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Publication numberUS3641999 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 15, 1972
Filing dateApr 6, 1970
Priority dateApr 6, 1970
Publication numberUS 3641999 A, US 3641999A, US-A-3641999, US3641999 A, US3641999A
InventorsFranklin R Greene
Original AssigneeEzem Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Standup container adapted for the administration of enemas
US 3641999 A
Abstract
There is disclosed a standup container adapted for the administration of enemas, as well as the administration or reception of other fluids and/or compounds. The container consists of a stiffened bottom and flexible, collapsible sidewalls so joined and formed that the container can be made to stand, and such that it assumes a tapered shape, when partially or completely filled. The tapering results in great stability and considerable rigidity of the container when in use, while still preserving the desirable features of flexibility, malleability when filled, and collapsibility when emptied. A simple means for achieving the tapered shape of this container is also disclosed.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Greene Feb; 15, 1972 [54] STANDUP CONTAINER ADAPTED FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF ENEMAS [72] Inventor: Franklin R. Greene, New York, NY. 731 Assignee: E-Z-Em Company, Inc., Westbury, N.Y.

[22] Filed: Apr. 6, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 25,906

I 52] US. Cl. ..,..128/227, l28/D1G. 24, 222/107, 128/2 F [51] int. Cl. ..A6lm 3/00 [58] Field of Search ..128/227, 224, 228, 275, D16. 24; 222/92, 107, 206, 207, 215; 150/50, 1; 229/55; 215/11 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,263,848 8/1966 Zackheim ..215/11 3,239,096 3/1966 Buono et a1 3,537,456 11/1970 Harautuneian et a1. 1,718,369 6/1929 Lillford.....'. 3,367,380 2/1968 Dickey ..222/215 X 1,647,210 1l/1927 Bryans.. ....l28/227 1,551,820 9/1925 Gold ..150/50 3,319,684 5/1967 Calhoun... ....l28/275 X 3,332,420 7/1967 Voller ..128/227 X Primary Examiner--Richard A. Gaudet Assistant Examiner-J. Yasko Attorney-Ryder, McAula'y & Hetler [57] ABSTRACT There is disclosed a standup container adapted for the administration of enemas, as well as the administration or reception of other fluids and/or compounds. The container consists of a stiffened bottom and flexible, collapsible sidewalls so joined and formed that the container can be made to stand, and such that it assumes a tapered shape, when partially or completely filled. The tapering results in great stability and considerable rigidity of the container when in use, while still preserving the desirable features of flexibility, malleability when filled, and collapsibility when emptied. A simple means for achieving the tapered shape of this container is also disclosed.

6 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures STANDUP CONTAINER ADAPTED FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF ENEMAS This invention relates in general to an improved device, adapted among other applications for the administration of enemas, and more particularly to a flexible, collapsible container which can be hung, held, or made to stand in a stable upright fashion for the administration or reception of fluids.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Previously known techniques for the administration of enemas have involved almost exclusively the use of rigid buckets placed upon elevated platforms. Plastic bags have also been used, but these have had to be hung, and this has been considered an inconvenience. As a result, buckets have continued to enjoy a widespread and substantial popularity.

, Buckets pose several problems, however. They are rigid, and therefore difficult and bulky to store. They are open at the top and usually reused, thus posing problems of sanitation. The open top, furthermore, poses a risk in case the bucket is spilled. Previous art includes plastic bags which are sealed and disposable (for sanitary purposes), collapsible (for easy storage), flexible and malleable (for ease and sanitation in mixing the contents by hand). But such bags, as mentioned, do not enjoy universal popularity because they lack the buckets rigidity and its ability to stand free. Such plastic bags are also difficult, inconvenient, and clumsy to hold by hand, when such is desired, and compression of the contents is likely in such cases. Furthermore, such bags cannot readily be placed on the floor. Neither can they be used conveniently for such purposes as the reception of urine when sampling or collecting is desired.

It is, therefore, a major purpose of this invention to provide a spillproof container which will rest or stand in a safe, stable, rigid and upright fashion on flat surfaces.

It is a further purpose of this invention to provide such a sta- BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS With reference to the drawings, all drawings are of the same embodiment. As may be seen therein, the device of this invention includes a plastic bag, or container 10, the base 12 of V which is made of a flat stiffened material such as stiff plastic or ble and upright container which also combines the properties of flexibility, collapsibility, and disposability for ease of storage and for sanitation.

It is a still further purpose of this invention to provide such a container which can easily be used in any of the most common methods: resting on a flat surface, held by hand, or suspended as from a hook.

It is a further purpose of this invention to accomplish the above objects and purposes with a configuration that permits an improved and simplified method of fabrication.

