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Publication numberUS3643316 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 22, 1972
Filing dateFeb 24, 1969
Priority dateFeb 20, 1967
Also published asDE1610459A1, US3461513
Publication numberUS 3643316 A, US 3643316A, US-A-3643316, US3643316 A, US3643316A
InventorsLaurent H Girard, Clive E Hockmeyer, Marcel C Quellette
Original AssigneeAmerican Velcro Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making separable fastening devices
US 3643316 A
Abstract
A method of making separable fastening devices which have a very large number of closely spaced hooking elements of the hook and loop type such that pressing opposed surfaces of two fastening members together in face-to-face relation will engage a large number of hooks and loops; the hooking elements are formed of metal and in preferred forms are operable at temperatures from cryogenic temperatures to above 1,000 DEG F.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States 1 Elm 131,316

Girard et al. 51 ll ella. 22, 1972 [54] METHOD OF MAKHNG fillElWllM/irllillLlE 3,009,235 11/1961 De Mestral ..297/D1G. 6 FASTENING DEVllUEfi 3,130,111 4/1964 l /lanji lzumi... 24/201 V 3,1 l l ..2 [72] Inventors: Laurent ll-ll. Gimrd, Bedford, N11; lClir/e 36 3 1 6/ 964 LEWIS 97mm 6 3,328,081 6/1967 Scruggs ..24/201 V 1E. llloelrmeyer, Lowell, Mass; Marcel C. 3 337 341 6/1968 M 24 0 V Quelmm Manchester NH- ates /2 1 3,372,438 3/1968 Rineclcer. .....24/201 V [73] Assignee: American Velcro, llne. 3,453,696 7/1969 Mates ..24/2()1 V [22] Filed: Feb. 24, 1969 [21] App1.No.: 801,357

Related ILLS. Application Data [62] Division of Ser. No. 617,265, Feb. 20, 1967, Pat. No.

Primary 1E'Jramirzer,lohn 1 Campbell Assistant ExaminerDonald lP. Rooney /lttomey-Pennie, lEdmonds, Mort-on, Taylor and Adams [5 7] ABSTRACT Al method of making separable fastening devices which have a very large number of closely spaced hooking elements of the hook and loop type such that pressing opposed surfaces of two fastening members together in face-to-face relation will engage a large number of books and loops; the hooking elements are formed of metal and in preferred forms are operable at temperatures from cryogenic temperatures to above 1,000 F.

1 11 Claims, 41 Drawing Figures METHOD OF MAKING SEPARABLE FASTENING DEVICES CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS This is a division of copending application Ser. No. 617,265, filed Feb. 20, 1967, now U.S. Pat. No. 3,461,513.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to a method of making separable fastening devices of the type having two members each provided with a very large number of closely spaced interengageable hooking elements with certain of the hooking elements comprising metal hooks and certain of the hooking elements comprising metal loops. The hooks and loops are characterized by the property that opposed surfaces of two can be pressed together in face-to-face relation so that a large number of hooks will engage a large number of loops for several cycles of repeated engagement and disengagement without permanently deforming the hooks or loops and without substantially crushing the loops.

2. Description of the Prior Art U.S. Pat. Nos. 2,717,437 and 3,083,737 and 3,154,838 disclose various forms of separable pile fastening devices, Le, a fastener comprised of two separate tapes having interengageable piles which contain loop elements and loop-engaging hook elements. The fastening devices described in these patents are recited as preferably being constructed from synthetic resin materials such as polyamidelike nylon. For some applications these tapes may be fabricated from textile material with an interwoven pile of synthetic material.

