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Publication numberUS3638770 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 1, 1972
Filing dateOct 6, 1969
Priority dateOct 6, 1969
Publication numberUS 3638770 A, US 3638770A, US-A-3638770, US3638770 A, US3638770A
InventorsFrill Richard K, Zoric Michael T
Original AssigneeWestinghouse Air Brake Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Brake and propulsion controller
US 3638770 A
Abstract
An improved railway vehicle operator's brake and propulsion controller combining the use of fluidic devices and light-responsive devices with fluid pressure responsive devices for controlling braking as well as propulsion functions of the vehicle, such arrangement thus providing a compact controller requiring less space than present controllers when installed. Operation of the several devices is effected by a manually rotatable shaft having rotary cams arranged thereon for operating certain ones of the devices and which also carries perforated disc members by which light-responsive elements are selectively exposed to or shielded from a light source, depending upon the angular position of the respective disc members to thereby control closing or opening of respective electrical control circuits.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

atent Frill et a1.

[ 1 Feb. 1, 1972 1541 BRAKE AND PROPULSION CONTROLLER Westinghouse Air Brake Company, Wilmerding, Pa.

[22] Filed: Oct. 6,1969

21 Appl.No.: 863,951

[7 3] Assignee:

[52] US. CL ..192/2, 350/96, 340/380,

- 303/19, 137/815, 192/1, 192/3, 303/15 [51] Int. Cl ..Fl6d 67/02 [58] Field of Search ..192/1, 2, 3; 104/26; 137/597,

3,136,586 6/1964 Rush ..303/19 3,160,444 12/1964 Linhart ....303/19 3 ,472,5 60 10/1965 Desthuiluers ....303/ l 3 3,506,836 4/1970 Rueger ..250/219 3,519,116 7/1970 Koehn 197/98 Primary Examiner-Clarence R. Gordon Attorney-Ralph W. Mclntire, Jr.

[57] ABSTRACT An improved railway vehicle operator's brake and propulsion controller combining the use of fluidic devices and lightresponsive devices with fluid pressure responsive devices for controlling braking as well as propulsion functions of the vehicle, such arrangement thus providing a compact controller requiring less space than present controllers when installed. Operation of the several devices is effected by a manually rotatable shaft having rotary cams arranged thereon for operating certain ones of the devices and which also carries perforated disc members by which light-responsive elements are selectively exposed to or shielded from a light source, depending upon the angular position of the respective disc mem bers to thereby control closing or opening of respective electrical control circuits.

7 ClaimsIQbrawing Figures PATENTEU FEB 1 I972 3638.770

saw 1 or 4 INVENTOR. RICHARD K. FRILL BY MICHAELT ZORIC ATTORNEY PATENTED FEB I 1972 SHEEI 2 0F 4 "IIIII"" I NVE NTOR.

L KT ma MM w m W RM fi ATTORNEY PATENTEU FEB 1 m2 SHEEY 3 [IF 4 INVENTOR.

RICHARD K. BY MICHAELT Wh -4 ILL C AT TORNEY PATENTEU FEB H972 36 SHEET WUF 4 PROPULSION ZONE SERVICE APPLICATION ZONE FULL SERVICE EMERGENCY A ski 2%. ATTORNEY BRAKE AND PROPULSION CONTROLLER BACKGROUND OF INVENTION With greater sophistication and refinement of railway vehicles, control equipment for such vehicles, especially the braking and propulsion control equipment, necessarily becomes more complex and, therefore, bulkier so that available space in which such equipment may be installed also becomes more limited. Complexity of control equipment also necessitates that such equipment he more sensitive to provide quicker response to a control impulse when initiated by the operator. US. Pat. No. 2,215,356, issued to E. E. Hewitt on Sept. 17, I940, and assigned to the assignee of the present invention, discloses a complex propulsion and brake controller of the type above mentioned.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION The object of the present invention, therefore, is to provide an operators controller of compact design, so as to require a minimum of mounting space in the cab of the vehicle, and of such sensitivity as to provide a minimum of time in responding to initiation of a brake or propulsion control operation by the operator.

The railway vehicle operators controller embodying the invention comprises a cam-actuated, self-lapping service application portion including a fiber optic arrangement for effecting application or release of the brakes and a cam-actuated emergency application pilot valve portion, the cams for operating said service application and emergency application portions being carried by a common shaft rotatable either by an angularly movable handle connected directly thereto or by a linearly movable handle connected thereto through a cog belt and gear train for translating the linear motion into rotational motion of the shaft. The controller further comprises a propulsion-controlling fiber optic device having a plurality of fiber optic light conductors connected to a stationary block for registering with a plurality of respective photosensitive diodes arranged on an oppositely disposed stationary block with a perforated disc carried by the shaft and rotatable thereby between the light conductor block and the diode block for making or blanking desired light connections between the conductors and the diodes, as desired, to effect closing or opening of respective electric control circuits of the vehicle. The operators controller further includes a fiber optic reverser unit similar to that described above but operated by a separate shaft and handle affixed thereto.

