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Publication numberUS3641617 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 15, 1972
Filing dateSep 4, 1970
Priority dateSep 4, 1970
Publication numberUS 3641617 A, US 3641617A, US-A-3641617, US3641617 A, US3641617A
InventorsLopez Pedro R
Original AssigneeLopez Pedro R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable shoeshine mount
US 3641617 A
Abstract
A mounting bracket, an arm mounted therein and transverse thereto, a vertical support pivotally mounted at the other end of the arm, and a shoe frame mounted at the bottom of the support comprising sections pivotally and slidably connected to each other for securing and stretching the shoe to be polished.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Lopez [54] ADJUSTABLE SHOESHINE MOUNT [72] Inventor: Pedro R. Lopez, 144 Follett St., Richmond, Calif. 49801 [22] Filed: Sept. 4, 1970 211 App]. No.: 69,597

[52] 11.8. C1 ..15/267 [51] Int. Cl. ..A47l 23/18 [58] Field of Search... ....15/267; 12/123, 128; 248/224 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,537,119 11/1970 Hussey ..l2/123 1 Feb. 15, 1972 2,025,627 12/1935 Whenham.... 15/265 2,383,678 8/1945 Persinger l 15/267 3,055,462 9/ 1962 Steele ..248/224 X Primary Examiner-Leon G. Machlin Attorney-Victor J. Evans & Co.

[57] ABSTRACT A mounting bracket, an arm mounted therein and transverse thereto, a vertical support pivotally mounted at the other end of the arm, and a shoe frame mounted at the bottom of the support comprising sections pivotally and slidably connected to each other for securing and stretching the shoe to be polished.

6 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures 1 ADJUSTABLE SHOESHIN E MOUNT This invention relates to a simple mount for holding and adjusting the positioning of a shoe in order to facilitate shining and polishing. The device can be personally or commercially used in one s home, shop, or ofiice.

Accordingly, the primary object of this invention is to provide a shoeshine holder which can be easily and quickly mounted and demounted for on the spot use and stored out of the way at all other times.

Another object of this invention is to provide a shoeshine holder which will quickly and easily adapt to any size shoe.

A further object of this invention is to provide a shoeshine holder which will rotate the shoe to any position desired quickly and easily.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a shoeshine holder which will stretch the shoe for a better polish as the shoe is being held.

The above and other objects of this invention 'will become apparent to those skilled in the an after a consideration of the following detailed description of the preferred embodiment of this invention taken together with the accompanying drawing wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of the device;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken on line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken on line 3-3 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken on line 4-4 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken on line 5-5 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view taken on line 66 of FIG. 1; and FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken on line 7-7 of FIG. 1.

Referring in detail to the drawing, there is shown a mounting bracket which is permanently mounted against a vertical surface such as a wall, doorframe, or stud. Bracket 20 is basically a flat metal plate 22 with opposing U-shaped ends 24. An arm 26 having a metal plate 28 threadedly fastened against one end thereof is mounted within said bracket 20 transverse to the vertical surface of wall 18. The sides of plate 28 extend outward further than the sides of arm 26and are slidably inserted between flat plate 22 and the legs of U- shaped end 24, the width of arm26 being slightly less than the distance between the ends of the legs of U-shaped ends 24. A spring-loaded clip is pivotally mounted on a pin 42 which is secured to plate 24 by means of supports 44. Extending from one end of clip 40 toward plate toward plate 28 from the other end of clip 40 is a pin 48. Plate 28 has a hole and plate 22 has a hole 52 through which pin 48 is inserted by 'means of pressure from spring 46 which pushes pin 48 into hole 52 as plate 28 is slid downward at the point where holes 50 and 52 are in alignment thereby holding arm 26 in place and preventing it from moving upward or downward during shining. Other variations of mounting arm 26 in place by means of clip 40 will come to ones mind. For instance, clip 40 could be mounted across the legs of end portions 24, and pin 48 would hold plate 28 and am 26 in place when pressed into hole 50 by means of spring 46 thereby obviating the necessity of hole 52. When the device is to be demounted, one merely presses his thumb on the end of clip 40 in order to contract spring 46 and remove pin 48 from hole 52 or hole 50 as the case may be in order to slip arm 26 and plate 28 from bracket 20.

