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Publication numberUS3644036 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 22, 1972
Filing dateJun 8, 1970
Priority dateJun 8, 1970
Publication numberUS 3644036 A, US 3644036A, US-A-3644036, US3644036 A, US3644036A
InventorsCanfield Merlyn O
Original AssigneeCanfield Merlyn O
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for photographic printing without a darkroom
US 3644036 A
Abstract
A lighttight casing adapted to be connected to the lens of a conventional photographic enlarger, and a lighttight photographic paper holding container movable in and out of the lighttight casing. The paper-holding container including a focusing target on one side, an opening having a slidable close on a second side opposite said focusing target and an internal paper display area aligned with the target and the opening. The paper-holding container adapted to be manipulated such that the focusing target and the internal paper display area may be placed an equal distance from the enlarger lens. The paper-holding container including light-trapping baffles which allow fluid to flow therethrough such that a sheet of exposed paper therein may be developed by immersing the paper-holding container serially in conventional photographic developing fluid baths. A method of exposing and developing a piece of photographic paper without a darkroom.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Canfield 1 Feb. 22, 1972 [54] APPARATUS FOR PHOTOGRAPHIC PRINTING WITHOUT A DARKROOM [72] Inventor: Merlyn 0. Canfield, 27022 l2th Ave. S.,

Kent, Wash. 98031 [22] Filed: June 8, 1970 211 Appl. No.: 44,477

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3/1887 9/l9ll 2/1914 7/1917 1/1956 Primary ExaminerSamuel S. Matthews Assistant Examiner-Michael Harris AttorneyGraybeal, Cole & Barnard [57] ABSTRACT A lighttight casing adapted to be connected to the lens of a conventional photographic enlarger, and a lighttight photographic paper holding container movable in and out of the lighttight casing. The paper-holding container including a focusing target on one side, an opening having a slidable close on a second side opposite said focusing target and an internal paper display area aligned with the target and the opening. The paper-holding container adapted to be manipulated such that the focusing target and the internal paper display area may be placed an equal distance from the enlarger lens. The paper-holding container including light-trapping baffles which allow fluid to flow therethrough such that a sheet of exposed paper therein may be developed by immersing the paper-holding container serially in conventional photographic developing fluid baths. A method of exposing and developing a piece of photographic paper without a darkroom.

18 Claims, 15 Drawing Figures PATENTEDFEBZZ I972 3.644.036

SHEET 1 OF 6 INVENTOR. MEFZV/V 0. C/l/YF/ELD PATENTEDFEBZZ I972 SHEET 2 [IF 6 INVENTOR.

WMQM ATTOPNFYS PATENTEDFEBZZ 1972 I SHEET 3 BF 6 INVENTOR. MERLY/Y 0. CANF/ELD APPARATUS FOR PHOTOGRAPI-IIC PRINTING WITHOUT A DARKROOM BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates, in general, to color and black-andwhite photographic printing, and in particular to a method and apparatus for use with a conventional photographic enlarger whereby a print may be made without a darkroom.

2. Description of the Prior Art In recent years, public interest in photography as a hobby and particularly home printing of pictures has increased markedly, notwithstanding the significant'monetary outlay which is often necessary to obtain an enlarger, photographic paper, chemicals and other darkroom equipment. Perhaps the greatest obstacle preventing even more persons from enjoying this hobby, however, is lack of a suitable darkroom. A suitable darkroom for photographic printing must, of course, be lighttight, and in addition should be equipped with running water. Many dwelling places, particularly apartments, simply are not large enough to allow an entire room to be continually used as a darkroom, and the part-time use of a bathroom or closet as a darkroom necessitates bothersome and time-consuming unpacking and packing of photographic equipment before and after use.

Leeds US. Pat. No. 1,088,030 discloses an early apparatus for making photographic enlargements from negatives or films without a darkroom. Two distinct disadvantages of the Leeds apparatus are: first, that the focusing screen is disposed at a distance away from the lens of the camera which is different from the distance between the paper to be exposed and the camera lens; and second, that developing of the print must still be done in a darkroom.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for printing both black-and-white and color photographic prints without a darkroom. In short, the apparatus includes a vertically adjustable lighttight enclosure which is adapted to be connected to a conventional photographic enlarger. The casing includes a closable view port, and may also include a filterholding drawer, an external lens control adjustment for the enlarger and a manually adjustable gripping means extending through the casing. A generally rectangular drawer or container for storing a piece of photographic paper on which a print is to be made extends through the casing wall near its base and is slidably mounted for easy insertion and removal. This drawer or container is lighttight to prevent premature exposure of the light-sensitive photographic paper. A focusing target substantially equal in size to the sheet of photographic paper to be exposed and printed is disposed on a portion of one external side of the drawer, while an opening having a slidable close comprises a portion of the external side opposite the focusing target. Within the lighttight drawer, and aligned with both the focusing target and the closable opening is a paper display area for holding the light-sensitive paper.

