Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3643689 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 22, 1972
Filing dateOct 31, 1969
Priority dateOct 31, 1969
Also published asCA921359A1, DE2053119A1, DE2053119B2, DE2053119C3
Publication numberUS 3643689 A, US 3643689A, US-A-3643689, US3643689 A, US3643689A
InventorsIsreeli Jack, Kassel Aaron
Original AssigneeTechnicon Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fluid distribution manifold
US 3643689 A
Abstract
A fluid distribution manifold for the division of a segmented fluid stream into a plurality of similarly configured segmented fluid streams is provided and comprises a manifold body forming a manifold chamber, a fluid stream inlet, and a plurality of fluid stream distribution outlets to flow the similarly configured fluid streams from the distribution chamber. The volume of said manifold chamber is no greater, and preferably substantially less, than the volume of the smallest of said fluid stream segments to thus insure substantial manifold chamber washout to prevent contamination of a succeeding fluid stream segment by the residue of a preceding fluid stream segment, and provide for accurate division of said segmented fluid stream into said plurality of similarly configured segmented fluid streams.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Isreeli et a1.

[ Feb. 22, 1972 [54] FLUID DISTRIBUTION MANIFOLD [72] inventors: Jack IsreeIL'Mamaroneck; Aaron Kassel,

Brooklyn, both of NY. [73] Assignee: Technieon Corporation, Tarrytown, N.Y.

[22] Filed: Oct. 31, 1969 [21] Appl. N0.: 872,816

3,530,881 9/1970 Tanner ..l37/56l FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS Primary Examiner-William R. Cline Attorney-S. P. Tedesco A fluid distribution manifold for the division of a segmented fluid stream into a plurality of similarly configured segmented fluid streams is provided and comprises a manifold body forming a manifold chamber, a fluid stream inlet, and a plurality of fluid stream distribution outlets to flow the similarly configured fluid streams from the distribution chamber. The volume of said manifold chamber is no greater, and preferably substantially less, than the volume of the smallest of said fluid stream segments to thus insure substantial manifold chamber washout to prevent contamination of a succeeding fluid stream segment by the residue of a preceding fluid stream segment, and provide for accurate division of said segmented fluid stream into said plurality of similarly configured segmented fluid streams.

7 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures 1,338,566 10/1963 France ..137/561 PATENTEDF EB22 I972 3,643 .689

sum 1 [1F 3 FlG.l

INVENTORS JACK ISREELI B A ON KASSEL od fl ATTORNE PATENTEUFB22 I972 SHEET 2 UF 3 ATTORNEY ZON KASSEL PAIENIEDFEB 22 I972 SHEET 3 OF 3 TO FLUID ANALYSIS SYSTEM PROPORTIONING FIG.

TO FLUID ANALYSIS SYSTEM FIG. 5

DRIVE A a PORPORTIONING/ g \DRIVE L FIG. 6

24 (A)s2(A)s2(A) ACK l AR BY L s3 (A)s3(A)s3(A) E/ENTORS ON KA L d ATTORNE FIG.7

FLUID DISTRIBUTION MANIFOLD BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to a new and improved fluid distribution manifold for the division of a segmented fluid stream into a plurality of similarly configured segmented fluid streams.

2. Description of the Prior Art Although a wide variety of fluid distribution manifolds are known for the division of a fluid stream into a plurality of fluid streams, it may be understood that, in general, the same have been found to be decidedly unsatisfactory for use in improved version of substantially constant flow rate, automatic sequential fluid sample analysis means in the nature of those shown and described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,241,432 issued Mar. 22, 1966 to Leonard T. Skeggs, et al., which are operable with substantially reduced fluid sample volumes at substantially reduced fluid sample flow rates and substantially increased fluid sample analysis rates. More specifically, for use in such fluid sample analysis means which operate to analyze a segmented fluid sample stream comprising successive fluid segments of different fluid samples, it becomes critical that a succeeding fluid sample segment not be contaminated by the residue of a preceding fluid sample segment to thus render the results of the analysis of the former inaccurate, and that the segmented fluid stream be accurately divided into a plurality of similarly configured segmented fluid sample streams.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION It is, accordingly, an object of this invention to provide a new and improved fluid distribution manifold for the accurate division of a segmented fluid stream into a plurality of similarly configured segmented fluid streams wherein contamination of a succeeding fluid stream segment by a preceding fluid stream segment is substantially inhibited.

