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Publication numberUS3643046 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 15, 1972
Filing dateDec 17, 1969
Priority dateDec 17, 1969
Also published asCA928751A, CA928751A1, DE2062338A1
Publication numberUS 3643046 A, US 3643046A, US-A-3643046, US3643046 A, US3643046A
InventorsKelver William L Jr, Weingart Norman C, Zdanys John Jr
Original AssigneeCts Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multiple contact snap action slide switch
US 3643046 A
Abstract
A snap action slide switch is provided having a contactor assembly engaging a common contact and selectively engaging one of a plurality of discrete contacts. A slider extends outwardly through a slot in a housing containing the contacts and has legs extending over the ends of a spring seated in the contactor assembly thereby biasing the contactor assembly to move with the slider. Projections on the contactor assembly engage notches on the housing to position the contactor assembly in engagement with a selected discrete contact and the common contact and to restrain the contactor assembly from movement with the slider. Movement of the slider relative to the contactor assembly compresses the spring and moves a cam depending from the slider into engagement with a cam surface on the contactor assembly. Relative movement between the cam and cam surface produces pivoting of the contactor assembly and removal of the projections from the notches permitting the force of the compressed spring to snap the contactor assembly into engagement with another of the discrete contacts.
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United States Patent Zdanys, Jr. et al.

[$4] MULTIPLE CONTACT SNAP ACTION SLIDE SWITCH [72] inventors: John Zdanys, Jr., Edwardsburg; William L. Kelver, Jr., Cassopoli s, both of Mich.; Norman C. Weingart, Elkhart, Ind.

[73] Assignee: CTS Corporation, Elkhart, Ind.

[22] Filed: Dec. 17, 1969 [2]] Appl. No.: 885,873

[52] US. Cl ..200/76, 200/68, 206/16 Hults .200/ l 6 Feb. 15, 1972 Primary Examiner David Smith, In

Attorney-John J. Gaydoa one of a plurality'of discrete contacts. A slider extends out- I wardly through a slot in a housing containing the contacts and v has legs extending over the ends of a spring seated in the contactor assembly thereby biasing the contactor assembly to V 1 move with the slider. Projections on the contactor assembly engage notches on the housing to position the contactor assembly in engagement with a selected discrete contact and the common contact and to restrain the contactor assembly from movement with the slider. Movement of the slider relative to the contactor assembly compreses the spring and moves a cam depending from the slider into engagement with a cam surface on the contactor assembly. Relative movement between the cam and cam surface produces pivoting of the contactor assembly and removal of the projections from the notches permitting the force of the compressed spring to snap the contactor assembly into engagement with another of the discrete contacts.

20 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PATENTEDFEB 15 I972 mvENToiis JOHN ZDANYS JR.

WILLIAM L. KELVER JR. NORMAN C. WEING AR T BY WW W411 9YATTORNEYY MULTIPLE CONTACT SNAP ACTION SLIDE SWITCH This invention relates generally to electrical switches and, more particularly, to a multiple contact snap action electrical switch.

In the past there has been a large number of multiple contact switches such as that shown by Hoy et al., U.S. Pat. No. 3,223,794QThese switches in general have been slow make, slow break. Because the movement of the contactor relative to the contacts has not been sufficiently rapid, destruction of either the bridging contactor or stationary contacts occurs due to arcing between the movable contactor and stationary contact surfaces when the contactor and contact surfaces are not in engagement. While the major cause of arcing is due to slow relative movement between the contactor and contact surfaces, arcing also occurs due to the movable contactor bouncing against the stationary contact surfaces as the switch is closed and due to insufficient contact pressure between the bridging contactor and stationary contact surfaces. Insufficient contact pressure also contributes to objectionably high contact resistance, i.e., the electrical resistance between the bridging contactor and stationary contact surfaces. It would be desirable to provide a multiple contact snap action slide switch capable of very rapidly making and breaking an electrical circuit designed so that one or more movable contactors within the switch cannot be held in a neutral or center position by teasing the switch, that is carefully controlling or manipulating the switch actuating member. Such a structure would be desirable to provide an improved economically producible switch wherein contactor bounce, arcing, burning and contact resistance within the switch housing is substantially eliminated or reduced and yet wherein such switch may be readily and inexpensively fabricated.

