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Publication numberUS3640275 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 8, 1972
Filing dateMay 5, 1970
Priority dateMay 5, 1970
Publication numberUS 3640275 A, US 3640275A, US-A-3640275, US3640275 A, US3640275A
InventorsGeorge K Burke, Kenneth Raines
Original AssigneeBurron Medical Prod Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Intravenous needle assembly
US 3640275 A
Abstract
An intravenous needle assembly for administering medication into a patient comprising a cannula having a hub portion from the opposite sides of which extend a pair of hub wing sections. The hub wing sections are adapted to flex in either direction around said hub into abutting contact with one another to form a gripping handle for holding the cannula while it is being inserted into the vein of the patient. The wing portions include interlocking means thereon which serve both to lock the wing portions together in an upright position thereby preventing them from slipping relatively to one another and also to provide a roughened surface on the outside of said wing portions thereby lessening the danger of the fingers of the person handling said needle assembly from slipping on said wing portions.
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United States Paent Burke et a1.

[ Feb.8,1972

[54] INTRAVENOUS NEEDLE ASSEMBLY [72] Inventors: George K. Burke; Kenneth Raines, both of [211 App]. 110.: 34,800

[52] US. Cl. ..128/214, 128/221 [51] ..A61m5/32, A61m 5/00 [58] Field ofSearch ..l28/214,214.2,2l414, 221,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,064,648 11/1962 Bujan ..l28/214 R 3,538,915 11/1970 Framptonetal...

D2l7,795 Spaven et a1. 128/214 R UX 2,725,058 11/1955 Rathkey ..l28/22l Primary ExaminerRichard A. Gaudet Assistant Examiner-J. C. McGowan Att0rney-Shoemaker and Mattare [5 7] ABSTRACT An intravenous needle assembly for administering medication into a patient comprising a cannula having a hub portion from the opposite sides of which extend a pair of hub wing sections. The hub wing sections are adapted to flex in either direction around said hub into abutting contact with one another to form a gripping handle for holding the cannula while it is being inserted into the vein of the patient. The wing portions include interlocking means thereon which serve both to lock the wing portions together in an upright position thereby preventing them from slipping relatively to one another and also to provide a roughened surface on the outside of said wing portions thereby lessening the danger of the fingers of the person handling said needle assembly from slipping on said wing portions.

13 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures 3.640.275 SHEET 1W2 IN VENTORS GEORGE K. BURKE 8x KENNETH RAINES ATTORNEYS Wwmwm em 3,640,275

SHEW 0F 2 INVENTORS GEORGE K BURKE & KENNETH RAINES ATTORNEXS INTRAVENOUS NEEDLE ASSEMBLY BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a needle assembly for intravenous administration of medicaments into a patient and, more particularly relates to a needle assembly for the intravenous administration of fluids into a scalp vein of an infant.

Heretofore known needle assemblies of this type have been constructed with a handle portion on the cannula extending upwardly therefrom and which is used to hold the needle when the needle is inserted into the patient. Such needle assemblies are expensive and are also difficult to secure in position after the needle has been inserted into the vein. A more recent development in needle assemblies of this type is exemplified in US. Pat. No. 3,064,648, wherein a pair of oppositely extending hub wing portions are provided on the cannula for gripping the cannula to insert the point thereof into the vein of the patient and also for providing a means for securing the cannula in position once the needle is inserted. The needle assembly disclosed in this patent, although representing an improvement over the prior art intravenous needle assemblies, suffers from several serious disadvantages. For example, the wing portions 18 and 18' tend to slip relatively'to one another and also, are difficult to grasp when, for example, the fingers of the person using the needle assembly are covered with a lubricating material, such as powder or liquids or the like. Accordingly, accuracy and speed are difficult to accomplish with the intravenous needle assembly of the type described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,064,648.

The present invention is an improvement over the device described in the aforementioned patent, and solves the problems encountered therein. Specifically, the oppositely extending hub wing sections of the present invention are provided with interlocking means on the opposite sides thereof which are adapted to interlock when the wings are bent either upwardly or downwardly to maintain the wings securely in position, and the interlock means on the opposite sides of the wings, when the wings are interlocked, serve to provide a roughened surface which prevents the fingers of the person handling the needle assembly from slipping on the wings. Thus. very accurate and quick handling of the intravenous needle assembly is readily accomplished.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION It is an object of this invention to provide an intravenous needle assembly having means thereon enabling the needle assembly to be grasped and handled in a secure and safe manner.

