Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3640284 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 8, 1972
Filing dateJan 5, 1970
Priority dateJan 5, 1970
Publication numberUS 3640284 A, US 3640284A, US-A-3640284, US3640284 A, US3640284A
InventorsPhilip A De Langis
Original AssigneePhilip A De Langis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for electrotherapy of the pubococcygeus
US 3640284 A
Abstract
Apparatus for electrotherapy of the pubococcygeus muscle group of a female. The apparatus includes an electrode member contoured for insertion into the vagina. Spaced electrodes on the member are supplied with a carrier signal comprising shaped, bipolar pulses in the frequency range of from 20 Hz. to 8 kHz., the signal being carrier modulated at a rate of between 0.2 Hz. and 10 Hz. The bipolar pulses exercise striated muscle, while the low-frequency modulation contracts smooth muscle and prevents continuous tetany. A condom-type vaginometer permits measurement of vaginal volume and of vaginal pressure resulting from contraction of pubococcygeus muscles.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

llnited States Patent De Langis [151 smmm 1 Feh.%,1972

[54] APPARATUS FOR ELECTROTHERAPY OF THE IPUBOCOCCYGEUS 21 Appl. No.: 762

[52] U.S.Cl. ..l28/422, 128/2 S, 128/408 3,056,409 10/1962 Edwards ..l28/422 Primary Examiner-Hugh R. Chamblee Attorney-Lyon & Lyon [5 7] ABSTRACT Apparatus for electrotherapy of the pubococcygeus muscle group of a female. The apparatus includes an electrode member contoured for insertion into the vagina. Spaced electrodes on the member are supplied with a carrier signal comprising shaped, bipolar pulses in the frequency range of from [51] int. Cl. ..A61n 01/06 20 to 8 KHZ, the Signal being carrier modulated at a r 58 Field of Search ..12s/2, 24.1,24.4, 407,408, of between and 10 The bipolar Pulses exercise 123/422 striated muscle, while the low-frequency modulation contracts smooth muscle and prevents continuous tetany. A condom- 56] Reiereuces Cited type vaginometer permits measurement of vaginal volume and of vaginal pressure resulting from contraction of pubococ- UNITED STATES PATENTS yg s mus le 3,403,684 10/1968 Stiebel et a1. 128/407 4 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures POWER 217 iii/f AMP 27 7'0 24 Z ELECT/Q0055 [0W I fiesagfgf 25 5/ flR06E'550/Q 28 .92

22 MIA/VAL 2p AMPL I7'UOE CUII/TROL ER 29 cgfr t in rs 3/ CONSTANT CURRENT 0575670/2 PATENTED rsa 81972 EHEET W W 2 INVENTOR.

APPARATUS FOR ELECTROTIIERAPY OF THE PUBOCOCCYGEUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Primary muscular support for the female urogenital area is provided by two muscle groups, the iliococcygeus and the pubococcygeus. If the pubococcygeus muscles are atonic or functioning inadequately, a number of urogenital anomalies such as urinary stress incontinence and uterine prolapse may result. Moreover, poor functioning of the pubococcygeus muscles is a significant cause of female frigidity or sexual inadequacy.

Proper adjustment to sexual relations by married persons is a significant element of happiness in marriage. Unsatisfactory adjustment can, and frequently does lead to unhappiness, to adverse affects on personality, and in many cases, to divorce. Therefore, it is important that married persons learn to perform their respective sexual roles as well as possible, and that physicians have the means available to assist them in doing so. To this end, awareness of the role played by the pubococcygeus muscles in female frigidity is of considerable importance.

In typical cases of apparent female frigidity, the strength of the pubococcygeus has been tested and the muscles found to be functioning at less than about percent of their optimum. In the past, gynecologists have treated this problem by perscribing a series of exercises to be performed by the female to tone up the pubococcygeus muscles. These exercises included voluntary contraction of the muscles in the midpelvic area, and particularly of the muscles surrounding the middle onethird of the vagina. The result of such exercise was a very marked improvement in sexual appreciation and response of the female. Often patients reported that they were feeling more sexually, and many indicated that they were experiencing vaginal orgasms for the first time in their lives.

