straight transverse edges 64 at each side, which merge with edges 65, 66 of the respective pocket-forming flaps 62, 63. Advantageously, the flap edges 65, 66 are generally of convex contour, as shown.

In the construction of the modified sheet of FIGS. 6-8, the confronting edges of the head and foot portions 60, 61 are sewn together across the entire width of the sheet. The two sheet sections thus are joined essentially along a transverse line determined by the straight edge portions 64. The convex flap sections 62, 63 form a deep pocket 67 in the assembled sheet.

The depth of the pocket 67 which is a function of the free length of the flaps 62, 63 provides a pillow positioning pocket bulge 68 in the head portion ofthe pillow, as in the case of the modifications of FIGS. l-5. In addition, the material of the flaps 62,63 may be tucked under the front edge ofa pillow 69, as reflected in FIG. 8. The ability to tuck the deep pocket 67 under the pillow edge is advantageous where a covering bedspread is utilized, as it permits the bedspread to be tucked in under the front edge ofthe pillow in the conventional manner. The tucked-in pocket also lends a more conventional appearance to the bedsheet and pillowcase combination, which may be desirable for some applications.

Unique advantages are realized where .the combination bedsheet and pillowcase of the invention is constructed to a knitted fabric, and where the fabric constituted of cotton or a material based substantially on cotton fibers. Such a material has an especially high degree of elasticity and conformability, as will be understood. These characteristics are highly desirable for a fitted-contour sheet and are even more important for a fitted-contour sheet according to the invention, incorporating an integral pocket bulge serving as a pillowcase. The knitted construction enables the sheet to be applied over a mattress and one or more pillows in a manner to provide a substantially smooth and wrinkle-free appearance.

One of the important advantages of the new bedsheet is that it is made possible to provide a so-called no iron" bedsheet utilizing plain cotton fabric, rather than the conventional synthetic or resin-treated fabric. The latter, while providing the advantages of not requiring ironing after laundering, is less desirable than plain cotton fabric from a standpoint of personal comfort. In accordance with the present invention, a bedsheet may be constructed to great advantage utilizing knitted cotton fabric. The knitted cotton fabric inherently possesses substantial stretchability. When a contour-fitted bedsheet of such construction is applied over a mattress, it is stretched and placed under a slight tension, which serves to remove wrinkles and provide a made-up bed of a desired, smooth appearance.

In the construction of a bed sheet of knitted cotton fabric, the factor of potential shrinkage must be dealt with effectively, because typical cotton knitted fabrics are subject to a very high percentage of shrinkage, e.g., 20 percent or more in length, after processing by the knit goods finisher. The amount of inherent residual shrinkage may, of course, be reduced through the use of certain synthetic fibers. However, the use of a sufficient percentage of such fibers to effectively counteract severe shrinkage is considered disadvantageous for a bedsheet application, because of the undesirable feel of many such materials.

Thus, in accordance with one aspect of the invention, cotton knitted fabric used in the construction of the new combination bedsheet and pillowcase is first subjected to mechanical compressive shrinkage in the lengthwise direction, sufficient to substantially eliminate potential residual shrinkage in the finished product. For this purpose, it has been found to be particularly advantageous to utilize the method and apparatus of the Eugene Cohn, et al. U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,0l5,l45, 3,015,146 and 3,083,435. The teachings of the before-mentioned patents are particularly advantageous where the fabric is processed in the tubular form, as is conventional in many finishing mills. By this means, it is readily possible to achieve a finished article with a residual shrinkage which can be guaranteed to be less than I percent.

It will be understood, of course, that the combination bedsheet and pillowcase of the invention is not required to be constructed of knitted fabric, even though unique advantages are realized therefrom. It is possible to construct the sheet from conventional woven bedsheet materials. It is also contemplated that the sheet may be constructed of other materials, either woven or knitted, which have been processed to impart a degree of elasticity. In this connection, at least some degree of elasticity in the fabric is to be preferred, as it tends to provide a sheet of smoother and more wrinkle-free appearance, as will be understood.

One of the advantages of the invention is that it provides a practical way to eliminate the need for separate pillowcases for each of the pillows. Not only does this simplify bedmaking operations, but it also enables significant savings to be realized in the purchase of bedding materials.

It should be understood, of course, that the specific forms of the invention herein illustrated and described are intended to be representative only, as certain changes may be made therein without departing from the clear teachings of the disclosure. Accordingly, reference should be made to the following appended claims in determining the full scope of the invention.

I claim:

I. A three-dimensional combination bedsheet formed of fabric of stretchable construction which comprises a. a pair of initially separate fabric sections forming head area and body area portions, respectively, of the sheet,

b. said sheet including a surface cover area and head, side and foot edge cover areas constituted for application over the top surface and the head, side and foot edges of a bed mattress,

c. mattress corner engaging means formed by the edge cover areas at the corners of the bedsheet for engaging the corners of a mattress and holding said sheet firmly thereagainst,

d. at least portions of the bedsheet, adjacent the head areas thereof, being engageable along and underneath side margins of a mattress, whereby the edge cover areas of the sheet, at least across the head area of the sheet and along the sides in the region of the head area, are drawn snugly about the head edge and side edges of a mattress,

. the? brie sections forming said head area and body area portions having confronting arcuate edges extending generally transversely of the sheet substantially throughout the width of said surface cover area and forming a panel area, said panel area forming a pillow positioning pocket bulge in the head area of said sheet,

g. said sheet including a line of stitching extending transversely from one side edge of the sheet to the other and serving to join said head area and body area,

h. said panel area being spaced a predetermined distance from the head edge of the sheet,

i. said panel area, the edge cover area at the head, the edge cover area of the sheet at the sides in the region of the head end, and the surface cover portions of the sheet bounded by said edge cover areas and said panel area, constituting a stretchable pillow positioning pocket.

j. said pillow pocket being adapted to fully cover, and position a pillow interposed between said pocket and the head end portion of a mattress when said matt ess corner engaging means arejoined to an underlying mattress.