In operation, the transparency or negative to be printed is inserted in the enlarger, and the projected image is focused upon the target side of the photographic paper storage drawer. The viewing port in the casing is opened to allow the user to determine proper focus. The enlarger light is then turned off, the viewing portal closed and the paper-holding drawer slidably removed from the casing, turned over, and reinserted therein such that the closable opening side is up. The plate closure of this opening is then moved outwardly to allow the projected beam from the enlarger and through the negative to strike the light-sensitive paper within the drawer. The enlarger is then turned on for the desired exposure time. The sliding plate is then reinserted to close the opening of the drawer to again render it lighttight, and the entire drawer is then removed from the casing and serially disposed in appropriate photographic developing fluids and baths. The lighttight drawer includes baffles which allow fluids to flow easily therethrough and thus the exposed paper within the drawer is developed.

It is an object of the present invention, therefore, to provide a method and apparatus for use in combination with a photographic enlarger to print pictures.

It is another object, to provide apparatus for printing photographic pictures without a darkroom.

One more object is to provide photographic printing apparatus for use in making both color and black-and-white prints.

Still another object is to provide photographic printing apparatus wherein the photographic paper to be exposed is exactly the same distance from the enlarger lens as the focusing target.

An additional object is to provide a container for holding the photographic paper to be printed which prevents the entrance of light therein while allowing fluids to flow easily therethrough.

Still another object is to provide photographic chemical holding tanks in which the photographic paper within the photographic paper holding container may be developed.

Additional objects and advantages will be apparent from the following detailed description of the invention taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an apparatus typifying the present invention, including a conventional photographic enlarger.

FIG. 2 is an exploded perspective view of the typical apparatus of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an exploded perspective view of the opening side of the paper-holding container, including a sectioned corner showing the bead-type seal.

FIG. 4 is an exploded perspective view of the focusing target side of the paper-holding container.

FIG. 5 is an exploded sectional end view of the paper-holding container.

FIG. 6 is a partial sectional end view of the paper-holding container showing the baffles and light-trapping wells.

FIG. 7 is a partial sectional elevation view of the lighttight casing of the present invention, including manually adjustable gripping means extending through the casing.

FIG. 8 is a sectional elevation view of one embodiment of an external enlarger lens control.

FIG. 9 is a sectional view taken along line 99 of FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 is a sectional elevation view of a second typical embodiment of an external lens control.

FIG. 11 is a sectional view taken along line 11-11 of FIG. 10.

FIG. 12 is an exploded view of a multiprint photographic paper holding developing container, including two sheets of photographic paper.

FIG. 13 is a perspective view of the paper-holding container of FIG. 12 disposed in a photographic fluid tank, including a section showing the end of the paper-holding container.

FIG. 14 is a sectional view taken along line 14l4 in FIG. 13.

FIG. 15 is a perspective view showing the paper-holding container of FIGS. 3 and 4 disposed in a photographic fluid tank.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Referring now to FIG. 1, a photographic printing apparatus 10 for printing color and black-and-white pictures without a formal darkroom is disclosed. Printing apparatus 10 includes, in general, a casing 12 which is adapted to be adjustably connected to the lens 14 of a conventional photographic enlarger 16. Casing 12 further includes a removable photographic paper storage drawer 18. Printing apparatus 10 is mounted on enlarger base 20 by conventional finger-actuated clips 22 disposed opposite each other on base 20. The release of clips 22, allows the printing apparatus to be moved either towards or away from the enlarger support pole 24, but not transverse thereto. Although enlarger 16 is shown mounted for only vertical movement on support pole 24, other conventional enlargers move toward or away from the main support pole when they are moved up or down, and the mobility of the printing 7 apparatus provided by clamps 22 is convenient for use with that type enlarger.

