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Publication numberUS3638448 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 1, 1972
Filing dateMay 6, 1970
Priority dateMay 6, 1970
Also published asCA928091A, CA928091A1
Publication numberUS 3638448 A, US 3638448A, US-A-3638448, US3638448 A, US3638448A
InventorsRaymer Doyle
Original AssigneeUmc Ind
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cleaning system for the ice maker of a vendor
US 3638448 A
Abstract
A cleaning system for the ice maker and appurtenant water lines of a postmix cold drink vendor in which provision is made for connecting the outlet of the water pump of the vendor to the ice maker for circulating water through the ice maker, and having a drain valve for draining the ice maker. A programmer controls the operation of the pump and drain valve for operation through a cleaning cycle involving circulation of water with a cleaning agent therein through the ice maker followed by draining of the ice maker and rinsing with clear water.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

iinited States Patent Rayrner Feb. 1,1972

[54] CLEANING SYSTEM FOR THE ICE MAKER OF A VENDOR [72] lnventor: Doyle Raymer, High Ridge, Mo.

[73] Assignee: UMC Industries, Inc., St. Louis, Mo.

[22] Filed: May 6, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 35,078

[52] US. Cl ..62/233, 62/303, 222/148 [51] Int. Cl. ..F25c 1/14 [58] Field of Search ..222/148; 62/354, 303, 233;

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,369,376 2/1968 Kious ..62/303 X Holstein et a1 ..222/ 148 X Padek ..222/ 148 X Primary Examiner-William E. Wayner Attorney-Koenig, Senniger, Powers and Leavitt [57] ABSTRACT A cleaning system for the ice maker and appurtenant water lines of a postmix cold drink vendor in which provision is made for connecting the outlet of the water pump of the vendor to the ice maker for circulating water through the ice maker, and having a drain valve for draining the ice maker. A programmer controls the operation of the pump and drain valve for operation through a cleaning cycle involving circulation of water with a cleaning agent therein through the ice maker followed by draining of the ice maker and rinsing with clear water.

19 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures PATENTEDFEB H972 3.6383148 sum 1 0F 7 CD I www

PATENTEU FEB 1 I972 SHEET 2 BF 7 av -TE] PAIENIED FEB 11912 :3; 3a 314 saw u or 7 F|G.5 FIG.6

PATENTED FEB H872 353 sum 5 or 7 PATENTED FEB 1 I872 SHEET 6 UF 7 PATENTEB FEB I I972 3,638,448

SHEET 7 BF 7 FIG. IO

TIME (MINUTES) SWITCHNO l23456789lOIll2l3l4|5I6l7l8192O INTERRUPTS OFF REFRIG. CYCLE ICE DUMP w WATER PUMP I FPUMP H2O INLET r 5 T I'I I T I'I'H I'I' CLEANING SYSTEM FOR THE ICE MAKER OF A VENDOR BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a cleaning system for the ice maker of a vendor, and more particularly to a cleaning system for the ice maker and appurtenant waterlines of a postmix cold drink vendor.

The invention is especially directed to a cleaning system for the ice maker and appurtenant water lines of a postmix cold drink vendor such as shown in the coassigned Kious U.S. Pat. No. 3,369,376, issued Feb. 20, 1968, which relates to a system for disposing of water resulting from melting of ice in the ice hopper of the ice maker in such manner as to avoid buildup of slime. While the system shown in this patent has been highly successful in avoiding the problem of slime buildup and in reducing the number of service calls previously necessary on account of slime buildup, it is still 'important that the ice maker and the waterlines appurtenant to the ice maker be cleaned (sanitized) at appropriate intervals (e.g., monthly) to remove algae and/or other foreign matter detrimental to the vending of quality cold drinks which may have accumulated in the ice maker. Heretofore, the operation of cleaning the ice maker, which it has been recommended be carried out monthly, has been a slow, tedious manual operation, and it has been further recommended that the ice maker be disassembled quarterly and washed in cleaning solution, also that twice a year the plastic waterlines appurtenant to the ice maker be replaced and that a citric acid solution be poured in the water feeder cup of the vendor and then drained. All this is timeconsuming and tedious, and depends for effective cleaning on the conscientiousness of the Serviceman assigned to the job.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Among the several objects of this invention may be noted the provision of a cleaning system for the ice maker and appurtenant waterlines of a vendor, and particularly a postmix cold drink vendor having an ice maker provided with a melt water disposal system such as is shown in the aforesaid US. Pat. No. 3,369,376, which is essentially automatic in operation and which is adapted to circulate a cleaning solution under pressure through the ice maker and appurtenant lines for effectively dislodging algae and/or other foreign matter and to flush this out, followed by rinsing with clear water; the provision of such a system which, in addition to sanitizing the ice maker and appurtenant lines, also sanitizes the water feeder cup and water pump of the vendor; the provision of such a system which requires a minimum of manual operations by the serviceman, and a minimum of his time, the cleaning cycle proceeding automatically without any attention from the serviceman once he has started it, and terminating automatically; the provision of such a system which considerably reduces the time in which the vendor is out of service for cleaning of the ice maker; the provision of such a system which blocks out vending by the vendor during a cleaning cycle and which insures that vendingcannot be resumed until the cleaning cycle is completed; the provision of such a system which, during a cleaning cycle, completely isolates those components of the water system of the vendor which are not subjected to cleaning (e.g., the carbonator) to avoid the possibility of contaminating such components with cleaning solution; and the provision of such a system which positively programs the cleaning cycle so as not to rely on the conscientiousness of the serviceman to attain effective cleaning.

