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Publication numberUS3638420 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 1, 1972
Filing dateOct 19, 1970
Priority dateOct 19, 1970
Publication numberUS 3638420 A, US 3638420A, US-A-3638420, US3638420 A, US3638420A
InventorsHladek James J, Kelly Donald A
Original AssigneeHladek James J, Kelly Donald A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Thermal isolation for stirling cycle engine modules and/ modular system
US 3638420 A
Abstract
The Stirling cycle engine module is a conventional single cylinder, twin-piston displacer-type engine, with the addition of a rotary valve/crankdisc which times and isolates the thermal phases of the cycle, so that effective thermal separation is maintained for maximum operating effectiveness.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Kelly et al.

[ 51 Feb. 1,1972

[54] THERMAL ISOLATION FOR STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE MODULES AND/ MODULAR SYSTEM [72] Inventors: Donald A. Kelly, 5806 67th Place,

Maspeth, NY. 11378; James J. l-lladek, 35 Avenue A, New York, N.Y. 10009 [22] Filed: Oct. 19,1970

[2]] Appl.No.: 81,876

[52] US. Cl ..60/24 [51] Int. Cl ..F03g 7/06 [58] Field of Search ..60/24 [56} References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,508,393 4/1970 Kelly ..60/24 Primary Examiner-Edgar W. Geoghegan Assistant Examiner-Allen M. Ostrager [5 7] ABSTRACT The Stirling cycle engine module is a conventional single cylinder, twin-piston displacer-type engine, with the addition of a rotary valve/crankdisc which times and isolates the thermal phases of the cycle, so that effective thermal separation is maintained for maximum operating effectiveness.

Multiple hot and cold conduction threaded rods are uniformly placed within the respective displacer zones for more effective heat transfer.

A modular system is adopted of ganging individual engine modules into a custom power package, to suit various applications. Each module is secured in a cradle frame with each fly wheel drive gear meshing with pinions on a common drive shaft extension.

An evaporative cooling arrangement is included for more effective heat sinking and reduced cooling surface area.

A V engine module type is described which features thermal isolation techniques as an alternate engine modular system.

5 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures slsssAzo PATENTED FEB 1 i972 SHEET 2 OF 3 FIG?) INVINf'ORJ 2% THERMAL ISOLATION FOR STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE MODULES AND/ MODULAR SYSTEM The Stirling cycle modular system is advocated as an efficient and versatile power source for many stationary and mobile power applications including use in motor vehicles.

The modular system is comprised of individual thermally phased or isolated modules which are ganged together into an array of an number of modules to suit the specific application.

The basic engine module is similar to previously built, twin coaxial piston displacer type machines with the exception of each piston having its own conventional connecting rod and crankdisc/shaft, which are connected externally by a sprocket and drive chain arrangement.

The addition of a connecting rod and crankdisc in the displacer section allows for the inclusion of a rotary valve portion on the crankdisc, with a mating valve seat built into the base of the power cylinder. With a rotary valve in the displacer section, it is now possible to isolate the thermal phases of the classic Stirling cycle engine, for increased thermal effectiveness.

It will be realized from the drawings that the rotary valve portion and the counterbalancing mass of the crankdisc coincide to provide nearly the correct opening and closing timing of the gas volume between the two pistons.

When the displacer piston is moving outward to transfer the hot gas into the power cylinder, through the regenerator section, the rotary valve is closing to prevent the hot expanding gas from entering the cold volume zone of the displacer cylinder. Conversely, when the displacer piston is moving inward, together with the power piston, the rotary valve is opening, allowing for the cooling/compression of the gas being transversed through the regenerator section toward the hot displacer zone.

The relative opening and closing angle for the rotary valve must be determined by the heating and cooling effectiveness of each specific engine design, but must be nearly balanced or near l 80 for proper operation.

The twin crankshaft and external connecting drive chain arrangement necessitates the use of two shaft seals to maintain the normal internal engine pressurization. The displacer crankshaft seal is subjected to lower then base pressure of the cold gas volume, while the power crankshaft seal is exposed to the under piston (power) gas volume pressure.