It is a still further purpose of this invention to accomplish all of the above objects and purposes in a convenient, simple, and inexpensive device.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Briefly, one embodiment of this invention includes a container having flexible, collapsible sides and a stiffened bottom. The stiffened bottom, or base, enables the container to stand in an upright fashion. The container has an outlet tube passing through the collapsible side and adjacent to the base. A clamp is provided to close off the outlet tube. There is also an opening near the top of the container through which the desired fluids and solids may be introduced. The opening is fitted with a cap which, when closed, completely seals the container except for the outlet tube. The top of the container is provided with flaps, or panels, by which the container may beheld by hand. In a center panel of these flaps there is provided a hole which does not communicate with the interior of the container and by means of which the container may be hung. Finally, the sides and top of the container are tapered such that the circumference of the contents decreases as the height increases.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Other objects and purposes of this invention will become apparent from the following detailed description and drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an embodiment of this invention;

cardboard sealed in plastic, thus providing a firm, flat base on which the container may stand. The ability of the container to stand provides an important and desirable alternative means of use. The walls 11 of the container 10 are of a flexible, collapsible, plastic material, thus enabling the container 10 to be folded flat upon the stiffened base 12. The walls 11 are sealed to the base 12, usually by means of a heat seal. A tube 13 is attached to the base of one of the walls 11, usually by means of a heat seal. This tube 13 communicates with the interior of the container 10 and can serve either as an outlet tube, as when fluids are being administered, or as an inlet tube, as when fluids are being collected. 1

A clamp 15 which can be operated by finger pressure is provided on the tube 13, enabling the user of the container 10 to close off the tube 13. This prevents the entry or exit of fluids, material, or contamination. The clamp 15 also provides a simple and easy means of controlling or regulating the dosage which flows through the tube 13. I

A plastic cap 14 is sealed, usually by means of a heat seal, to the upper portion of one of the walls 11 of the container 10. The cap 14 allows for easy introduction of fluid and/or other compounds when open, and seals tightly when closed. When both the cap 14 and clamp 15 are closed, the interior of the container 10 is completely sealed.

The walls 11 of the container 10 are joined together along a heat seal 16. The heat seal 16 is shaped in such a fashion that the line described by this seal 16 tends to curve inward and away from the edges 17 of the plastic material 11 as the distance from the base 12 increases. The line of the heat seal 16, in this preferred embodiment, thus curves in an arclike fashion and thereby tapers the top'and upper portions of the container 10. As can be seen both in the external view of the filled container, FIG. 1, and in the'sectional view of FIG. 2, the effect of shaping the sidewall heat seal 16 in this fashion is that, as a result of this taper, when the container 10 is at least partially filled, the transverse cross-sectional area of the interior of the container 10, defined by the walls 11, decreases as the distance from the base 12 of the container 10 increases. This tapering of the filled container 10 results in an increased rigidity and a considerably increased resistance to sag and collapse. Likewise, the taper and the resulting decreased diame-' ter of the interior of the container 10 at the top make it much less likely that the upper portion of the container 10 will collapse or tip over when the container is only partly filled. Further, the increased rigidity of the filled or partly filled container 10, in combination with the decreased diameter of the surface 18 of the contained liquid 19, means that waves or motion of the surface 18 of the contained liquid 19 will be confined to a narrower region more centrally located over the base 12. These characteristics of increased stability and rigidity, when combined with the stiffened base 12, allow this otherwise flexible container 10 to stand upright in a stable fashion.

The contents 19 can be mixed in a sanitary fashion within the container 10 by means of manual manipulation of the flexible walls 11 as described in US. Pat. No. 3,177,871. Thus the desirable properties of collapsibility and flexibility, for easy storage and preparation, are combined in this invention with the desired properties of stability and rigidity when in use.

A simple means of achieving the tapered shape of this container 10 consists of placing two flat sheets of the flexible sidewall material one on top of the other, and then heat sealing them while still flat along the heat seal line 16 as previously described. No special three-dimensional forming or shaping devices are required. Neither is it necessary to cut or form the sidewall material to any special shape. Once the two side material pieces are joined in this fashion the container will automatically assume a tapered configuration as previously described when filled.

Alternate means for lifting, supporting, or holding the container 10 are provided by upwardly extending panels 20 of the plastic sidewall material, which extend beyond the heat seal 16. These upwardly extending panels 20 are flaps which provide a simpleand convenient means of grasping the container 10 without at the same time compressing the contents 19. In the central portion of these panels 20 an opening 21, or hole, is provided by means of which the container 10 may be hung or suspended. These alternate means for lifting, supporting, or holding the container 10 are especially important where it might otherwise be very awkward and difficult to lift the container 10 without unduly compressing the contents 19.

A nonskid surface is preferably provided on the bottom (exterior) surface of the base 12 in order to enhance further the stability and usefulness of the container 10.

