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Publication numberUS3640001 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 8, 1972
Filing dateAug 17, 1970
Priority dateAug 17, 1970
Publication numberUS 3640001 A, US 3640001A, US-A-3640001, US3640001 A, US3640001A
InventorsEllison John M
Original AssigneeEllison John M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tobacco smoking pipe conditioning apparatus
US 3640001 A
Abstract
Tobacco smoking pipe conditioning apparatus comprises a pipe-receiving container, and means including an air evacuation pump in communication with the container interior for reducing air pressure in the container to a level at which smoking deposits on the pipe are vaporized and withdrawn from the container interior.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Ellison Feb. 8, 1972 [54] TOBACCO SMOKING PIPE CONDITIONING APPARATUS [72] Inventor: John M. Ellison, 4907 Ethyl Ave., Sherman Oaks, Calif. 91403 [22} Filed: Aug. 17, 1970 [21] Appl.No.: 64,335

2,447,084 8/ 1948 Moore ..34/104 Fruth ....34/92 X Primary Examiner-Volodymyr Y. Mayewsky [52] US. Cl. ..34/218, 131/172, 131/244, Atmmey white Haefliger and Bachand 219/371, 219/438, 219/521 [51] Int. Cl ..F26b 25/16 57 ABSTRACT [58] Field Search ..219/400,41l,362, 430, 371,

219,439, 385486, 521, 34/92, 104, 12, Tobacco smoking pipe conditioning apparatus comprises a 13 U172 244 pipe-receiving container, and means including an air evacuation pump in communication with the container interior for M! reducing air pressure in the container to a level at which [56] M CM smoking deposits on the pipe are vaporized and withdrawn UNITED STATES PATENTS from the container interior.

2,577,278 12/1951 Sellers ..34/ 104 1 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures IO a TOBACCO SMOKING PIPE CONDITIONING APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to conditioning of smoking pipes. More specifically, it concerns the relatively rapid removal of tobacco and moisture deposits from pipes to enable resumption of smoking with maximum pleasure.

Pipe smokers commonly find it necessary to utilize an inventory of pipes and to rotate their usage on a day-to-day basis after the pipes are broken in. Even so, a pipe which has been laid aside for several days may be found unpleasant to the taste when smoking is resumed, despite normal cleaning of such a pipe.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is a major object of the invention to provide pipe conditioning apparatus and method for overcoming the above problem as well as other problems associated with tobacco smoking pipes. Basically, the apparatus of the invention comprises a container having an opening through which a pipe or pipes are received, and a closure for that opening; and means including an evacuation pump in communication with the container interior for reducing the air pressure in the container to a level at which smoking deposits on the pipe (such as volatizable tobacco and moisture deposits) become vaporized and are withdrawn from the container interior. As a result, a pipe treated in this way is found to be rapidly restored to a condition favoring smoking with maximum pleasure.

Additional objects of the invention include the provision of a radiant heat source (as for example an electric light bulb) associated with the container to enhance vaporization of the deposits; the provision of a container closure to drawn toward the container interior in response to reduction of pressure in the container, and a seal to seal off between the cover and container when the closure is so displaced; the provision of a pipe rack received into the container and by means of which multiple pipes may be quickly placed into and removed from the container; and the provision of valving as will be described for controlling backfilling of air into the evacuated container to enable withdrawal of the lid and removal of the conditioned pipes.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention, as well as the details of illustrative embodiments, will be more fully understood from the following detailed description, in which:

DRAWING DESCRIPTION FIG. 1 is a side elevation, taken in section, showing one form of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a view similar to FIG. 1 showing a modified form of the invention; and

FIG. 3 is a side elevation showing an environmental application of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION FIG. 1, the pipe conditioning apparatus includes a container having an open top at 11 through which smoking pipes 12 are downwardly received. A rack 13 may be utilized to support the pipes, as shown, whereby a number of pipes may be lowered into the receptacle on the rack. A closure or cover 14 for the open-topped receptacle is then placed thereon, and an communicates with the container interior 16 via a duct or line 18 which may, if desired, contain a three-way valve 19. At

such time as it is desired to remove the pipes from the evacuated container, the valve 19 may be opened to atmosphere at 40 when closed to the pump, to accommodate pressure rise in that container. Alternatively, a valve 20 in a line 21 carried by the closure 14 may be opened to allow airflow into the container interior.