In general, the system of this invention is adapted for circulating water through the ice maker via a water pump, and includes a drain valve for draining water from the system. It has a programming means controlling operation of the pump and the drain valve for operation through a cleaning cycle comprising operation of the pump with the drain valve closed to circulate water with a cleaning agent therein through the ice maker, followed by operation of the pump with the drain valve open to drain the water with the cleaning agent therein from the system, and then followed by operation of the pump to rinse the ice maker and said system with clear water. Other objects and features will be in part apparent and in part pointed out hereinafter.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a front elevation of a postmix cold drink vendor having an ice maker and equipped with a cleaning system of this invention, showing the interior of the cabinet of the vendor, with certain conventional components of the vendor shown and others omitted;

FIG. 2 is a diagram showing the ice maker and the water system of the FIG. 1 vendor with lines connected for normal vendor operation;

FIG. 3 is a diagram like FIG. 2 showing lines connected for operation through a cleaning cycle;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged vertical section of the ice maker;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged front elevation of a programmer and drain valve unit of the cleaning system;

FIG. 6 is a right side elevation of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a rear elevation of the FIG. 5 unit;

FIG. 8 is a right side elevation of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a wiring diagram; and

FIG. 10 is a timing chart.

Corresponding reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to the drawings, first more particularly to FIG. 1, there is indicated at 1 a cold drink vendor 1 having a cup delivery station 3 in a panel 5 adapted to be swung out on hinges such as indicated at 7 when the front door (not shown) of the cabinet for the vendor is opened. It will be understood that in the course of a vend cycle, a cup is delivered to this cup-delivery station by a cup dispenser CD in the vendor, after which, in the case of a postmix vendor, syrup and carbonated water are delivered to the cup via syrupand water-delivery lines (not shown). Syrup tanks and pumps (not shown) are provided in the space in the cabinet below the cup dispenser. An ice maker is indicated at 9 in the vendor 1 at the top thereof. The ice maker as herein illustrated, particularly in FIG. 4, is a commercially available type having a vertical, relatively thin walled metal cylinder 11 constituting a freeze chamber having an anger 13 rotatable therein. Surrounding the freeze chamber 11 is the evaporator 15 of a conventional refrigeration system for cooling the wall of the chamber. The cylinder 11 extends up into an ice hopper 17 and has a drip ring 19 surrounding its upper end in the hopper. A motor 21 is provided for driving the auger-via a transmission in a transmission housing 23. In the cylinder 11 adjacent its upper end is a combination extruding head and bearing member 25. The upper end of the auger is journaled in this member 25. Above member 25, the upper part of the auger carries an ice cutter 27 and a set of ice agitators 29. At the lower end of the chamber 11 is a port 31 which, in the normal use of the vendor, serves as a water inlet for the ice maker. The hopper 17 has a melt water drain 33 and an ice discharge opening 35 normally closed by a solenoid-actuated door 37.

In the vendor 1 is a water feeder cup or reservoir 39 for supplying water to the ice maker 9 and maintaining a predetermined level of water in the freeze chamber 11 of the ice maker.'Water is adapted to flow from the cup 39 to the ice maker 9 via an ice maker water delivery line indicated at 41 in FIG. 2 extending from the cup 39 to the port 31 at the lower end of chamber 11 (this port, as above noted, normally serving as a water inlet port). This ice maker water delivery line 41 includes a tube 43 extending from a bottom outlet 45 of the cup to the stem 47 of a T-fitting 49, and a tube 51 extending from one end of the head of the T-fitting to the port 31. The cup is supplied with tap water from a suitable source of tap water via a tap water supply line 53 having a water supply valve 55 therein. This valve 55 is a solenoid valve under control of water inlet switch 57 actuated by a float 59 in the cup 39 to maintain a predetermined level of water L in the cup, and the arrangement is such as to maintain the same predetermined level L of water in the ice maker freeze chamber 11. Thus, when the level of water in the cup 39 and in the chamber 1 1 drops below a predetermined level, float 59 actuates switch 57 to open valve 55 for flow of tap water into the cup 39 and for flow of water from the cup 39 to the freeze chamber 11 until the predetermined water level is restored, whereupon switch 57 is deactuated by the float 59 and valve 55 closes to cut off further flow of tap water to the cup. The float also controls a low water level switch 60.

The water level L in the chamber 11 (and hence in the cup 39) will fall as a result of demand for water from the carbonator of the vendor and/or as a result of ice being made in the chamber 1 1 and delivered upward out of the chamber into the hopper 17 by the auger 13, thus instituting a demand for water which is taken care of by the actuation of valve 55 to supply tap water to the cup 39 and chamber 11 until the level L is restored. Ice is made and delivered to the hopper 17 by the freezing of water on the inside of the cylindrical wall of chamber 11, and the scraping off of this ice and its upward delivery by the auger 13, rotated by motor 21.

During each vend cycle, the ice hopper door 37 is opened by a solenoid 61 to deliver a predetermined quantity of ice from the hopper 17 to the cup at the cup delivery station via an ice delivery chute or tube shown in phantom at 63 in FIG. 1. An ice level switch 65 is provided for the hopper 17, functioning when the level of ice in the hopper falls below a predetermined level to institute operation of the auger l3 and the refrigeration system which includes the evaporator to make more ice and deliver it to the hopper 17 until the predetermined level of ice in the hopper is restored.

