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Publication numberUS3643079 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 15, 1972
Filing dateJan 29, 1970
Priority dateJan 29, 1970
Publication numberUS 3643079 A, US 3643079A, US-A-3643079, US3643079 A, US3643079A
InventorsRichard B Glickman
Original AssigneeBerkey Colortran Mfg Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
High-efficiency adjustable luminaire
US 3643079 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [[5] 3,643,079 Glickman 1 Feb. 15, 1972 [54] HIGH-EFFICIENCY ADJUSTABLE LUMINAIRE O'IH ER PU BLICA'I'lONS Reflector Lamps: their applicationpuhlished by Westinghouse Stage Lightingby T. Fuchs- 1929, p. I90

Primary Examiner-Richard C. Queisser Assistant Examiner-Marvin Smollar Attorney--Flam and Flam [57] ABSTRACT A luminaire mounts an array of standard sealed beam lamps each of which has a filament orientation and reflector configuration that produces a generally oval field of illumination. A plurality of elongate housings are provided, each housing mounting a set of lamps. The housings are mounted in side-byside relationship and so that the housings can be rotated to achieve a desired degree of overlap or a desired degree of spacial relationship of the illumination fields produced by the sets of lamps. The luminaire can be turned 90'' so that the spreading or overlap can take place either in a horizontal direction or a vertical direction as desired. Filament orientation can be detennined independently.

V 14 Claims, 14 Drawing PATENTEUFEB 15 1972 3', s43 O79 SHEET 1 BF 5 IN l/ENTOZ.

3/6/0020 B. G1. mum/v I 107 roeA/Es-U'.

HIGH-EFFICIENCY ADJUSTABLE LUMINAIRE BACKGROUND OF TFIE INVENTION This invention relates to lighting equipment particularly suitable for the stage or stadium, or for motion picture or television photography. The primary object of the invention is to provide a lighting system that matches the performance of arc flood lights commonly called brutes", but which uses inexpensive mass produced lamp components compactly arranged.

Sealed beam lamps of the type used in automobiles have reached a high state of development in terms of long life and lumens per watt. Unlike lamps typically used for stage lighting and for motion picture and television photography, these sealed beam lamps produce a field of illumination that is noncircular due to elongate transverse orientation of the filament. This is quite efficient for illuminating a highway, since illumination spread vertically to the same extent that it is spread horizontally would be wasteful. However, the characteristic oval illumination field fairly matches a screen proportion of an aspect ratio of about 1.5. Moreover, by stacking oval fields one above the other, desired composite lighting fields can be produced.

Accordingly, one of the objects of the present invention is to provide a versatile luminaire particularly adapted for use with sealed beam lamps. Another object of this invention is to provide a new luminaire in which by simple means, the lighting patterns produced by a number of lamps can be overlapped or expanded either in a horizontal or vertical direction. Still another object of this invention is to provide simple means for securing the lamps in selected angular positions whereby the orientation of the noncircular lighting pattern may be correspondingly determined.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In order to accomplish the foregoing objects, I provide a thin frame open both at the front and the back and supported for tilting movement about a horizontal axis by a yoke of a standard. Within the frame, a number of elongate lamp housings are mounted for movement about parallel axes. By turning the entire framein its yoke, the orientation of the adjustment axes of the lamp housings can be changed from horizontal to vertical.

The individual lamps are supported in the housings at frontally opening circular apertures therein. The lamp characteristically has a frontal peripheral flange that rests in an arcuate seat on the inside of the frame opening. The lamp characteristically has three locating lugs located in 120 relationship. Two alternately operable clamps cooperate with these lugs to determine the angular orientation of the lamps in their openings, and hence, the orientation of the lamp filament. One of the lugs is in alignment with the filament. The clampsare spaced 30 apart preferably on the side of the housing opening opposite the arcuate seat. By judicious location, one or the other of the clamps will engage one of the lugs when the lamp is turned.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS A detailed description of the invention will be made with reference to the accompanying drawings. These drawings, unless described as diagrammatic or unless otherwise indicated, are to scale.

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of a luminaire incorporating the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a top plan view thereof.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view showing the mounting for the barn doors.

FIG .4 is a front elevational view similar to FIG. 1 but showing the luminaire frame rotated 90.