In the drawings,

FIG. 1 is a schematic view of typical railway vehicle brake apparatus in which the right-hand portion, as viewed in the drawings, of an operators controller embodying the invention appears in section and in an elevational disposition;

FIG. 2 is an elevational view, in section, of the left-hand portion of the controller, said FIGS. 1 and 2, when placed side by side in the order indicated, constituting the entire controllcr unit along with the brake apparatus;

FIG. 3 is an elevational view, in section, of a modified portion of the controller shown in FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 4 is an elevational view, partly in section and partly in outline, of an alternative form of an operator's control handle mechanism for the controller shown in FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIGS. 5, 6, 7 and 8 are diagrammatic views relating to certain rotary members of the controller; and

FIG. 9 is a diagrammatic view showing the several positions of the operators handle.

DESCRIPTION AND OPERATION The operator's brake and propulsion controller, as seen in FIGS. 1 and 2 combined, comprises a casing 1 having journaled at each end thereof the respective ends of a rotatable main shaft 2. An operator's handle or lever 3, which will be described in greater detail hereinafter, is removably secured onto the main shaft 2 at a normal disposition relative thereto by screw threads 4 and extends externally of the casing 1 so as to be accessible to the operator for angular rotation thereof in a vertical plane for effecting rotation of said shaft about its axis.

A rotary disc type cam member 5 (see FIG. 5) is coaxially mounted on the main shaft 2 for rotation therewith for operating a self-lapping-type service brake application device 6, which will be described in greater detail hereinafter. The cam member 5 is the well-known type having the periphery so contoured as to provide the desired cam action on a cam follower 7. In this instance, the cam member 5 is effective, when the point of contact with the cam follower 7 is at a predetennined low point within a short-radius sector 8 of said cam member (see FIG. 6), for operating the service application device 6 to a brake release position. When the point of contact of cam member 5 with the follower 7 is at a preselected high point of a cam sector 9 (see FIG. 6) of gradually increasing radius of said cam member, the service application device 6 is operated to a brake application position, said brake application and release positions to be more fully described hereinafter. A spring-biased detent device 10 is mounted within the casing l in such position as to operatively engage a notch 11 (see FIG. 6) formed within a peripheral sector of uniform radius of the cam member 5 opposite the short-radius sector 8 for locking said cam member in the release position, in which it is shown in FIG. 1, or for engaging another notched sector 12 (see FIG. 6) opposite cam sector 9 for locking said cam member in a selected application position.

The service application device 6 comprises a diaphragmtype piston 13 subjected on the upper side, as viewed in FIG. 1, to the force of a main spring 14 disposed in a spring chamber 15 and caged between a lower spring seat 16 and an upper spring seat 17. The upper spring seat 17 is coaxially and slidably disposed on a stem 18 formed concentrically on the lower spring seat 16 and extending upwardly therefrom for accommodating said upper spring seat. A snapring 19 secured adjacent the upper free end of stem 18 limits upward movement of upper spring seat 17. The compression of main spring 14 and, therefore, the degree of the force exerted thereby on the upper side of piston 13 varies in accordance with the application position in which cam 5 is set, said force being transferred to said piston through the cam follower 7, the upper spring seat 17, and a cam follower support member 20 interposed between said cam follower and said upper spring seat, said support member being slidably movable in a coaxial bore 21 formed in the casing wall.

The lower spring seat 16 abuttingly contacts the upper end, as viewed in FIG. 1, of an axially aligned piston stem 22 to which the piston 13 is secured by being clamped between an upper piston follower 23 and a lower piston follower 24, said lower spring seat acting through said stern and said piston followers for transmitting the force of spring 14 to said diaphragm.

The force of main spring 14 is, in part, opposed by the force of an auxiliary spring 25 compressed between lower piston follower 24 and a casing wall 26 formed in casing 1, said auxiliary spring being disposed within a fluid pressure chamber 27 defined by piston 13, said casing, and said casing wall.