At 67 in FIG. 2 is indicated the water delivery system of the cold drink vendor 1. This includes a water pump 69 having its inlet 71 supplied with water from a bottom outlet 72 of the cup 39 via a water supply line 73. A hopper drain line 75 connects the melt water drain 33 of the ice hopper 17 to line 73 via a T-fitting 76. Water is delivered from the outlet 77 of the water pump via a flexible pump output line 79 to a cooling coil 81 in a water bath 83 (a so-called sweet-water bath) in the vendor and thence to a carbonator 85, this arrangement being similarto that shown in Kious U.S. Pat. No. 3,369,376. In accordance with this invention, the flexible pump output line 79 is connected to the coil 81 via a quick connect and disconnect coupler 87 of a conventional type comprising a quick-connect valved plug 89 on the inlet end of the cooling coil 81 and a quick-connect valved socket 91 on the outlet end of line 79. Both the plug 89 and socket 91 as noted are valved members, each having a spring-loaded valve therein which is self-closing when the socket is disconnected from the plug.

With the exception of the quick coupler at 87, and the T- fitting at 49, the above corresponds generally to prior cold drink vendors with ice makers which are equipped with a melt water disposal system such as shown in FIG. 1 of the Kious U.S. Pat. No. 3,369,376. In accordance with this invention, there is furnished a programmer and drain valve unit generally designated 93 which, as herein illustrated, is mounted in the vendor 1 as a permanent part thereof. It will be understood, however, that unit 93 may be a portable unit, to be carried from vendor to vendor, as will be later explained.

Unit 93 (see particularly FIGS. 5-8) comprises a sheet metal housing I-I having a front wall 95, a backwall 97, left and right sidewalls 99 and 101 and a top wall 103. The housing is open at the bottom. The right sidewall 101 has a downward extension 105 extending below the other walls, and this extension reaches back rearward of the backwall 97. Mounted on a bracket 107 adjacent the rear of extension 105 is a solenoidactuated valve 109, the solenoid of which is indicated at 111. This valve, which is an on-off valve, has an inlet 113 and an outlet 115 and is normally closed, being opened for flow from the inlet through the outlet when solenoid 111 is energized. One end of the head 11.7 of a T-fitting 119 is connected to the inlet 113. A quick-connect valved plug 12] adapted to receive the socket 91 at the end of the flexible pump output line 79 is connected to the other end of the head of the T-fitting 119. This plug 121, like plug 89, has a valve therein normally spring-biased toward a closed position and adapted to be opened by socket 91 when the latter is applied to plug 121. A line 123 (see FIGS. 2 and 3) interconnects the end ofthe stem 125 of T-fitting 119 and the end of the head of the T-fitting 49 opposite that to which line 51 is connected. A switch 127 is mounted above plug 121 on a bracket 129 secured to extension 105 of wall 101. This switch has an operating arm 13] extending down through a slot 133 in bracket 129 for engagement by the quick-connect socket 91 on the end of line 79 when the socket is applied to plug 121 as will appear.

At 135 in the housing H is indicated a programmer of the cleaning system of this invention. This comprises a camshaft 137 carrying five cams designated C1-C5 for actuating five switches respectively designated Sl-SS. At 139 is indicated an electric motor for driving the camshaft. A signal lamp 141 is mounted in the front wall 95 of housing [-1. The upper end por tion of the right sidewall 101 of the housing is bent in to form a platform 143 above the programmer carrying two relays R1 and R2. Wall 101 has keyhole slots such as indicated at 145 for receiving pins (not shown) on the inside of the right sidewall of the cabinet of vendor l for mounting the unit 93 on this wall of the cabinet. A waste line 147 extends from the outlet 115 of solenoid valve 109 to a waste bucket 149 on the floor of the cabinet of the vendor in front of the water bath 83. At 151 is indicated a switch controlled by coupler socket 91 at the end of line 79. When socket 91 is on the plug 89 (FIGS. 1 and 2) it engages and holds arm 153 of the switch 151 in activated position. As shown in FIG. 1, switch 151 may be mounted below the transmission housing 23 of the ice maker.

Referring now to FIG. 9, relay R1 is shown as having a coil CR1, and three sets of double-throw contacts Rla, Rlb and Rlc. The contactors of the three sets are normally closed on their upper contacts as shown and close on the lower contacts of the three sets when coil CR1 is energized. Relay R2 is similar to R1, having a coil CR2 and three sets of doublethrow contacts R2a, R2b and R2c, the movable contactors thereof normally being closed on their upper contacts as shown and adapted to close on their lower contacts when coil CR2 is energized. Cam-actuated switches 51, S3 and S4 are shown as double-throw switches; S2 and S5 are shown as single-throw switches. S1, S3 and S4 close on their lower contacts when thrown by the respective cams C1, C3, C4. S2 opens when thrown by its cam C2; S5 closes when thrown by its cam C5.

The coupler-actuated switch 151 is a double-throw switch closed on its upper contact as shown in FIG. 9 when its operating arm 153 is held up in activated position by the coupler socket 91 (FIGS. 1 and 2) and closing on its lower contact when the socket 91 is disconnected from the plug 89 (FIG. 3). A terminal plug P1 having 15 terminals T1*T15 is mounted in an opening in wall 97 of unit 93. Terminals 12 and 15 are not used (note the omission of two terminals from the plug in FIG. 7). The movable contactor and upper contact of switch 151 are connected in a line 154 between terminals T13 and T1. A power supply line LA2 is connected to terminal 13 and a vend circuit power line LA4 extends from terminal 1. A line 155 including switch 127 of unit 93 extends from the lower contact of switch 151 to the lower contact of the first cam-actuated switch S1. The arrangement is such that when the flexible pump output line 79 is disconnected from the coil 81 and connected to the fitting 119, switch 151 is opened in line 154 to deenergize the vend circuit LA4, so as to insure that a vend will not occur during a cleaning cycle, and switch 127 is closed for energizing the cleaning system from powerline LA2 via line 154 and switch 151 and initiating operation through a cycle as will be later described.