FIG. 5 is a rear elevational view of the luminaire shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged sectional view taken along a plane corresponding to line 6--6 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along a plane corresponding to line 7-7 of FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a transverse sectional view taken along a plane corresponding to line 8-8 of FIG. 7.

FIGS. 9 and 10 are front elevational views of a modified form of the present invention, the luminaire frame being rotated in FIG. 10.

FIG. 11 is a front elevational view of a still further modified form of the present invention.

FIGS. 12 and 13 are front elevational views of a still further modified form of the present invention, the luminaire being rotated 90 in FIG. 13.

FIG. 14 is a pictorial view of the clamp element used to secure the lamp to its housing.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION The following detailed description is of the best presently contemplated modes of carrying out the invention. This description is not to be taken in a limiting sense, but is made merely for the purpose of illustrating the general principles of the invention since the scope of the invention is best defined by the appended claims. Structural and operational characteristics attributed to forms of the invention first described shall also be attributed to forms later described, unless such characteristics are obviously inapplicable or unless specific exception is made.

The luminaire shown in FIGS. 1 to 8 includes nine individual lamps l0 arrayed in three sets of three. The lamps 10 are sealed beam lamps of conventional design. Three side-byside'elongate lamp housings 12 respectivelymounts sets of three lamps. The housings 12 are identical. One is shown in detail in FIGS. 6, 7 and 8. v

The front wall of the lamp housing 12 (FIG. 6 has three circular apertures 16, 18 and 20 sized to receive the bulbous frontal projecting portion of the sealed beam lamps 10. The characteristic flange 22 of each lamp abuts the inside edges about its aperture. The flange 22 seats in an arcuate flange 24 (see also FIG. 7) welded or otherwise secured along a section of the corresponding aperture. The arcuate flange or seat 24 extends substantially less than 180 to allow easy placement and removal of the flange 22.

In order to secure the lamp in its seated position. a pair of clamp structures 26 and 28 are provided for each lamp. As shown in FIG. 7, one of the clamps 2815 located opposite the center of the arcuate seat 24 say, at the 12:00 o'clock position, and the other clamp 26 is located in 30 spaced relationship to the clamp 28, in this instance, at the 1 1:00 oclock position.

In the position shown, the filament of the lampextends in a direction transverse to the housing 12. This is revealed by the orientation of an elongate electrical socket 30 that cooperates with the two terminal posts (not shown) at the back of the lamp. The illumination field produced by the lamp I0 is oval with the major axis of the pattern aligned with the lamp filament.

The back of the lamp 10 has three lugs 32, 34 and 36 near the flange 22 and spaced in relationship. One of the lugs 34 is aligned-with the socket 30 at the 3:00 oclock position. The two other lugs 32 and 36 thus are at the 7:00 oclock and ll:00 oclock positions. Accordingly, the clamp 26 is positioned to engage the lug 36 whereas the other clamp 28 is idle. When the clamp 26 is released, the lamp may be rotated 90 in a counterclockwise direction in order correspondingly to orient the lamp filament and the illuminationpattern. In this instance, the lug 34 will be positioned at the l2z00 o'clock position in registry with the clamp 28, and the clamp 26 will be idle.

The clamps 26 and 28 are identical. One is shown in detail in FIG. 14. The clamp has an operative latch element 38 pivotally mounted by a bracket 40. The bracket 40 is attached to the housing 12 (FIG. 6) so that the latching or distal end of the element can swing over the lamp lug. A pin 42 pivotally mounts the'latch element 38 between upstanding cars 44 and 46 of the bracket 40. The latching end of the element 38 has two projections 47 defining a recess 48 therebetween. The lug is received in the recess when the element 38 is moved into position, the projections 47 preventing angular movement of the lamp 10 by cooperation with the flat sides of the lug. The element 38 also forms an abutment surface 49 positioned to prevent the lamp flange 22 from moving away from the housing opening.

The latch element 38 is releasably held in its latching position by a spring-pressed plunger head or detent 50 carried on the side of the latch element 38. The detent 50 is received in an aperture 52 formed in an extension of the corresponding lug 44, thus to lock the latch element 38 in place. In order to retract the head or detent 50, a handle 54 is provided. The handle 54 is simply the offset end of a rod attached to the head, the rod extending through a transverse bore in the element 38. The lug 44 is beveled as at 55 in order to provide automatic retraction of the plunger head or detent 50 as the latch element 38 is moved into operative position.