Although this invention has been described in connection with one preferred embodiment, it should be obvious that certain changes can be made in the invention as described without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

I. An improved standup device adapted for the administration of enemas, comprising:

a container having first and second collapsible side walls and a stiff flat base, the up-standing edges of said first sidewall being sealed to only the up-standing edges of said second sidewall to provide first and second seal lines along said sidewalls,

said first and second seal lines extending upwardly from said flat base and extending inwardly toward each other, the horizontal distance between said seal lines decreasing over most of the length of said seal lines as a function of the distance above said flat base,

said sidewalls extending upwardly from said flat base and extending inwardly toward each other and, when said container is substantially .full, the horizontal distance between the upward medial line of each sidewall decreasing over most of the length of said medial lines as a function of the distance above said flat base,

thereby providing a container that tapers inwardly along most of the intersection between any vertical plane and the container walls as the distance from the base increases,

the base edge of each of said sidewalls being sealed to only said stiff flat base, and

an outlet tube sealed to the lower portion of one of said sidewalls of said container and communicating with the interior thereof, i

said container being completely closed except for access to the interior thereof through said outlet tube.

2. The device of claim 1 further characterized by:

an opening in one of said sidewalls, and

an openable cap sealed therein, said cap when closed sealing the container, except for said outlet tube, said cap when open allowing the introduction of the desired fluids and compounds.

3. The device of claim 1 further characterized by:

a continuation of the sidewall material at the top beyond the junction where the material is joined, thus forming outwardly extending flaps which serve as an alternate means of grasping the container.

4. The device of claim 3 further characterized by:

a continuation of the sidewall material at the top beyond the junction where the material is joined, thus forming outwardly extending flaps which serve as an alternate means of grasping the container.

5. The device of claim 1 further characterized by: a clamp located on the outlet tube, openable by finger pressure, and capable of closing said tube when so desired. 6. The device of claim 2 further characterized by: a clamp located on the outlet tube, openable by finger pressure, and capable of closing said tube when so desired.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1551820 *Nov 15, 1922Sep 1, 1925Gold BenjaminCollapsible wall tank
US1647210 *Mar 26, 1926Nov 1, 1927Bryans William AFountain syringe
US1718369 *May 8, 1926Jun 25, 1929John Lillford HarryCollapsible irrigation bag
US3239096 *Nov 25, 1964Mar 8, 1966Becton Dickinson CoCaptive cap assembly
US3263848 *Dec 3, 1963Aug 2, 1966Johnson & JohnsonNursing container with supporting handles
US3319684 *Nov 30, 1964May 16, 1967Pharmaseal LabCollapsible container
US3332420 *Dec 2, 1963Jul 25, 1967Voller Ronald LValved enema bag made from materials having different surface affinities
US3367380 *Mar 5, 1964Feb 6, 1968Dev Consultants IncCollapsible container
US3537456 *Apr 15, 1968Nov 3, 1970American Hospital Supply CorpBottom emptying drainage container for medical liquids
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3786816 *Dec 21, 1972Jan 22, 1974TechnibioticsMethod and apparatus for occluding fluid flow through vessels
US3802434 *Aug 17, 1971Apr 9, 1974Brooks PDisposable syringe
US4010783 *Jul 21, 1975Mar 8, 1977Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Flexible, collapsible container for liquids having reinforced tail portion
US4117847 *Apr 23, 1976Oct 3, 1978Clayton Ralph SColon catheter
US4185754 *Jun 13, 1978Jan 29, 1980Nice-Pak Products, Inc.Collapsible recloseable dispenser packet with two part resealable closure
US4308904 *Mar 3, 1980Jan 5, 1982Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Collapsible solution container having reduced collapse rate at the end of the collapsing process
US4335770 *Oct 8, 1980Jun 22, 1982Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Enteral feeding container
US4570827 *Mar 28, 1984Feb 18, 1986Essex Chemical Corp.Liquid dispenser
US5474193 *Feb 28, 1995Dec 12, 1995Medela, Inc.Breastfeeding assistance device
US5494196 *Feb 13, 1995Feb 27, 1996Healthtek, Inc.System for filling medical nutrition containers
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/262, 222/107, 128/DIG.240
International ClassificationA61M3/02
Cooperative ClassificationY10S128/24, A61M3/0245
European ClassificationA61M3/02D4B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 23, 1984AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: E-Z-EM COMPANY, INC., A CORP OF NEW YORK
Effective date: 19840329
Owner name: E-Z-EM, INC., 7 PORTLAND AVENUE, WESTBURY, NEW YOR
Apr 23, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: E-Z-EM, INC., 7 PORTLAND AVENUE, WESTBURY, NEW YOR
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:E-Z-EM COMPANY, INC., A CORP OF NEW YORK;REEL/FRAME:004266/0754
Effective date: 19840329
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:E-Z-EM COMPANY, INC., A CORP OF NEW YORK;REEL/FRAME:004266/0754
Owner name: E-Z-EM, INC.,NEW YORK