It is another object of this invention to provide an intravenous needle assembly wherein the hub of the cannula is provided with oppositely extending wing portions which are adapted to be folded together to define a handle for gripping the needle assembly to insert the cannula into the vein of the patient.

It is a further object of this invention to provide an intravenous needle assembly as described above wherein the wing portions include interlocking means thereon for locking the wings together and for providing a roughened surface to aid in the grasping of the wings in a secure manner.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a top perspective view of one form of an intravenous needle assembly according to the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a front view in elevation of the needle assembly shown in FIG. I.

FIG. 3 is a top perspective view of a needle shown in FIG. 1 with the oppositely extending wing portions folded upwardly and secured together by the interlock means.

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along the line 44 in FIG. 3 and showing the manner in which the interlocking means interengage.

FIG. 5 is a side view in elevation of the needle assembly shown in FIG. 3.

III

FIG. 6 is a top perspective view of a second form of the intravenous needle assembly according to the present invention.

FIGS. 7, 8, 9 and 10 are views of the second form of the invention corresponding to FIGS. 2, 3, 4 and 5 of the first form of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Referring now to the drawings, wherein like reference numerals refer to like parts throughout the several views, the intravenous needle assembly is indicated generally at l in FIG. 1 and comprises a sharpened cannula 2 having a hub portion 3, which includes an enlarged body part 4 and from the opposite sides of which extend a pair of hub wings 5 and 6, the wirigs 5 and 6 being joined to the body part 4 along areas of reduced thickness or lines of weakened union 7 and 8, formed by recesses or notches 9 and 10 in the upper and lower surfaces of the oppositely extending hub wings. These weakened areas 7 and 8 permit the wing sections 5 and 6 to be folded upwardly into the position shown in FIG. 3 or if desired, the wing portions 5 and 6 could be folded oppositely to that shown in FIG. 3 and joined below the cannula means. The lines of weakened union 7 and 8 or areas of reduced thickness may be formed substantially parallel to the axis of cannula 2 so that the wing sections 5 and 6 fold substantially vertically over the body 4 or the areas of reduced thickness may be formed at an angle to the axis of cannula 2 as shown in FIG. 1 so that the wing sections 5 and 6 will be slightly forwardly inclined when they are folded upwardly over the body 4 as seen in FIG. 3 and FIG. 5.

In order to lock and maintain the wing sections 5 and 6 together against relative slippage thcrebetween when they are folded into the position shown in FIG. 3, a locking projection in the form of a raised circular rib is formed on the opposite surfaces of each of the wing sections 5 and 6. As seen most clearly in FIG. 4, the circular projection of rib 11 on one surface of wing section 5 fits snugly within the circular projection or rib 12 on the facing surface of the other wing section 6 to lock the wing sections 5 and 6 together. Corresponding circular projections or ribs 13 and I4 are formed on the wing sections 5 and 6, respectively, on the opposite sides thereof from ribs II and I2 and when the wing sections are locked together, as shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, these projections l3 and I4 serve as gripping surfaces to prevent the fingers of a person using the needle assembly from slipping on the lockedtogether wing sections. Conversely, if the wing sections are folded in the opposite direction and locked together with projections l3 and I4 interlocked, the ribs 11 and 12 would then serve as a roughened surface to prevent the fingers from slipping on the locked-together wing sections. I

As seen best in FIG. 4, the outside diameter of the rib or projection 11 on the surface of wing section 5 is substantially the same as, or slightly less than, the inside diameter of the circular rib or projection 12 on the opposing facing surface of wing section 6 and the outside diameter of projection I4 is substantially the same as or slightly less than the inside diame ter of projection 13 so that a secure and tight interlocking fit is effected between the opposing ribs or projections when the wing sections are folded together.

After the cannula 2 has been inserted into the patient, the wing sections 5 and 6 may be folded downwardly with the wings extending laterally from opposite sides of body 4 substantially as shown in FIG. 1 to conform to the shape of the body part into which the cannula is inserted and when thus positioned, the needle assembly can be secured to the body part by placing a strip of adhesive tape or the like directly over the wing sections 5 and 6.

That form of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 6 through I0 is identical to the invention shown in FIGS. 1 through 5, except that the interlocking projections on the opposite wing sections 5 and 6 comprise elongate ribs rather than the circular ribs or projections, such as Ill and 12, in FIGS. 1 through 5.