Accordingly it is an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved electrical switch having the various desirable features set forth above. Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved electrical switch wherein spring means operates to provide fast and crisp movement of a bridging contactor relative to a plurality of stationary contact surfaces. Still another object of the present invention is to provide a snap action switch that is tease proof, i.e., the switch cannot be held in a neutral or center position by carefully controlling or manipulating the switch actuating member. A further object of the present invention is to provide an electrical switch capable of performing a large number of cycles without destruction of the bridging contactor or stationary contacts due to arcing between such contactor and stationary contact surfaces. A still further object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved electrical switch wherein a slider stores energy in a spring upon initial movement and upon further movement releases the energy permitting the spring to rapidly snap a contactor assembly into engagement with contact surfaces. Further objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent as the following description proceeds and the features of novelty characterizing the invention will be pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed to and forming a part of this specification.

Briefly, the present invention is concerned with a multiple contact snap action slide switch employing a bridging contactor that selectively engages a common contact and one of a plurality of discrete contacts. In a preferred embodiment a contactor assembly is movable within a housing containing a plurality of discrete contacts and a common contact mounted on a dielectric base. A slider having a handle extending outwardly through a slot in the housing is resiliently connected to the contactor assembly by means of a spring seated in the contactor assembly. Legs of the slider extend over both ends of the spring to bias the contactor assembly to move with said slider. A plurality of notches in the housing cooperate with a projection on the contactor assembly to restrain the contactor from moving with initial movement of the slider. Movement of the slider relative to the contactor assembly compresses the spring and moves a cam depending from the slider into engagement with a cam surface on the contactor assembly. As

the cam moves on the cam surface, the contactor assembly pivots on the bridging contactor until the projection is removed from the notch, at which time the compressed spring snaps the contactor assembly into engagement with another of the discrete contacts.

For a better understanding of the present invention reference may be had to the accompanying drawings wherein the same reference numerals have been applied to like parts and wherein:

FIG. 1 is an isometric view of an electrical switch control embodying the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an exploded view of the control shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along line Ill-III of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along line IV-IV of FIG- 3, assuming FIG. 3 to be shown in full; and

FIGS. 5 and 6 are fragmentary sectional views taken along line V-V of FIG. '4, assuming FIG. 4 to be shown in full, with parts broken away to illustrate the relative positions'of the switch parts during operation.

Referring now to the drawings an electrical switch is generally indicated at 10 having a housing 11 comprising a plurality of walls including a dielectricbase 12 and a metal cover 13. Tabs 14 extend from the walls-of thev cover l3 and are folded over the dielectric base 12 to secure the base 12 to the cover 13. The cover 13 is provided with restraining means comprising a plurality of pairs of notches 15, 15a, 15b, whose function will be described later.

The switch 10 is provided with an operating member of slider 16 having control operating means in the form of a handle 17. The cover 13 is provided with an opening in the form of an elongated slot 18 through which the handle 17 extends. The slider 16 is preferably made of a one piece suitable dielectric material, however, the handle 17 could be made separately and secured to the main body of the slider 16. A pair of legs 19 depend from the slider 16 into engagement with the dielectric base 12. A shoulder 21 extending around the handle 17 slidably engages the cover 13 adjacent the slot 18. The legs 19 and shoulder 21 serve to prevent the slider 16 from rocking when the handle 17 is moved longitudinally in the slot 18. A cam 22 depends downwardly from the slider 16 on each side of a plane passing through the legs 19. Each cam 22 comprises downwardly converging cam surfaces 23. An apertured detent spring 24 is disposed on the slider around the shoulder 21. The

spring having a pair of detents 25 which project into one of the pair of notches 14, 15a, 15b, 150 of cover 13 restrains inadvertent movement of the slider 16 relative to the cover 13. This eliminates sloppy movement of the slider 16 in the housing I];