A line 157 interconnects the upper contact of switch S1 and line 154 as shown in FIG. 9. The programmer motor 139 (for driving camshaft 137) is connected in a line 159 between the movable contactor of switch S1 and terminal T14 to which is connected a circuit ground line LB2. When switch 127 closes, and the movable contactor of switch S1 is on its lower contact, motor 139 is energized via LA2, 154, 151, 155 (including switch 127), 159 and LB2 to drive the camshaft. Powerline LA2 extends from a service plug P2 and includes a main switch 161, a pressure switch 163 responsive to pressure of refrigerant in the refrigeration system of the vendor and a conventional waste pail switch 165 which is normally closed but which opens if the waste pail 149 fills up with liquid to prevent overflow from the waste pail.

A line 167 interconnects the movable contactor of switch S1 and the lower contact of the set R2a of relay R2. The coil CR1 of relay R1 is connected in a line 169 between the upper contact of switch S2 and line 159. The movable contactor of switch S2 is connected to powerline 154 by a line 171. The lower contact of switch S2 is not used. The upper contact of switch S3 is connected by a line 173 to terminal T11 of plug P1. The movable contactor of switch S3 is connected by a line 174 with the upper contact of switch S4. The movable contactor of switch S4 is connected to line 167. The lower contact of switch S4 is connected by a line 175 to the lower contact of set Rlb of contacts of relay R1. The upper contact of switch S5 is connected by a line 177 including the solenoid drain valve 109 with line 159. The coil CR2 is connected in parallel with CR1 as indicated at 178.

The upper contact of set Rla is not used. The movable contactor of set Rla is connected by a line 179 including the lamp 141 to terminal T9. The lower contact of set Rla is connected by a line 181 to the line 159 as shown. The upper contact of set Rlb is connected by a line 183 with line 154. The movable contactor of set Rlb is connected by a line 185 to terminal T4. The upper contact of set Rlc is connected by a line 186 to terminal T3. The movable contactor of set Rlc is connected by a line 187 to terminal T5. The lower contact of set R is interconnected with the movable contactor of switch S3 by a line 188. The upper contacts of sets R2a and R2b are connected by a line 189 with terminal T2. The movable contactor of set R2a is connected by a line 190 with terminal T6. The lower contact of set R2a is not used. The movable contactor of set R2b is connected by a line 191 with terminal T7. The lower contact of set R2b is not used. The upper contact of set R2c is connected by a line 193 with terminal T10 of plug P1. The movable contactor of set R20 is connected via line 179 to terminal T9. A line 195 interconnects the lower contact of switch S3 and terminal T8.

Powerline LA4 for the vend circuit (not shown) of the vendor continues from terminal T1 as shown in FIG. 9. A powerline LAS is connected to terminals T2 and T3. The water inlet switch 57 is a double-throw switch closed on its upper contact as shown in FIG. 9 when the water in cup 39 reaches its predetermined level. The low water level switch 60 is a normally closed single-throw switch. The upper contact of switch 57 is connected by a line 197 with terminal T6. The movable contactor of switch 57 is connected by a line 199 with terminal T4. The lower contact of switch 57 is connected by a line including valve with a circuit ground line LB3. At R3 is indicated a low water level relay having a coil CR3 and a set of double-throw contacts R311. The movable contactor of this set is normally closed on the lower contact as shown. At R4 is indicated a so-called refrigeration relay having a coil CR4 and upper and lower contacts R4a and R41). This relay controls the operation of a compressor 201 of the refrigeration system of the vendor. At 203 is indicated a double-throw switch for controlling relay R4, this switch normally being closed on its upper contact as shown and closing on its lower contact in response to a demand from the water bath for refrigerant for the formation of ice in the bath. At 205 is indicated a so-called icemaker solenoid valve which controls the supply of refrigerant to the evaporator 15 of the icemaker 9. At R5 is indicated a so-called water pump relay having a coil CR5 and a single set of contacts R5a. At 207 is indicated a switch actuated by the ice dispenser solenoid 61. This is a double-throw switch normally closed on its upper contact as shown when solenoid 61 is deenergized, and closing on its lower contact when solenoid 61 is energized to open the door 37.

Upper contacts R4a of refrigeration relay R4 are connected in series with compressor 201 in a powerline LA3. Lower con tacts R4b are connected in parallel with upper contacts R4a as indicated at 211. At 215 is indicated a refrigerant solenoid valve which is normally closed and which when energized opens for flow of refrigerant to the refrigerant coil in the water bath. The ice level switch 65 is a double-throw switch normally closed on its upper contact as shown in FIG. 9 and adapted to close on its lower contact in response to a demand for ice from the ice hopper 17.

A line 217 interconnects terminal T5 and the movable contactor of the ice level switch 65. A line 219 interconnects the upper contact of switch 65 and the lower contact of set R3a of relay R3. The movable contactor of set R3a is interconnected with the movable contactor of switch 203. Powerline LA3 is connected to the upper contact of set R3a. Valve 215 is connected in a line 221 between the lower contact of switch 203 and circuit ground line LB3. The low water level switch 60 and coil CR3 of relay R3 are connected in series in a line 223 between terminal T7 and line LB3. Coil CR4 of relay R4 is connected in a line 225 between line 223 and the upper contact of switch 203. A line 227 interconnects line 217 and the lower contact of switch 207. The water pump 69 is connected in a line 229 between terminal T8 and circuit ground line LB3. Contacts R5a of relay R5 are connected in a line 231 between line 229 and powerline LA5. Coil CR5 of relay R5 is connected in a line 233 between a line LA6 and circuit ground line LB3. Line LA6 is under control of a conventional system (not shown) for sensing the level of water in the carbonator, being energized on a demand for water from the carbonator. Solenoid 61 (for opening the door 37) is connected in a line 235 between terminal T11 and circuit ground line LB3. Solenoid valve 205 is connected in a line 237 between terminal T10 and circuit ground line LB3. A line 239 interconnects terminal T9, the lower contact of switch 65 and the upper contact of switch 207. Motor 21 is connected in a line 241 between the movable contactor of switch 207 and circuit ground line LB3.