As seen most clearly in FIGS. 6 and 9, the interlocking ribs in this form of the invention comprise a first elongate rib l5 formed on one surface of wing section 5 and disposed at an angle to the axis of cannula 2. A pair of spaced parallel ribs 16 and 17 are formed on the corresponding surface of the opposite wing section 6 and are arranged such that when the wing sections are folded upwardly to the position shown in FIGS. 8 and 9, rib l5 fits snugly between ribs 16 and 17 locking the wing sections 5 and 6 together as in the FIG. 1 embodiment. Corresponding ribs 18 and 19 and 20 are formed on the opposite surfaces of wing sections 5 and 6 for locking the wing sections together when they are folded in the opposite direction about body part 4 and for serving as a roughened gripping surface when the wing sections are locked together as shown in FIGS. 8 and 9.

The interlocking ribs need not take the specific shapes described but could assume any other configuration which would provide an effective interlock between the two wing sections. Moreover, the interlocking means need not take the form of a projection on each wing section but could comprise a projection on one wing and a socket on the other, or it could comprise a tacky or adhesive surface means which would interlock and maintain the wing sections together against relative movement and also serve to prevent the fingers of a person using the assembly from slipping on the wings. Also, the areas of reduced thickness could be disposed parallel to the axis of the cannula or at an angle other than that shown or could be eliminated entirely, if desired.

The wing sections and body are preferably molded about the cannula to form an integral unit although they may be formed of a heat sealable or solvent sealable flexible plastic material, such as polyvinyl chloride, polyethylene and polypropylene and secured to the cannula by means other than molding.

As this invention may be embodied in several forms without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof, the present embodiment is therefore illustrative and not restrictive. I

We claim:

I. An intravenous needle assembly comprising:

a cannula having a pointed end;

a hub means on the other end of said cannula; and

a pair of flexible wing sections normally extending laterally from opposite sides of said hub means in a direction substantially perpendicular to the axis of said hub means and joined thereto along areas or lines of reduced thickness disposed at an angle with respect to the axis of the cannula and diverging toward said pointed end so that said flexible wing sections may be readily folded relative to said hub means about said lines of reduced thickness and brought into abutting contact with one another in a forwardly inclined vertically disposed position to define a wedge-shaped handle means to be grasped for inserting said cannula into the vein of a patient.

2. An intravenous needle assembly as in claim 1, wherein said wing sections have interlocking means on at least one surface thereof, the interlocking means on one wing section adapted to engage with the interlocking means on the other wing section when the wing sections are folded together to lock and maintain the wing sections together.

3. An intravenous needle assembly as in claim 2, wherein said interlocking means comprises a projection on at least one wing section.

4. An intravenous needle assembly as in claim 2, wherein an interlocking means is provided on each surface of each wing section.

5. An intravenous needle assembly as in claim 2, wherein said interlocking means comprises a circular rib on each wing section, the outer diameter of the rib on one wing section being substantially the same as the inner diameter of the circular rib on the other wing section so that when the wing sections are folded together, the circular rib on said one wing section is snugly fitted within the circular rib on the other wing section to lock the wing sections together against relative movement therebetween. I

6. An intravenous needle assembly as in claim 4, wherein the interlocking means on each surface of each rib section comprises a circular rib, the outer diameter of the circular rib on one side of one wing section being substantially the same as the inner diameter of the circular rib on the corresponding surface of the other wing section.

7. An intravenous needle assembly as in claim 2, wherein said interlocking means comprises an elongate rib on at least one surface of one wing section and a pair of spaced-parallel elongate ribs on one surface of the other wing section, said one rib adapted to fit snugly between said spaced-parallel ribs when said wing sections are folded together to lock said wing section against relative movement therebetween.

8. An intravenous needle assembly as in claim 7, wherein the other surface of said one wing section includes a pair of spaced parallel elongate ribs thereon and the other surface of said other wing section includes an elongate rib thereon corresponding to the ribs on said one surface of said wing sections, said ribs on said other surface of said wing sections adapted to interlock when said wing sections are folded in the opposite direction relative to said hub means.

9. An intravenous needle assembly as in claim 7, wherein said ribs are disposed at an angle to the axis of said cannula.

10. An intravenous needle assembly comprising:

a cannula having a sharpened end;

a hub means on the other end of said cannula;

a pair of flexible wing sections normally extending laterally from opposite sides of said hub means; and

releasable interlocking means on both surfaces of each of said wing sections, the interlocking means on adjacent surfaces of the wing sections adapted to interengage and interlock said wing sections against relative movement therebetween when said wing sections are folded together about said hub means and the interlocking means on the opposite surfaces of the wing sections defining roughened finger-gripping surfaces.