The lower extremity of the valve stem 22, as viewed in the drawing, carries the light-emitting ends of two light-transmitting conductors 28 and 29 in an over-and-under relationship, said cono'uctors being of any suitable type such as fiber optic, for example. The upper light conductor 28 is adapted for registering with a light-responsive device such as a photodiode 30 for example, when cam 5 is in its brake release position and, therefore, piston 13 is correspondingly in a brake release position defined by abutment of the upper piston follower 23 with an internally disposed shoulder 31 formed on casing l in spring chamber 15, said photodiode being effective when subjected to light from said conductor, for closing an electrical circuit 32 connected, preferably via an amplifier device 33 to a release electromagnet valve device 34 and thereby causing operation for effecting a release of any existing brake application. When piston 13 and, therefore,

piston stem 22 are moved downwardly as a result of the force of spring 14 acting thereon (when cam 5 is operated to its brake application position), said piston is correspondingly moved to a brake application position defined initially by abutment of the lower piston follower 24 with an internally disposed shoulder 35 formed in fluid pressure chamber 27. with downward movement of piston 13 to its brake application position, consequent downward movement of piston stem 22 moves light conductor 28 out of registry with photodiode 30 and places the lower light conductor 29 in registry with a photodiode 36, which, when thus sensitized, is effective for actuating an electrical circuit 37 connected via an amplifier device 38 and thereby causing operation of an application electromagnet valve device 39 for effecting an application of the brakes.

The photodiodes 30 and 36, similar to the light conductors 28 and 29, are arranged in an over-and-under relationship also, but are spaced further apart than said conductors to provide for lapping action of the service application device 6 in a manner to be more fully described hereinafter.

A pipe bracket 40 is mounted on the casing I and is provided with connections 41, 42, 43 44 and 45 connected respectively to brake pipe 46, a straight air pipe 47, a manually operable emergency brake valve device 48, said brake pipe, and a feed valve pipe 49, said latter two connections being made via a combined pressure regulator and relay valve device 50, as will be more fully explained hereinafter. The straight air pipe 47 is connected, via a passageway 51 formed in the casing l, to the fluid pressure chamber 27 of the service application device 6 for a purpose to be later disclosed. The pipe bracket 40 is also provided with an atmospheric port 52.

The operators controller also comprises an emergency brake application or pilot valve device 53, as shown in FIG. I, having a piston-valve member 54 slidably operable in a bore 55 formed in casing l. The piston-valve member 54 is provided on its upper side, as viewed in the drawing, with a valve element 56 which is normally held in a seated or closed position on a valve seat 57 by said piston-valve member when the latter is moved upwardly to a release position either by the force alone of a spring 58 acting on the lower side of said piston-valve member or by the combined force of said spring and fluid pressure prevailing in a spring chamber 59 adjacent said lower side and in which said spring is disposed. The piston-valve member 54 cooperates with the casing l to define an intermediate or pressure chamber 60 which is connected to spring chamber 59 via a choke 61 disposed in the wall of said piston-valve member, said intermediate or pressure chamber being connected by a passageway 62 to the brake pipe 46 via connection 41. An atmospheric chamber 63, connected via a passageway 64 to atmospheric port 52, is disposed adjacent the upper side of piston-valve member 54. Spring chamber 59 is connected via a branch passageway 65 of a passageway 66 to the emergency brake valve device 48 via connection 43.

A rotary disc type cam member 68 is carried on and rotatable with the main shaft 2 in suitable axial position for effecting operational control of the emergency pilot valve device 53. In usual manner, the cam member 68, when rotated to a highpoint sector 69 of the cam (see FIG. 7), acts on a cam follower '70 and through a stem 71 for moving the piston-valve 54 downwardly to an application position, which will be described more fully hereinafter, and, therefore, operating the valve element 56 to an unseated or open position off valve seat 57. When the cam member 68 is returned to a low-point sec tor 72 (see PIC. 7), spring 58 acts to return the piston-valve member 54 to its release position in which valve 56 occupies its seated position as shown in the drawing.

The propulsion operations of the vehicle are controlled by a propulsion control device 73 as shown in FIG. 1, which cornprises a stationary block 74 having a plurality of light conductors 7S arranged'thereon and which again may be of the fiber optic type, so that the light-emitting ends of said conductors are disposed respectively oppositely to a plurality of photodiodes 76 arranged on an oppositely facing stationary block 77. When sensitized or desensitized, the diodes 76 make or break various electrical train circuits, several of said circuits being shown and designated as Propulsion Control Circuits in the drawing. A perforated circular light-shielding plate or disc 78, which is carried by the shaft 2 and is rotatable therewith between the light conductor block 74 and the diode block 77, has a plurality of perforations or openings 79 (see FIG. 5) through which light from the ends of the light conductors 75 may pass for sensitizing the photodiodes 76 when said disc is selectively positioned between said light conductors and photodiodes by rotating said disc with the handle 3 in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIGS. 5 and 9. The perforations 79 are so arranged on the disc 78 in relation to the light conductors 75 and the photodiodes 76 as to provide a desired switch logic for controlling the various train circuits when said disc is operated to its various positions in the manner above mentioned. Further details of operation of the propulsion control device 73 for controlling train propulsion are not deemed essential to an understanding of the invention.