It is found that smoking pipes 12 may be effectively deodorized by subjecting them to reduced pressure of bout 25 inches of mercury for several hours, i.e., between 5 and 10 hours for example.

If desired, the low-pressure conditioning of smoking pipes may be accompanied by heating to enhance the volatilization of deposits on the pipes. FIG. 2 shows a heater in the form of an electric light bulb 24 projecting in the container intermediate the pipe bowls 26 supported on a bracket or brackets attached to the container. Otherwise, the elements of the apparatus are the same as in FIG. 1.

The environment of the invention in FIG. 3 includes a cabinet 27 having a top opening into which the container 10 is set so that the container flange 28 seats on the cabinet top 29. Accordingly, the exposed lid 14 may be removed or replaced as by means of the handle 30. The evacuation pump may be located as seen at 31 within the cabinet interior. Cabinet legs are indicated at 32.

I claim:

1. In tobacco smoking pipe conditioning apparatus, the combination comprising a. a container having an opening through which the pipe is receivable, and a closure for said opening,

b. a tobacco smoking pipe received in the container interic. means including an evacuation pump in communication with the container interior for reducing the air pressure in the container to a level at which smoking deposits on the pipe are vaporized and withdrawn from the container interior, a duct communicating between the pump and the container interior,

e. said container opening upwardly and said closure extending over said opening to be drawn toward the container interior in response to operation of said pump, and a loop seal located to seal off between the closure and container,

f. there being an electric light bulb located to radiate heat in the container to enhance vaporization of said deposits,

g. a rack received into the container interior through said opening, the rack having shoulder means to seat and position the pipe thereon,

h. and there being valve means operable to control communication between the pump and said interior, via said duct, and to control admission of air into the container interior.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2050254 *Feb 14, 1934Aug 11, 1936Westinghouse Electric & Mfg CoHumidity regulated drier
US2113770 *Mar 15, 1934Apr 12, 1938Steel Engravers Appliance CorpMethod and apparatus for drying inked impressions
US2447084 *Dec 22, 1945Aug 17, 1948Moore William HSmoking pipe holder and drier
US2577278 *Jan 31, 1949Dec 4, 1951Kenneth Sellers JohnDevice for holding and desiccating smoking pipes
US2809441 *Apr 19, 1955Oct 15, 1957Wassco Electric Products CorpSmoking pipe dryer
US2856697 *Jun 22, 1955Oct 21, 1958Frederick Fruth HalMethod of loosening and conditioning a stack of sheets
US3135589 *Sep 29, 1961Jun 2, 1964Pennsalt Chemicals CorpDrying apparatus
US3308553 *Jun 16, 1966Mar 14, 1967William Lambert ChandleyVacuum clothes dryer
US3536892 *Apr 4, 1968Oct 27, 1970Siemens AgDevice for thermal processing of semiconductor wafers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3997978 *Sep 8, 1975Dec 21, 1976Stuckey Alfred RRope conditioning apparatus
US4660297 *Nov 1, 1985Apr 28, 1987Philip DanielsonDesorption of water molecules in a vacuum system using ultraviolet radiation
US6002110 *Aug 28, 1998Dec 14, 1999Lockheed Martin Energy Research CorporationMethod of using infrared radiation for assembling a first component with a second component
WO1987002759A1 *Oct 30, 1986May 7, 1987Philip M DanielsonDesorption of water molecules in a vacuum system using ultraviolet radiation
WO2001033982A1 *Nov 8, 1999May 17, 2001Aracaria BvMethod of protecting tobacco or a tobacco product, and a container or package or a receptacle for storing thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification34/218, 392/416, 219/521, 131/244, 392/393, 219/438, 219/411, 131/328
International ClassificationF26B5/04, F26B9/00
Cooperative ClassificationF26B5/04, F26B9/003
European ClassificationF26B9/00B, F26B5/04