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Publication numberUS3639923 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 8, 1972
Filing dateNov 25, 1970
Priority dateNov 25, 1970
Publication numberUS 3639923 A, US 3639923A, US-A-3639923, US3639923 A, US3639923A
InventorsStewart Albert A
Original AssigneeStewart Albert A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf practice platform
US 3639923 A
Abstract
A golf practice platform is divided into two sections one of which is stationary, and the other of which is mounted to tilt slightly as the golfer's weight shifts from one foot to the other in order to indicate the instant when the shift occurs. Each section has an artificial turf surface and the turf surface of the stationary section from which the ball is driven is laid above a pad of cellular elastomeric material to simulate actual playing conditions. The entire platform may be tilted in various directions to simulate uphill, downhill and sidehill lies.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Stewart [451 Feb. 8, 1972 [54] GOLF PRACTICE PLATFORM Albert A. Stewart, 150 Fox Meadow [72] lnventor:

Road, Scarsdale, NY. 10583 [22] Filed: Nov. 25, 1970 21 1 Appl. No.: 92,563

[52] US. Cl ..273/l87 R, 273/195 A, 273/195 B [5 1 lnt. Cl. ..A63b 69/36 [58] Field ofSearch ..273/183, 187, 195, 196,197, 273/198 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,370,529 2/1945 Fuller ..273/195 R 2,879,996 3/1959 Lederer ..273/l95 B X 3,352,559 11/1967 Larsen ..273/187 R 3,413,006 11/1968 Beston .273/187 R 3,423,096 l/1969 Tone .273/195 A Primary Examiner-George J. Marlo An0rneySandoe, Hopgood & Calimafde 5 7 ABSTRACT A golf practice platform is divided into two sections one of which is stationary, and the other of which is mounted to tilt slightly as the golfers weight shifts from one foot to the other in order to indicate the instant when the shift occurs. Each section has an artificial turf surface and the turf surface of the stationary section from which the ball is driven is laid above a pad of cellular elastomeric material to simulate actual playing conditions. The entire platform may be tilted in various directions to simulate uphill, downhill and sidehill lies.

4 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PATENTEU FEB 8 I372 SHEET 1 OF 2 FIG.4

FlG.2

1 N VENTOR. ALBERT A. STEWART ATTORNEYS PATENTEDFEB 81972 3.639.923

saw 2 OF 2 I N VENTOR. ALBERT A. STEWART ATTORNEYS GOLF PRACTICE PLATFORM This invention relates to golf practice platforms.

One of the important lessons which must be learned by a golfer is how to groove his swing from the time he addresses the ball until he has completed his swing. Ability to consistently groove 3. swing is important to a golfer, but this ability can only be acquired by long and tedious practice. Many factors are involved in achieving a properly grooved swing such as proper foot position, proper head position, and proper coordination of movement of arms, legs, hips and shoulders at all times during the back swing, down swing and follow through after the ball has been struck. Usually a novice golfer requires instruction from a professional teacher to acquire a good swing, but even experienced golfers frequently require instruction and practice to cure a faulty swing.

One of the important factors in a proper swing is ability to shift ones weight from one foot to another at the proper mo ment, and the ability to make the shift consistently, time after time. Thus, in the case of a right-handed golfer, when first addressing the ball, the weight of the body is usually distributed evenly between the right foot and the left foot. However, during the back swing, the weight must be shifted preponderantly to the right foot. Then, at or near the beginning of the down stroke, the weight must be shifted preponderantly to the left foot. The difficulty is for the golfer to known exactly when his weight has shifted and to know whether it has shifted before or after it should have been shifted.

It is an object of the invention to give the golfer an indication of the exact instant when his weight shifts from one foot to the other during the process of his swing.

It is important, however, that this indication be given under conditions which simulate as closely as possible the conditions of actual play. It is a further object of the invention, therefore, to provide a platform surface for supporting the ball which simulates very closely the feel of natural turf. It is a further object, also, to provide means to adjust the platform to simulate the conditions of an uphill lie, a downhill lie or a sidehill lie.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will appear hereinafter.

A preferred embodiment of the invention is shown in the accompanying drawings, in which,

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of the platform.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged section on the line 22 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged section on the line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged detail view of one corner of the platform, partly in section.

FIG. 5 is a section on the line 5-5 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 6 is a side elevation illustrating the tilting of the entire platform to simulate hilly conditions.