Similar marked improvement in other urogenital anomalies have been reported as a result of exercise of the pubococcygeus muscle. For example, women who experience urinary incontinence found that after a program of exercise of the pubococcygeus muscle they were able to control bladder release to a degree not previously possible.

Electrotherapy has been used extensively in the past to exercise muscles of various parts of the body in cases where natural muscle function has been lost or diminished. In such cases, the production of painless, graduated muscular exercise by electric stimulation reproduces the physical and chemical phenomenon connected with normal muscular work. But despite the widespread use of electrotherapy for other parts of the body, there have been virtually no reports of the application of such therapy to the female urogenital area.

SUMMARY OFTI-IE INVENTION muscles. Use of the inventive apparatus results in significant improvement in the tone, strength and functioning of the pub'ococcygeus muscles. Benefits of such use including significant reduction in female frigidity, relief from urinary incontinence difiiculties and improvement of other urogenital anomalies.

The present electrotherapy apparatus includes electrical circuitry which provides a carrier signal comprising shaped bipolar pulses and having a carrier frequency in the range of from 20 Hz. to8 kHz., the signal being carrier modulated at a rate of between 0.2 Hz. and 10 Hz. The bipolar pulses exercise striated muscles, and are shaped so that a relatively low-current initially is applied to the muscle, with a higher current being applied once the muscle has contracted. The lowfrequency pulse modulation exercises smooth muscle and prevents continuous tetany.

To measure the condition and performance of the pubococcygeus muscle, there is also disclosed a novel condom-type vaginometer which permits measurement of the vaginal volume and of the pressure resulting from contraction of pubococcygeus muscles. The vaginometer comprises a generally cylindrical condom holder having a shank region over which the open end of a condom is stretched. An O-ring and an annular cover maintain the condom on the holder.

In use, the condom portion of the vaginometer is inserted in the vagina and filled with water via an axial opening through the condom holder. The vaginal volume may be measured by determining the amount of water required to fill the condom. By connecting a manometer to the vaginometer, the pressure resulting from contraction of pubococcygeus muscles may be measured directly.

Thus, it is an object of the present invention to provide apparatus for electrotherapy of the female pubococcygeus muscles.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an electrotherapy apparatus including an electrode member contoured for insertion into the vagina, and means for supplying a programmed electrical signal to the electrode member for exercise of muscles in the pelvic region.

It is another object of the present invention to provide an electrotherapy apparatus including circuitry to supply a carrier signal comprising shaped bipolar pulses of a relatively high frequency, the carrier signal being modulated at a relatively low frequency.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide an apparatus for electrotherapy of the pubococcygeus muscle group and including means for exercising both striated and smooth muscle and for preventing continuous tetany.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide an apparatus for the electrotherapy of pubococcygeus muscles including means for applying a relatively low current to the muscles before they have contracted and a relatively larger current thereafter.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a novel vaginometer.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a vaginometer of the condom-type, useful for measuring vaginal volume and vaginal pressure resulting from contraction of pubococcygeus muscles.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Still other objects, features and attendant advantages of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art from a description of the preferred embodiments constructed in accordance herewith, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein like numerals designate like parts in the several figures, and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an electrode member contoured for insertion into the vagina, and useful as part of the inventive apparatus for electrotherapy of the pubococcygeus muscle group;

FIG. 2 is an electrical block diagram showing typical circuitry useful for providing a programmed electrical signal to the electrode member of FIG. 1;

FIG. 2a graphically illustrates a typical waveform produced by the circuitry of FIG. 2; and

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a novel condom-type vaginometer useful for measuring vaginal volume and vaginal pressure resulting from contraction of pubococcygeus muscles.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to tlne drawings, and particularly to FIGS. 1 and 2 thereof, there is shown a preferred embodiment of the inventive apparatus for electrotherapy of the pubococcygeus muscle group. In general, the apparatus comprises a generally tubular electrode member (FIG. 1) which is contoured for insertion into the vagina. Member 10 includes a pair of Iongitudinally spaced, circumferential electrodes 11 and 12 to which is supplied a programmed electrical signal from the circuitry 13 of FIG. 2.