A contact track or common contact 27 and a plurality of discrete contacts 28 are positioned on the dielectric base 12. Each discrete contact 28 is electricallysecured to a terminal 26 extending outwardly of the housing 11 for connection toan electrical circuit. As shown in FIG. 4 the discrete contact '28 extends through the dielectric base 12, passes through a hole in the terminal 26 and is deformed over the terminal 26 to secure the discrete contact 28 to the tenninal 26. The common contact 27 formed with one end comprising an integral terminal 29 passing through an opening in the base 12, extends outwardly of the housing 11 for connection to an electrical circuit. In FIG. 5 the other end of the common contact 27 is shown passing through an opening in the base 12 and folded over the base 12 to secure the common contact 27 to the base 12. Since the common contact 27 simply provides means for establishing a closed circuit with the discrete contacts28 and the tenninals 26 and 29 many different constructions could be utilized depending upon the switch application. Where it is desired to operate more than one circuit it would be necessary to have more than one common contact 27 and one terminal 29. Such a construction could be-provided bysplitting the common contact 27 and extending a tenninal 29 from both portions or by replacing the common contact 27 with a plurality of individual contacts similar to discrete contactsi=28, each having a terminal extending outwardly of the housing] I.

As best shown in FIG. 2, a contactor assembly 30, comprising a driver 31, preferably made of a suitable dielectric material, and a conductive bridging contactor 32, is positioned within the housing engaging the common contact 27 and selectively engaging one of the discrete contacts 28 to establish a closed circuit therebetween. The bridging contactor 32 is provided with an opening 33 adapted to receive an extension 34 (see FIG. 4) depending from the driver 31. By making the bridging contactor 32 of a suitable resilient material, the arms 32a of the contactor bias the opening 33 into engagement with the extension 34. Ordinarily the resilient force of the bridging contactor 32 is sufficient to maintain engagement of extension 34 in opening 33 and constrain the bridging contactor 32 to move with the driver 31, however, the contactor 32 may be additionally secured in any suitable manner, e.g., the end portion of extension 34 could be deformed over the portion of the contactor 32 surrounding opening 33. The driver 31 is provided with a groove 36 which seats a resilient means in the form of a spring 37. On each side of the groove 36 a channel 38 isprovided with outwardly diverging tapered end surfaces 39 providing cam surfaces for cooperating with cams 22 on the slider 16. When the switch 10 is assembled the earns 22 are positioned to ride in the channels 38. Projections 41 extend upwardly from the driver 31 for engagement in one of the pair of notches 15, 15a, 15b, 15c of cover 13. The resilient force of the bridging contactor 32 biases the projections 41 into one of the pair of notches 15, 15a, 15b, 15c. Switch 10 is assembled with the legs 19 of the slider 16 positioned over the ends of the spring 37. The interaction of the spring 37 with the legs 19 resiliently biases the driver 31 to move with the slider 16. Since the driver 31 is restrained from movement due to engagement of projections 41 in one of the pair of notches 15, 15a, 15b, 15c, before movement of the driver 31 can occur the projections 41 must be disengaged from one of the pair of notches 15, 15a, 15b, 150. As will be later described movement of cams 22 against cam surfaces 39 provides releasing means to disengage projections 41 from notches 15, 15a, 15 b, 150. Since the contactor assembly 30 is restrained from moving with the slider 16 while projections 41 are positioned in one of the pair of notches 15, 15a, 15b, 15c,

the spring 37 permits relative movement between the contac-' tor assembly 30 and the slider 16. During such relative movement the spring 37 will be compressed by one ofthe legs 19.

