Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3643804 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 22, 1972
Filing dateSep 24, 1970
Priority dateSep 24, 1970
Publication numberUS 3643804 A, US 3643804A, US-A-3643804, US3643804 A, US3643804A
InventorsDallas E Sharpton
Original AssigneeDallas E Sharpton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Waste oil recovery unit
US 3643804 A
Abstract
An endless conveyor belt having an affinity for oil is mounted on the bow of a barge and projects downwardly and forwardly therefrom towards a water surface having oil floating thereon. Buoyancy means located at the lower end of the belt are adjustable such that the lower run of the belt can be selectively positioned slightly below the interface of the water and oil to assure maximum oil absorption with minimum water pickup.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Sharpton Feb. 22, 1972 [54] WASTE OIL RECOVERY UNIT Dallas E. Sharpton, PO. Box 444, Dewey, Okla. 74029 [22] Filed: Sept. 24, 1970 [21] Appl.No.: 75,214

{72] Inventor:

[52] U.S. CI. ..210/242, 210/526, 210/DlG.21

[58] Field of Search ..210/242, 83, S23, DIG. 21, 210/526 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,330,508 9/1943 McColl ..210/523 3,314,540 4/1967 Lane ..2lO/DlG. 21

Primary Examiner-Reuben Friedman Assistant Examiner-Theodore A. Granger Attorney-Head & Johnson [57] ABSTRACT An endless conveyor belt having an affinity for oil is mounted on the bow of a barge and projects downwardly and forwardly therefrom towards a water surface having oil floating thereon. Buoyancy means located at the lower end of the belt are adjustable such that the lower run of the belt can be selectively positioned slightly below the interface of the water and oil to assure maximum oil absorption with minimum water pickup.

2 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PAIENIEUFEB22 m2 SHEET 1 or 3 FIGQZ I/VI/E/VTORS. DALLAS E SHARPTON ATTORNEYS PATENTEUFEBZZ m2 SHEET 2 OF 3 M/VEIVITORS. DALLAS E. SHARPTON BY I Mf ATTORNEYS PATENTEUFEBZZ I972 SHEET 3 OF 3 v INVENTOR. DALLAS, E. SHARPTON WFMM ATTORNEYS WASTE OIL-RECOVERY UNIT BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to an apparatus for removing oil from water. More particularly the invention relates to'an apparatus for removing a large expanse of oil floatingon top of open water.

The recent developments of the massive oil tanker'transporting vessels and offshore drilling platforms have drawn attention to the problem of collecting oil which has accidentally spilled into the sea and which floats on top of-the water surface onto beaches and the like, devastating'both life and property.

The idea of skimming the oil from the water by means of an endless belt system having an affinity for oil has been taught and used heretofore. Presently manufactured endless belt systems project rigidly forwardly from the bow of the vessel into the water. With the belt disposed in the water, the flow of the oil is disrupted and a quantity of water along with the oil is transported up the belt and into an oil storage reservoir provided within the craft. As the storage reservoir begins to fill and the craft settles into the water the belt, being rigidly mounted to the vessel, continues to be displaced deeper into the water thereby picking up additional quantities of water. Thus a large portion of the storage capacity of the reservoir is occupied by water rather than the desired oil, and the craft must return to port and the storage reservoir dumped frequently.

It is therefore an object of this invention-to present an apparatus which overcomes the aforementioned problems of presently manufactured endless belt oil skimming apparatus.

It is a further object of this invention to present an apparatus having adjustable buoyancy means on the lower end of the endless conveyor belt whereby the lower end thereof can be continuously positioned slightly below the interface of the oil and water to assure maximum absorption of oil with minimum pickup of water.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Generally the apparatus comprises a frame having two spaced-apart parallel elongatedmembers rotatably receiving at one end an upper drum and at the opposite end a lower drum with an endless belt wrapped therearound. The frame is pivotally mounted on the bow ofa barge. Buoyancy means are received on each elongated member at-the lower end thereof and are slidable along the longitudinal axis of the elongated member by crank means mounted on the craft such that the bottom of the lower drum can be positioned slightly below the interface of the water and oil.