FIG. 10 shows the timing and sequence of operation of the programmer switches Sl-S5 by their respective cams C1-C5. The programmer motor 139, when energized, drives the camshaft 137 through a revolution in about 20 minutes (i.e., at a speed of 3 r.p.h.). As appears in FIG. 10, cam C1 holds switch S1 down on its lower contact at the start of a cycle and continues to hold it there for about 19 minutes of elapsed time, at which time switch S1 closes on its upper contact and remains there to the end of the 20 minute cycle whereupon it closes back down on its lower contact. Cam C2 holds switch S2 open at the start of a cycle, closes it at about one-half minute of elapsed time, and opens it at about 19% minutes of elapsed time. Switch S3 is held up (closed on its upper contact) by cam C3 at the start of a cycle, moved down (on to its lower contact) at about 2% minutes, moved up at about 7 minutes, down at about 8 minutes, up at about 9 minutes, down at about 10 minutes, up at about 12 minutes, down at about 13 minutes, up at about 14 minutes, down at about 15 minutes, and up at about 18 minutes (where it stays back to the start of the next cycle). Cam C4 holds switch S4 down on its lower contact at the start of a cycle, moves it up on to its upper contact at about one quarter minute of elapsed time, down at about 7% minutes, up at about 9% minutes, down at about 12% minutes, up at about 14% minutes, and down at about 18% minutes. Switch S5 is open at the start of a cycle, is closed by cam C5 at about 6 minutes, opened at about 9 minutes, closed at about 11 minutes, opened at about 14 minutes, closed at about 17 minutes, and opened at about 1 8% minutes.

Operation is as follows:

In the normal operation of the vendor, water is supplied from the cup 39 to the ice maker 9 via the ice maker water delivery line 41, and from the cup to the inlet 71 of pump 39 and thence to the flexible pump output line 79, attached by means of the socket 91 at its end to the plug 89 as shown in FIG. 2. Line 123 is blocked at the plug 121, the valve of which is closed, and line 113 is blocked by the solenoid drain valve 109 which is deenergized and closed.

To operate the vendor through a cleaning cycle, the serviceman swings out the panel 5, and sees to it that the waste pail 149 is in position to receive ice discharged from the lower end of the ice chute 63. He disconnects the socket 91 at the end of the flexible pump output line 79 from the plug 89 and connects this socket to the plug 121 of unit 93, as shown in FIG. 3. In disconnecting the socket 91 from the plug 89, switch 151 is thrown onto its lower contact (see FIG. 9), thus opening the LA2, 154, LA4 circuit to prevent operation of the vendor through a vend cycle during the cleaning cycle. As a result of connecting the socket 91 to the plug 121, switch 127 is thrown onto its lower contact (see FIG. 9). This results in energization of the programmer motor 139 via LA2 (switches 161, 163 and 165 being closed), T13, 154, switch 151 (closed on its lower contact), line 155 (switch 127 being closed on its lower contact), switch S1 (closed on its lower contact) and line 159 to terminal T14 and circuit ground line LE2. It also energizes line 167. With the programmer motor 139 in operation, camshaft 137 carrying the cams C1-C5 for operating switches S1-S5 is driven through a revolution to carry out a cleaning cycle as described following.

At the start of the cleaning cycle, switch S1 is down, S2 is open, S3 is up, S4 is down and S5 is open-With S1 down, the programmer motor 139 is energized as above noted to start driving the camshaft 137 through a 20 minute one-revolution cycle. In this regard, switch S1 remains down on its lower contact from 0 to 19 minutes (see FIG. and the motor 139 is held energized for the final minute as will appear. With switch S2 open, relays R1 and R2 are deenergized. With relays R1 and R2 deenergized, the refrigeration system is in circuit for operation on demand for refrigeration. For example, with switch 65 closed on its lower contact on demand for ice from the ice hopper, relay R4 will be deenergized for closure of its contacts R4a and R4b to energize the compressor 201, ice maker motor 21 will be energized via LAS to terminal T3, 186, R10, 187, T5, 217, switches 65 and 207 and line 241 to L83, and valve 205 will be energized via 217, 65, 239, T9, 179, R2c, 193 and 237 to LE3. When S3 is closed on its lower contact, the pump 69 is adapted to be energized as will appear. With S5 open, drain valve 109 is deenergized and hence closed.

Immediately prior to the start of a cleaning cycle, the cams C1-C5 are in their 0' or home position, and the movable contactors of switches S1, S2, S4 and S5 are all down and S3 is up as shown in FIG. 9. With the movable contactor of switch S1 down, the circuit is set for energization of programmer motor 139 upon closure of switch 151 on its lower contact followed by closure of switch 127 on its lower contact. With the movable contactor of switch S2 down, switch S2 is open and the coils CR1 and CR2 of relays R1 and R2 cannot be energized. With these relays deenergized, the circuitry is set for vending operations; and refrigeration is effected on closure of switch 65 on its lower contact in response to demand for ice from the ice hopper 17. With the movable contactor of switch S3 up, a circuit is established to energize the ice door solenoid 61 when the movable contactor of S4is thrown up onto its upper contact, as will appear. With the movable contactor of switch S4 down, the circuit is set for subsequent energization of the water supply valve 55 when coil CR1 of relay R1 is subsequently energized. Energization of valve 55 is via line 167, switch S4, line 175, the movable contactor of relay contacts Rlb down on its lower contact, line 185, terminal T4, line 199, switch 57 (closed on its lower contact) and LB3. Switch S5 is open and hence drain valve 109 is deenergized and closed.