Another object of this invention is the provision of a new and improved fluid distribution manifold as above which requires the use of only readily available components of proven dependability in the fabrication thereof, and is of relatively simple construction having no moving parts, to thus insure long periods of satisfactory, maintenance-free manifold operation.

A further object of this invention is the provision of a new and improved fluid distribution manifold as above which is particularly adapted for use in improved, reduced fluid sample volume and flow rate, and increased fluid sample analysis rate, versions of fluid sample analysis means in the nature of those shown and described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,241,432.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION As disclosed herein the new and improved fluid distribution manifold of the invention comprises a manifold splitter assembly which includes a fluid distribution chamber formed therein generally centrally thereof, and fluid inlet means extending generally axially of the latter into fluid flow communication therewith. A plurality of fluid outlets are provided and take the form of a plurality of outlet nozzles which are arranged generally radially of said fluid distribution chamber, and a fluid nozzle which is arranged generally axially of said fluid distribution chamber, respectively. For use in the division of a segmented fluid stream which is introduced thereto through said fluid inlet means into a plurality of similarly configured segmented fluid streams which flow therefrom through said fluid outlets, the fluid distribution manifold of the invention is dimensioned so that the volume of said manifold chamber is no greater, and preferably substantially less, than the volume of the smallest segment of said segmented fluid stream whereby is insured that the entire volume of said fluid distribution chamber will be substantially filled by each of said fluid stream segments to thus provide for substantial washout of said fluid distribution chamber to substantially inhibit contamination of a succeeding fluid stream segment by the residue of a preceding fluid stream segment, and to promote accurate division of said segmented fluid stream into said plurality of similarly configured segmented fluid streams.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The above and other objects and significant advantages of this invention are believed made clear by the following detailed description thereof taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawingswherein:

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a new and improved fluid distribution manifold constructed in accordance with the teachings of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the distribution manifold of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken along the lines 3-3 in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a somewhat schematic perspective view illustrating a first application of the distribution manifold of the invention to a fluid analysis system;

FIG. 5 is a somewhat schematic perspective view illustrating a second application of the distribution manifold of the invention;

FIG. 6 is a flow diagram illustrating an example of segmented fluid stream which may be supplied to the distribution manifold of the invention when the latter is utilized as depicted in FIG. 4; and

FIG. 7 is a flow diagram illustrating an example of the fluid stream which may be supplied to the distribution manifold of the invention when the latter is utilized as depicted in FIG. 5.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Referring now to FIGS. 1 through 3 of the drawings, a new and improved fluid distribution manifold constructed in accordance with the teachings of this invention is indicated generally at 10 and may be seen to comprise a fluid splitter manifold assembly 12 having the depicted, generally cylindrical exterior configuration. A bore 14 extends as shown generally axially of the splitter manifold assembly 12 and terminates as shown at the lower extremity thereof in a generally frustoconical bore portion 16. Plug means 18 are inserted as depicted through the upper portion of the bore 14 to seal the latter in fluidtight manner as should be obvious. Said plug means may, if' desired, be positioned within the bore 14 in readily removable manner so as to enable the convenient cleansing of the latter upon removal of the former as should be obvious. By this construction it is believed'made clear that a fluid distribution chamber as indicated generally at 20 is formed generally axially of the splitter manifold assembly l2.

A counterbore 22 is formed as shown to extend generally axially through the bottom surface 23 of the splitter manifold assembly 12 into fluid flow communication with the fluid distribution chamber 20 through the frustoconical bore portion 16. An inlet needle, or fluid sample probe, is indicated at 24 and extends as shown, in fluidtight manner, into the counterbore 22 in such manner that the end of the said inlet needle or fluid sample probe is seated flush as shown with the shoulder of the counterbore 22 to thus provide for the flow of fluids to the distribution chamber 20 as should be obvious. The inlet needle or fluid sample probe 24 is fixedly secured to the splitter manifold assembly 12 in any suitable manner as, for example, through the use of silver solder as depicted at 26.