Engageable pile fasteners have found a wide variety of uses where ease of opening and closing is desired such as in clothing, footwear, belts, curtains, tapestry, and also for a variety of uses in the manned space program. However, due to the construction of such fasteners and the polymeric materials utilized for the interengageable pile elements, such fasteners are not adapted to applications in which the fastener must withstand shearing or normal stresses at very high temperatures and at cryogenic temperatures or repeated opening and closing cycles at such temperatures. It has generally been found that commercially available fasteners of this type have a practical operating range of from below about 25 to about 290 F. It is accordingly the object of this invention to provide a separable fastening device which will function at low and high temperatures not heretofore possible.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Broadly stated, the invention relates to a method of making separable fastening devices of the type characterized in that pressing opposed surfaces of two members together in face-toface relation a large number of hooks will engage a large number of loops. The device is comprised of two members each provided with a very large number of closely spaced en gageable hooking elements, certain of the hooking elements comprising metal hooks and certain of the hooking elements comprising metal loops and each of the members having a base of sheet material with the hooking elements secured thereto in positions extending generally upright from one surface of the base. The hooks are comprised ofa hardened metal characterized by resilient spring properties such that pressing of opposed surfaces of the members together in face-to-face relation wherein a large member of hooks engage a large number ofloops and upon subsequent separation of the members, the hooks have sufficient spring to return to substantially their original form. The loops are formed of a metal characterized by sufficient tensile strength and spring to resist breaking, permanent deformation and crushing after several cycles of repeated engagement and disengagement.

The fastening device preferably has a woven construction in which the base sheet is comprised of a ground weave of warp and weft yarns and the hookin g elements are provided by supplemental yarns. The base sheet can be comprised of a hightemperature synthetic strand but it is preferred for the maximum temperature range and life of the device that the base sheet be woven from multifilament strands of fine diameter metal wire which have high-temperature properties complementary to those properties of the hooking elements. The allmetal construction of the fastening devices offer advantages in the heat treatments to which they can be subjected to improve their properties.

The method of making separable fastening members of this type involves forming the hooking elements of metal in a base member preferably by a weaving operation and cutting at least some of the hooking elements to form hooks. With the allmetal fastening devices the multifilarnent metal strands are subjected to a special precoating operation prior to weaving which is subsequently heated to cause decomposition and vaporization, and at the same time the hooking elements are subjected to a heat treating operation to eliminate the brittleness which is imparted to the hooking elements by working during weaving.

It is also characteristic of the loop elements that they be formed with pairs of loop elements wit one element in each pair being a softer metal than the other element so that the combined effect of a large number of these paired element is to give ease of engagement with hooking elements and resistance to crushing.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. I is a perspective view of one tape member of the fastening device of the invention showing hooking elements extending from one surface thereof;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective of a hook element in a fastening device ofthe invention;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective of paired loop elements in a fastening device of the invention; and

FIG. 4 is a side elevation of two tape members forming a fastening device in opposed face-to-face relationship but spaced apart.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS In the two preferred embodiments to be described below, both fastening members comprising a fastening device have visually the same construction as shown in FIGS. 1-4. They are comprised basically of a woven base sheet 10 which has been woven from warp and weft yarns 11 and 12 into a fabric tape construction along with auxiliary or supplemental metal wire 14 which extends upright from the base sheet to form upstanding hooking elements IS of the hook 16 or loop 17 type. The loop elements are formed of paired wires 18 and 19 ofdifferent metal alloys. The underlying distinction between the two embodiments is that the first embodiment has a base sheet which is woven from multifilament strands of metal wire whereas, in the second embodiment, the: base sheet is formed of multifilament strands of a high-temperature synthetic filament.

Further distinctions which will be pointed out in more detail below are that the hooking elements in the first embodiment are firmly locked in the base sheet by the condition in which the base sheet is placed by a heating operation whereas the back adhesive coating is required in the second embodiment. Also, being an all-metal construction, the first embodiment is subjected to a heating treatment which so improves the pro perties of the hooking elements that is operable for a substantially greater number of times of engagement and disengage ment than is the second embodiment. This is not to suggest that the fastening device of the second embodiment is inoperable, but merely that the lifetime of the all-metal construction is increased because it can be subjected to a heat treatment at elevated properties.

FIRST EMBODIMENT The warp and weft yarns are strands of filaments per strand of the fine diameter (0.0005-inch) stainless steel having the following composition in percent by weight:

Chromium Nickel Carbon lron In the method of making the members of the fastening device, the fine stranded wires were bound together with a volatile adhesive coating such as an acrylic to provide strength in the strand and prevent breakage of the filaments during weaving. A volatile lubricating coating, such as liquid paraffin, was applied on top of the acrylic coating in order to prevent chafing during weaving and sticking while on the warp spools. These warp and weft yarns were then tightly woven with a supplemental yam extending upright therebetween in the form of a loop to define the hooking elements in the fastening device with the warp and weft yarns forming a fabric ground weave base sheet tightly woven so as to hold the hooking elements upright and locked into the ground weave.