Referring in greater detail to FIG. 1, electrode member 10 includes a closed end 14 of generally hemispherical shape, and an open end 15 which is outwardly flared. Member 10 preferably is constructed of plastic or other smooth, electrically nonconductive material. Electrodes l1 and 12 are flush with the exterior surface of member 10, and are positioned with electrode 11 adjacent end 14 and electrode 12 spaced approximately one-third of the way back toward end 15. The interior 16 of tubular member 10 houses a pair of electrode wires 17 and 18 which are respectively connected to electrodes l1 and 12 interiorly thereof. Electrode wires 17 and 18 extend out through flared end 16, and are connected to the electrical circuitry of FIG. 2, as described below.

For effective electrotherapy of the pubococcygeus muscle group, it is desirable to supply to electrodes 11 and 12 a signal having both high-frequency and low-frequency components. Illustrative circuitry for providing such a signal is shown in FIG. 2. Referring thereto, circuitry 13 includes an oscillator 20 having a frequency in the range of from 20 Hz. to 8 kHz., and preferably in the range of from 150 Hz. to 1 kHz. Bipolar output pulses from oscillator 20 are shaped by a high-frequem cy signal processor 21, typically a passive filter network, which provides a gradual rise time to each pulse. As will be described below, this shaping is desirable to provide initially low current to the striated muscles of the pubococcygeus, followed by a relatively higher current once these muscles have contracted. The output of oscillator 20 also is shaped by a lowfrequency signal processor 22 which in effect introduces a low-frequency carrier modulation in the frequency range of from 0.2 to 10 Hz., and preferably in the range of from 0.5 to 1 Hz.

The shaped and modulated signals from processors 21 and 22 are combined in a conventional summing amplifier 23 to provide on a line 24 a carrier signal comprising shaped bipolar pulses and having a frequency in the range of from 20 Hz. to 8 kHz., the carrier signal being modulated at a low frequency in the range of from 0.2 to 10 Hz. This signal on line 24 is amplified by an automatic gain control (AGC) amplifier 25 and by a power amplifier 26, and the amplified signal provided via a terminal 27 to one of electrodes 11 and 12 of member 10. The other of electrodes 11 and 12 is connected to a temninal 28 associated with a constant current detector 29.

The average current flowing between electrodes 11 and 12 is sensed by constant current detector 29 which provides along a line 30 a signal indicative of the sensed current level. The signal on line 30 is supplied to an automatic gain control (AGC) driver 31 which in turn controls the gain of AGC amplifier 25 in a manner so as to maintain the average current between electrodes 11 and 12 at a generally constant level. A manual amplitude control 32 associated with AGC driver 31 permits operator selection of the average current level provided to electrode member 10. Preferably, average current levels below about 250 milliamperes may be employed. A power supply 33 provides DC power to operate oscillator 20 and the other components of circuitry 13.

The circuitry of FIG. 2 is illustrative only, and other electronics may be used to produce the programmed electrical signal to electrode member 10. However, the excitation signal provided to electrodes 11 and 12 should include both highfrequency and low-frequency components. The reason for this is that the pelvic area muscle group includes both striated and smooth muscle, both of which must be considered in any process of pelvic rehabilitation. Experiments have proved that effective, painless vaginal muscle stimulation requires bipolar pulses of relatively high frequency (20 Hz. to 8 kHz.) to contract striatedmuscle and relatively low frequency (0.2 to l0 Hz.) bipolar pulses to contract the smooth muscle. The optimum frequencies for these bipolar pulses vary somewhat from patient to patient, but generally are in the range of from Hz. to l kHz. for the high-frequency component and from 0.5 to l Hz. for the low-frequency component. As mentioned hereinabove, the low-frequency component may be introduced by carrier modulating a high-frequency signal comprising bipolar pulses.