The housing 12 for the set of three lamps has top and bottom end walls 60 and 62 (FIG. 6). In the present instance, the housings are closed at the back. The rear wall is formed in part by a hinged cover 64 (FIG. 8) releasably held in position by hasps 66 or other suitable fasteners whereby access to the lamps is provided.

The three lamp housings 12 are supported in side-by-side relationship by a square frame 68 (FIGS. 1 and The frame elements themselves are hollow. The two outer housings can be angularly moved about their longitudinal axes while the center housing is fixed. FIG. 6 shows how the outer housings are mounted. At one end of the housing a flanged nipple 70 is provided that extends through aligned apertures in the hollow frame 68 and the housing end wall 60, a bearing washer 72 being interposed between the end of the housing and the frame. A nut 73 which is not tightened down, is staked in place to complete the assembly. The hollow nipple 70 conveniently provides a passageway for the lamp leads. (See also FIG. 5). The lower end wall of the housing 12 (FIG. 6) carries a nut plate 74 that registers with aligned openings in the lower housing wall 62 and the frame 68. A clamp 75 has a shank 76 provided with a reduced threaded end that passes through the apertures and engages the nut plate 74. When the clamp is rotated in one direction as by its enlarged handle portion 77, the shoulder at the base of the threaded end jams a bearing 78 against the frame and tightens both the frame and the lamp housing to a separating washer 79. Angular movement of the housing is thus restrained. When the clamp is rotated in the opposite direction, the housing is free to move within limits.

The center lamp housing is mounted by nipples and nuts at both ends, the nuts being tightened down.

By angular adjustment of the side housings 12, all of the lamps can be moved to a substantially coplanar relationship within the front opening of the frame 68 as shown in FIG. 2. From this coplanar relationship, the lamp housings can be tilted inwardly or outwardly to a limited degree so as to converge at the main luminaire axis x or to diverge therefrom. The axes movement of the housings lie close to the openings in which the lamps are mounted in order to permit maximum angular movement without interference and without undue spacing between the housings.

In use, the luminaire axis x is first directed at the subject. A conventional standard 82 (FIG. 1) supports the frame so that it can be tilted about a horizontal axis passing through the center of the frame, and so that the frame can be moved about a-vertical axis passing through the center of the frame. However, once the main axis of the luminaire is properly directed, it may be desirable to expand or contract the illumination field either in a vertical or fore and aft direction, or it may be desirable to expand and contract the field in a horizontal or lateral direction. For this purpose, the hollow frame 68 itself is selectively mounted so that the axes of angular adjustment of the lamp housings 12 are either parallel to the horizontal axis of adjustment of the frame (FIG. 4), or perpendicular thereto (FIG. 1). In order to make this possible, nut members 83 are provided at the center of each of the sides of the frame 68.

The nut members 83, which may be welded in place, are

generally of U-shaped configuration to fit over the sides of the frames. Thus the frame can be slipped between the arms of the standard 82 with one of the two pairs of nut members in registry with clamp bearings 84 carried by the arms of the standard.

Accordingly, the selective mounting of the frame is achieved.

A pair of barn doors 86 are provided in order to control the lateral spread of the illumination field. Each barn door carries an elongate bracket 87 (FIG. I) having offset ends 88 (FIG. 3) that cooperate with angle brackets 89. The brackets 89 define an axis for angular adjustment of the barn doors. The brackets 89 can be moved to the opposite sidewalls (FIG. 4) by using alternate threaded holes 90 (FIG. I). The barn doors have slots by the aid of which a diffusion frame (not shown) may be mounted.

On the back of each of the lamp housings (FIG. 5) are four switches. One switch 92 controls the main line to the set of lamps. Three switches 94 control the individual lamp circuits.

The Iuminaire is quite versatile. When the frame is mounted for tilting movement about a horizontal axis transverse to the axes of angular adjustment of the several lamp housings 12, the illumination can be cast upon three laterally spaced subjects. Optionally, the illumination patterns can be caused to overlap to a desired degree. When the frame is mounted in the alternate position of FIG. 4, the individual lamp housings can illuminate foreground, center and background subjects. Or the illumination patterns produced can be caused to overlap to a desired degree. Any desired number of lamps can be energized. In any case, the orientation of the major axis of the lamps can be determined.