As further shown in FIG, 1, the operators controller is also provided with a fluidic device 80 through which the brake pipe 46 is charged with fluid pressure, said fluidic device having an inlet passage 81 connected via a passageway 82, connection 45, and the pressure regulator portion of device 50 to the feed valve pipe 49 and having an outlet or delivery passage 83 connected via a passageway 84 and connection 44 to the relay valve portion of device 50, said inlet and outlet passages being connected to each other. Also, formed in the fluidic device 80 are an exhaust passage 85 and a transverse atmospheric passage 86, the latter intersecting the inlet passage 81 and outlet passage 83 at the juncture thereof.

The purpose of the fluidic device 80, which may be a conventional commercially available type, is to charge the brake pipe 46 during initial charging of the braking equipment in preparation for normal operation and also for recharging said brake pipe to effect a release of the brakes subsequently to an emergency application, as will be more fully discussed hereinafter. Fluid under pressure from the feed valve pipe 49 is reduced by the pressure regulator portion of the device 50 to a low pressure consistent with fluidic operating devices, and is then supplied via passageway 82 to the inlet passage 81. Normally the handle 3 of the controller is in a neutral or release position (see FIGS. 1, 8 and 9) in which the transverse passage 86 is closed at one end (the left-hand one, as viewed in FIG. 1), by a rotary plate or vane 87 carried on the shaft 2 and rotatable therewith, so that, in well-known manner, a partial vacuum is created in the left-hand portion of said transverse passage by the stream of fluid flowing through the inlet passage 81, thereby rendering the higher atmospheric pressure in the right-hand end of said transverse passage effective for diverting the flow of fluid to the exhaust passage 85 and effecting dissipation thereof to atmosphere. When the handle 3 is moved to a full service position (to be more fully described hereinafter), an opening 88 (see FIG. 8) formed on the plate 87 is moved into registry with the left-hand end of transverse passage 86, thereby establishing a balance of atmospheric pressure at both ends of said passage to cause normal flow of fluid from inlet passage 81 to outlet 83, thence to passageway 84 and the relay valve portion of device 50 for effecting supply of fluid under pressure from the feed valve pipe 49 to the brake pipe 46 at a pressure higher than the control pressure supplied from said feed valve pipe, via the pressdre regulator portion of device 50, to the fluidic device 80. In all other positions of handle 3, opening 88 is out of registry with transverse passage 86.

For further details relating to the type of fluidic device such as that above discussed wherein opening or closing of one end of the transverse passage is effected by a controlled member, see US, Pat. No. 3,072,147, issued to C. W. Allen et al. on Jan. 8, I963, and assigned to the assignee of the present invention.

The shaft 2 has an annular groove 89 formed thereon and registering with passageway 66, while a passageway 90 also formed in said shalt interconnects said groove with a passageway 91 extending longitudinally through the handle 3. A thumb-operated valve 92 disposed in the free end of the handle 3 is normally held by a spring 93 in an unseated position relative to a valve seat 94, whereby passageway 91 is open to atmosphere past said unseated valve and via a plurality of openings 95 formed in said handle. The operator, during normal running conditions of the vehicle, maintains the valve 92 in a closed position by depressing a button 96 with his thumb, thereby forcing said valve, against the force of spring 93, into said closed or seated position on valve seat 94 and thus closing passageway 91 from atmosphere.

As seen in FIG. 2, the operators controller also comprises a reverser unit 97 comprising a shaft 98 journaled in the casing 1 and manually rotatable by a handle 99 extending through a slot to the outside of said casing. Similarly to the propulsion control device 73, the reverser unit 97 comprises a stationary block 109 on which a plurality of light conductors 101 are arranged for selectively sensitizing a plurality of photodiodes 102 (only two of which are shown) arranged on an oppositely facing stationary block 103. A light-shielding rotary plate or disc 104 is fixed on the shaft 98 and is therefore rotatably disposed between the blocks 100 and 103 so as to be selectively positionable by the handle 99 for causing selected openings (not shown) formed in said disc to be positioned in registry between selected light conductors 101 and photodiodes 102 for effecting energization of the latter. The photodiodes 102 are connected to various and respective electrical circuits (not shown) whereby the propulsion equipment (not shown) may be conditioned to cause the vehicle to reverse its direction of travel in a manner not deemed essential to an understanding of the present invention.

The reverser unit 97 is also provided with a spring-biased detent device 105 appropriately disposed in the casing 1 for engaging notches, such as at 106, defining the several corresponding positions of the handle 99, the shaft 98 and, therefore, the rotary disc 104.

