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Publication numberUS3638337 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 1, 1972
Filing dateMay 18, 1970
Priority dateMay 18, 1970
Publication numberUS 3638337 A, US 3638337A, US-A-3638337, US3638337 A, US3638337A
InventorsDollar Harry C Jr
Original AssigneeEcono Kleat Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe cleat construction
US 3638337 A
Abstract
A shoe having one or more cleats rigidly secured to the outer surface thereof by adhesive. Each cleat includes integral shank and base portions of plastic or metal having depressions with the base portion positioned adjacent the shoe sole or heel.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

0 United States Patent m1 3,638,337

Dollar, Jr. 1 Feb. 1, 1972 [54] SHOE CLEAT CONSTRUCTION 2,740,208 4/1956 Dye ..36/59 R [72] Inventor: "a"! C. M", Jr. Mebane, N'Cl 2,274,559 2/ 1942 Nitkey ..36/67 C [73] Assignee: Econo-Kleat Company, Incorporated Primary Examiner-Patrick D. Lawson Fned: y Attorney-Dav! Rabin [2]] Appl. No.: 38,042 57 ABSTRACT A shoe having one or more cleats rigidly secured to the outer 3 '3"? A surface thereof by adhesive. Each cleat includes integral [58] Field 0 Search 36/67 R 67 C 59 R shank and base portions of plastic or metal having depressions 5 with the base portion positioned adjacent the shoe sole or heel.

[56] References Cited 8 cl I 9mm Figures UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,922,924 8/1933 Bird 11/ 7 A' PATENTEU FEB! i872 FIG.2

FIG.5

FIG.6

INVENTOR HARRY c. DOLLAR,JR.

attorney SHOE CLEAT CONSTRUCTION BACKGROUND, BRIEF SUMMARY AND OBJECT S OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to athletic shoes and more particularly to shoe cleats or calks adapted to be positioned on golf, football and baseball shoes or upon a wearer's ordinary shoe.

The mounting of conventional cleats on a shoe with substantial rigidity to prevent angular displacement from the normal axes has presented problems since they are difficult to install and replace. In some instances, cleats have been secured to shoes by securing a cleat head between the inner and outer soles of a shoe, by securing the cleat to a sole by screws or nails, or by positioning a cleat within a holder secured to a shoe by various means.

Briefly, the present invention relates to inexpensive cleats of various forms that can be conveniently and rigidly attached to a shoe sole or heel. The cleats have face portions with depressions or recesses therein for receiving a suitable contact adhesive thereon for attaching the cleats to ordinary shoes or athletic shoes. The cleats may be fonned of suitable materials such as metal, plastic or rubber.

A primary object of the invention is the provision of a novel cleat that may be readily applied to any shoe by means involving no modification of the shoe structure.

Another object of the invention is to secure cleats to shoes in a manner which will not interfere with the normal flexibility of the shoe.

Still another object of the invention is the provision of cleats that may be readily removed for replacement in the event of excessive wear or for converting the cleated shoes to ordinary shoes.

An important feature of the invention is the provision of a cleat which is relatively inexpensive to produce and which may be readily affixed to and subsequently removed from the shoe sole without damage thereto.

Another feature of the invention is a means for conveniently attaching a cleat to a shoe in a fixed position against accidental dislodgment.

Other features and advantages of the invention will become apparent during the course of the following detailed description.

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of a shoe equipped with cleats in accordance with my invention;

FIG. 2 is a bottom plan view of the shoe of FIG. 1 illustrating the arrangement of the cleats secured to the sole of the shoe;

FIG. 3 is a bottom plan view of one embodiment of a cleat drawn to a larger scale;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of the cleat of FIG. 3 taken along 4-4;

FIG. 5 is a plan view of a modified embodiment of a cleat drawn to a larger scale;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a plan view of still another modified embodiment of the cleat;

FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view of the cleat of FIG. 7 taken along line 8-8; and

FIG. 9 is an enlarged, fragmentary, cross-sectional view of the cleat of FIGS. 3 and 4 illustrating the adhesive means for securing the cleat to a shoe sole.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Referring to FIG. 1, reference numeral 10 designates a conventional shoe having a plurality of cleats 12 secured thereto. The shoe includes a flexible sole l4 and heel 16 having relatively smooth outer surfaces for receiving the cleats 12.