Casing 12 includes base portion 26, collapsible bellows portion 28, cap portion 30, collapsible bellows neck 32 and enlarger lens connecting portion 34. Vertical support braces 36 are connected to base portion 26 by conventional screws 38 and include centrally located vertical slots 40. Screws 42 extend through slot 40 and are threaded into cap portion 30 of the casing such that rotation of screws 42 in one direction causes cap portion'30 to be clamped between vertical supports 36 thus preventing vertical movement thereof, while rotation of screws 42 in the opposite direction allow the cap portion to be moved in the vertical direction. It is understood that both bellows portions'of the casing 12 contribute toits ability to be vertically extended, and in combination allow sufficient vertical adjustment for practically all types of enlargers.

Referring also to FIG. 2, it will be seen that cap portion 30 additionally includes a hole 44 in which a manually operated gripping device 46 mounted on rod 48 is disposed. A generally conical, flexible, seal 50 is adapted to be connected to the inner'edg'e of hole 44, and rod 48 extends through hole 52 near the apex portion thereof. It is understood that the connections between seal 50 and hole 44 and rod 48 and hole 52 are lighttight to prevent the leakage of light into the casing. Seal 50 may be constructed of black cloth, paper-laminated cloth rubber or other material, with the only requirements being that it be impervious to the passage of light and sufficiently flexible to allow the movement of the rod and attached gripping means within the casing.

Cap portion 30 of the casing further includes viewing port 54 having slidable close 56. The surface of cap 56 adjacent the viewing port is formed to allow the operator looking through the viewing port to see the entire focusing target area as will be described hereafter. Outwardly extending contoured eyeshade 58 is additionally mounted on casing 30 adjacent the viewing port. Eyeshade 58 is curved to conform, in general, to the human face such that light may be prevented from entering the casing, even when port 54 is open, by the operator pressing his face thereagainst. It is contemplated that a sponge or felt cushion may alsobe provided on the top edge of shade 58 to provide comfort for the user and additionally ensure against leakage of light into the casing. As will be seen from the following discussion, a lighttight seal between the viewers face and shield 58 is not necessary during focusing of the enlarger on the target area, although it is desirable, in that the projected image appears in greater contrast in a totally dark environment. The lighttight seal between the operators face and light shade 58 is, however, critical when dodging, burningin or vignetting techniques are employed during the actual exposure of the light-sensitive paper.

Flexible bellows 28 and 32 may be made of black cloth, paper-laminated black cloth, or other flexible, light impervious material, and the end portions of each bellows are connected to cooperating portions of casing 12 by glue or other conventional sealing means. Bellows 32 is connected at its wide end to plate 60 which is held by clips 62 to cap portion 30 of the casing. As is best seen in FIG. 2, plate 60 includes downwardly depending tongue 64 which mates with the groove defined by walls 66 and 68 near the top of cap 30 to form a lighttight joint.

Referring additionally to FIGS. 3-6, light-sensitive paper holding drawer or container 18 which is slidable in opening 70 of base portion 26 is disclosed. Drawer 18 is generally rectangular in shape and is adapted to move on adjustable guides 72 held by notches 74 on base portion 26 of the casing. It will be readily understood that prints of varying size may be made with the present device by adjusting the position of guides 72 with respect to notches 74 and using various-sized paper storage drawers. Front wall 76 of the base portion of the casing is connected to sidewalls 78 by unglued tongue-andgroove connections 80, and thus wall 76 may be readily removed and replaced by a front wall having an opening of different size to accommodate varying-sized paper storage drawers 18. As shown in FIG. 2, guides 72 are disposed in intermediate notches on the base which, for example, may be used when it is desired to produce 5X7 prints. Inner notches 74 may be used for producing 4X5 prints, while the outer notches could, for example, be used for 8X10 prints. It is understood that prints of other size may also be produced by varying the position of notches 74 and by using the desiredsize paper storage drawer and a front wall having a cooperatingly sized opening.

It is also contemplated that prints of varying size may be produced by employing a drawer having an 8Xl0 size paperholding area, for example, which includes a depression of smaller dimension located centrally on the paper-holding area thereof and adapted to receive inserts which in turn are adapted to hold individual sheets of developing paper of 5X7 or 4X5 size for example. The depth of the depression is equal to the thickness of the cooperating insert, and consequently the smaller size paper to be exposed is held at exactly the same distance from the enlarger lens as the 8X10 paper.