In operation, assuming that the brake pipe 46 has been charged from the feed valve pipe 49 via the fluidic device 80, as above described, with fluid at a predetermined pressure, such fluid pressure also prevails in pressure chamber 60 of the emergency brake application pilot valve device 53 and eventually equalizes via choke 61 in spring chamber 59. Such pressure also prevails in passageways 65, 66, 90 and 91, assuming the operator has the button 96 in the handle 3 depressed, as he normally should, except as hereinafter noted. With the brakes released, chamber 27 of the service application device 6 is at atmospheric pressure.

To effect a brake application, the operator moves the handle 3 in a clockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. 9, out of a neutral or release position to a selected position in a service application zone, as indicated in FIGS. 6 and 9, which causes the shaft 2 and the cam member 5 to be rotated accordingly, and, therefore, depending upon the position at which the cam sector 9 is stopped on the cam follower 7, the spring 14, by downward movement of said cam follower, the follower support member 20, and spring seat 17, is correspondingly compressed and thereby forces piston 13 and piston stem 22 downwardly to their respective brake application positions until light conductor 28 moves out of registry with photodiode 3i) and light conductor 29 moves into registry with photodiode 36. Electromagnet valve device 39 controlling the braking operation of the vehicle is thus actuated to cause, among other things during initiation of the brake application, the straight air pipe 47 to be charged with fluid from a supply reservoir 197 at a preselected pressure commensurate with the amount of movement of handle 3. Fluid under pressure from the straight air pipe 47 is then supplied via a double check valve device 108 to a brake cylinder device 109 to effect a brake application accordingly. Further details of this operation are not deemed essential to an understanding of the invention, except to note that when the straight air pipe 47 is charged with fluid at the preselected pressure, such fluid under pressure also flows through passageway 51 to chamber 27 of the service application device 6. When fluid pressure in chamber 27 is sufficient for balancing the opposing force of compressed spring 14, spring 25 causes piston 13 and piston stem 22 to move upwardly to a lapped position in which the forces on opposite sides of said piston are balanced, whereupon the light conductors 28 and 29 assume a neutral position between and out of registry with both photodiodes 30 and 36. Thereafter, until such time that the operator effects a release or a reduction of the brake application (by moving the handle 3 in a counterclockwise direction either to the release position or to a lower point on the cam sector 9, respectively, as indicated in FIGS. 6 and 9), the service application device 6 operates in wellknown manner in maintaining a balance of forces on opposite sides of piston 13, and, therefore, a braking level consistent with the degree selected by the operator.

If the pressure in straight air pipe 47 and brake cylinder 109, and, therefore, in chamber 27, drops below the preselected pressure, spring 14 causes piston 13 and piston stem 22 to move downwardly to bring light conductor 29 into registry with photodiode 36 to cause magnet valve device 39 to restore pressure in said straight air pipe, brake cylinder, and chamber to the preselected pressure at which the piston moves up to its lap position. lf pressure in straight air pipe 47, brake cylinder 109, and chamber 27 builds up to a degree in excess of the preselected pressure, piston 13 and piston stem 22 move upwardly until light conductor 28 registers with photodiode 30 to cause the magnet valve device 34 to effect a fluid pressure in said straight air pipe and said brake cylinder, and consequently a corresponding reduction of the brake application and the pressure in said chamber until the forces on opposite sides of said piston are restored to a balanced state and the piston and piston stem to lapped positions.

Of course, if the operator desires to release the brake application entirely, he moves the handle 3 and consequently cam member 5, as above noted, to the brake release position, in which it is shown in the drawings, whereupon compression of spring 14 is released. The combined forces of fluid pressure in chamber 27 and spring 25 cause piston 13, along with piston stem 22, to be moved upwardly to the brake release position in which light conductor 28 registers with photodiode 30 to actuate the electromagnet valve device 34 for effecting a release of the brake application by venting fluid pressure from the straight pipe 47 and the brake cylinder device 109, as well as that in chamber 27.

During such time that the operator maintains control of braking operations by actuating the service application device 6, as above described, which is usually when the vehicle is in motion, he must keep the button 96 at the end of the handle 3 depressed in order to prevent occurrence of an untimely emergency brake application.