, The operation of the switch is best explained by reference to FIGS. and 6. FIG. 5 shows the position of the various elements of the switch after initial movement of the slider 16 in the direction of the arrow. Since the driver 31 is restrained from moving with the slider 16 due to engagement of projections 41 in notches 150, such movement produces relative movement between the driver 31 and the slider 16. As is apparent the detent spring 24, constrained to move with the slider 16, has moved so as to disengage the detents 25 from notches a. One of the legs 19 of the slider 16 has compressed the spring 37 thereby biasing the contactor assembly 30 to move with the slider 16. As shown in FIG. 5 one of the earns 22 depending from the slider 16 abuts the cam surface 39 of the channel 38. As shown in FIG. 6 further movement of the slider 16 from its position in FIG. 5 relative to the contactor assembly 30 will force the cam 22 to move upwardly relative to the cam surface 39. Since the slider 16 is constrained from rocking due to engagement of the legs 19 against the base 12, and engagement of the shoulder 21 against the housing 11, the contactor assembly 30 pivots counterclockwise. Such further movement of the slider 16 from its position in FIGS relative to the contactor assembly 30 overcomes the resilient pressure of the bridging contactor 32 causing the contactor assembly 30 to pivot counterclockwise about an axis passing through the points of engagement of the arms 32a of bridging contactor 32 with the contacts 27 and 28. This pivoting begins movement of the projections 41 out of engagement from the notches 15a. FIG. 6 shows the switch 10 just prior to movement of the contactor assembly 30 into engagement with an adjacent discrete contact 28. Additional movement of the slider 16 from its position in FIG. 6 will start movement of the detents 25 into engagement in the notches 15b adjacent to the notches Such additional movement of the slider 16 permits the contactor assembly 30 to pivot sufficiently to remove the projections 41 from notches 15a at which time the force built up in the compressed spring 37 will snap the contactor assembly 30 into engagement with the next adjacent discrete contact 28 and maintain contact with the common contact 27. It is readily apparent that the bridging contact 32 will remain in contact with discrete contact 28 until the projections 41 are removed from the notches 15a whereupon the bridging contactor 32 moves rapidly into engagement with the next adjacent discrete contact 28. This rapid motion substantially eliminates arcing and corresponding destruction of either the bridging contactor 32 or stationary contacts, discrete contacts 28 and common contact 27, occurring in the slow-make, slowbreak switches shown in the prior art. As the bridging contactor 32 comes into engagement with the next adjacent discrete contact 28, the projection 41 engages the adjacent notch 15b in the housing 11 thereby preventing the contactor assembly 30 from bouncing back due to the resilient force of the bridging contactor 32 ordinarily tending to force the bridging contactor 32 away from the discrete contact 28. Each pair of notches 15, 15a, 15b, 15c, corresponds to one of the discrete contacts 28 so as to ensure positioning the bridging contactor 32 in engagement with one of the discrete contacts 28 when the projections 41 are engaged in the corresponding pair of notches 15, 15a, 15b, 15c

Since the detents 25 on the detent spring 24 are moving into the adjacent notches 15b as the projections 41 on the contactorassembly move out of the notches 150, the switch 10 is tease proof since the slider 16 cannot be held so as to hold the bridging contactor 32 in a neutral or center position. Also in accord with the present invention, as the slider moves from one switch position to another switch position and pivots the contactor assembly to remove the projections 41 from the notches 15a, the contactor assembly is forced downwardly. Such downward movement of the contactor assembly increases the contact pressure of the arms 32a of the bridging contactor against the pair of discrete contactsand moves the contact areas between the arms 32a of the bridging contactor and the pair of discrete contacts outwardly before the bridging contactor starts to' move and break the circuit. This shift or wiping of the contact areas before breaking assures long life of the switch because any small degree of arcing and burning of the contacts and arms 32a does not affect or cause an increase in contact resistance between the arms 32a and the contacts after many operations ofthe switch.