About one-quarter minute after the programmer motor 139 has started timing out a cleaning cycle, cam C4 throws the movable contactor of switch S4 up onto its upper contact.

This cuts out the water supply valve 55 so that it cannot be energized, and permits the serviceman to take off the lid 39a of the water feeder cup 39 and pour a cleaning agent into the cup without any possibility of water spurting from the water inlet on the lid. It also establishes a circuit via line 167, switch S4 and line 174, for immediate energization of the ice door solenoid 61 since switch S3 is closed on its upper contact at the beginning of the cycle.

Energization of solenoid 61 results in opening of the ice door 37 for discharge of ice from the hopper 17 and energization of motor 21 (after the movable contactor of switch S2 is thrown up onto its upper contact) to drive the auger 13 and the ice agitators 29 to dump the ice from the hopper. Solenoid 61 is energized from line 167 via switch S4 which is thrown up onto its upper contact at about one-quarter minute as previously mentioned, line 174, switch S3, and line 173, terminal T1 1 and line 235 to the circuit ground line LE3. With S3 on its upper contact, the water pump 69 is cut out of the circuit and cannot be energized. Solenoid 61, on being energized, throws switch 207 on its lower contact and this establishes a circuit to motor 21 from line 167 via switch S4 (closed on its upper contact), lines 174 and 188, R1c (to be closed on its lower contact upon energization of relay R1), line 187, terminal T5, lines 217 and 227, switch 207 closed on its lower contact and line 241 to LBS.

At about one-half minute of elapsed time, cam C2 closes switch S2. This results in energization of coils CR1 and CR2 of relays R1 and R2 from line LA2 via terminal T13, line 154, line 171, switch S2, and lines 169 and 178 to line 159, terminal T14 and circuit ground line LB2, thereby closing contacts Rla, throwing Rlb and Rlc on their lower contacts, opening contacts R2a and R2b, and throwing R2c on its lower contact. On closure of Rla, lamp 141 is energized from line 167 via R20 closed on its lower contact, line 179, Rla, line 181 and line 159 to circuit ground line LB2. This signals to the service man that the cleaning cycle is in progress and that he should pour cleaning agent in the water feeder cup 39. The service man then proceeds to do this, pouring in about 1 ounce of an aqueous solution of a suitable cleaning agent, and then he replaces the lid 39a of the water feeder cup. The cleaning agent may be a phosphoric acid-type cleaning agent, such as that sold under the trade name CALGON. It is an important feature of the circuitry that once relays R] and R2 have been energized by the closure of switch S2, the cleaning cycle must be allowed to proceed to completion before vending operations may be resumed. Thus, for example, if the service man should uncouple socket 91 from plug 121, the programmer motor will stop and the cleaning cycle will simply be suspended until socket 91 is reapplied to plug 121, whereupon it will be carried through to completion.

The door 37 is held open and agitators 29 are driven by motor 21 to discharge ice from the hopper 17 down through chute 63 into the waste pail 149 until about the 2% minute point of elapsed time from the start of the cleaning cycle is reached, whereupon cam C3 throws the movable contactor of switch S3 down on its lower contact. This deenergizes solenoid 61 and motor 21, and door 37 thereupon closes. The water pump 69 is energized from line 167 via S4 closed on its upper contact, line 174, S3 closed on its lower contact, line 195, terminal T8 and line 229 including the pump to LB3. The pump, in operation, draws cleaning solution from the feeder cup 39 via line 73, and discharges it from its outlet 77 through line 79, socket 91, plug 121, fitting 119, line 123 (drain valve 109 being closed), fitting 49 and line 51 to the water inlet 31 of the ice maker 9, up through the freeze chamber 11 into the hopper 17, and down out of the hopper through the melt water drain 33 and line to fitting 76 and back to line 73 and the pump inlet 71 for circulation of the cleaning solution through the ice maker and the appurtenant waterlines. Cleaning solution also enters the cup 39 at 45 via line 43 and exists at 72.

Circulation of the cleaning solution through the system via lines 51, 75, 43 and 45 continues until about 6 minutes of elapsed time from the start of the cleaning cycle, whereupon cam C closes switch S5. This energizes and opens the drain valve 109 via line 167, S5, and lines 177 and 159, for draining the cleaning solution into the waste pail 149 under the pumping action of pump 69, which continues in operation when drain valve 109 is opened until the seventh minute of elapsed time, whereupon cam C3 throws switch S3 onto its upper contact, deenergizing the pump. During the interval from 6 to 7 minutes in which the pump is running with drain valve 109 open, the pump delivers cleaning solution from the ice maker 9, line 75 and line 73 out through line 79, socket 91, plug 121, line 113, valve 109 and line 147 to the waste pail. Thereafter,

' cleaning solution continues to drain by gravity until the drain valve is closed (at the 9-minute point).

At about the 7%-minute point, cam C4 throws switch S4 back on its lower contact. This energizes and opens the water supply valve 55 via line 167, S4 closed on its lower contact, line 175, Rlb closed on its lower contact, line 185, T4, line 199 and switch 57 closed on its lower contact, to LE3. Switch 57 (the water inlet switch) is down as a result of the drainage of the system. Fresh water for rinsing is thus supplied to the cup 39 via valve 55 until valve 55 subsequently closes (at 9% minutes). Drain valve 109 is open at this time.

At about 8 minutes, cam C3 throws switch S3 back onto its lower contact, energizing the pump 69 in the manner previously described. The drain valve 109 remains open for 1 minute, and the pump, in running, flushes itself out with rinse water from the cup 39.