The wave shape of the bipolar pulses comprising the relatively high-frequency component of the excitation signal to electrode member 10 is not critical. In fact, both sine wave and square wave signals have been found to work effectively. However, for optimum exercise of striated muscle, it is desirable that the pulses be shaped to provide an initially low current, followed by a considerably higher current as the muscle starts to contract. Similarly, the shape of the low-frequency carrier modulation is not critical. However, a relatively slow rise time again is desirable to provide an initially low current to the smooth muscles, followed by a higher current when these muscles begin to contract. FIG. 2a shows a typical signal produces by the circuit of FIG. 2; the shape of the lowfrequency modulation is clearly evident. However, signals having waveshapes other than that illustrated in FIG. 2a may be used effectively with the inventive apparatus.

The low-frequency component of the excitation signal, in addition to causing contraction of smooth muscle, also functions to avoid continuous tetany of the striated muscles. This is desirable, since if the striated muscle were continuously contracted by the high-frequency component, the muscle would tend to accommodate or relax, and little or no effective exercise of the striated muscle would result despite continued application of the bipolar pulses. By interrupting or modulating the high frequency carrier at a low-frequency rate, such continuous tetany is avoided, and the striated muscle has no chance to acconunodate or relax.

The shaping of the highand low-frequency signal compornents also serves the function of eliminating very highfrequency components (in excess of several thousand Hz.) which develop heat within the tissue and/or stimulate the pain receptors. This insures that the electrotherapy will be painless to the patient. Moreover, the low-frequency component allows use of the present apparatus on both innervated and denervated muscles.

In operation, electrode member 10 is inserted into the vagina of the patient, possibly using a lubricant such as water. Electrode wires 17 and 18 are connected to terminals 27 and 28 of circuitry 13 (FIG. 2), and the manual amplitude control 32 is given to the patient. The patient increases the amplitude of the excitation signal from circuitry 13 to a point where pubococcygeus muscle contractions occur. Because of accommodation, the patient typically will increase the amplitude of the excitation signal from time to time during the treatment. Optimum muscle exercise was found to occur when electrodes 11 and 12 were positioned over the motor points of the pubococcygeus.

Significant improvement in the tone, strength and functioning of the pubococcygeus muscle group was found to result from regular use of the inventive electrotherapy apparatus. To facilitate actual quantitative measurement of this improvement, the Vaginometer of FIG. 3 was developed. This device permits measurement of the vaginal volume and also of the vaginal pressure resulting when the pubococcygeus muscles are contracted.

Referring to FIG. 3, vaginomenter 40 comprises a generally cylindrical condom holder 41 having a vaginal shank region 42 of relatively small diameter and a flared body region 43 of relatively larger diameter. An axial opening 44 extends through condom holder 41. Attached rearwardly of condom holder 41 is a disc-shaped back plater 45 having a central opening 46. Vaginometer 40 also includes an Oring 47 and an annular cover 48 of plastic, hard rubber or the like. The diameter of central opening 49 in cover 48 is slightly larger than the outer diameter of shank region 42 of condom holder 41.

weeks is indicated for each patient, as well as the total number of treatments. Typically, individual treatments were of about one-half hour in duration. The vaginal volume and vaginal pressure resulting from contraction of pubococcygeus muscles As illustrated in FIG. 3, the band 50 of a condom 51 is 5 prior to the treatment period isindicated, and the correspondstretched over shank region 42 of holder 41, and the condom ing vaginal volume and pressure values measured at the end of threaded thro gh O-rmg 47 and ann lar cover 48 The O-rmg the treatment period also are listed. Note that as a control, 47 and cover 48 are Posmoned about Shank 8 42 to Table 1 includes data for two patients (Case Nos. 6 and 7) secure the condom open end 52 to holder 41. Cover 48 h i d no t t nt,

TABLE I Pre-treatment Post-treatment Period of Patient treatment, Number of Volume, Vaginal Volumev Vaginal case no. (weeks) treatments (1111.) pressure (mL) prcssult 16 22 130 5 125 11s 12 35 150 0 140 110 s 150 *is 150 140 4 11 280 3 2x5 17 3. 5 10 150 *3 1511 *50 4 0 160 4 11m 5 4 0 150 *5 155 *5 *Cornbined vaginal and abdominal pressure.

prevents condom 51 from forming an aneurism outside the vagina which would give erroneous pressure and volume readings. Further, the vaginal orifice shank 42 is provided to assist in holding the vaginometer in the vagina, and to eliminate false pressure readings which might otherwise result should the patient contract the vaginal orifice.