The use of two shaft seals, and especially one in the displacer volume is a disadvantage which can only be offset by the use of two hydrodynamic screw-type seals. The hydro/screw seals are noncontacting, helical grooves on shafting which provide a null gas flow pumping head to the silicone fluid used in the sealing space. Since the hydro/screw seals are noncontacting minimum friction levels are assured which counters the disadvantage of the additional shaft required by the rotary valve design.

The nominal ll angular phase relationship between the two pistons is maintained by the chain drive when once set up in the fixed relationship which keys the cycle for proper operation. The twin cranks and chain drive arrangement provides the sinusoidal output motion as in the classic Stirling engine, but each crank disc must be individually counterbalanced, while the balancing of the engine module is accomplished by flywheel counterbalance, and by sprocket lightenmg.

The external chain drive system permits a minimum volume engine module, since a large crankcase for another drive arrangement are eliminated. The chain drive with the two connected sprockets will be enclosed by a lightweight sheet metal cover, since the drive section is unpressurized in the basic design.

It is possible to seal and pressurize the drive section so that the displacer shaft seal may be eliminated or simplified. If the section is pressurized, only one drive shaft seal is required, but with the additional expense and weight entailed by such pressurization.

The basic shape of the displacer housing and piston are optional, a squarish shape may be most desirable so that many multiple thermal conduction rods may be utilired, or a conventional cylinder used. If a cylindrical section is used it must be mounted on a squarish crankcase so that adequate space is available for the crankdisc/rotary valve, bearings and seals. The power cylinder must also be mounted on a squarish crankdisc, so that an adequate power stroke is provided.

Both the power and displacer stages will be in line with two or more regenerator ducts connecting the two stage sections. In general appearance the ending modules will look like two nearly similar shaped units joined together in a tandem arrangement.

To insure improved heat transfer in both the hot and cold displacer sections, multiple thermal conducting rods are uniformly secured within the end displacer plates. The hot and cold rods are of copper or aluminum, threaded for maxim um surface area and the external and internal lengths are .nearly equal.

The external portions of the hot conduction rods are heated so that the heat is transferred directly into the hot displacer volume, and the external portions of the cold conduction rods are cooled, so that the heat is removed from the cold displacer volume.

Common clearance holes for the hot and cold conduction rods must be provided in the displacer piston or block to allow it to move freely over the conduction rods.

The externally protruding hot and cold conduction rods allow the use of several heating and cooling arrangements. A propane or kerosene burner may be mounted directly on the hot end plate with the hot conducting rods running directly and uniformly into the burners for maximum surface area exposure. The same arrangement holds true for the cooling side, where the rods may be directly immersed into the circulating coolant within the cooling jacket secured to the cold end displacer plate.

The key feature of the multiple conduction rods is that they provide a maximum of heat transfer area, both internally and externally, (hot and cold) within a reasonable package size.

The cooling effectiveness can be increased by an evaporative cooling arrangement whereby water is sprayed or allowed to drip from a reservoir, over copper mesh woven over and around the cooling conduction rods. The remaining water is collected in a pan under the rods and pumped backed into the reservoir.

This cooling method may be more effective than the coolant jacket and circulating coolant arrangement, since a large surface area can be covered. The capacity of the water reservoir would be matched to the effective heating fuel capacity, so that they may be replenished together, or nearly so.

The Stirling cycle modular system with ganged, identical engine modules driving a common drive shaft, provide a versatile and reliable power system. A flywheel gear mounted on the output drive shaft of each module meshes with a pinion on the common drive shaft extension. The drive shaft extension is splined to a standard clutch and transmission, to match the power requirements of the specific application.

Each engine module is positioned and clamped in a cradleframe so that the proper gear mesh is established and maintained. A quick-acting and positive-clamping arrangement is desirable for the quick interchange of modules.

The purpose of the multiple modular system is as follows:

1. Easy replacement of bench servicing of each to pound engine module.

2. Any number of engine modules may be mounted in a standard cradle/frame to provide the necessary horsepower to match the power requirement.

3. A wraparound cooling jacket or evaporative cooler can be provided for maximum heat-sinking required by the Stirling engines.