The operation of the switch 10 has been described for a movement of the slider 16 in a direction from right to left in FIGS. 5 and 6, however, it is to be understood that the same principles of operation apply when the slider 16 is moved from left to right in FIGS. 5 and 6. It is to be noted that while four discrete contacts 28 are shown the specific number of positions does not affect the motion from one position to an adjacent position. Thus it is seen that the invention provides a slide switch 10 with snap action motion of a contactor 32 between multiple positions in selective engagement with a common contact 27 and one of a plurality of discrete contacts 28.

While there has been illustrated and described what is at present consideration the preferred embodiment of the invention, it will be appreciated that numerous changes and modifications are likely to occur to those skilled in the art and it is intended in the appended claims to cover all of those changes and modifications which fall within the true spirit and scope of the present invention.

We claim:

1. A multiple contact slide switch comprising a housing having a plurality of walls, said housing having an opening extending through one of said walls, a plurality of discrete contacts mounted within said housing, a contactor assembly movable within said housing for selectively engaging two of said discrete contacts to establish a closed circuit therebetween, a slider having a handle extending outwardly through said opening, resilient means biasing said contactor assembly to move with said slider, said resilient means permitting relative movement between the contactor assembly and the slider, restraining means releasably maintaining said contactor assembly positioned in engagement with said two of said discrete contacts, and releasing means whereby a predetermined movement of said slider relative to said contactor assembly actuates said releasing means and releases said contactor assembly from said restraining means thereby permitting said resilient means to move said contactor assembly to a position in engagement with another two of said discrete contacts at least one of which is different from said first two, said releasing means comprising a pair of first cam surfaces and a pair of second cam surfaces, one of said slider and said contactor assembly having a channel formed therein having diverging tapered end surfaces defining said second cam surfaces, ,said first cam surfaces being positioned in said channel, said predetermined movement of said slider relative to said contactor assembly causing one of said first cam surfaces to engage one of said second cam surfaces and move relative thereto.

2. The switch of claim 1 wherein said restraining means comprises a plurality of notches in said housing, a projection on said contactor assembly selectively engages one of said notches. I

3. The switch of claim 2 wherein a detent spring is positioned on said slider to engage the notches in said housing and prevent inadvertent movement of said slider.

4. The switch of claim 2 wherein said contactor assembly comprises a driver having a groove, and a conductive contactor positioned on said driver, said resilient means being a spring seated in said groove, a pair of legs on said slider extend over the ends of said groove for compressing said spring upon relative movement between said driver and said slider when said projection is positioned in one of the notches.

S. The switch of claim 1 wherein said contactor assembly comprises a driver and a conductive contactor, said predetermined movement pivoting said driver on the conductive contactor.

6. A multiple contact slide switch comprising a housing, a plurality of discrete contacts mounted within said housing, a contactor assembly movable within said housing engaging said contact track and selectively engaging two of said discrete contacts to establish a closed circuit therebetween, a slider mounted for movement relative to said contactor assembly, control operating means for moving said slider relative to said contactor assembly, resilient means for biasing said contactor assembly to move with said slider, said resilient means permitting relative movement between the contactor assembly and the slider, restraining means for releasably maintaining said contactor assembly positioned in engagement with two of said discrete contacts, and releasing means for releasing said contactor assembly from said restraining means upon a predetermined movement of said slider relative to said contactor assembly, said releasing means comprising a cam having a pair of first cam surfaces on one of said slider and said contactor assembly and a pair of second cam surfaces on the other of said slider and said contactor assembly whereby said predeter mined movement causes one of said first cam surfaces to engage one of said second cam surfaces and move relative thereto, said cam having downwardly converging tapered surfaces defining said first cam surfaces, and the other of said slider and said contactor assembly having a channel formed therein having upwardly diverging tapered end surfaces defining said second cam surfaces, said cam being positioned in said channel.