Each cleat 12 includes an elongated shank l7 and an enlarged base member 18 integral therewith. While the configurations of the shank and base member may vary considerably, preferably they are generally circular. The base member comprises a generally flat face portion 20 for engaging the shoe sole 14 and an intermediate, generally frustoconical portion 22 for interconnecting the face portion 20 and the shank 17. It is to be noted that any load on the shank 17 will be transferred to the sole of the shoe through the face portion 20 of the base.

To facilitate securing of the cleats 12 to the sole 14, the face portion of each cleat is provided with a plurality of depressions. In the embodiment illustrated by FIGS. 3 and 4, the metal cleat has a plurality of circular depressions 24 provided therein.

To secure the cleat to a shoe, contact adhesive 23 is spread generously on the cleat face 20 and in the depressions 24. The cleat 20 is placed on the shoe sole 14 in the correct position and moved slightly to evenly distribute the adhesive. The cleat then is removed away from the sole thus exposing the adhesive to the air. After approximately thirty seconds the cleat is pressed firmly back into place on the shoe sole. Prior to securing the cleat to the sole, the sole areas for receiving the cleats must be sandpapered to provide a clean, dry surface free from oil, wax and grease.

FIGS. 5 and 6 illustrate a modified embodiment of the cleat comprising an integral shank 26 and base member 28 formed of plastic material. The face portion 30 includes a plurality of depressions 32 forming rings and a centralized depression 34 positioned above the shank 26.

FIGS. 7 and 8 disclose another modified embodiment of the plastic cleat including a shank 36 and a base 38. The base face portion 40 has a shallow circular depression 42 and a deeper centralized depression 44 formed therein. Note that the base 38 tapers to a feather edge 46 adjacent the face portion.

The cleats illustrated by FIGS. 5 and 6 and FIGS. 7 and 8 would be secured to a shoe by suitable adhesive in the manner described above. The contact adhesive, which may be of various suitable types, will cause the cleats to adhere strongly to the shoe sole and/or heel.

The cleats of FIGS. 3-8 may be provided with tungsten carbide tips to prolong the wear thereof. The tips may be secured to the cleat shanks by sleeve members or other suitable means.

I claim:

1. A shoe having a flexible sole, a series of cleats on the outer surface of said sole, each cleat of said series of cleats including a base member and a shank extending therefrom, said base member including a flat face portion, having a plurality of depressions therein, abutting said sole outer surface and a portion connecting said face portion and said shank, and means intermediate said face portion and said sole and within said depressions for rigidly securing said face portion to said sole.

2. A shoe as defined in claim 1, said means for rigidly securing said face portion and said sole comprising adhesive.

3. A shoe as defined in claim 1, wherein said face portion has a plurality of concentrically spaced depressions formed therein for receiving said securing means.

4. A shoe as defined in claim 1, wherein said shank is integral with said base member.

5. A shoe as defined in claim 1, said shank being of a cylindrical configuration and said portion interconnecting said face portion and said shank being of a generally frustoconical configuration.

6. A cleat for attaching to the sole of a shoe comprising, a base member and a shank extending therefrom, said base member including a relatively flat face portion for engaging the sole and a tapered intermediate portion interconnecting said face portion and said shank, and means for facilitating securement of said face portion to the sole including a plurality of depressions formed in said face portion.

7. A cleat as defined in claim 6, said shank being of a cylindrical configuration and said intermediate portion being of a generally frustoconical configuration.

8. A cleat as defined in claim 6, wherein said means for facilitating securement of said face portion to a sole includes a plurality of concentrically spaced depressions formed in said face portion.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1922924 *Jun 15, 1931Aug 15, 1933Henry Bird WilliamAntislipping projection for boots and shoes
US2274559 *May 29, 1940Feb 24, 1942Loren W NitkeyShoe calk
US2740208 *Oct 19, 1953Apr 3, 1956Cornell Aeronautical Labor IncFriction pad footwear
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4004356 *Nov 17, 1975Jan 25, 1977James P. WattersStudded sole and heel plates for shoes
US5065534 *May 5, 1987Nov 19, 1991Trisport Ltd.Studs for footwear
US5255453 *Feb 1, 1990Oct 26, 1993Weiss Harry MFootball shoe and method therefor
US5410823 *Jan 26, 1994May 2, 1995Iyoob; Simon J.Replaceable golf cleat
US20120260534 *May 31, 2010Oct 18, 2012Jean Luc GuerSports shoe with studs
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/67.00R
International ClassificationA43C15/16, A43C15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43C15/165
European ClassificationA43C15/16C1A