When vaginometer 40 is assembled as described, condom 51 may be filled with water or other fluid supplied underpressure from a syringe (not shown) via an inlet tube 530 (FIG. 3), a valve 54 and a tube 55 which communicate with the interior of condom 51 via axial openings 44 and 46. For pressure measurement, a manometer (not shown) is connected for fluid communication with the interior of condom 51 via a line 56, valve 54 and tube 55. Valve 54 permits selection of whether vaginometer 40 is connected to inlet tube 53, so as to permit filling of condom 51, or to line 56, so as to facilitate manometer measurement of vaginal pressure.

In operation, the condom portion 51 of vaginometer 40 is inserted into the vagina with shank portion 42 of condom holder 41 extending into the vaginal orifice. With valve 54 positioned to provide fluid communication between tubes 53 and 55, condom 51 may be filled with warm water from a syringe (not shown). Typically, the condom is unfused with water until a tare pressure of millimeters of mercury (mm. Hg.) is observed. The patient then is asked to contract rapidly the vaginal and abdominal muscles. When this exercise is stopped, the condom water pressure again is checked. If the vaginometer pressure has changed, more water is infused and the exercise repeated until a constant pressure is obtained. This insures complete vaginal filling. The amount of water required 1 to fill condom 5 1 then is indicative of the vaginal volume.

To determine vaginal pressure resulting from contraction of pubococcygeus muscles, vaginometer is inserted in the vagina and filled with fluid as described above. The patient is asked to contract the vaginal muscles only, with the lungs empty. During the measurement, the abdomen may be palpated to ensure that the abdominal muscles are not contracting. To obtain the vaginal pressure reading, valve 54 is turned to provide fluid communication between the manometer line 56 and the interior of condom 51, via tube 55. Typically, the patient is asked to maintain this pubococcygeus contraction for about 10 seconds while a manometer pressure reading is taken.

The significant improvement is muscle tone, strength and functioning of the pubococcygeus resulting from treatment with the inventive electrotherapy apparatus is illustrated by the statistics in the following Table ll, derived from actual paticnt case histories. In this table, the period of treatment in As is evident from Table l, in each case, a very significant increase in vaginal pressure resulted at the end of the treatment period. This increase in pressure is indicative of the improved pubococcygeus muscle tone, strength and functioning resulting from use of the inventive apparatus. Typically, patients noted a significant increase in sexual interest and activity after treatment with the inventive electrotherapy apparatus. Moreover, in cases of urinary incontinence and other female urogenital anomalies, definite improvements also resulted when the pubococcygeus muscles were exercised and toned up by use of the apparatus described herein.

Although reference is made herein for use of the apparatus in connection with the vagina of a female, it is to be understood that the apparatus may also be used for the male or female as a rectal probe or electrode.

While the invention has been described with respect to several physical embodiments constructed in accordance therewith, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications and improvements may be made without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention.

I claim:

1. Apparatus for electrotherapy including, a pair of spaced electrodes; means developing a carrier wave which is substantially a sine wave having a frequency within the range of Hz. to 1 kHz., means amplitude modulating said carrier wave with a modulating signal having a frequency substantially less than said carrier frequency and producing a series of recurrent bipolar pulses with each of said pulses having a duration established by said modulating signal and consisting of varia tions in its amplitude at said carrier wave frequency from a maximum positive value, to a zero value to a maximum negative value, to a zero value to a maximum positive value, and so forth; and means connected to said amplitude modulating means and continuously modifying said maximum positive values and said maximum minimum values such that they become progressively larger at a slower rate during initial development of each of said pulses than during subsequent development such that each of said bipolar pulses is defined by a slowly rising portion followed by a portion of substantially constant amplitude; and means applying said bipolar pulses to said electrodes.

2. Apparatus as set forth in claim 1 in which modulating frequency is in the range of 150 Hz. to 1 kHz.

3. Apparatus as set forth i claim 1 in which said modulating frequency is within the range of 0.5 Hz. to 1 kHz.

4. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 including means for limiting the current flow to said electrodes to a value which does not exceed 250 milliamperes.