For the hook element, a cobalt-nickel alloy having the following composition in percent by weight was used:

Cobalt 40 Chromium Z Nickel 15 Molybdenum 7 Manganese 2 Beryllium .04 Carbon .l5 lron Balance The wire was in 47 percent reduced condition prior to weaving. It preferably had a diameter of 0.004 inch and after being woven into loop form, the member was subjected to a heat treatment at 980 F. for 5 hours. It was brought up to the 980 F. condition over a period of 2 hours to first decompose and vaporize the coatings contained in the ground wires and after heating for this period of time, which is sufficient time at tem perature to age the alloy, the brittleness of the wire resulting from strain hardening of the wire by mechanical working during the weaving operation was relieved and its spring properties improved. Subsequently, the hardened and aged hooking alloy was cut by suitable cutters adjacent their ends to form hook elements.

In forming the loop elements paired wires of two distinct alloy compositions were used as a supplemental yarn. The first wire in the pairs, herein called the spring wire, had the same alloy composition as the wire used for the hook described above except that it was used in the 22 percent reduced condition and thus the final spring qualities were not equal to that of the hook elements. In addition, the diameter of this spring wire was 0.00225 inch. The second wire of the pair, called the loop wire," had the following metal alloy composition in percent by weight and was used in the percent reduced condition.

Nickel (a) 70.0 min 7t Chromium 14.0-17.0 Iron 5.0-9.0 Titanium 2.25-2.75 Columbium (b) 0.70-1.20 Manganese 1.0 max. Silicon 0.5 max. Sulfur 0.01 max. Copper 0.5 max. Carbon 0.08 max.

(a) contains small amount ofcohalt (b) contains small amount ot'lantalum ln weaving with the paired supplemental wire yarns, the paired wires were not twisted together but rather they were laid flat in the weaving machine so that upon forming the loops they are free to separate from each other as shown in FIG. 3. These paired wires were woven with the ground weave to provide a pair of upstanding loops of spring wire and soft wire. This paired wire construction provided the combination of properties essential to continued use of the fastening device. The spring wire has suflicient strength and spring to resist being crushed during handling and repeated use, while the soft wire has sufficient softness so that it will be displaced without springing by a hook wire when the hook wire is pressed into the pile loops during engagement. It was found that a pile composed of all soft wires will engage hooks well but is too easily crushed for continued use, and the spring wires alone while resisting crushing does not engage the hooks as readily. It has further been found that the loop wires preferably are finer in diameter than the hook wires and there must be many more loops per area than hooks.

The use of the alloy composition selected from the soft wire is particularly applicable in this combination because it is not significantly embrittled by weaving and by using the wire in the initially cold worked condition and furthercold working the wire during weaving and following this weaving operation with an aging treatment at elevated temperatures so that substantial spring is imparted to the wire and embrittlement to the extent that it will prevent the hooks from returning to their original shape after repeated opening and closing is removed.

By heating these fastening devices to the proper heat treating temperature for a period of time sufficient to age the alloy and eliminate embrittlement of the hook wire and the spring loop wire, the fastening devices retained about 44 to 66 percent of their initial shear and tension properties after opening and closing cycles and microscopic examination after this test showed only a small amount of breakage and distortion of the hook and loop. Fastening devices not heat-treated had substantially poorer properties than those which were heat-treated.

It has further been found that this heat treatment causes an interlocking of the roots of the hooking elements to such an extent that with an initially tight ground weave there is no need to apply any adhesive backing to the ground weave to retain the hooking elements in place. It has been found that a tape member having a length of 100 feet which was heattreated to a temperature of 830 F. for 5 hours reduced in length by about 1 1/2 inch and it is theorized that this small but significant shrinkage is the vehicle by which the additional interlocking around the roots of the hooking elements is rea1- ized after being heat-treated.

These fastening devices were further tested at temperatures up to 1,050 F. and they operated at this temperature for an extended period of time and were also tested in a liquid helium bath having a temperature of about 420 F. to determine their cryogenic properties and found the device also functioned satisfactorily.