An emergency brake application, which, as is well known to those skilled in the art, is effected by a reduction of fluid pressure in the brake pipe 46 to atmosphere at a rapid rate. Such reduction of brake pipe pressure at an emergency rate may be effected through the emergency brake application or pilot valve device 53 and may be initiated in several ways. As was previously noted herein, intermediate chamber 60 of the pilot valve device 53 is connected to the brake pipe 46 via passageway 62 and connection 41, while spring chamber 59 is connected to said intermediate chamber via choke 61, so that prevailing brake pipe pressure is normally equalized in said chambers. If the pressure in spring chamber 59, however, is unrestrictedly reduced to atmosphere (in the several ways to be discussed hereinafter), pressure in intermediate chamber 60 acting on the upper side of piston-valve member 54 causes said piston-valve member to move downwardly to its application position to effect unseating of valve element 56 from valve seat 57 and thereby permit fluid pressure in said intermediate chamber. and. therefore, in the brake pipe, to escape unrestrictedly to atmosphere via chamber 63, passageway 64,

and atmospheric port 52. In response to such rapidl reduction of brake pipe pressure, an emergency control valve device 1 10 connected to brake pipe 46 thereby effects supply of fluid under pressure from supply reservoir 107 (which is connected to said brake pipe) via the double check valve device 108 to the brake cylinder 103 to effect an emergency brake application. Being well known and conventional, details of such operation are not deemed essential to an understanding of this invention.

One way of releasing fluid pressure from spring chamber 59 is by manually opening the conveniently located emergency brake valve device 48 which, as above noted, is connected to said chamber via connection 43 and passageways 66 and 65. Fluid pressure from chamber 59 may then escape to atmosphere via passageways 65 and 66 and out through a vent port 11 1 in the emergency brake valve 48.

Another way in which fluid pressure may be released from spring chamber 59 is by releasing the button 96 on the end of handle 3, thus permitting spring 93 to unseat valve 92 from valve seat 94, whereupon fluid pressure from said spring chamber may escape to atmosphere via passageways 65, 66, 91) and 91, and openings 95. This arrangement of the button 96 and valve 92 in the handle 3 provides a deadman" safety device whereby an emergency brake application is obtained in the event of incapacitation of the operator and consequent release of said button.

The emergency application device 53 may also be operated by moving the handle 3 in a clockwise direction (see FIGS. 7 and 9) to an emergency position, whereupon a high-point sector 112 of cam member 68, acting through the cam follower 70 and stem 71, causes the piston-valve member 54 to be moved downwardly to its application position so that valve 56 is unseated from valve seat 57. Fluid pressure in intermediate chamber 60 and, therefore, brake pipe 46 is vented unrestrictedly to atmosphere via chamber 63, passageway 64 and vent 52 to thereby effect an emergency brake application.

FIG. 3 of the drawings illustrates a modified service brake application device 113 which can be used in place of the service brake application device 6. The service application device 113 is also actuated by the cam member 5 acting through the cam follower 7 and a hollow cam follower support member 114 for compressing a spring 115 caged between an upper spring seat 116, on which said follower support member rests, and a piston follower 117. Also, similarly to service application device 6, the force exerted by spring 115, when compressed, acts through the piston follower 117 on one side of a diaphragm-type piston 118, while the lower or opposite side of said piston is subject to feedback of fluid pressure from straight air pipe 47 via passageway 51 and a passageway 119 connecting said passageway 51 with a pressure chamber 120 adjacent said lower side of said piston. An auxiliary spring 121 is compressed between a piston follower 122, adjacent the lower side of piston 118, and the casing wall of the service appiication device 113.

The upper spring seat 116 is coaxially slidably disposed on a piston stem 123 to permit relative axial movement therebetween during initial compression of spring 115 and during self-lapping action similar to that described in connection with service application device 6. The upper end of piston stem 123 terminates within the confines of the cam follower support member 114 with a lever 124 pivotally connected between its ends to said upper end of said piston stem. One end of lever 124 is pivotally anchored to the casing of the application device 113 to provide a fulcrum therefor, while the other end of said lever carries light-disbursing ends of a plurality of light conductors, two such conductors 125 and 126 being shown. With piston 118, stem 123 and lever 124 in respective release positions, in which they are shown in FIG. 3, the end of light conductor 125 registers with and, therefore, sensitizes a photodiode 127 mounted in a stationary diode block 128 supported on the controller casing 1. When piston 118, stem 123 and lever 124 are moved downwardly to respective application positions by operation of cam member 5, lever 124 is pivoted in a counterclockwise direction about the fulcrum end so that light conductor 125 moves out of registry with photodiode 127, and light conductor 126 moves into registry with a photodiode 129 to effect application of the vehicle brakes. The photodiodes 127 and 129 serve to effect energization and deenergization of the magnet valve devices 34 and 3?, respectively, in a manner similar to that of photodiodes 3i and 36.

Feedback of straight air pipe pressure into pressure chamber of the application device 113 operates similarly to that inchamber 27 of the application 6, as above described, in maintaining a level brake application according to the preselected position of handle 3. Any variation of pressure in chamber 120 effects lapping action of piston 118 and piston stem 123, which, in turn, effects appropriate movement of lever 124 between its release and application positions, or of the light conductors and 126 between the photodiodes 127 and 129.