A plurality of outlet nipples are provided to extend as shown generally radially of the fluid distribution chamber 20 for the flow of fluids from the latter, More specifically, and as best seen by way of example in FIG. 3, counterbores 28, 30, 32, 34 and 36, are respectively formed in the depicted generally staggered manner to extend generally radially of the splitter manifold assembly 12 into fluid flow communication with the fluid distribution chamber 20, and nipples 38, 40, 42, 44, and 46, are respectively inserted as shown in fluidtight manner into the said counterbores to, in each instance, be disposed therewithin as shown flush with the respective counterbore shoulders. Each of the said outlet nipples is fixedly secured to the splitter manifold assembly 12 in any suitable manner which may, for example, again take the form of silver soldering as indicated at 48 for nipple 38. In like manner a counterbore 50 is formed as shown in the plug means 18 to extend therethrough generally axially of the splitter manifold assembly 12 into fluid flow communication with the fluid distribution chamber 20 and an outlet nipple 52 is provided to extend thereinto as shown in fluidtight manner flush with the counterbore shoulder.

As shown in FIG. 1, it may be seen that the new and improved fluid distribution manifold of the invention comprises eight groups or series of generally aligned and generally radially extending outlet nipples or arms, and that the said groups are disposed at generally 45 angles around the circumference of the splitter manifold assembly 12. Thus, and as best seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, it may be understood that, in addition to the respective outlet nipples 38, 40, 42, 44, 46 and 52 which have already been described, the said fluid distribution manifold comprises a generally aligned group of generally radially extending outlet nipples 54 and 56, a generally aligned group of generally radially extending outlet nipples 58, 60 and 62, a generally aligned group of generally radially extending outlet nipples 64 and 66, a generally aligned group of generally radially extending outlet nipples 68, 70 and 72, a generally aligned group of generally radially extending outlet nipples 74, 76 and 78, and a generally aligned group of generally radially extending outlet nipples or arms 80 and 82, respectively.

For purposes of facilitating the connection of the respective outlet nipples in a fluid analysis system as described in greater detail hereinbelow, and to, in any event, provide easier access thereto, it may be understood that some of the outlet nipples of each of the outlet nipple groups are bent to provide for suitable outlet nipple diversion with regard to the outlet nipples of each of said outlet nipple groups. More specifically, and as best seen in FIG. 3, outlet nipple 40 is bent at an angle of a proximately 25 relative to outlet nipple 42, while outlet nipple 38 is bent at an angle of approximately 75 from outlet nipple 42 to thus provide for suitable outlet nipple diversion within theoutlet nipple group which is constituted by the outlet nipples 38, 40 and 42. In like manner, outlet nipple 44 may be seen to be bent at an angle of approximately 25 with reference to outlet nipple 46 to thus provide for suitable outlet nipple diversion within the outlet nipple group which is constituted by the outlet nipples 44 and 46.

For use, for example, in improved versions of apparatus for the automatic, sequential quantitative analysis of a series of fluid samples as shown and described in US. Pat. No. 3,241,432 issued Mar. 22, 1966 to Leonard T. skeggs. et al., which are operable with substantially reduced fluid sample volumes at substantially reduced fluid sample flow rates, the new and improved fluid distribution manifold of the invention might be arranged within said apparatus as depicted for purposes of illustration in FIG. 4. More specifically, and as seen in said FIG. 4, sample supply means which may, for example, take the form of those shown and described in US. Pat. No. 3,134,263 issued May 26, 1964 to Edward B. M. DeJong, are illustrated generally at 84 and comprise a turntable 86 upon which is disposed a generally circular array of fluid sample containers 88. A sample offtake device is indicated generally at 90 and comprises an operating arm 92 to which, in this instance, is fixedly secured the fluid distribution manifold in such manner that the inlet end of the fluid sample probe 24 of the latter is immersible in a fluid sample container 88 with the sample supply means 84in the operational position thereof depicted in FIG. 4.