4. An inoperative module can be readily disengaged from the power train without handicapping the remaining operative modules. Part power output is always guaranteed, since each module is independent of the others, for maximum reliability.

The advantages of the Stirling cycle engines are:

1. Very low toxic emissions and noxious odors, due to controlled external combustion at a steady rate.

2. Very good fuel economy due to long heat residence and heat regenerative techniques.

3. Near silent operation.

4. A minimum of maintenance due to uncontaminated internal operating parts.

5. Operation on any type of available fuel.

6. High cycle efficiency-higher than deisels.

7. Moderate initial costabout equal to Rankine/freon systems, and far less than gas turbines.

It will be noted that this conventional coaxial form of Stirling engine provides full effective regeneration, since the cold return gas flow passes through the same duct system as the hot expanding gas flow in the opposite direction.

Another feature of the engine modules which supports thermal isolation within the cycle is the splitting of the displacer cylinder into two, nearly equal halves, in order to achieve a separation of the hot and cold thermal zones. The separation of the housing is desirable since it precludes thermal losses by direct conduction from one side to the other.

The slight gap between the two housing halves is filled and insulated with fiberglass/epoxy or similar higher temperature material and secured in place.

The description of the thermally isolated Stirling cycle modules and modular system has been previously disclosed in a Disclosure DocumentNo. 002,927, filed in the U.S. Patent Office, which will remain on file as a permanent record of the Invention.

A variation of the conventional coaxial displacer-type engine in a V" form of Stirling engine, which would also feature thermal isolation, or the separation of the hot and cold zones within the engine.

The V" engine would provide a uniflow gas path so that the thermal zones are not crossed. Normally, this in an undesirable arrangement in the Stirling cycle, since regeneration is more difficult when the gas flows do not reciprocate, but can be accomplished by indirect conduction between the two transfer ducts.

The distinct advantage in the V" form of Stirling engine module is the simplicity of the single crankdisc/output shaft design, whereby both piston connecting rod bearings are joined to a common crankpin. The uniflow V Stirling engine is presented as the simplest form of closed cycle engine because of this simplified piston rod common connection and the minimum number ofinterconnecting drive parts.

Another natural advantage of the V" form engine is that the nominal crank phase angle between the pistons is geometrically obtained due to the angle between the two cylinders relative to the crankdisc/shaft.

It is a simple expedient to provide an adjustable two step, or eccentric crankpin in order to obtain the optimum piston relationship for the best cycle efficiency, rather than by complex analytical means.

Since correct internal counterbalancing is not possible in the V" form engine, an external counterbalancing flywheel must be utilized on the external drive shaft.

The *V form of Stirling cycle module provides a natural separation of the displacer cold zone from the upper power piston volume, which when joined as a common volume, as in the conventional coaxial machines is seen as a considerable deficiency. The uniflow gas path of this design keeps the hot expanding gas from coming into the vicinity of the cold displacer zone. Since the action of the pistons would cause an alternating gas flow in the ducts, one-way snubbing cones are positioned at the entrances and exits of the ducts to provide the one-direction gas flow.

The snubbing cones are smaller in diameter than the cross section of the ducts, so that the gas may readily flow over the conical shape, while the conical base is flat or concave to provide the snubbing effect to the gas flow in the opposite direction.

A shaped entrance section is used in conjunction with the snubbing cones to lead the gas flow into and over the cones to enhance the snubbing effect without greatly impeding the gas flow in the other direction.

The snubbing cones and shaped sections within each duct are the key to a useful uniflow gas path arrangement with efficient heat utilization and heat sinking.

A regenerator section is placed within and over the hot transfer duct and the heat received is conducted to the cool gas transfer duct section within the displacer cylinder. Although this is an indirect regeneration method it should be reasonably effective, if the heat transfer means is insulated and the gas transfer path kept short. The hot transfer duct connects the top of the displacer cylinder with the top end of the power cylinder, unlike the usual V" Stirling engine arrangement. it is possible to bias the hot gas flow in this way because a cold return flow duct section is a part of the power cylinder, which provides the return path for the uniflow gas path arrangement.