* w n t n

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3056409 *Aug 28, 1953Oct 2, 1962Edwards Meryl JMethod of and means for physiotherapy
US3403684 *Nov 23, 1964Oct 1, 1968Ariel I. StiebelElectrical stimulator
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3933147 *Apr 2, 1970Jan 20, 1976Vall Wilbur E DuApparatus and method for treating disorders in the region of the pubococcygeous muscle
US3941136 *Nov 21, 1973Mar 2, 1976Neuronyx CorporationMethod for artificially inducing urination, defecation, or sexual excitation
US4050449 *Feb 25, 1976Sep 27, 1977Medical Products Development CorporationApparatus for exercising muscles of a female patient's pelvic diaphragm
US4106511 *Apr 12, 1977Aug 15, 1978Svenska UtvecklingsaktiebolagetElectrical stimulator in remedy of incontinence
US4305402 *Jun 29, 1979Dec 15, 1981Katims Jefferson JMethod for transcutaneous electrical stimulation
US4396019 *Jun 8, 1981Aug 2, 1983Perry Jr John DVaginal myograph method and apparatus
US4476880 *Dec 3, 1982Oct 16, 1984Giem David AApparatus for sensing and indicating vaginal muscle contraction
US4503863 *Sep 15, 1981Mar 12, 1985Katims Jefferson JMethod and apparatus for transcutaneous electrical stimulation
US4537195 *Nov 20, 1981Aug 27, 1985Mcdonnell Roy EElectrical control of body discharges and headaches
US4550733 *Jan 9, 1984Nov 5, 1985Pain Suppression Labs, Inc.Electronic dental analgesia apparatus and methodology
US4559948 *Aug 7, 1984Dec 24, 1985Pain Suppression LabsCerebral palsy treatment apparatus and methodology
US4574808 *Apr 26, 1984Mar 11, 1986Pain Suppression Labs, Inc.Apparatus and method for relieving symptoms of multiple sclerosis
US4586509 *Aug 13, 1984May 6, 1986Pain Suppression Labs, Inc.Temporomandibular joint-myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome treatment apparatus and methodology
US4614193 *Jun 7, 1984Sep 30, 1986Pain Suppression Labs, Inc.Electronic glaucoma treatment apparatus and methodology
US4627438 *Aug 13, 1984Dec 9, 1986Pain Suppression Labs, Inc.Electronic migraine modulator apparatus and methodology
US4688575 *Mar 12, 1982Aug 25, 1987Duvall Wilbur EMuscle contraction stimulation
US4784142 *Nov 4, 1986Nov 15, 1988Pain Suppression Labs, Inc.Methodology for electronic dental analgesia
US4844075 *May 7, 1986Jul 4, 1989Pain Suppression Labs, Inc.Transcranial stimulation for the treatment of cerebral palsy
US5107835 *May 22, 1989Apr 28, 1992PhysiodynamicsElectrotherapeutic treatment
US5109848 *May 22, 1989May 5, 1992Physiodynamics, Inc.Electrotherapeutic apparatus
US5433219 *Sep 23, 1992Jul 18, 1995Spery; Nanette S.Receptive condom assembly
US5674238 *Jun 24, 1996Oct 7, 1997Research Foundation Of The State Univ. Of N.Y.Perineometer
US6354991Oct 6, 1999Mar 12, 2002Bio Control Medical LtdIncontinence treatment device
US6652449Oct 5, 1999Nov 25, 2003Bio Control Medical, Ltd.Control of urge incontinence
US6712772Feb 15, 2002Mar 30, 2004Biocontrol Medical Ltd.Low power consumption implantable pressure sensor
US6862480Nov 29, 2001Mar 1, 2005Biocontrol Medical Ltd.Pelvic disorder treatment device
US6896651Jan 15, 2002May 24, 2005Biocontrol Medical Ltd.Mechanical and electrical sensing for incontinence treatment
US7079882Jan 22, 2000Jul 18, 2006Richard SchmidtMethod and apparatus for quantifying nerve and neural-muscular integrity related to pelvic organs or pelvic floor functions