In the form shown in FIGS. 9 and 10, two lamp housings are provided that each mount two lamps. The square frame can be oriented in the manner shown in FIG. 9 or in the manner shown in FIG. 10. In FIG. 11 one of the individual lamp housings is itself mounted in a standard.

In the form shown in FIGS. 12 and 13, the frame is rectangular, three two-element lamp housings being mounted in side-by-side relationship. Extensible yoke bracket struc' tures are, in this instance, necessary in order to achieve the alternative mounting.

Iclaim:

1. In a luminaire for stage lighting or the like:

a. a frame having a frontal opening;

b. a plurality of lamp housings individually mounted in the frame opening for relative angular movement about substantially parallel axes transverse to the opening;

. a plurality of individual lamps for each of the lamp housings, said lamps producing elongated illumination fields;

. means mounting the lamps on their housings for angular adjustment about an axis substantially parallel to the beam produced by the lamp in order correspondingly to orient the illumination field produced by the lamp;

e. a support for the frame; and

f. means mounting the frame on the support in one,of a

number of angularly selected positions for correspondingly orienting the axes of angular movement of said lamp housings.

2. The luminaire as set forth in claim I in which said frame is substantially square, said frame mounting means having arms spaced to receive the frame between them, each side of said frame having coupling elements, a selected opposite pair of said coupling elements being cooperable with said arms of said mounting means.

3. The luminaire as set forth in claim 2 in which said frame is angularly adjustable about an axis transverse to said frame defined by opposite coupling elements.

4. The Iuminaire as set forth in claim 1 in which each of said housings has a front wall provided with a plurality of substantially circular openings extending in a single row substantially parallel to the axes of relative angular movement of said houstngs.

5. The luminaire as set forth in claim 4 in which the number of openings in each housing equals the number of housings, the openings being located to provide a substantially square array of lamps. 1

6. The luminaire as set forth in claim 1 in which:

a. each of said housings has a front wall provided with a plurality of substantially circular openings;

b. said lamps having peripheral flanges fitted against the edges of said opening and a plurality of lugs located rearwardly of the flange, the angular spacing of the lugs being other than 90;

. said lamp mounting means including for each lamp,

i. means forming a seat for receiving the flange at one side of the lamp, and

ii. two clamp structures located in angularly spaced relationship to said seat forming means, each of said clamp structures cooperating with one of said lugs to hold said lamp in one angular position about its axis while the other is idle.

7. The luminaire as set forth in claim 6 in which said frame is substantially square, said frame mounting means having arms spaced to receive the frame between them, each side of said frame having coupling elements, a selected opposite pair of said coupling elements being cooperable with said arms of said mounting means.

8. The luminaire as set forth in claim 7 in which said frame is angularly adjustable about an axis transverse to said frame defined by opposite coupling elements.

9. The luminaire as set forth in claim 7 in which each of said housings has a front wall provided with a plurality of substantially circular openings extending in a single row substantially parallel to the axes of relative angular movement of said housings.

10. The luminaire as set forth in claim 9 in which the number of openings in each housing equals the number of housings, the openings being located to provide a substantially square array of lamps.

11. In a luminaire for stage lighting or the like:

a. a substantially square frame having hollow side frame elements and having a frontal opening;

b. a plurality of elongated lamp housings located in side-byside relationship in the frame opening;

. at least all but one of said housings being mounted by opposite elements of the frame for angular movement about parallel axes extending longitudinally of said housings;

. each of said housings having a front wall provided with a plurality of substantially circular openings spaced along the length of the corresponding housing;

e. a lamp for each of said openings, each of said lamps producing an elongated illumination field; each of said lamps having a peripheral flange fitted against its opening; each of said lamps also having lugs located rearwardly of the flange, the angular spacing of the lugs being other than f. means forming a seat at each opening for receiving part of the flange of the corresponding lamp;

g. two clamp structures for each of the lamps located in angularly spaced relationship to the seat forming means, each of said two clamp structures cooperating with one of said lugs to hold said lamp in one angular position about its axis while the other is idle;

. a nut plate secured centrally at the outside of each of said frame elements: and

. a yoke structure having a pair of arms each mounting a clamp screw cooperable respectively with nut plates on opposite sides for mounting the frame element for angular adjustment either parallel to or perpendicular to the axes of angular movement of said housings according to the nut plates selected for cooperation therewith.