DESCRIPTION OF TI-IE DRAWINGS DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Looking now at FIG. I, there is shown a large expanse of water 10, upon which a quantity of oil or other immiscible fluid I2 is floating. Projecting downwardly and forwardly from a floating barge 14 is the oil recovery apparatus 16 of this invention. A frame comprising two spaced-apart parallel elongated members 18A and 18B rotatably carries an endlessbelt 20. Elongated members 18A and 188 may be of any suitable construction and preferably are channels having the flange portions 19A and 19Bprojecting outwardly as can be seen in FIG. 5. Belt 20 may be made of any material having an afflnity for oil but not for water. A typical belt is shown in cross section in FIG. 4 and comprises an elongated neoprene core 22 encapsulated by synthetic rubber 24.

Turning now to the side view shown in FIG. 2, elongated frame member 18A is pivotally connected to a support strut 26 which projects vertically upwardly from a point on the bow of barge 14. Similarly frame member 188 is also attached to the barge. Rotatably supported by and between elongated members 18A and 18B is an upper drum 28; the axis of rotation thereof being transverse to the longitudinal axis of the elongated members. Rotatably supported by and between elongated-members 18A and 188 at the lower end thereofis a lower drum 30; the axis of rotation also being transverse the longitudinal axis of the elongated members. Belt 20 is wrapped around and between drums 28 and 30. Preferably the diameter of upper drum 28 is twice that of the lower drum 30 such that for every revolution of the upper drum the lower drum makes two revolutions.

Power rotating means 32 attached to the shaft of upper drum 30 effects travel of belt 20. A tension roller 34 is rotatably secured to and disposed between frame members 18A and 18B outside of the path of endless belt 20. An adjustable pitch roller 36 is rotatably secured to the elongated frame members 18A and 18B within the path of belt 20 via an arm 38. An inner support pan'40 intermediate the upper and lower drums provides a planar surface upon which the upper run of the belt rides.

Carried by floating barge 14 directly under upper drum 28 is an oil pickup reservoir or sump 42 which has an outlet coupled to a suction pump for transferring oil therefrom to the main storage which may in some cases constitute the craft itself. Suitable wiper blades or squeegees 44 pressing against the width of the belt 20 wipe the oil from the belt and allow same to flow into pickup reservoir 42.

Turning now to FIG. 6, a wiper bar 68 is disposed within the run of belt 20 at upper drum 28 and is suitably secured at opposite ends to elongated members 18A and 18B respectively, Dual wiper blades 72 carried by wiper bar 68 through adjustable arms 74 press against the inside of belt 20 and are outwardly inclined from a vertex in order to wipe any liquid which tends to accumulate on the inside of belt 20 into the sump.

Turning now to FIGS. 3 and 5, there is shown in cross section the lower end of frame member 18A. It is to be understood that frame member 18B is similar and any features hereinafter discussed in regards to member 18A apply equally to member 18B.

Lower drum 30 with belt 20 wrapped therearound includes a hub 31 which is rotatably secured to the web of frame member 18A adjacent the lower end thereof.

Along the length of the lower portion offrame member 18A there is welded to the outer peripheral edges of both upper and lower flanges 19A and 198 a roller guide strip 46 perpendicular to the flanges to form in conjunction with frame member 18A a float roller raceway 48 along the longitudinal axis of the frame member.

Received and retained in raceway 48 are two spaced-apart float roller wheels 50 and 52 rotatably carried about the hubs thereof by a carrying plate 54.

Carrying plate 54 includes a perpendicular shaft 55 on which ispivotally joined a float bracket 58. A nut 56 retains bracket 58 on the shaft. Float bracket 58 extends pivotally downwardly from carrying plate 54 and supports on theglower end thereof a pontoon 60 which floats in the water.

Looking now at the upward end of carrying plate 54, the lower end of a fast threaded lead screw 62 is rotatably received in an aperture 63 and held therein by washers and a pin 67. Lead screw 62 extends upwardly parallel with the axis of frame member 18A and is threadedly captured by an adjusting nut 64 rigidly fastened to the frame member 18A in an appropriate manner. The uppermost end of lead screw 62 has received thereon a universal joint 66 which is interconnected to a crank handle conveniently mounted on barge 14.