US7343203 *Nov 15, 2004Mar 11, 2008Physiomed Elektromedizin AgApparatus for electrotherapy
US7387603 *Nov 30, 2004Jun 17, 2008Ams Research CorporationIncontinence treatment device
US7582053Sep 24, 2003Sep 1, 2009Ams Research CorporationControl of urge incontinence
US7613516Nov 28, 2002Nov 3, 2009Ams Research CorporationPelvic disorder treatment device
US8083663Jun 17, 2009Dec 27, 2011Ams Research CorporationPelvic disorder treatment
US8160710Jul 10, 2007Apr 17, 2012Ams Research CorporationSystems and methods for implanting tissue stimulation electrodes in the pelvic region
US8195296May 5, 2006Jun 5, 2012Ams Research CorporationApparatus for treating stress and urge incontinence
US8340786Jun 12, 2008Dec 25, 2012Ams Research CorporationIncontinence treatment device
US8380312Dec 30, 2010Feb 19, 2013Ams Research CorporationMulti-zone stimulation implant system and method
US8509900Nov 24, 2006Aug 13, 2013Femeda LimitedCompressible device
US8768474Oct 5, 2010Jul 1, 2014ARP Wave LLCElectro-therapeutic stimulation
US8774942Mar 27, 2012Jul 8, 2014Ams Research CorporationTissue anchor
US8805509Nov 24, 2006Aug 12, 2014Femeda LimitedCompressible electrodes
US8983627 *May 23, 2007Mar 17, 2015Publiekrechtelijke Rechtspersoon Academisch Ziekenhuis Leiden H.O.D.N. Leids Universitair Medisch CentrumMedical probe for electro-stimulation and bio-feedback training of pelvic floor musculature
US20090270963 *May 23, 2007Oct 29, 2009Publiekrechtelijke Rechtspersoon Academisch Ziekenhuis Leiden H.O.D.N. Leids Universitair MediMedical probe
DE2538369A1 *Aug 28, 1975Mar 11, 1976Gorenje Tovarna GospodinjskeSchaltungsanordnung fuer ein automatisches integriertes intravaginales reizgeraet
DE3515691A1 *May 2, 1985Feb 27, 1986Guenter StratenSucking-thrusting massage device (for the genital region)
DE3827232A1 *Aug 11, 1988Nov 9, 1989Shafik Dr Med BarsomElectric stimulator for treating female incontinence
WO1986002567A1 *Oct 18, 1985May 9, 1986Zion FoundationMethod and apparatus for delivering a prescriptive electrical signal
WO1992007617A1 *Nov 9, 1990May 14, 1992Physiodynamics IncApparatus and method for electrotherapeutic eye treatment
WO1993024176A1 *May 21, 1993Dec 9, 1993Keith Edward TippeyElectrical stimulation for treatment of incontinence and other neuro-muscular disorders
WO1994015667A1 *Jan 10, 1994Jul 21, 1994Brent CarmanMethod of varying appropriate muscle strength of a person to alleviate urinary or fecal urgency or incontinence or vaginal or bladder spasms
WO2000019939A1 *Oct 5, 1999Apr 13, 2000Bio Control Medical LtdControl of urge incontinence
WO2000019940A1 *Oct 5, 1999Apr 13, 2000Bio Control Medical LtdIncontinence treatment device
WO2002034328A1 *Sep 20, 2001May 2, 2002Best Medical Internat B VProbe for treatment of incontinence
WO2003057313A1 *Jan 2, 2003Jul 17, 2003Ardent Pharmaceuticals IncMethod for screening therapeutic agents for modulation of ejaculatory response
WO2007059989A2 *Nov 24, 2006May 31, 2007Femeda LtdSelf contained device with treatment cycle for electrostimulation
Classifications
U.S. Classification607/71, 607/64, 607/74, 600/591
International ClassificationA61B5/03, A61N1/36, A61N1/05, A61B5/103, A61H21/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61N1/0524, A61B5/4337, A61B5/1073, A61H21/00, A61N1/36007
European ClassificationA61B5/107C, A61N1/05G1, A61B5/43F3F, A61H21/00, A61N1/36B