The gas flow transfer section within the displacer cylinder completes the uniflow gas circuit and heat regeneration occurs within this section.

it will be seen that as the displacer piston reciprocates within its cylinder, the hot expanding gas is forced into the hot transfer duct, and not allowed to enter the regeneration section by the snubbing action of the one-way snubbing cones.

During the cooling phase of the cycle, the gas returned from the power cylinder is forced into the cold return section, and not allowed to return into the hot transfer duct, by the snubbing action of the snubbing cones at the exit of this duct.

The cooled, compressing gas is again forced into the transfer section by the action of the displacer piston, and is prevented from reentering the cold return section, again by the snubbing cones at the exit of this duct.

The gas flow receives preheating in the regeneration section and is again heated, fully, at the hot end of the displacer section, to return to the starting point of the cycle. The uniflow gas circuit is kept reasonable simple by incorporating the regeneration duct section as part of the displacer cylinder, and the cold return duct as part of the power cylinder with only the hot transfer duct exposed to connect the two cylinders.

The balance of the V form engine construction is also simple in that a basically rectangular crankcase supports the two operating cylinders. The specific angle forming the V configuration is not critical and will be based on the necessary space required by the crank throws and piston connecting rods. The necessity of keeping the hot transfer duct as short as possible requires that the V" angle be kept to a minimum.

As previously stated, the V form of engine can provide for the necessary phase angle between the two pistons. With both connecting rods on a common crankpin, it will be seen that while one piston is at the bottom (or top) ofits stroke, the other piston is about at its midstroke position in its cylinder, which is required for the proper keying of the cycle. Since the displacer piston must lead the power piston in operation, only one direction of rotation is possible with this arrangement, and for the opposite direction of rotation, the power and displacer pistons must be interchanged.

Since it is known that the volume phase angle for the Stirling cycle varies between and 1 15, it is not difficult to obtain the optimum crankpin position by revolving the eccentric to various positions, within the 15 possible angular variation. It is recognized that rotating the eccentric crankpin will also vary the stroke of each piston slightly, but this will not materially affect engine performance.

The empirical nature of the adjustment will take into account all unknown factors and variables, such as the slight stroke variation.

Dual ball or roller bearings and a low-friction shaft seal are required for the drive shaft where it exits the crankcase. The bearings and shaft seal must have sufficient capacity to support the counterbalancing flywheel and the forces imposed by the driven load.

Conventional heating and cooling means are provided at each end of the displacer cylinder, as is usual in Stirling cycle practice. Multiple hot and cold metal conducting rods will be utilized within and outside the hot and cold displacer zones, to provide a maximum of heat transfer area for maximum thermal effectiveness for the specific engine.

The individual V" uniflow Stirling cycle engine modules may be ganged into a custom modular engine system, as with the conventional coaxial design, to suit any specific power application.

The description of the V form, uniflow Stirling cycle engine module and system has been previously disclosed in a Disclosure Document-No. 003,080, filed in the US. Patent Office, which will remain on file as a permanent record of the invention.

The prime objective of both the V form of Stirling cycle module and the previously described coaxial rotary valve en gine is that of achieving thermal zone isolation or separation for best possible operating efficiency.

A second object of the invention is to provide a high degree of heat transfer effectiveness, within both the hot and cold displacer zones by the use of multiple threaded conduction rods.

Another object of the invention is to increase cooling effectiveness for the engine by the application of an evaporative cooling method, which coincides with the rate of heating fuel consumption.

Another object of the invention is to describe an alternate V form of Stirling engine, which is the simplest type with the fewest number ofoperating parts.

A final object of the invention is to advocate a modular engine system in which many individual engine units are ganged together to drive a common output drive shaft. The modular system provides any number of engine units made up in a custom power package to suit any specific power requirement.

While the invention has been described with particular reference to the construction shown in the drawings, various changes may be made in the detail construction; it shall be understood that such changes shall be made within the spirit and scope of the present invention as described in the appended claims.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a top longitudinal section of the coaxial Stirling engine module, during the hot transfer phase of the cycle.

FIG. 2 is a side longitudinal elevation of the coaxial Stirling engine module with rotary valve.

FIG. 3 is a cross section taken through the rotary valve of the engine.