The other end of arm 26 rotatably secures a vertical support 60. Support 60 has a central shaft 62 with a threaded end portion and four pins 64 equidistant from each other and shaft 62 projecting from the top surface of support 60. Shaft 62 is inserted through a hole 66 in arm 26, and the knob 68, having a threaded bore 70, screws on the threaded end portion of shaft 28 is a spring 46 Extending I 62. Knob 68 is threaded until pins 64 are slightly below the l bottom surface 72 of arm 26 at which time support 60 may be rotated in any direction until pins 64 are aligned with corresponding holes 74. Knob 68 is then turned thereby lifting central shaft 62 and support 60 upwards raising pins 64 into holes 74. When support 60 is to be rotated, knob 68 is simply turned in reverse until pins 64 drop below surface 72.

Fastened to the bottom of support 60 is a metal channel having a longitudinal series of equally spaced holes 82 along each leg 84 thereof. A second metal channel slidably fits within channel 80 and has a series of longitudinal holes 92 which may be aligned with holes 82. Thespring clip shown in FIG. 7 has a spring 102 on one end thereof and a pair of opposing pins 104 extending from legs 106 on the other end of clip 100. By contracting pin 102 with the thumb and index finger, the distance between pins 104 may be lengthened so that legs of channel 80 maybe slipped within the space between the ends of pins 104. When channel 90 extends from channel80 at a desired length, holes 82 and 92 are aligned and pins 104 are inserted thereinto preventing further sliding between the channels and fixing their combined length. Ce-

mented to the rear of channel 80 is a spherical plastic buffer 110 and pivotally mounted'to the front of channel 90 by means of a pin 1 12 is a toeplate 114.

. When a shoe is to be polished, toepla'te 114 is pivoted downward thereby shortening the distance from the tip of toeplate 114 to the end of plastic buffer 110. This facilitates slipping the shoe on and then pushing it upward in order to pivot toeplate 114 back into a substantially horizontal position which causes the shoe to stretch out to its full length thereby eliminating most of the wrinkles in the leather in and around the toe section facilitating a better polish job.

While the preferred embodiments of this invention have been illustrated vanddescribed, it will become apparent to those skilled in the art that many changes and modifications may be resorted to without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention. For instance, plastic buffer 110 may have a shape other than sphericaL'Also, the longitudinal series of holes 92 of channel 90 may be raised so that when a hole 92 is aligned with a hole 82, channel 90 in addition to toeplate 119 may be pivoted to facilitate the mounting of the shoe.

I claim:

1. A shoe holder for shining shoes,'comprising a mounting bracket secured to a vertical surface, an arm, a flat plate fastened to one end of said arm, said mounting bracket having a U-shaped end on each vertical edge thereof, said plate slidably insertable within the channel formed by said U- shaped ends, the width of said arm being less than the distance between the edges of the opposing legs of said U-shaped ends, vertical support means rotatablyconnected to the other end of said arm for rotating the shoe being held in a horizontal plane and locking all rotatable movement of the shoe at the angle desired by the polisher, and a slidable and pivotal shoe holder rigidly secured directly, between its ends, to the bottom of said vertical support means for quickly and easily securing and stretching the shoe, said plate having a hole therein below the bottom surface of said arm, and spring-actuated locking means insertable within said hole for firmly securing said arm in place transverse with said vertical surface, said mounting bracket allowing the rest of the shoe holder to be slipped in and out thereof for mounting and demounting respectively simply and quickly for on the spot polishing and to be stored out of the way when not in use.