At about 9 minutes, cam C5 opens switch S5 and the drain valve 109 is deenergized and closes. At about the same time, cam C3 throws switch S3 onto its upper contact, deenergizing the pump 69 to allow the cup 39 to fill with water for circulation through the system, as will appear.

At about 9% minutes, cam C4 throws switch S4 onto its upper contact and this deenergizes the water supply valve 55 so that it closes to cut off delivery of water to the cup 39 to preclude overflow.

At about 10 minutes, cam C3 throws switch S3 back onto its lower contact, energizing the pump 69 to circulate rinse water through the ice maker 9 from the pump outlet 77 via 79, 91, 121,119,123, 49, 51, 75, 76 and 73 to the pump inlet 71.

At 11 minutes, cam C5 opens switch S5 to open the drain valve 109. The pump 69 is still running and hence rinse water is drained into pail 149 by the pumping action until about the 12th minute whereupon cam C3 throws switch S3 onto its upper contact, deenergizing the pump 69. Gravity drainage of the rinse water via the open valve 109 continues.

At about 12% minutes, cam C4 throws switch S4 back onto its lower contact, and this energizes the water supply valve 55 to open it to start to supply a second batch of rinse water to the cup 39.

At about 13 minutes, cam C3 throws switch S3 back on its lower contact to energize the pump 69. The drain valve 109 is still open and the pump flushes itself out a second time with rinse water from the cup 39.

At about 14 minutes, cam C5 opens switch S5 to deenergize and close the drain valve 109, and cam C3 throws switch S3 onto its upper contact, deenergizing the pump 69.

At about 14% minutes, cam C4 throws switch S4 onto its upper contact to deenergize and close the water supply valve 55 to cut off delivery of water to cup 39 to preclude overflow.

At about 15 minutes, cam C3 throws switch S3 onto its lower contact to energize the pump 69 for a second circulation of rinse water.

At about 17 minutes, carn C5 closes switch S5 to energize and open the drain valve 109 for drainage of the second rinse under action of the pump until about the 18th minute, whereupon cam C3 throws switch S3 onto its upper contact to deenergize the pump. Gravity drainage of the second rinse via the open valve 109 continues.

At 18% minutes, cam C4 throws switch S4 back onto its lower contact, and this energizes water supply valve 55 to open it to start to supply a fresh batch of water to the cup 39 for subsequent use for supplying the carbonator S5 and the ice maker 9.

Also at about 18% minutes cam C5 opens switch S5 to deenergize and close the drain valve 109.

At about 19 minutes, cam C1 throws switch S1 up off its lower contact and onto its upper contact. This deenergizes the programmer motor 139 and the signal lamp 141 is deenergized. This indicates to the service man that the cleaning has been completed and that he may now disconnect socket 91 from plug 121 and connect it back to plug 89. He proceeds to do so and, as a result, switch 127 is thrown back on its upper contact and switch 151 is thrown back on its upper contact (their original setting as shown in FIG. 9). With S1 closed on its upper contact, the motor 139 is reenergized via line 154, switch 151, line 157, switch S1 and line 159, and proceeds to run for another minute as determined by cam C1 at which time cam C1 throws S1 back on its lower contact to break the motor circuit and stop the cams in their 0 or home position. At about 19% minutes, cam C2 opens switch S2, and this deenergizes relays R1 and R2 so that the system is ready for the next cleaning cycle. With switch 151 back on its upper contact, switch 127 open, switches 51-55 in their home positions, and relays R1 and R2 deenergized, the vendor resumes its normal vending operations.

It will be observed that the cleaning solution and rinse waters are circulated through the ice maker and appurtenant lines 51, 75 etc., by the pump 69 under pressure, which effects thorough cleaning and sanitizing of the ice maker and appurtenant lines by the cleaning agent and thorough rinsing out of the ice maker and appurtenant lines to clear out the cleaning agent. The use of pressure contributes substantially to dislodging of algae and other foreign matter and the flushing of the algae and other foreign matter out of the system into the waste bucket. There is also a circulation of cleaning solution through the water feeder cup 39 followed by rinsing thereof via 123, 47, 43 and 72. The components of the water system other than those used in the ice making process (e.g., coil 81, carbonator are completely isolated during the cleaning cycle and there is no possibility of contaminating them with cleaning solution. The manual operations required of the service man to effect the thorough cleaning are minimal; all he has to do at the start is uncouple socket 91 at the end of base 79 from plug 89, apply it to plug 121, and pour the cleaning solution into the cup 39, and, at the end, uncouple 91 from 121 and put it back on 89. The procedure is simple; the regular routeman can start the cleaning cycle when he first arrives at the location on one of his regularly scheduled visits, complete his other duties, and then put the vendor back in service (by applying socket 911 to plug 89). Water spillage as occurred with previous cleaning methods is eliminated. Vendor down time for cleaning has also been greatly reduced, the system as herein shown imposing only 20 minutes down time on the vendor, and it is to be noted that the routeman can tend to other duties for more than three-quarters of this 20 minutes.

in view of the above, it will be seen that the several objects of the invention are achieved and other advantageous results attained.

As various changes could be made in the above constructions without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

What is claimed is:

1. In a vendor, an ice maker, a water pump having an inlet and an outlet, a system for delivering water from the pump outlet through the ice maker and returning it from the ice maker to the pump inlet, a drain for draining water from said system, a valve for the drain adapted to be closed for circulation of water through the ice maker and to be opened for drainage of the system, means adapted for the introduction into the system of a cleaning solution, and programming means controlling operation of the pump and the valve for operation through a cleaning cycle including operation of the pump with the valve closed to circulate a cleaning solution through the ice maker, opening of the valve to drain the cleaning solution from the system, and operation of the pump to rinse the ice maker and said system with clear water.