Referring to the drawings, the platform comprises a rectangular frame 1 fabricated from any suitable structural members such as steel angle irons. Preferably the vertical flanges 2 of the angle irons form the outside periphery of the frame and the horizontal flanges 3 extend inwardly therefrom. The frame is supported on adjustable legs 4, one of which is located at each corner of the frame.

The frame is divided into two separate platform sections 5 and 6 by a transverse frame member 7 which may also be a steel angle iron, welded or otherwise secured to the side frame members.

Section 5 of the platform is the ball supporting section. It comprises a flat rectangular platform panel 8, preferably of plywood, having a rectangular opening 9 formed therein. Located below the member 8 is a basket formed of crossed steel strips 10 and 11 which extend transversely and longitudinally of the platform and are bent upwardly and outwardly near their ends to form flanges 12 which rest on the frame flanges 3 to support the basket. The member 8 rests on the flanges l2. Mounted within the basket below the opening 9 is a pad 15 of cellular elastomeric material such as cellular rubber or polyurethane. The upper surfaces of pad 15 and member 8 are covered with a layer of artificial turf 16 such as that now available commercially from Monsanto Co. under the name Astroturf. The artificial turf is adhesively secured to the member 8 and the pad 15, and the turf above the pad is flush with that above the member 8. The tufted surface of the artificial turf simulates ordinary grass turf and supports a golf ball in much the same manner. Moreover, the elastomeric pad 15 permits the artificial turf to be depressed when struck by the club head practicing iron" shots to simulate the feel oftaking a divot.

Alternatively, the pad 15 may be removed from the basket and a pan filled with sand may be inserted to simulate conditions when a golfer finds his ball in a sand trap.

Section 6 of the platform is the tilting section on which the golfer stands. It comprises a rectangular platform member 17 covered with a layer of artificial turf l8 adhered to the upper surface thereof as previously described. The layer 18 is flush with the layers of turf which cover the section 5.

This section of the platform is mounted to tilt on the frame on an axis which is perpendicular to the end edges of the frame 1, and equally spaced from the side edges thereof. It is, therefore, perpendicular to a line between the golfer's feet and is spaced at substantially equal distances from each foot when the feet are properly placed for driving. For this purpose, the member 17 is secured to a supporting member 20 by straps 21. The supporting member, in turn, has a shaft 22 secured thereto and extending longitudinally beyond the ends thereof into hole 23 in the vertical flange 2 of the frame and hole 24 in the transverse frame member 7, which said holes serve as bearings to permit the shaft and platform to tilt.

As the golfer stands on section 6 of the platform, his feet straddle the shaft 22 and the axis of tilting as shown in FIG. 3. Thus, as his weight shifts from one foot to the other, the platform section 6 tilts in one direction or the other. The tilting movement of the platform section 6 is restrained by engagement of the member 17 with one or the other of the horizontal flanges 3 of the frame acting as a stop. The amplitude of the tilting movement should be small and inch should not exceed three-eighths inch as measured between the flanges 3 and the edges of the platform member 17. This slight tilting movement is sufficient to give the golfer an indication of the exact moment when his weight is shifted from one foot to the other, but is insufficient to disturb his balance or to otherwise interfere with his swing. It is important also that the tilting movement be limited to movement about a single axis, for movement in any other direction would tend to give the golfer a false indication.

As previously noted, an adjustable leg 4 is mounted at each comer of the frame. As shown in FIG. 4 the legs 4 are threaded and they are screwed into threaded socket members 18 secured to the frame at each comer thereof. As shown in FIGS. 5 and 6, the provision of such adjustable legs permits the entire platform to be tilted in various directions to simulate an uphill lie, a downhill lie or a sidehill lie. Since the entire platform including both sections 5 and 6 is tilted by adjustment of the legs, the golfer receives the same indication of shift of weight regardless of the direction of tilt.

It will be understood that the invention may be variously modified and embodied within the scope of the subjoined claims.

I claim as my invention:

1. A golf practice platform comprising a rectangular frame, said frame having two sections, one of said sections being stationary and comprising a flat platform panel supported by said frame and having an opening therein, a basket mounted below said opening, a pad of cellular elastomeric material in said basket below said opening, a layer of artificial turf secured to the upper surface of said platform panel, a layer of artificial turf secured to the upper surface of said pad and flush with the layer on said panel, the other of said sections comprising a second flat platform panel, a layer of artificial turf secured to the upper surface of said panel, and means for mounting said second platfomi panel to tilt with respect to said frame on an axis which is perpendicular to the ends of the frame and equally spaced from the sides of the frame.