2. The combination bedsheet of claim 1, further characterized by a. said sheet being constructed of knitted fabric, and

b. said fabric being mechanically compressively preshrunk in the length direction.

3. The combination bedsheet of claim 1, further characterized by terized by a. said panel area comprises pocket-forming flaps of convex edge contour formed on said head area and body area portions,

b. said flaps forming a deep pocket adapted to be tucked under the front edge of a pillow.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2217819 *Feb 7, 1939Oct 15, 1940Rook Clay HCombination sheet and pillowcase
US2528313 *Jan 21, 1949Oct 31, 1950Kessler William LMattress covering sheet
US2577178 *Nov 17, 1950Dec 4, 1951Bellinger Kenneth PBed covering
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4136413 *Nov 4, 1977Jan 30, 1979The Institute Of OrthopaedicsSupport appliance
US4607402 *Apr 15, 1985Aug 26, 1986Pollard Dianne JRetainer sheet
US4723331 *Jul 28, 1986Feb 9, 1988Sleep-Knit InternationalFitted sheet with tapered bottom width panels
US4754509 *Jun 25, 1986Jul 5, 1988Pollard Dianne JRetainer sheet
US4872228 *Jun 27, 1988Oct 10, 1989Bishop Carolyn BBed guard
US4873734 *Jul 1, 1988Oct 17, 1989Pollard Dianne JBumper sheet
US4896406 *Mar 27, 1989Jan 30, 1990Burlington Industries, Inc.Method for producing sheeting products from yarn having sheath and core construction
US5168590 *Sep 28, 1990Dec 8, 1992Sullivan Dennis OTherapeutic pillow cover having compartments for receiving hot/cold packs and/or pillow insert supports
US5297304 *Nov 6, 1992Mar 29, 1994Sullivan Dennis C ORoll-up body support cushion
US5367731 *Dec 7, 1992Nov 29, 1994O'sullivan; Dennis C.Therapeutic pillow having an exterior depression on one side for providing different degrees of support to a user's neck
US5438719 *Oct 3, 1994Aug 8, 1995Anthony; JerleanIntegrated pillow case and fitted sheet
US5497521 *Jun 12, 1995Mar 12, 1996Waits; Ronald L.Foot warmer
US5572757 *Mar 6, 1995Nov 12, 1996O'sullivan; Dennis C.Body support having hingedly connected semi-cylindrical cushions
US5996147 *Jul 9, 1998Dec 7, 1999Trimble; LynnBedsheet and pillowcase combination
US6049925 *Mar 12, 1998Apr 18, 2000Lewis; DelphiaOne-piece sheet set
US6164092 *Mar 5, 1998Dec 26, 2000Menaker; PeterKnitted fabric having elastomeric yarn
US6178574Apr 17, 2000Jan 30, 2001Jeff StromattBedsheet with pocket
US6539565Jan 7, 2002Apr 1, 2003Lynn TrimblePartial bedsheet and pillowcase combination
US6568007 *Dec 17, 2001May 27, 2003Louise HatcherSlitted blanket adapted to accomodate feet
US7107635Nov 24, 2004Sep 19, 2006Henry Jodi MFitted sheet with bolsters mounted thereon
US7584515 *Aug 30, 2007Sep 8, 2009Dianna JonesSnuggle pockets
US7971292 *Apr 20, 2010Jul 5, 2011Nedunchezian SithianPocketed bedsheet, system and method
US8516632 *Mar 22, 2011Aug 27, 2013Beverly L OgundareComfort quilt and pillowcase
US20110265261 *Mar 22, 2011Nov 3, 2011Ogundare Beverly LComfort quilt and pillowcase
CN101862097A *May 20, 2010Oct 20, 2010咸明植Portable bedding sheet
WO1988000806A1 *Jul 22, 1987Feb 11, 1988Sleep Knit IntFitted sheets with tapered width
Classifications
U.S. Classification5/485, 5/497, D06/603, 5/490, D06/602
International ClassificationA47G9/02
Cooperative ClassificationA47G9/02
European ClassificationA47G9/02
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 3, 1987AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: SLEEP-KNIT INTERNATIONAL, 4014 ETTL LANE, GREENWIC
Effective date: 19870105
Owner name: WEISS, SIDNEY, MATTHEW
Mar 3, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: SLEEP-KNIT INTERNATIONAL, 4014 ETTL LANE, GREENWIC
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST. SUBJECT TO AN AGREEMENT DATED DEC. 17, 1986;ASSIGNOR:SLEEP KNIT CORPORATION, A CORP. OF CT.;REEL/FRAME:004675/0919
Effective date: 19870105
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST. SUBJECT TO AN AGREEMENT DATED DEC. 17,1986.;ASSIGNOR:WEISS, SIDNEY, MATTHEW;REEL/FRAME:004675/0912
Nov 14, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: SLEEP-KNIT CORPORATION, P.O. BOX 11104, GREENWICH,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:WEISS, SIDNEY M.;REEL/FRAME:004647/0303
Effective date: 19861111
Nov 14, 1986AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: SLEEP-KNIT CORPORATION, P.O. BOX 11104, GREENWICH,
Effective date: 19861111
Owner name: WEISS, SIDNEY M.