FIG. 4 is a side longitudinal elevation of the coaxial Stirling engine module, during the cold transfer phase ofthe cycle.

HO. 5 is a section through the form of Stirling cycle engine module, as an alternate design.

FIG. 6 is a front elevation of the Stirling cycle modular system, showing the coaxial engine modules.

Referring to the drawings in detail:

The coaxial type of engine consists of a sealed displacer housing I, which is made up ofa hot section 1a, a cold section 1b, and an insulating joining section 1c, which are pressure tight and fastened with the screws 48.

The displacer housing 1, is secured in line with the power cylinder 2, with the screws 51.

The lower end of the power cylinder 2, is secured to the crankcase assembly 3, with the screws 48. All joints are lapped and sealed with the sealant compound 49.

The squarish displacer piston 4, is guided within the displacer housing I, by six ball bearings 5, mounted on the pins 6. The ball bearings 5, are located only on the cold end of the displacer piston 4, because of bearing temperature limitations. Six carbon/graphite guide pads 7, are uniformly secured to the displacer piston 4, at the hot end, to guide its movement.

Multiple sealing strips 8, are retained in matching grooves 9, within the central area ofthe displacer piston 4, to seal the two thermal zones. A clearance cavity 10, is located within the displacer piston 4, at the cold face end, which provides clearance for the rotary valve/crankdisc ll.

The rotary valve/crankdisc 11, rotates within the cold zone of the displacer housing I, and converts the reciprocating motion of the displacer piston 4, into rotary motion at the crankshaft 12. The rotary valve/crankdisc 11, is supported by two ball bearings 13, mounted within the support 14, and the screws 49.

A shaft seal 15, is located within the displacer housing 1, where the crankshaft 12, exits the housing. A thin connecting link l6,joins the rotary valve/crankdisc 11, with the displacer piston 4, through the crankpin l7, and wristpin 18.

A radial valve seat 19, is provided in the end plate of the cold section lb, of the displacer housing 1, which has a close clearance (0.0050.0l0) with the partial periphery of the rotary valve portion of the rotary valve/crankdisc 11. The side edges 20, of the radial valve seat 19, also are at a close clearance (0.0050.0l0) with the sides of the rotary valve/crankdisc 11, with the sealing strips 21, secured to the side edges 20, to insure a near zero gas leakage at t his area.

A radial sealing strip 22, is located at the end plate of the cold section lto preclude loss of gas flow caused by the shape of the rotating crankdisc. The radial sealing strip 22, is located in relation to the direction of rotation for each specific engine design.

The power piston 23, and the carbon-faced piston rings 24, are located within the power cylinder 2, with the wrist pin 25, connecting the power piston to the connecting rod 26, The connecting rod 26, is pivotably positioned on the crankpin 27,

' which is secured to the power crankdisc 28. The crankdisc 28,

is supported by the output shaft 29 and the two ball bearings 30, mounted within the two flanges 31. A shaft seal 32, is located within the crankbox assembly 3, where the output shaft 29 exits the crankbox 3. The two flanges 31, are fastened to the crankbox assembly 3, with the screws 49.

Two identical sprockets 33, are secured to the crankshaft l2, and the output shaft 29, with the two shafts connected by the drive chain 34.

A sheet metal cover 35, encloses the drive chain and sprockets, which is secured to the displacer housing 1, with the screws 49.

At least two gas transfer tubes 36, connect the hot section la of the displacer housing 1, with the top of the power cylinder 2. Regenerator sections 37, are located approximately midway within the gas transfer tubes 36, into which fine mesh metallic filament 38, is uniformly packed.

Multiple hot conduction threaded rods 39, are uniformly located and sealed into the end plate of the hot section la, which provide an increased heat transfer surface area for the hot side.

A fuel burning heater 40, is located over the hot conduction rods 39, which transfer heat directly to the multiple rods.

Multiple cold threaded conduction rods 41, are uniformly located and sealed into the cold section lb, for the same pur pose as the hot conduction rods.

Multiple clearance axial holes 42, must be located in the displacer piston 4, to clear each of the conduction rods, as the displacer piston reciprocates within the displacer housing 1.