2. The shoe holder of claim 1, wherein said locking means includes a clip pivotally mounted at the center thereof having a spring between one end thereof and said plate and apin extending from the other end thereof, said mounting bracket having a hole therein corresponding with said hole of said plate, said spring pressing said pin forward into saidmounting bracket hole as said hole of said mounting bracket and said plate come into alignment as said plate is slidably inserted into said mounting bracket.

3. The shoe holder of claim 1, wherein said locking means includes a clip pivotally mounted at the center thereof and having a spring between one end thereof and the leg of said U- shaped end of said mounting bracket and a pin extending from the other end thereof, said pin locking said arm in place when pressed into said hole of said plate by said spring.

4. A shoe holder for shining shoes, comprising a mounting bracket secured to a vertical surface, an arm having one end thereof slidably inserted within said mounting bracket for holding said arm in place transverse with said vertical surface, a vertical support means rotatably connected to the other end of said arm for rotating the shoe being held in a horizontal plane and blocking all rotatable movement of the shoe at the angle desired by the polisher in the alternative, a slidable and pivotal shoe holder secured to the bottom of said vertical support means for quickly and easily securing and stretching the shoe, locking means connected to said pivotal shoe holder for fixing the length of the pivotal shoe holder and preventing any pivotal movement, said vertical support means including a vertical support, a shaft projecting from the top of said vertical support having a threaded top portion, four pins projecting from the top of said vertical support equidistant from each other and said shaft, and a knob having a threaded bore therein for receiving the threaded top portion of said shaft, the other end of said arm having holes corresponding to and for the reception of said pins and said shaft, said vertical support being rotatable to any desired position by the polisher when the tops of said pins are below the bottom surface of said arm and being locked into the desired position when said knob at the top surface of said arm is turned to the extent that the said pins are raised into said holes corresponding thereto.

5. The shoe holder of claim 4, wherein said shoe holder includes a first metal channel having a series of longitudinal holes along each leg thereof, a second metal channel slidable within said first metal channel and having a series of longitudinal holes along each leg thereof corresponding to the series of longitudinal holes of said first channel, a plastic buffer secured to the rear of said first channel for pressing against the inside of the heel of a shoe that is to be held, and a toeplate pivotally mounted at the front of said second metal channel, said toeplate being pivoted downward to shorten the distance between the tip of said toeplate and the back of said plastic butfer allowing said plastic buffer and said toeplate to be easily inserted in the shoe, the shoe being stretched to eliminate wrinkles therein when it is lifted so as to pivot said toeplate back up into its substantially horizontal position parallel with said channels.

6. The shoe holder of claim 5, wherein said locking means includes crossed legs having a spring therebetween at one end thereof and a pin projecting from the end of each leg at the other end thereof, said pins opposing each other, said crosslegs being pivotally connected to each other at the center thereof, said pins being inserted in the holes of the legs of said channels when aligned and set for a total combined length in accordance with the shoe length.

* l ii I.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2025627 *Jul 3, 1933Dec 24, 1935Lorne Whenham EverettShoe-shine apparatus
US2383678 *Jul 3, 1944Aug 28, 1945Persinger James RShoe holder
US3055462 *Oct 21, 1960Sep 25, 1962Bathey Mfg CompanySelf-locking connection for structural members
US3537119 *Aug 19, 1969Nov 3, 1970Scoa Ind IncJack for hand-sewn shoes
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4483039 *Sep 29, 1983Nov 20, 1984Breen Cydney EShoe support apparatus
US4984327 *Aug 24, 1989Jan 15, 1991Braverman George JUse in dyeing, cleaning or polishing
US5136746 *Jul 17, 1991Aug 11, 1992Willard JonesAdjustable shoe holder and support
US7757338Apr 7, 2006Jul 20, 2010Michael RossiterShoe shine box
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/267
International ClassificationA47L23/18, A47L23/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47L23/18
European ClassificationA47L23/18