The utilization of lead screw 62 and adjusting nut 64 is only one of many ways of operably controlling the movement of carriage plate 54. Obviously the same result could be obtained by hydraulic means.

Returning now to FIG. 1, adjustable counterbalanceweights 70 are slidably received on the upper ends of frame members 18A and 188 to cushion the rocking of pontoons 60.

In operation the barge with the oil recovery apparatus of this invention attached thereto is transported to a point adjacent an oil slick. Pontoons 60 are then moved relative to frame members 18A and 188 by manipulation of the crank handle until the lower run of belt 20 at the underside of drum 30 is slightly below the interface of the oil and water.

The belt 20 is then rotated in a counterclockwise direction to convey oil upwardly to upper drum 28 where wiper blade 44 squeezes the oil from the belt into sump 42 from whence the oil is conducted to the main reservoir within the craft. As before mentioned, the location of the lower part of the belt and the drum at the interface of the oil and water assures the maximum attraction of the oil to the belt while a minimum of water is conveyed upwardly onto the belt. As the reservoir in the craft begins to fill and the craft settles in the water, the crank is further manipulated to readjust the lower run of belt at drum 30 so that it remains slightly below the interface of the oil and the water.

Thus at all times during the operation the lower drum is conveniently and easily positioned at the interface of the water and oil by an operator on the craft.

In some applications oil recovery apparatus 16 may be conveyed through the oil slick by the barges power plant. In other applications the apparatus may remain stationary and the flow ofthe water may be utilized to carry the oil to the belt.

The dimensions of the components of the apparatus are determined by the particular requirements of each application. Under some circumstances, it may be feasible to mount the apparatus to a stationary support on shore rather than on a barge.

During the detailed description of the preferred embodiment specific language has been used for the sake of clarity. However, it is to be understood that such language includes all equivalents which operate in a similar manner to accomplish a similar purpose. For example, although the apparatus has been discussed with reference to large oil slicks floating on open water, the apparatus would work equally well in industri all applications such as skimming oil or other impurities from water in such equipment as industrial washers.

Also optional diverting wipers 46 may be attached to the corners of the support pan and angled upwardly for the purpose of directing oil away from the edge of belt 20 into the center thereof.

Additionally in some applications, the device may be pivotally mounted on the shore and project therefrom into the ocean. In these applications it is desirable to have individual adjusting cranks for each pontoon such that any inclination of the shore relative to the sea can be compensated for thereby keeping the lower drum horizontal with the water.

What is claimed:

1. An apparatus for removing oil floating on water comprismg:

a frame having two spaced-apart substantially parallel elongated members;

supporting means for pivotally securing said frame to the bow of a floating vessel such that said frame projects forwardly and downwardly therefrom toward said water;

an upper drum rotatably supported by and between said elongated members ofsaid frame;

a lower drum rotatably supported by and between said elongated members at the lower end thereof;

an endless belt wrapped around and extending between said drums, said belt having an affinity for oil; buoyancy means pivotal y coupled to the lower end of each said elongated member;

means for sliding said buoyancy means relative to the longitudinal axis of said elongated member whereby the bottom of the lower run of said endless belt at the underside of said lower drum can be positioned slightly below the interface of said oil and water;

power means for driving said endless belt whereby said belt picks up oil at the lower drum and conveys same to said upper drum;

an oil reservoir disposed adjacent and under said upper drum; and

wiper blades pivotally carried adjacent said upper drum for wiping said oil from said belt and allowing said oil to flow into said reservoir.