A wash liquid receptacle 94 is disposed as shown adjacent the turntable 86, while sample supply device drive means are indicated schematically at 96 and are operative to drive each of the turntable 86 and the sample offtake device 90 as indicated by the dashed lines extending therebetween. Proportioning pump means which may, for example, take the form of the compressible tube or peristaltic pump as shown and described in US. Pat. No. 3,227,091 issued Jan. 4, 1966 to Jack Isreeli, et al., are indicated schematically at 98 and may be understood to comprise a plurality of compressible pump tubes which are progressively compressed or occluded by a series of pump rollers in the direction from left to right as seen in FIG. 4 to pump fluids therethrough, all in a manner made clear in said U.S. Patent. For use with the fluid distribution manifold of the invention which, as illustrated in FIGS. 1 through 3, comprises 21 outlet nipples or arms, it may be understood that the proportioning pump means 98 would in turn comprise 21 compressible pump tubes and that the inlet ends of the same would be respectively connected, as through the use of suitable flexible tubing, to the respective outlet ends of the said nipples as indicated by the dashed line extending between the fluid distribution manifold 10 and the proportioning pump means 98 in FIG. 4.

In operation to provide a segmented fluid stream in the nature of that depicted in FIG. 6 to the manifold chamber 20, the turntable 86 would be intermittently rotated, or indexed, to present each of the sample containers 88 to the sample offtake device 90, while the latter is in turn operated, for each of the thusly presented sample containers, to initially immerse the inlet end of probe 24 in the wash liquid receptacle 94 for a predetermined period of time to thus aspirate a measured volume of wash liquid therethrough, to then transfer the said probe inlet end for immersion in a thusly presented sample container for aspiration of a measured volume of air therethrough during said transfer, to then briefly immerse and withdraw the said probe inlet end from the thusly presented sample container three times to respectively aspirate measured volumes of the said sample, and air, therethrough, and to then immerse the said probe inlet end in the said sample container for a predetermined longer period of time to aspirate the main portion of the sample therethrough, it being understood that this operation of the offtake device would, of course, be repeated for each of the thusly presented sample containers 88. As a result, it may be understood that a fluid stream consisting of successive segments of the respective fluid sample from the thusly presented sample container 88, and intervening segments of air and the wash liquid from the wash liquid receptacle 94, would be aspirated through the fluid sample probe 24 for flow therefrom to the fluid distribution chamber 20 of the splitter manifold assembly 12. The part of this segmented fluid stream which would result from the presentation as described of the first two sample containers 88, as indicated at $1 and S2 in FIG. 4, is illustrated in FIG. 6, and it may be understood that as this segmented stream is flowed to the fluid distribution chamber 20 the same will be accurately divided by the fluid distribution manifold of the invention into 21 similarly configured segmented fluid streams for flow from the said fluid distribution chamber through the respective outlet nipples, and therefrom, through the respective 21 compressible pump tubes as indicated to the fluid analysis system.

Of particular significance with regard to use of the fluid distribution manifold 10 in a fluid analysis system as as depicted in FIG. 4 is the fact that proper cleansing of the fluid distribution manifold must be effected to prevent the residue of a preceding sample from contaminating a succeeding sample and thus rendering inaccurate the results of the analysis of the latter. As a result, and in addition to insure that each of the segmented fluid streams which flow from the fluid distribution chamber 20 through the respective nipples has the same general configuration as the segmented fluid stream depicted in FIG. 6 which flows thereto through fluid sample probe 24, it becomes necessary that the volume of the fluid distribution chamber 20 be no greater than, and preferably substantially less than, the volume of the smallest fluid segment in said segmented fluid stream. More specifically, and if it is assumed, for example, that the respective air segments A in the fluid stream of FIG. 6 have the smallest volume of any of the fluid segments which constitute the same, it may be understood that the volume of the fluid distribution chamber 20 would be predetermined to be no greater than the volume of the said air tau-m4 1.1

segments A. Accordingly, as each of the said air segments is flowed through the fluid sample probe 24 to the fluid distribution chamber 20, it may be understood that the same will be substantially filled by the said air segments A and, as follows, by the wash liquid segments W and the fluid sample segments S, to insure substantial washout of the said fluid distribution chamber and provide that each of the said segments will in turn be respectively divided into 21 fluid segments for respective flow through each of the fluid distribution manifold outlet nipples as described hereinabove.

With more specific regard to this provision of substantial fluid distribution chamber washout, it may be understood that as each of the air segments A, the wash liquid segment W, and the smaller fluid ,sample segments S2, respectively, of FIG. 6 substantially fill and flow through the fluid distribution chamber 20, the same will be successively effective to substantially remove the residue of the preceding sample S1 therefrom to thus substantially prevent contamination of the succeeding main segment or portion of the fluid sample S2 thereby and insure the substantial accuracy of the results of the subsequent analysis of the said main segment or portion.