12. The luminaire as set forth in claim 11 in which the housings mounted for angular movement are so mounted by hollow bushings; conductors for said lamps being accommodated in said hollow side frame elements and extending through said hollow bushings.

13. The luminaire as set forth in claim 12 together with individual switches for the lamps and mounted on the corresponding lamp housings.

14. The luminaire as set forth in claim 11 in which said lamps are of the seal beam type having a transversely oriented filament.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3783264 *Jul 7, 1972Jan 1, 1974Berkey ColortranReflective barndoor
US3798436 *Jun 16, 1972Mar 19, 1974Berkey ColortranLamp rotation socket
US5209557 *Jun 5, 1992May 11, 1993Bron Elektronik AgPhotographic light
US7434966 *Mar 15, 2007Oct 14, 2008Finn Bruce LSoft projected lighting device using multiple par lamps
US7810968May 15, 2009Oct 12, 2010Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.LED unit for installation in a post-top luminaire
US8376582Mar 26, 2010Feb 19, 2013Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.LED luminaire
US8414155Mar 18, 2009Apr 9, 2013Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.LED luminaire
US8506127Dec 11, 2009Aug 13, 2013Koninklijke Philips N.V.Lens frame with a LED support surface and heat dissipating structure
US9010948 *Sep 30, 2013Apr 21, 2015Global Fiberoptics, Inc.Photography lighting fixture
US20050200306 *Mar 9, 2004Sep 15, 2005Chris Conway Incorporated.Mobile stage lighting system
US20070153538 *Mar 15, 2007Jul 5, 2007Bruce FinnSoft projected lighting device using multiple par lamps
US20100238671 *Mar 18, 2009Sep 23, 2010Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.Led luminaire
US20110013397 *Mar 26, 2010Jan 20, 2011Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.Led luminaire
US20110141728 *Dec 11, 2009Jun 16, 2011Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.Lens frame with a led support surface and heat dissipating structure
US20110149582 *Oct 22, 2010Jun 23, 2011Musco CorporationApparatus, method, and system for adjustably affixing lighting fixtures to structures
US20120170268 *May 10, 2011Jul 5, 2012Finn Bruce LVersatile high efficiency illumination system
US20140293572 *Sep 30, 2013Oct 2, 2014Global Fiberoptics, Inc.Photography lighting fixture
US20150285464 *Oct 23, 2014Oct 8, 2015Bruce L. FinnVersatile illumination system
USD734888 *Apr 29, 2014Jul 21, 2015Neptun Light, Inc.Light fixture
USD735394 *Apr 29, 2014Jul 28, 2015Neptun Light, Inc.Light fixture
USD735395 *Apr 29, 2014Jul 28, 2015Neptun Light, Inc.Light fixture
USD735396 *Apr 29, 2014Jul 28, 2015Neptun Light, Inc.Light fixture
WO2016114931A1 *Dec 30, 2015Jul 21, 2016Hubbell IncorporatedDimensionally adjustable luminaire housing
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/249.9, D26/63, 362/249.13, D26/69
International ClassificationF21S8/00, F21V21/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21S8/00, F21V21/00, F21V21/30
European ClassificationF21V21/00, F21S8/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
May 2, 1988AS06Security interest
Owner name: BERKEY COLORTRAN MFG., INC.,
Owner name: CITICORP NORTH AMERICA, INC., (FORMERLY CITICORP I
Effective date: 19880217
May 2, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: CITICORP NORTH AMERICA, INC., (FORMERLY CITICORP I
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BERKEY COLORTRAN MFG., INC.,;REEL/FRAME:004869/0511
Effective date: 19880217
Owner name: CITICORP NORTH AMERICA, INC. (FORMERLY CITICORP IN
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BERKEY COLORTRAN MFG., INC.;REEL/FRAME:004869/0511
Oct 29, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: CITICORP INDUSTRIAL CREDIT, INC., 725 SOUTH FIGUER
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BERKEY COLORTRAN MFG., INC.;REEL/FRAME:004776/0526
Effective date: 19871013
Owner name: CITICORP INDUSTRIAL CREDIT, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Oct 29, 1987AS06Security interest
Owner name: BERKEY COLORTRAN MFG., INC.
Effective date: 19871013
Owner name: CITICORP INDUSTRIAL CREDIT, INC., 725 SOUTH FIGUER