4. A golf practice platform as claimed in claim 1 in which said rectangular frame is provided with a supporting leg at each corner thereof, each of said legs being adjustable to raise or lower the frame so that the entire platform may be selectively tilted to simulate uphill, downhill or sidehill lies.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2370529 *Apr 21, 1942Feb 27, 1945Katherine FullerGolf ball teeing device
US2879996 *Jan 7, 1957Mar 31, 1959Albrecht M LedererGolf practicing machine
US3352559 *Jul 20, 1964Nov 14, 1967Erling A LarsenGolf swing training device
US3413006 *Aug 8, 1966Nov 26, 1968Anthony J. BestonGolf training apparatus
US3423096 *Dec 2, 1965Jan 21, 1969Tone Richard NGolf practice device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3955821 *Aug 27, 1974May 11, 1976Spedding Oliver TGolfer's stance training device
US4088325 *Dec 6, 1976May 9, 1978Sutton Otis BenjaminGolf swing training device
US4130283 *Jan 6, 1977Dec 19, 1978University Of Iowa Research FoundationSimulated fairway surface for golf apparatus
US4279420 *Dec 17, 1979Jul 21, 1981Marvon BayPortable golf practice platform
US4331332 *Jan 8, 1981May 25, 1982Hughes Royal WPortable golf practice station
US4432552 *Apr 15, 1982Feb 21, 1984Saverino Bennett JGolf practice apparatus
US4875684 *Jan 20, 1988Oct 24, 1989Jacques BenilanOrientable platform, in particular for training in golf
US4875685 *Apr 1, 1988Oct 24, 1989Ballinger Kedric LGolf practice apparatus
US4886276 *Sep 14, 1988Dec 12, 1989Digangi Joseph AGolf tee platform device
US5024441 *Apr 5, 1989Jun 18, 1991Claude RousseauGolfcourse simulator device
US5028052 *May 11, 1990Jul 2, 1991Miller Omer EGolf mat
US5118112 *Dec 24, 1990Jun 2, 1992S & B Enterprises, Inc.Golf swing balance analyzer
US5333876 *Jun 22, 1993Aug 2, 1994Kaisei Engineering Co., Ltd.Golf practice apparatus
US5358251 *Sep 20, 1993Oct 25, 1994Ashton James TGolf training aid/simulator
US5460379 *Mar 7, 1994Oct 24, 1995Sidehill Golf International, Inc.Golf practice platform with controllable tilt
US5518245 *Aug 29, 1995May 21, 1996Nelson; HarryGolf practice apparatus
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US6422872 *Apr 6, 2000Jul 23, 2002James F. OutlawBatting practice balance platform
US6450895 *Jun 5, 2000Sep 17, 2002Denny J. Galluzzo, Jr.Golf practice device with adjustable golf ball tee platform and adjustable leg stance platform
US6623373 *Dec 6, 2001Sep 23, 2003Peter CarltonGolf practice platform
US6705953May 23, 2002Mar 16, 2004Michael A. HaskinsViscous golf practice turf
US8187122Sep 30, 2010May 29, 2012Sri Sports LimitedClub fitting system
US8221272 *Jun 1, 2010Jul 17, 2012Koncelik Jr Lawrence JMethod and apparatus for a golf mat
US8414409Apr 9, 2013Sri Sports LimitedClub fitting system
US8414414Dec 23, 2010Apr 9, 2013Walter ViramontezWeight shifting device(s) for athletic training
US8998741Apr 9, 2013Apr 7, 2015Walter ViramontezWeight shifting device(s) for athletic training
US20030220152 *May 23, 2002Nov 27, 2003Haskins Michael AlanViscous golf practice turf
US20080070713 *Aug 5, 2005Mar 20, 2008Lee Scarbrow Swing Studio LimitedGolf Apparatus
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US20110111873 *Sep 30, 2010May 12, 2011Sri Sports LimitedClub fitting system
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EP0336839A1 *Apr 5, 1989Oct 11, 1989Claude RousseauA golf parcours simulating device
WO1990002587A1 *Sep 13, 1989Mar 22, 1990Joseph A DigangiGolf tee platform device
WO1991002570A1 *Aug 9, 1990Mar 7, 1991James Terence AshtonGolf training aid/simulator
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WO2001056668A1 *Feb 2, 2001Aug 9, 2001American Golf Technologies IncPortable, weather resistant golf practice device
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Classifications
U.S. Classification473/269, 473/279
International ClassificationA63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63B69/3652
European ClassificationA63B69/36D6