7. The switch of claim 6 wherein said restraining means comprises a plurality of notches in said housing, a projection on said contactor assembly selectively engages one of said notches.

8. The switch of claim 7 wherein said contactor assembly comprises a driver having a groove, and a conductive contactor positioned on said driver, said resilient means being a spring seated in said groove, a pair of legs on said slider extend over the ends of said groove for compressing said spring upon relative movement between said driver and said slider when said projection is positioned in one of the notches.-

9. A multiple contact slide switch comprising a housing having a plurality of walls, said housing having a slot extending through one of said walls, a slider having a handle extending outwardly through said slot, a plurality of discrete contacts positioned within said housing, a contactor assembly movable within said housing for selectively engaging two of said discrete contacts to establish a closed circuit therebetween, a

spring biasing said contactor assembly to move with said slider, said spring permitting relative movement between the contactor assembly and the slider, restraining means releasably maintaining said contactor assembly positioned in engagement with said two of said discrete contacts, a pair of first cam surfaces on said contactor assembly, a pair of second cam surfaces on said slider whereby a predetermined movement of said slider relative to said contactor assembly causes one of said first cam surfaces and one of said second cam surfaces to matingly engage and release said contactor assembly from said restraining means thereby permitting said spring to move said contactor assembly into engagement with another of said discrete contacts, said contactor assembly having a channel formed therein having upwardly diverging tapered end surfaces defining said first cam surfaces and said slider having a depending cam having downwardly converging tapered surfaces defining said second cam surfaces, said cam being positioned in said channel.

10. A snap action multiple contact slide switch comprising a housing having a plurality of walls, said housing having a slot extending through one of said walls, a plurality of discrete contacts mounted within said housing, a terminal electrically connected to each of said discrete contacts, said terminals extending outwardly from said housing for connection to an electrical circuit, a contactor assembly movable within said housing for selectively engaging two of said discrete contacts to establish a closed circuit therebetween, a plurality of notches in said housing, a projection on said contactor assembly engaging one of said notches to maintain said-contactor assembly in engagement with the two discrete contacts, a slider having a handle extending outwardly of said housing through said slot, a spring biasing said contactor assembly to move with said slider, said spring permitting relative movement between said slider and said contactor assembly, engagement of said projection in said notchreleasably restraining said contactor assembly against movement with said slider, a first cam surface on said contactor assembly, a second cam surface on said slider whereby a predetermined movement of said slider relative to said contactor assembly causes said cam surfaces to matingly engage and move relative to each other to release said projection from said notch thereby permitting said spring to move said contactor assembly into engagement with another of said discrete contacts and move said projection into engagementwith another of said notches, said contactor assembly having a groove and said spring being seated in said groove, a pair of legs on said slider extending over the ends of said groove for compressing said spring upon relative movement between said driver and said slider when said projection is'positioned in one of said notches, said legs extending to the wall opposite the wall having said slot to restrain said driver from rocking.

11. The switch of claim 10 wherein said contactor assembly comprises a driver and a conductive contactor, movement of said cam surfaces relative to one anotherpivoting said driver on the conductive contactor and releasing said projection from said notch.

' 12. In a multiple contact slide switch the combination'comprising a housing, a plurality of discrete contacts mounted within said housing, a contactor assembly movable within said housing selectively engaging two of said discrete :contacts to establish a closed circuit therebetween, a slider mounted for movement relative to said contactor assembly, control operating means for moving said slider, resilient means for permitting relative movement between the contactor assembly and the slider, restraining means for releasably maintaining said contactor assembly positioned in engagement with one of said discrete contacts, and releasing means whereby a predetermined movement of said slider relative to said contactor assembly actuates said releasing means and releases said contactor assembly from said restraining means, said releasing means comprising a pair of first cam surfaces and a pair of second cam surfaces, one of said slider and said contactor as sembly having a depending cam having converging tapered surfaces defining said pair of first cam surfaces, the other of said slider and said contactor assembly having a channel formed therein having end surfaces defining said second cam surfaces, said cam being positioned between said pair of second cam surfaces.