The weaving operation is performed substantially as described in the prior art patents referred to above. Thus, the members are woven on a modified narrow fabric or broad fabric loom which operates in the same manner as a pile loom for the production of velvet-type ribbon or terry cloth, with each of the supplemental wires or auxiliary warp wires being formed into a loop pile during weaving by being alternately disposed on either side of its respective lancet by means of doupes. Preferably the lancets broaden in cross section toward their ends to tighten the loops into a generally circular configuration. A velvet-type pile loom of this type is described in detail in U.S. Pat. No. 3,083,727.

SECOND EMBODIMENT In a second embodiment, the same alloy composition was used for the hook elements and the loop elements. The base sheet was formed of a ground weave of a high temperature resistant nylon filament yarn specifically an aromatic polyamide marketed under the trademark Nomex by E. l. duPont de Nemours & Co., Wilmington, Delaware. In this embodiment, fine denier warp yarns e.g., 100 denier, and coarser denier filling yarns e.g., 200 denier, were used to provide the tight weave required to hold the hook and loop in the base sheet. While the hook and loop elements could sustain the elevated temperatures described in the first embodiment, the ground weave was limited by the synthetic material used and had an upper elevated temperature level of about 500 F. in this embodiment, itwas found necessary to apply a coating of adhesive to the back of the ground weave and it was found that a polyimide which was capable of substaining 500 F. temperatures gave good bonding between the hooking elements and the ground weave and had sufficient rigidity to allow cutting and was still flexible enough to permit rolling up as finished tape. This coating also provided a bonding surface for subsequent adherence to substrates.

This second embodiment falls short of the high operating temperatures of the first embodiment but it still is operable at temperatures up to 500 F. and at cryogenic temperatures. Because it was not possible to heat the hooking elements to the heat-treating temperature of the hook and spring loop, the second embodiment was not as good a fastening device from a standpoint of extended reuse, but being operable at these middle temperatures between the first embodiment and the presently commercially available fastening devices, it provides a useful but limited life fastening device.

We claim:

1. In a method of making a fastening member for use in a separable fastening device of the type comprising two members each provided with a very large number of closely spaced interengageable hooking elements, certain of said hooking elements comprising hooks and certain of said hooking elements comprising loops and characterized by the property that pressing opposed surfaces of the members together in face-to-face relation will secure the members together by en gagement of numerous hooks with numerous loops, the improvement comprising interlacing filaments to form a base sheet, interlacing a supplemental metal wire into the base sheet in its cold worked condition to form upstanding hooking elements. subsequently heat-treating the supplemental metal wire for a time sufficient to age the metal hooking elements to impart spring properties to the metal and relieve its brittleness.

2. A method according to claim 1 comprising forming the base member by tightly weaving warp and weft yarns with a (ti supplemental metal wire yarn of upstanding loop elements therebetween such that the roots of the loop elements are tightly held by the warp and weft yarns.

3. A method according to claim 2 wherein the warp and weft yarns are multifilament strands of fine diameter metal wires.

4. A method according to claim 3 wherein the supplemental yarn is woven in its cold worked condition and is subsequently heat'treated for time sufficient to age the metal to impart spring properties to the alloy and relieve its brittleness, and is cut to form hook elements.

5. A method according to claim 3 wherein the hooking elements are loops comprised of paired wires, the pair having a first wire and a second wire softer than the first wire, and the member is subsequently heat-treated for time sufficient to age the alloy to impart spring properties to the first wire and re lieve its brittleness but below the temperature at which any significant hardening of the second wire occurs.

6. A method according to claim 3 wherein the multifilament wire strands are bound together by a volatile adhesive prior to weaving, and the member is subsequently heated to volatilize the adhesive.

'7. A method according to claim 6 wherein a volatile lubricating coating is applied to the bound multifilament wire strands prior to weaving, and the temperature to which the member is subsequently heated is sufficient to volatilize the lubricating coating.

8. A method according to claim wherein the base weave is heat shrunk tightly about the roots ofthe hooking elements by the heating operation.

9. A method according to claim 5 wherein the base weave is heat shrunk tightly about the roots ofthe hooking elements by the heatingo eration.

10. A met od according to claim 2 wherein the warp and weft yarns are multifilament synthetic plastic strands which will not degrade at 500 F.

iii. A method according to claim 10 wherein the back ofthe base weave is coated with a bonding adhesive to lock the supplernental yarn to the base weave.