An evaporative cooling arrangement is utilized with the cold conduction rods 41, in which a water reservoir 43, allows water to uniformly drip into closely woven metallic filament intertwined around the external cold conduction rods. A drop pan 45, is located under the cold conduction rods 41, and the metallic filament 44, to catch the water that does not evaporate and returns it to the reservoir by means of the return tubing 46, and motor/pump 47.

In the V" form of the Stirling cycle engine module the displacer cylinder 50, and the power cylinder 51, are secured to the crankbox assembly 52, with the screws 48.

A gas transfer section 53, forms a gastight passageway between the upper portion of the displacer cylinder 50, and the power cylinder 51.

The hot transfer duct 54, joins the top of the displacer cylinder 50, with the top of the power cylinder 51. A regenerator cylinder 55, is located approximately midway within the hot transfer duct 54, which is uniformly filled with fine mesh metallic filament 56. A conduction leg 57, joins the regenera.

tor cylinder 55, with the portion of the gas transfer section 53, adjacent to the displacer cylinder 50, which is also filled with metallic filament 56.

The displacer piston 58, and carbon-faced piston rings 59, reciprocate within the displacer cylinder 50. The displacer piston 58, is connected to the connecting rod 60, by the wrist pin 61, while the lower end of the connecting rod 60, is pivotably positioned on the eccentric crankpin 62, which is secured to the crankdisc 63. The crankdisc 63, is supported by the output shaft 64, and by two ball bearings 65, mounted within the support 66.

A shaft seal 67, is secured within the front plate of the crankbox assembly 52, where the output shaft 64, exits the crankbox.

The power piston 68, and the carbon-faced piston rings 69, reciprocate within the power cylinder 51. The power piston 68, is connected to the connecting rod 60, by the wrist pin 61, while the lower end of the connecting rod 60, is pivotably positioned on the base diameter of the crankpin 62.

Three one-way snubbing cones 70, are located at the exits of each duct section, to provide a uniflow gas path through the engine cycle.

A heating unit 71, and a coolant jacket 72, are provided at the hot and cold ends of the displacer cylinder 50, respectively.

Hot and cold conduction rods 73 and 74, respectively, are provided within the displacer cylinder 50, to provide an increase in the heat transfer surface area, as in the coaxial type engine module.

An air cooling means consisting of multiple motor-driven fans 75, may be provided over the multiple cold conduction cards 41, of the twin coaxial piston type of engine module. A conventional coolant jacket 76, may also be utilized over the cold conduction rods 41, which is sealed to the displacer cold section lb.

The coolantjacket 76, would be used in place of the previously described evaporative cooling method, but the air cooling means would be used in conjunction with the evaporative means.

The modular engine system consists of ganging many individual engine modules of any type described, into a custom power package. The output flywheel gear 77, mounted on each output drive shaft on each module, meshes with each pinion 78. The drive pinions 78, are uniformly spaced and secured to the drive shaft extension 79. The drive shaft extension is coupled to a standard clutch and transmission of the correct capacity for the modular system.

What is claimed is:

l. A pressurized twin coaxial piston Stirling cycle engine module comprised of a rectangular displacer housing, a squarish displacer block fitted with multiple ball bearings and low-friction pads in rolling and sliding association with the inner surfaces of said rectangular displacer housing,

carbon sealing strips disposed within corresponding grooves centrally located within said squarish displacer block,

a wrist pin secured to a said partial cylindrical internal cavity within said squarish displacer block,

multiple axially disposed clearance holes uniformly located within said squarish displacer block, an elongate power cylinder axially disposed and secured to said rectangular displacer housing,

a power piston in sliding association within the bore of said elongate power cylinder, carbon-faced piston vrings disposed within corresponding grooves within said power piston,

a squarish crankbox axially disposed and secured to said elongate power cylinder, a crankdisc and drive shaft centrally disposed within said squarish crankbox,

a crankpin secured near the outer radius of said crankdisc,

bearing and sealing means uniformly disposed for said drive shaft,

support means for said bearing and sealing means secured to one side ofsaid squarish crankbox,