2. An apparatus as in claim 1 wherein the lower end of said elongated members contains a longitudinal raceway and wherein said means for slidably moving said buoyancy means relative to said elongated member comprises;

at least one float roller slidably disposed in said raceway; said buoyancy means being interconnected to the said roller;

a lead screw rotatably interconnected to said roller and projecting therefrom parallel to the axis of said member;

a lead screwnut rigidly secured to said elongated member and threadedly engaging said lead screw whereby rotation of said lead screw through said nut causes longitudinal movement of said buoyancy means to adjust the position of the bottom of said lower drum relative to interface of said oil and water; and

means to rotate said lead screw.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2330508 *Mar 5, 1940Sep 28, 1943Eli S MccollSystem for removing oil films from bodies of water
US3314540 *Jul 5, 1963Apr 18, 1967British Petroleum CoRemoval of oil films from water
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3762558 *Sep 30, 1971Oct 2, 1973J AndersonAnti-pollution barge and conveyer assembly
US3834538 *Oct 10, 1972Sep 10, 1974Firestone Tire & Rubber CoFloating anti-pollution apparatus
US3891558 *Dec 6, 1972Jun 24, 1975Jr Paul ConditOil and debris removal unit
US4110216 *Apr 22, 1976Aug 29, 1978Wagnon Albert LloydApparatus for collecting debris floating in a stream
US4178247 *Aug 2, 1978Dec 11, 1979Jan-Bar Retrieval CorporationOil spill retrieval system
US4360430 *May 5, 1981Nov 23, 1982Ellis Royd HSpill retrieval mechanism for removing a spilled substance from a liquid surface
US4555338 *Oct 9, 1984Nov 26, 1985Tony MarchiondaOil spill collector
US5015378 *Jan 24, 1990May 14, 1991Camshaft Machine CompanyBelt oil skimmer apparatus
US5084171 *Jan 17, 1991Jan 28, 1992Specialty Welding & Fabricating Of New York Inc.Oil recovery mop
US5200083 *Oct 16, 1991Apr 6, 1993Jannette Gomez KaylorSkimmer and method for its use
US5362391 *Jun 5, 1992Nov 8, 1994Stephens Leo WApparatus for picking up oil from water
US5522990 *Aug 8, 1994Jun 4, 1996Davidian; StevenOil removal device with integrated gravity separator
US5753108 *Oct 24, 1995May 19, 1998Haynes; William FredrickIntegrated oil response and recovery system and method and skimmer for use therein
US7504028 *Feb 22, 2008Mar 17, 2009Benjamin GurfinkelWater-contaminant separation system
US7585410Aug 15, 2007Sep 8, 2009Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally neutral processing with condensed phase cryogenic fluids
US7597799Aug 15, 2007Oct 6, 2009Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally-neutral processing with condensed phase cryogenic fluids
US7597800 *Aug 15, 2007Oct 6, 2009Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally-neutral processing with condensed phase cryogenic fluids
US7601257Aug 15, 2007Oct 13, 2009Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally-neutral processing with condensed phase cryogenic fluids
US7604732Aug 15, 2007Oct 20, 2009Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally-neutral processing with condensed phase cryogenic fluids
US7645378Aug 15, 2007Jan 12, 2010Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally-neutral processing with condensed phase cryogenic fluids
US7658856Aug 15, 2007Feb 9, 2010Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally-neutral processing with condensed phase cryogenic fluids
US7674373Aug 15, 2007Mar 9, 2010Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally-neutral processing with condensed phase cryogenic fluids
US7914672Aug 28, 2009Mar 29, 2011Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally-neutral processing with condensed phase cryogenic fluids
US7938964Mar 25, 2009May 10, 2011Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally-neutral processing with condensed phase cryogenic fluids
US8080164Jun 15, 2010Dec 20, 2011Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally-neutral processing with condensed phase cryogenic fluids
US8273250 *Jun 8, 2011Sep 25, 2012Environment Recovery EquipmentSkimmer, barge and methods for recovering and transferring heavy oil or bitumen