. UNITED S'lfAlES PAJIENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CQRRECTION Patent No.1 31 4 1 V I Dated February 22, 1972 Inventor(5) Tanr ni- H G'i'rard; ("l'ivp Fir Hof'kmyer" and Marcel C. Ouellette l It is certlfied that error appears in the aboveidentified parent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

'INVENTORS "Quellette" shouldread Ou e llett'e. Column 2, line-21, "wit" should read -with In Claim 4, line 4, "alloy" shoula ire adme calsi ed and sealed this lpth da y of July 1972.'

(SEAL Atte-st:

"EDWA D M.FL-mcHER,JR. H ROBERT GOTTSCHALK I; Comissioner of Patents Attesting Officer

Patent Citations
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US2717437 *Oct 15, 1952Sep 13, 1955Velcro Sa SoulieVelvet type fabric and method of producing same
US3009235 *May 9, 1958Nov 21, 1961Internat Velcro CompanySeparable fastening device
US3130111 *Aug 14, 1961Apr 21, 1964Sobef Soc De Brevets De FermetSeparable pile fastener
US3136311 *Nov 13, 1961Jun 9, 1964Melrose Hospital Uniform Co InPatient support garment
US3328081 *Oct 28, 1963Jun 27, 1967Scruggs Thomas MSafety seat belt
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4158927 *Apr 18, 1977Jun 26, 1979Cordell Tackle, Inc.Fishing material
US4856223 *Nov 13, 1985Aug 15, 1989Evans Steven CFishing lure
US5058247 *May 1, 1990Oct 22, 1991The Procter & Gamble CompanyMechanical fastening prong
US5180534 *Dec 21, 1990Jan 19, 1993The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess of manufacturing a refastenable mechanical fastening system
US5300058 *Dec 10, 1992Apr 5, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable absorbent article having an improved mechanical fastening system
US5325569 *Oct 30, 1992Jul 5, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyRefastenable mechanical fastening system having particular viscosity and rheology characteristics
US5326415 *Sep 3, 1993Jul 5, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyScreen printing method for manufacturing a refastenable mechanical fastening system and fastening system produced therefrom
US5392498 *Dec 10, 1992Feb 28, 1995The Proctor & Gamble CompanyNon-abrasive skin friendly mechanical fastening system
US5429875 *Dec 7, 1992Jul 4, 1995National Aerospace Laboratory Of Science & Technology AgencyMounting object provided with a metallic heat-resistant two-dimensional fastener
US5540673 *Jan 31, 1995Jul 30, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyRefastenable mechanical fastening system
US6477750 *Feb 23, 2001Nov 12, 2002Ykk CorporationSurface fastener
US8017213 *Apr 21, 2006Sep 13, 2011The Boeing CompanyTemperature tolerant hooks for hook and loop attachment
EP0151923A2 *Jan 3, 1985Aug 21, 1985GOTTLIEB BINDER GMBH & Co.Textile touch-and-close fastener, and textile touch-and-close material
EP0198182A1 *Feb 20, 1986Oct 22, 1986GOTTLIEB BINDER GMBH & Co.Textile self-gripping fastener
EP2258893A1 *May 14, 2009Dec 8, 2010Herbert FenkesTextile pile material
WO2004073444A1 *Feb 19, 2004Sep 2, 2004Howard A KingsfordWoven fastener products
Classifications
U.S. Classification148/516, 428/100, 24/445, 148/530, 140/80, 29/410, 297/DIG.600
International ClassificationA44B18/00, C22C38/52, C22C19/07, D03D27/00, C22C38/40, C22C19/05, B29D5/00
Cooperative ClassificationC22C19/058, C22C38/40, D03D27/00, D03D2700/61, Y10S297/06, C22C38/52, A44B18/0038, C22C19/07
European ClassificationD03D27/00, C22C19/07, C22C38/40, A44B18/00D8, C22C38/52, C22C19/05R
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 1, 1988AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: VELCRO INDUSTRIES B.V., NEIUWE WETERINGSTRAAT 38,
Effective date: 19870930
Owner name: VELCRO USA, INC.
Apr 1, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: VELCRO INDUSTRIES B.V., NEIUWE WETERINGSTRAAT 38,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:VELCRO USA, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004871/0369
Effective date: 19870930
Owner name: VELCRO INDUSTRIES B.V.,NETHERLANDS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:VELCRO USA, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004871/0369