FIG. 5 illustrates another application of the fluid distribution manifold of the invention in a fluid analysis system wherein the formeris maintained stationary as indicated and the turntable 86 is both indexed and reciprocated relative thereto by the drive means 96 to present each ofthe fluid sample containers 88 in turn to the fluid distribution for aspiration of measured volumes of the fluid samples therefrom. More specifically, and referring now in addition to FIG. 7, it may be understood that through proper sequential movement of the turntable 88 under the control of the drive means 96, the inlet end of probe 24 may be briefly immersed and removed from each of the fluid sample containers 88 twice to result in the aspiration of three air segments and two relatively small sample segments as indicated at A and S2, respectively, and to then be immersed in a said sample container for a substantially longer period of time to thus result in the aspiration through the probe 24 of the main fluid sample segment S, with the result that a segmented fluid stream having the configuration as illustrated in FIG. 7 would be supplied to the fluid distribution chamber 20.

Again,.as discussed hereinabove with regard to FIGS. 4 and 6, it may be understood that for use as depicted in FIG. 5, the volume of the fluid distribution chamber would, of course, be predetermined to be no greater than, and preferably substantially less than, the smallest segment volume provided within the segmented fluid stream of FIG. 7.

A particular advantage of the structural arrangement of FIG. 5 wherein the fluid distribution manifold 10 is maintained stationary is the fact that the respective manifold outlet nipples or arms may be somewhat lengthened and connected directly to the respective inlet ends of the compressible tubes of the proportioning pump 98 to thus render unnecessary the interconnection of flexible tubing therebetween with resultant system simplification.

Referring now to the geometrical configuration of the fluid distribution manifold 10 as depicted in FIGS. 1 through 3, it may be understood that the generally radial arrangement of all of the manifold nozzles, except nozzle 52, functions to enable the fabrication of the fluid distribution manifold with a minimum fluid distribution chamber volume to particular advantage as discussed in detail hereinabove with regard to FIGS. 5 through 7. In addition, it may be understood that the provision of the generally axially extending outlet nipple 52 will insure substantial flow-through of a portion, at least, of each of the fluid segments through the fluid distribution chamber 20 to thus further maximize the washout thereof.

To more specifically illustrate a preferred proposed utilization of the new and improved flow distribution manifold of the invention, it may be understood that the compressible tube or peristaltic pump 98 may take the form of that shown and described in our copending application for US. Pat. Ser. No.

844,545, filed July 29, 1969, entitled New and Improved Method and Apparatus for the Pumping of Fluids at Substantially Constant Flow Rate," and assigned to the assignee hereof; and that for such useage said pump means would preferably be calibrated in the manner shown and described in our copending application for US Pat. Ser. No. 841,351, filed July 14, 1969, entitled New and Improved Method and Apparatus for the Calibration of Tubing to Provide for a Desired Flow Rate Therethrough and assigned to the assignee hereof.

Although disclosed hereinabove for purposes of illustration as including 21 outlet nozzles or arms, it is believed clear that the fluid distribution manifold of the invention may, of course, be configured to include a greater or lesser number of the same. It is additionally believed clear that the fluid distribution manifold of the invention may, of course, be advantageously utilized in' a wide variety of fluid systems other and different than those depicted by way of illustration in FiGS. 5 and 6, and/or for distribution of a wide variety of fluid streams other and different than those depicted in FIGS. 6 and 7.

While we have shown and described the preferred embodiment of our invention, it will be understood that the invention may be embodied otherwise than as herein specifically illustrated or described, and that certain changes in the form and arrangement of parts and in the specific manner of practicing the invention may be made without departing from the underlying idea or principles of this invention within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A fluid distribution manifold for dividing a first fluid stream which comprises successive fluid segments of a plurality of different fluids including a cleansing fluid, the smallest segment having a volume at least as great as a predetermined volume, into a plurality of similarly segmented streams comprising, means forming a fluid distribution chamber, fluid inlet means to flow said first fluid stream to said fluid distribution chamber, said fluid inlet means comprising a fluid inlet probe in the form of a needle which is arranged generally axially of said fluid distribution chamber, fluid outlet means including a plurality of fluid distribution outlets in the form of radially disposed arms to flow said similarly configured fluid streams from said distribution chamber, said fluid distribution chamber having a volume which is not greater than said predetermined volume, whereby said fluid distribution chamber will be substantially filled by each of said fluid segments to insure substantial washout of said chamber.