11. An intravenous needle assembly as in claim 10, wherein said interlocking means comprises a circular rib, the outside diameter of the circular rib on one wing section being substan tially the same as the inside diameter of the circular rib on the confronting surface of the other wing section, said circular rib on said one wing section adapted to fit snugly within the circular rib on the other wing section to lock said wing sections together, the circular ribs on the other surface of each wing section defining the gripping means for securely gripping the folded-together wing sections.

12. An intravenous needle assembly as in claim 10, wherein said interlocking means comprises an elongate rib formed on at least one surface of one wing section and a pair of spacedparallel elongate ribs on at least one surface of the other wing section, said one elongate rib adapted to fit snugly between said parallel-spaced ribs when said wing sections are folded together about said hub means.

13. An intravenous needle assembly as in claim 12, wherein said elongate ribs are disposed at an angle relative to the axis of said cannula.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US3064648 *Apr 16, 1958Nov 20, 1962Abbott LabIntravenous needle assembly
US3538915 *Sep 12, 1968Nov 10, 1970Deseret PharmaInfustion device and method
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3782383 *Mar 6, 1973Jan 1, 1974Vicra Sterile IncWinged infusion holding device with thermoplastic elastomeric body
US3856019 *Jun 4, 1973Dec 24, 1974Waller BAcupuncture needle
US4352354 *Mar 4, 1981Oct 5, 1982Nissho CorporationWinged retention needle
US4353369 *Jan 17, 1980Oct 12, 1982Abbott LaboratoriesVenipuncture device
US4413992 *Dec 2, 1981Nov 8, 1983Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Cannula support assembly and its method of manufacture
US4496352 *Oct 6, 1983Jan 29, 1985Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Cannula support assembly and its method of manufacture
US4574456 *Sep 7, 1983Mar 11, 1986Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.For cannulas
US4595147 *Mar 12, 1984Jun 17, 1986Garber & Hedges IncorporatedSelf attrition pulverizing mill
US4629452 *Aug 15, 1984Dec 16, 1986Viggo AbArrangement in a catheter unit with attachment wings, for infusion cannulas
US4645486 *Jun 11, 1984Feb 24, 1987International Health ServicesDevice for drawing and processing blood and for administering liquid via parenteral injection
US4698057 *Jun 9, 1986Oct 6, 1987Joishy Suresh KBuilt in assembly for stabilizing and securing intravascular needle or catheter like device
US5088982 *Oct 13, 1988Feb 18, 1992Ryan Medical, Inc.Safety winged needle medical devices
US5149328 *Dec 31, 1990Sep 22, 1992Abbott LaboratoriesIntravenous needle assembly having interlocking wings
US5154699 *Jul 11, 1990Oct 13, 1992Ryan Medical, Inc.Safety winged needle device for use with fistulas
US5382239 *Apr 24, 1992Jan 17, 1995Becton, Dickinson And CompanyRepositional catheter fixation device
US6231548 *Oct 19, 1999May 15, 2001Alfred Ernest BassettSecuring device for intravenous cannula or catheter
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US7377911Oct 7, 2002May 27, 2008Jms Co., Ltd.Medical needle device with winged shield for erroneous piercing prevention
US7762986 *Nov 15, 2005Jul 27, 2010Biotop Holding Co., Ltd.Safety container for a scalp vein needle
US8197447 *Apr 19, 2005Jun 12, 2012Venetec International, Inc.Flexible IV site protector
US8323251Jan 14, 2008Dec 4, 2012Fenwal, Inc.Phlebotomy needle assembly and frangible cover
CN101466420BJun 6, 2007Oct 31, 2012弗雷泽纽斯医疗保健德国有限公司Device for use in an arrangement for monitoring an access to a patient, and method for monitoring a patient access, in particular a vascular access in extracorporeal blood treatment
EP0091227A1 *Mar 18, 1983Oct 12, 1983Smith and Nephew Associated Companies p.l.c.Intravenous needle assembly
EP1440702A1 *Oct 11, 2001Jul 28, 2004JMS Co., Ltd.Medical needle unit having wing shield for preventing erroneous puncturing
WO2007140994A1 *Jun 6, 2007Dec 13, 2007Fresenius Medical Care De GmbhDevice for use in an arrangement for monitoring an access to a patient, and method for monitoring a patient access, in particular a vascular access in extracorporeal blood treatment
WO2014033901A1 *Aug 31, 2012Mar 6, 2014Terumo Kabushiki KaishaButterfly needle assembly
WO2014033903A1 *Aug 31, 2012Mar 6, 2014Terumo Kabushiki KaishaButterfly needle
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/177
International ClassificationA61M25/06
Cooperative ClassificationA61M25/0637
European ClassificationA61M25/06D3