13. The switch of claim I wherein the other of said slider and said contactor assembly has a'depending cam having converging tapered surfaces defining said pair of first cam surfaces.

14. The switch of claim 4 wherein said legs extend to the wall opposite said one of said walls to restrain said driver from rocking.

15. The switch of claim 14 wherein a detent spring is posislider extend over the ends of said spring for compressing said.

spring upon relative movement between said driver and said slider, said legs extending to the wall opposite said one of said walls to restrain said driver from rocking.

18. The switch of claim 21 wherein said contactor assembly comprises a driver having a groove, and a conductive contactor positioned on said driver, said resilient means being a spring seated in said groove, a pair of legs on said slider extend over the ends of said groove for compressing said spring upon relative movement between said driver and said slider when said projection is positioned in one of the notches.

19. The switch of claim 18 wherein said restraining'means comprises a plurality of notches in said housing, a projection on said contactor assembly selectively engages one of said notches.

20. The switch of claim 18 wherein said legs extend to a wall of the housing to restrain said driver from rocking.

I i i i i

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4000383 *Jun 20, 1975Dec 28, 1976Amp IncorporatedRocker switch having slidable contact carriage biased by positive detent structure
US4022994 *May 28, 1975May 10, 1977Indak Manufacturing CorporationSlide action electrical switches having contact detenting structure
US4075441 *Feb 12, 1976Feb 21, 1978U.S. Philips CorporationSlide switch having resilient movable contact arm twisted to provide efficient electrical connection
US4210791 *Dec 26, 1978Jul 1, 1980Carlingswitch, Inc.Slide switch
US4311885 *Aug 27, 1980Jan 19, 1982Amf IncorporatedSnap action slide switch
US4324957 *Aug 18, 1980Apr 13, 1982Stackpole Components CompanySlide switch
US4352966 *Feb 29, 1980Oct 5, 1982Cts CorporationSlide switch
US4529851 *Jun 30, 1983Jul 16, 1985Cts CorporationMachine insertable miniature dip switch
US4620077 *Feb 19, 1985Oct 28, 1986Cts CorporationIntegral switch connector with remote actuator
US6597796 *Nov 9, 2001Jul 22, 2003Chao-Chih ChangMicrophone with a variable resistance switch
US7203330 *Jul 28, 2004Apr 10, 2007Taiwan Carol Electronics Co. Ltd.Switching unit for a microphone
US7456368 *Feb 21, 2007Nov 25, 2008Omron CorporationSafety switch
US8160489 *Feb 8, 2007Apr 17, 2012Jack StrauserKaraoke device with integrated mixing, echo and volume control
US8897693Mar 13, 2012Nov 25, 2014Dok Solution LlcKaraoke device with integrated mixing, echo and volume control
US20050058308 *Jul 28, 2004Mar 17, 2005Chao-Chih ChangSwitching unit for a microphone
US20070205089 *Feb 21, 2007Sep 6, 2007Omron CorporationSafety switch
US20080070213 *Sep 1, 2006Mar 20, 2008Jack StrauserKaraoke device with integrated mixing, echo and volume control
US20080070214 *Feb 8, 2007Mar 20, 2008J. S. Karaoke, LlcKaraoke device with integrated mixing, echo and volume control
WO2008027725A2 *Aug 15, 2007Mar 6, 2008J.S.KaraokeKaraoke device with integrated mixing, echo and volume control
Classifications
U.S. Classification200/430, 200/16.00D
International ClassificationH01H15/18, H01H15/16, H01H15/00, H01H15/02
Cooperative ClassificationH01H15/18, H01H15/02
European ClassificationH01H15/02, H01H15/18