a connecting rod with one end secured to said crankpin on said crankdisc,

a wrist pin secured to the inner walls of said power piston with the other end of said connecting rod pivoting on said crankpin,

a rotary valve crankdisc disposed within said rectangular displacer housing adjacent to the top end of said power cylinder,

a crankshaft secured on the axis of said rotary valve crankdisc with bearing and sealing means,

support means for said bearing and sealing means secured to one side of said rectangular displacer housing,

a crankpin secured to said rotary valve crankdisc,

a radial valve seat opening in close association with said r0- tary valve crankdisc disposed within one wall of said rectangular displacer housing adjacent to the top end of said elongate power cylinder,

sealing means within said radial valve seat opening in close association with said rotary valve cran kdisc,

a thin connecting link joining the crankpin secured to said rotary valve crankdisc with said wrist pin secured to a partial cylindrical internal cavity within said squarish displacer block,

multiple regenerator ducts connecting the upper end of said rectangular displacer housing with the upper end of said elongate power cylinder adjacent to said rotary valve crankdisc,

a regenerative canister section located approximately midway along each of said multiple regenerator ducts,

fine mesh metallic filament uniformly disposed within the interior of said regenerative canister section in free communication with said multiple regenerator ducts,

identical sprockets secured to said drive shaft and crankshaft in axial alignment,

a multiple link drive chain closely attached and connecting said identical sprockets,

a formed cover disposed over said identical sprockets with said drive chain and fastened to said rectangular displacer housing.

2. A pressurized twin coaxial piston Stirling cycle module according to claim 1, including multiple heat-conducting threaded rods uniformly disposed within the outer axial end of said rectangular displacer housing,

a fuel-burning heating means disposed over said multiple heat conducting threaded rods secured to said rectangular displacer housing,

multiple cold conducting threaded rods uniformly disposed within the inner axial end of said rectangular displacer housing,

a liquid coolantjacket disposed over said multiple cold conducting threaded rods secured to said rectangular displacer housing.

3. A pressurized twin coaxial piston Stirling cycle module according to claim 1, wherein an evaporative cooling method is utilized in association with the inner axial end of said rectangular displacer housing,

a water reservoir disposed over the inner axial end of said rectangular displacer housing disperses water drippings uniformly over closely woven metallic filament in close association with the inner axial end of said rectangular displacer housing,

a drop pan under and vertically in line with said closely woven metallic filament,

a return tubing line communicating with said drop pan and said reservoir,

a motor/pump located adjacent to said drop pan in communication with said return tubing line.

4. A pressurized twin coaxial piston Stirling cycle module according to claim 1, including an air cooling arrangement employed in association with the inner axial end of said rectangular displacer housing,

multiple motor driven fans uniformly disposed adjacent to said rectangular displacer housing,

mounting means for said motor driven fans on said rectangular displacer housing.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3508393 *Sep 17, 1968Apr 28, 1970Kelly Donald ALow friction stirling engines and chemical heating means
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7617680Aug 28, 2006Nov 17, 2009Cool Energy, Inc.Power generation using low-temperature liquids
US7694514Nov 21, 2007Apr 13, 2010Cool Energy, Inc.Direct contact thermal exchange heat engine or heat pump
US7805934Apr 13, 2007Oct 5, 2010Cool Energy, Inc.Displacer motion control within air engines
US7810330Aug 28, 2006Oct 12, 2010Cool Energy, Inc.Power generation using thermal gradients maintained by phase transitions
US7877999Apr 13, 2007Feb 1, 2011Cool Energy, Inc.Power generation and space conditioning using a thermodynamic engine driven through environmental heating and cooling
US8539771Jan 14, 2011Sep 24, 2013Cool Energy, Inc.Power generation and space conditioning using a thermodynamic engine driven through environmental heating and cooling
US20100212656 *Jul 10, 2009Aug 26, 2010Infinia CorporationThermal energy storage device
Classifications
U.S. Classification60/526
International ClassificationF02B75/00, F02B75/16, F01B1/12, F02G1/044, F01B1/00, F02G1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02G1/044, F05C2201/021, F01B1/12, F02B75/16
European ClassificationF02G1/044, F02B75/16, F01B1/12