US8580123 *Feb 17, 2011Nov 12, 2013Environment Recovery EquipmentSkimmer, barge and methods for recovering and transferring heavy oil or bitumen
US9248388 *Sep 23, 2013Feb 2, 2016ISM&M, Inc.Skimming apparatus
US9388546Jul 1, 2014Jul 12, 2016Victor Manuel QuinonesOil recovery system
US9493215 *Jun 11, 2014Nov 15, 2016Liquid Waste Technology, LlcFloating debris harvesting system
US20060017376 *Jul 7, 2005Jan 26, 2006Canon Kabushiki KaishaOrganic light emitting device
US20090044546 *Aug 15, 2007Feb 19, 2009Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally-Neutral Processing With Condensed Phase Cryogenic Fluids
US20090044840 *Aug 15, 2007Feb 19, 2009Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally-neutral processing with condensed phase cryogenic fluids
US20090044841 *Aug 15, 2007Feb 19, 2009Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally-Neutral Processing With Condensed Phase Cryogenic Fluids
US20090044842 *Aug 15, 2007Feb 19, 2009Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally-Neutral Processing With Condensed Phase Cryogenic Fluids
US20090045115 *Aug 15, 2007Feb 19, 2009Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally-neutral processing with condensed phase cryogenic fluids
US20090045117 *Aug 15, 2007Feb 19, 2009Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally-neutral processing with condensed phase cryogenic fluids
US20090045118 *Aug 15, 2007Feb 19, 2009Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally Neutral Processing With Condensed Phase Cryogenic Fluids
US20090045123 *Aug 15, 2007Feb 19, 2009Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally-Neutral Processing With Condensed Phase Cryogenic Fluids
US20090045148 *Aug 15, 2007Feb 19, 2009Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally-neutral processing with condensed phase cryogenic fluids
US20090205363 *Mar 25, 2009Aug 20, 2009Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally-neutral processing with condensed phase cryogenic fluids
US20100043487 *Aug 28, 2009Feb 25, 2010Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally-Neutral Processing With Condensed Phase Cryogenic Fluids
US20100282687 *May 11, 2009Nov 11, 2010Charles AbrahamSystem and Method for Extraction of Petroleum from Oil/Water Mixture
US20100287980 *Jun 15, 2010Nov 18, 2010Ronald De StrulleEnvironmentally-Neutral Processing With Condensed Phase Cryogenic Fluids
US20110233149 *Jun 8, 2011Sep 29, 2011Environment Recovery Equipment (6859194 Canada Ltd.)Skimmer, barge and methods for recovering and transferring heavy oil or bitumen
US20120085709 *Sep 22, 2011Apr 12, 2012Packham Andrew RobertRemoving oil from the surface of a body of water
US20120111792 *Jun 17, 2011May 10, 2012Suzhou Timelyblue Environmental Technology Co., Ltd.Apparatus for automatically adsorbing and recycling floating oil on water
US20120211435 *Feb 17, 2011Aug 23, 2012Environment Recovery Equipment (6859194 Canada Ltd.)Skimmer, barge and methods for recovering and transferring heavy oil or bitumen
US20140367342 *Jun 11, 2014Dec 18, 2014Liquid Waste Technology, LlcFloating debris harvesting system
CN102167139A *Mar 28, 2011Aug 31, 2011山东省油区环境污染治理工程技术研究中心Vessel for clearing and recycling water surface petroleum pollutants
CN102167139BMar 28, 2011Jul 24, 2013山东省油区环境污染治理工程技术研究中心Vessel for clearing and recycling water surface petroleum pollutants
DE3123343A1 *Jun 12, 1981Dec 30, 1982Bodan Werft Motoren Und SchiffConveying device for collecting contaminants from free water
EP2865820A1 *Oct 22, 2014Apr 29, 2015Gabriele PalmieriAutomatic system for detecting and blocking pollutants dissolved in environmental sites
WO1978000014A1 *Jun 8, 1978Dec 21, 1978Oil Mop International IncMethod and apparatus for oil skimming
WO1993008337A1 *Oct 16, 1992Apr 29, 1993Kaylor Joseph BOil skimmer
WO1997015732A1 *Oct 24, 1996May 1, 1997William Fredrick HaynesIntegrated oil response and recovery system and method and skimmer for use therein
Classifications
U.S. Classification210/242.4, 210/923, 210/526
International ClassificationE02B15/10, E02B15/04
Cooperative ClassificationE02B15/104, Y10S210/923
European ClassificationE02B15/10E