The length of that portion of lever 124 between the end at which the light conductors 125 and 126 are carried and the pivotal point at which said lever is pivotally connected to piston stem 123, is proportionately longer than that portion of said lever from said pivotal point to the opposite or fulcrum end. Such an arrangement of lever 124, in moving from the release position to the application position or vice versa, permits the end of said lever at which the light conductors 125 and 126 are carried, to travel through a vertical distance equivalent to the amount of axial movement of stem 22 of application device 6, but with a lesser amount of travel of piston 118 compared to the amount of travel of piston 13 in moving from one position to the other. Because of this lesser amount of travel of piston 118 of the application device 113, said device is characterized as being a more sensitive and quicker responding brake application device.

FIG. 4 represents a belt and gear-type control handle device 130 which may be used as an alternative to the handle 3 (FIG. 1) for rotating the shaft 2. The control handle device 130 permits an operators handgrip or handle 131 to be moved in a linear path rather than angularly, as is the handle 3 in H0. 1.

The handle 131 is clamped to an endless belt 132 and is slidably movable in a linear horizontal path, as viewed in H6. 4, in parallel tracks or grooves 133 formed on opposite sides of a casing 134, only one of said tracks being shown in the drawing. The belt 132, which may be made of rubber or other suitable flexible construction, has gear teeth 135 (only some of which are illustrated) formed on the inner side over its entire length for meshing with two axially parallel gear-type pulleys 136 and 137 disposed at opposite ends of casing 13d and over which said belt rides. Belt 132 also meshes with and rides over a third gear-type pulley 138 suitably disposed adjacent a gear 139 to which the shaft 2 is connected, said gear pulley and said gear being axially parallel to each other and to gear pulleys 136 and 137. Two roller-type pulleys 140 and 141 are disposed axially parallel to and on opposite sides of gear pulley 138 on the outer side of belt 132 for maintaining said belt taut and in mesh with said gear pulley. Gear pulley 138 is carried by a shaft 142, which also carries a pinion 143 meshing with gear 139, said shaft being rotatably supported at opposite ends in the casing 124 so as to be rotatable as a unit with said gear pulley and said pinion.

By sliding the handle 131 in either direction, in the tracks 133 to a selected position of several corresponding to those to which the handle 3 (FlG. 1) may be operated, the operator causes the belt 132 to be moved over and thereby rotate gear pulleys 136, 137 and 138, the rotation of the last mentioned of said gear pulleys causing rotation of pinion 143, gear 139 and therefore shaft 2 to a position corresponding to the selected position for effecting the desired operation in the manner described above in connection with the control device shown in FIG. 1.

A safety or deadmans feature is also included in handle 131 by providing a vent port 144 on the top side of said handle, over which port the operator holds his thumb to prevent an emergency brake application. Vent port 144 connects to one end of a passageway 145 extending through the handle 131 and having connected at its other end an adapter 146 to which one end of a flexible high-pressure tube 147 is connected. The other end of tube 147 is connected, in suitable manner not shown, to passageways 66 (FIG. 1) and 65 leading to spring chamber 59 of the emergency application device 53.

Thus, if the operator, either intentionally or unintentionally, lifts his thumb from the vent port 144, fluid pressure is released from spring chamber 59 via passageways 65 and 66, tube 147, passageway 145 and said vent port, whereupon, in the manner above set forth, an emergency brake application is effected.

Having now described the invention, what we claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

l. A railway vehicle operators brake and propulsion controller comprising a casing, a shaft mounted in said casing and manually rotatable by the operator out of a neutral position in either direction to selectively control brake application and propulsion, brake control means disposed in said casing, propulsion control actuating means disposed in said casing, and cam means positionally secured on said shaft for operatively engaging said brake control means and being effective upon rotation of said shaft out of its neutral position in one direction to cause operation of said brake control means, wherein the improvement comprises:

a. light-conducting means;

b. light-responsive means disposed in oppositely facing relation to said light-conducting means, said light-conducting means and said light-responsive means being fixed in said casing relative to each other; and

c. a disc fixed on said shaft for rotation therewith between said light-conducting means and said light-responsive means, said disc having perforations therein selectively communicating light from said light-conducting means to said light-responsive means upon manual rotation of said shaft in an opposite direction relative to said one direction out of said neutral position for activating said propulsion control actuating means.

2. A railway vehicle operators brake and propulsion controller, as defined in claim 1, wherein said light-conducting means comprises a plurality of fiber optic conductors and said light-responsive means comprises a plurality of light-sensitive diodes, said perforations on said disc being arranged thereon so as to provide a predetermined order of light communication between the several fiber optic light conductors and the several light-sensitive diodes.