2. In a vendor as set forth in claim 1, said programming means including means for opening the valve following the circulation of the cleaning solution while the pump remains in operation for pumping the cleaning solution out through the drain.

3. In a vendor as set forth in claim 2, said programming means including means for stopping the pump after an interval of pumping out the cleaning solution with the valve remaining open for an interval thereafter for further drainage of the system by gravity.

4. In a vendor as set forth in claim 1, said programming means being operable, following drainage of the cleaning solution from the system, to operate the pump with the valve closed for an interval to circulate clear water for a rinse through the ice maker.

5. In a vendor as set forth in claim 1, said programming means being capable, following drainage of the cleaning solution from the system, to operate the pump with the valve open for flushing the pump with clear water per se, and then proceeding with operation of the pump with the drain valve closed to circulate clear rinse water through the system, followed by operation of the pump with the drain valve open to pump the rinse water from the system.

6. In a vendor as set forth in claim 1, having a carbonator, said system including a water line extending from the outlet of the pump removably connected to the carbonator and adapted for disconnection from the carbonator and connection into said system for carrying out a cleaning cycle.

7. In a vendor as set forth in claim 6, means responsive to connection of said line into said system for initiating operation of said programming means to carry out a cleaning cycle.

8. In a vendor as set forth in claim 7, means responsive to disconnection of said line from the carbonator for disabling said vendor from operating through a vend cycle.

9. In a vendor as set forth in claim 1, said ice maker having a hopper for ice made by said ice maker, and means for dispensing ice from the hopper, said programming means being operable to operate the ice dispensing means to dispense substantially all the ice from the hopper before starting the circulation of cleaning solution through the ice maker.

10. In a vendor as set forth in claim 9 wherein the icedispensing means comprises a door normally closing an ice discharge opening in the hopper and a solenoid for operating the door, said programming means being operable to energize the solenoid to open the door and hold it open to dispense substantially all the ice from the hopper and then to deenergize the solenoid to close the door before starting the circulation of the cleaning solution through the ice maker.

11. A vendor having an ice maker comprising a freeze chamber in which water is frozen to form ice, an ice hopper above the freeze chamber for holding a supply of ice, said freeze chamber having an inlet for water to be frozen and being in communication at its upper end with the hopper, means for delivering ice upward from the freeze chamber into the hopper, the hopper having means for dispensing ice therefrom, a water feeder cup in which a predetermined level of water is maintained, a water delivery line extending from the feeder cup to the freeze chamber water inlet, a water pump having its inlet connected with the feeder cup, a pump output line extending from the outlet of the pump and adapted for connection to said water delivery line, a hopper drain line for connecting the hopper to the pump inlet, said pump being operable to circulate water through said pump output line, water delivery line, freeze chamber water inlet, freeze chamber hopper, and hopper drain line back to the pump inlet during a cleaning cycle, a drain for said water delivery line, a drain valve for said drain adapted to be closed for said circulation of water by the pump and to be opened for drainage of said lines, said programming means operable to control the pump and said drain valve for operation through said cleaning c cle includin operation of the pum with the drain valve c osed to circu ate a cleaning solution t rough said pump output line, said water delivery line, said freeze chamber and hopper, and said hopper drain line back to the pump inlet, followed by opening of the drain valve to drain the cleaning solution from said lines, then by operation of the pump with the drain valve closed to circulate water per se through the system for at least one rinse, and by opening of the drain valve to drain the rinse water from the system.

12. A vendor as set forth in claim 11 wherein said programming means includes means for opening the drain valve following the circulation of the cleaning solution and continuing the operation of the pump for pumping the cleaning solu' tion out of said lines through said drain, and for opening the drain valve following the circulation of the rinse water while the pump remains in operation.

13. A vendor as set forth in claim 12 wherein said programming means includes means for stopping the pump after an interval of pumping out the cleaning solution with the drain valve remaining open for further drainage of the cleaning solution by gravity, and for stopping the pump after an interval of pumping out the rinse water with the drain valve remaining open for further drainage of the rinse water by gravity.

14. A vendor as set forth in claim 11 having a carbonator wherein said pump outlet line is a flexible hose having a removable connection to the carbonator and adapted for disconnection from the carbonator and connection to said water delivery line.

15. A vendor as set forth in claim 14 having a line connecting the water feeder cup to the inlet of the pump for supplying water from said cup to the pump inlet during normal operation of the vendor, and for supplying cleaning solution and water from the cup to the pump inlet during a cleaning cycle, and wherein said hopper drain line is in communication with the pump inlet.

16. A vendor as set forth in claim 15 having disconnectable coupling means between said hose and the carbonator including a valve adapted to close on disconnection of the hose from the carbonator and including a coupling member on the hose, and means in communication with said water delivery line for connecting said coupling member thereto and including a normally closed valve adapted to open on application of said coupling member to said connecting means, said drain extending from said connecting means.

17. A vendor as set forth in claim 16 having means respon' sive to connection of said coupling member to said means for connection thereof to said water delivery line for initiating operation of said programming means to carry out a cleaning cycle.

18. A vendor as set forth in claim 17 having means responsive to disconnection of said hose from the carbonator for disabling said vendor from operating through a vend cycle.

19. A vendor as set forth in claim 18 wherein the vendor is restored to normal operation by reconnecting the hose to the carbonator only after completion of a cleaning cycle.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification62/233, 62/303, 222/149
International ClassificationF25C1/00, G07F13/00, G07F13/06
Cooperative ClassificationG07F13/00, F25C1/00, G07F13/065
European ClassificationF25C1/00, G07F13/06B, G07F13/00