2. In a fluid distribution manifold as in claim 1 wherein, said fluid distribution chamber is of generally cylindrical configuration.

3. In a fluid distribution manifold as in claim 2 wherein, said generally radially arranged fluid outlets are disposed at generally equal angular intervals around said fluid distribution chamber.

4. In a fluid distribution manifold as in claim 2 wherein, said fluid outlets are disposed in plural series which are in turn arranged at generally equal angular intervals around said fluid distribution chamber.

5. In a fluid distribution manifold as in claim 4 wherein, said fluid outlet means includes a fluid outlet which is arranged generally axially of said fluid distribution chamber.

6. In a fluid distribution manifold as in claim 1 wherein, said fluid outlet means includes a fluid outlet which is arranged generally axially of said fluid distribution chamber.

7. In a fluid distribution manifold as in claim 6 wherein, said fluid distribution chamber is of generally cylindrical configuration.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3103942 *Sep 22, 1961Sep 17, 1963Du PontApparatus and process for distributing viscous liquids
US3352486 *Apr 30, 1965Nov 14, 1967Clay Adams IncApparatus for washing particle matter
US3530881 *May 10, 1967Sep 29, 1970T K S Aircraft De Icing LtdLiquid flow proportioning devices
FR1338566A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3848633 *Oct 22, 1971Nov 19, 1974Damon CorpPrecise fluid-dividing apparatus
US3933178 *Sep 9, 1974Jan 20, 1976Werkzeugmaschinenfabrik Adolf Waldrich CoburgMetering apparatus for liquids containing granular solids, in particular lapping liquid
US4422471 *May 24, 1982Dec 27, 1983The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyFour bar manifold
US4484069 *Oct 15, 1981Nov 20, 1984St. Regis Paper CompanyApparatus and method for sensing distance
US4661306 *Jul 2, 1984Apr 28, 1987Westinghouse Electric Corp.Spectral shift pressurized water reactor
US4662391 *Oct 5, 1984May 5, 1987Chevron Research CompanyMethod and apparatus for splitting a liquid-vapor mixture
US5109955 *Jul 20, 1990May 5, 1992Clark Jimmy EApparatus for greasing a wheel bearing hub
US5724774 *Jun 21, 1996Mar 10, 1998Rooney; James W.Modular building assembly and method of assembling the same
US6615679Aug 15, 2000Sep 9, 2003Particle Measuring Systems, Inc.An ensemble manifold having a plurality of sample ports, a delivery port, and flow junction having no open-close valves or other flow selectors connecting all of said sample ports to said delivery port.
US6945266 *Oct 18, 2002Sep 20, 2005Metallic Power, Inc.Manifold for fuel cell system
US7694854 *Jan 25, 2005Apr 13, 2010Nordson CorporationHot melt adhesive system having centralized manifold and zone heating capability
US7942162Jan 14, 2008May 17, 2011National Tank CompanyTee flow splitter
US8821078 *Jan 7, 2011Sep 2, 2014Conagra Foods Lamb Weston, Inc.Fluid-based article distribution and sorting system
US20120174983 *Jan 7, 2011Jul 12, 2012Conagra Foods Lamb Weston, Inc.Fluid-based article distribution and sorting system
WO2002013943A2 *Aug 8, 2001Feb 21, 2002Particle Measuring SystEnsemble manifold, system and method for monitoring particles in clean environments
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/561.00A
International ClassificationF16L41/02, F15C1/00, G01N35/08, F16L39/00, G01N1/18, F16L41/03
Cooperative ClassificationF16L41/03, G01N35/08, G01N1/18, F16L39/00, F15C1/005
European ClassificationF15C1/00E, F16L41/03, G01N1/18, F16L39/00, G01N35/08
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 5, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: TECHNICON INSTRUMENTS CORPORATION
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:REVGROUP PANTRY MIRROR CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004912/0740
Effective date: 19871231