3. A railway vehicle operators brake and propulsion controller, as defined in claim 1, wherein the brake control means comprises:

a. a linearly movable element biased to a normal position;

b. a pair of light-conducting members carried in linearly spaced relation on said element;

0. a pair of linearly spaced stationary light-responsive members, one of which is subject to light from one of said light-conducting members only in the normal position of said element, the other of said light-responsive members being subject to light from the other of said light-conducting members upon linear displacement of said linearly movable element out of its said normal position, said light-responsive members being effective, when subjected to such light, for controlling the application and release of brakes on the vehicle; and

d. caged spring means compressible by said cam means upon rotation of said shaft in said one direction out of its said neutral position to exert a resilient linearly displacing force on said element.

4. A railway vehicle operators brake and propulsion controller, as defined in claim 1, wherein the brake control means comprises:

a. a linearly movable element biased to a normal position;

b. a lever member having a fixed end and a free end, said lever member being pivotally connected at a point between said fixed end and said free end to said linearly movable element, said free end of said lever member being pivotable about said fixed end upon linear movement of said linearly movable element;

0. a pair of light-conducting members carried in spaced relation on said free end of said lever member;

d. a pair of stationary, spaced-apart light-responsive members, one of which is subject to light from one of said light-conducting members only in the normal position of said element, the other of said light-responsive members being subject to light from the other of said light-conducting members upon linear displacement of said linearly movable element and consequent pivotal movement of said lever member, said light-responsive members being effective, when subjected to such light, for controlling the application and release of brakes on the vehicle; and

e. caged spring means compressible by said cam means upo'n rotation of said shaft in said one direction out of its said neutral position to exert a resilient linearly displacing force on said linearly movable element.

5. A railway vehicle operator's brake and propulsion controller, as defined in claim 1, wherein is provided a manual actuator for effecting rotation of said shaft, said actuator comprising:

a. an operators handle movable in a linear path in opposite directions; and

b. means interconnecting said shaft and said handle for translating such linear movement of said handle to effect rotation of said shaft.

6. A railway vehicle operators brake and propulsion controller, as defined in claim 5, wherein said means interconnecting said handle and said shaft comprises:

a. an endless malt supported on two spaced gear pulleys for endless movement thereon and to which said operators handle is secured for effecting such movement of the belt; and

b. rotatable means engaged by said belt and rotatable by said movement of the belt to cause rotation of said shaft upon linear movement of said handle.

7. A railway vehicle operators brake and propulsion controller, as defined in claim 6, wherein said belt, said gear pulleys, and said rotatable means are provided with meshing gear teeth for effecting transmission of motion therebetween.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3992062 *Jul 10, 1975Nov 16, 1976Westinghouse Air Brake CompanyCombination fluid pressure and electric trip cock emergency brake apparatus for railway vehicles
US5249480 *Nov 6, 1991Oct 5, 1993General Electric CompanyTwo handled controller for a locomotive
US6339739 *May 20, 1999Jan 15, 2002Robert Bosch GmbhSystem for controlling the motion of a vehicle
US9067601 *Oct 6, 2009Jun 30, 2015Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki KaishaSprung mass damping control system of vehicle
US20040134299 *Aug 20, 2003Jul 15, 2004Klaus-Jurgen GotthardtControl device for driving and braking a vehicle
US20110213527 *Oct 6, 2009Sep 1, 2011Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki KaishaSprung mass damping control system of vehicle
EP1396375A1 *Sep 3, 2002Mar 10, 2004W. Gessmann GmbHControl device for driving and braking a vehicle, especially a railway vehicle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification477/28, 303/15, 303/19
International ClassificationB60T15/00, B60T15/04, B60T13/66
Cooperative ClassificationB60T15/048, B60T13/665
European ClassificationB60T15/04D, B60T13/66C
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 14, 1990ASAssignment
Owner name: AMERICAN STANDARD INC., NEW YORK
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:BANKERS TRUST COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:005252/0780
Owner name: RAILWAY INC., NEW YORK
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:BANKERS TRUST COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:005252/0828
Effective date: 19900309
Jun 28, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: BANKERS TRUST COMPANY
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:AMERICAN STANDARD INC., A DE. CORP.,;REEL/FRAME:004905/0035
Owner name: BANKERS TRUST COMPANY, 4 ALBANY STREET, 9TH FLOOR
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:U.S. RAILWAY INC.;REEL/FRAME:004905/0255
Effective date: 19880624
Owner name: BANKERS TRUST COMPANY, NEW YORK