Referring particularly to FIG. 3, drawer 18 includes outer portion 82 which comprises a portion of casing 12 when drawer 18 is inserted in opening 7 0. Front portion 82 includes bead 84 running around its outer edge, which bead mates with groove 86 (FIG. 2) surrounding opening 70. Front wall portion 82 further includes handle 88 which may be gripped to movethe paper storage drawer into and out of the casing.

Drawer 18 additionally includes an opening 90 on one side, which opening is adapted to be closed by panel 92'which is slidable in slot 94. Panel 92 includes finger-gripping portion 96 whereby opening 90 may be opened or closed from without casing 12. Outer shield 98 is additionally provided to prevent light access to the lighbsensitive paper which, as will be described hereafter, is disposed within drawer 18.

Referring particularly to FIG. 4, drawer l8 additionally includes focusing target 98 mounted on the external side of drawer 18 opposite opening 90. Focusing target 98 may be made of plastic, treated paper or other material, and is preferably white or an approximation of the color of the lightsensitive paper to be printed. Focusing target 98 may be mounted on drawer 18 by any conventional means, including glue, so long as the mounting means is not weakened by immersion in photographic developing chemicals. Focusing target'98 should be substantially the same size as the desired print. Light-sensitive paper holding means such as right-angle tracks 100 and stop 102 are disposed within drawer 18 and define the photographic paper display area. The tracks and stop are adapted to hold a sheet of light-sensitive paper 104 in alignment with both focusing target 98 and opening 90. It should be understood that paper-holding means of other configuration may also be used, but it has been found that the simple guide-and-stop system disclosed in the drawings allows light-sensitive paper to be easily loaded into the drawer 18in a changing bag prior to printing.

Referring particularly to FIG. 5, it is seen that drawer 18 additionally includes an interlocking-baffle system which defines a plurality of light wells along its long edges. The closable opening side 106 of drawer 18 includes outer baffles 108 and inner baffles 110, while focusing target side 112 of drawer 18 includes baffles 114 and walls 116 which act as light baffles. End wall 118 of side 112 and end wall 120 of opposite side 106 meet edge to edge, as is best shown in FIG. 6, and in combination are longer than any of the baffles 108, or 114 or wall 116. Thus, when sides 106 and 112 are brought together such that ends 118 and meet, a pair of winding paths are defined extending from outside drawer 18 into the central light-sensitive paper storage area. This baffle construction defines a series of light wells which prevent the passage of light into the light-sensitive paper storage area, but, as will be described below, allow the passage of fluids into and out of the drawer.

From the above description, it will be understood that when drawer 18 is disposed within opening 70 of casing 12 with the focusing target side 112 in the up position, drawer 18 is supported by tracks 72 which bear upon surface portions 122 of the drawer. When drawer 18 is inserted in opening 70 with opening side 106 in the up position, guides 72 bear upon surface portions 124 of drawer 18. As is best seen in FIG. 6, surface portion 122 is exactly the same distance from focusing target 98 as surface portion 124 is from light-sensitive paper 104. As will be discussed hereafter, this construction allows the light-sensitive paper to be exposed at exactly the same distance from the enlarger lens as the target 98 during focusmg.

As is seen in FIG. 4, end walls 118 and 120, also include inner baffles 126 and 128 which combine to form an additional tongue-and-groove lighttight seal. It should be understood that this tongue-and-groove construction is desirable to prevent the leakage of light into either drawer 18 or casing 12 and that this construction is used at all connecting joints of the present invention where possible. Other lighttight connections may also be used to accomplish the same purpose.

Referring now to FIG. 7, the general position of gripping means 46 within casing 12 is disclosed. Flexible collar 50 allows rod 48 to be moved and pivoted universally within the lighttight casing such that gripping means 46 may be disposed over any portion of the light-sensitive paper within drawer 18. When it is desired to overexpose or underexpose a portion of the print, to either correct deficiencies in the negative or produce a special effect, a piece of paper or other opaque material may be held in gripping means 46 and positioned over that portion of the light-sensitive paper on which it is desired to have a lesser amount of light projected.

Referring now to FIGS. 8 and 9, one form of apparatus for adjusting the amount of light passing through the enlarger lens is disclosed. Enlarger lens 14 extends into the lens connecting portion 35 of the lighttight casing. Lens-connecting portion 35 includes a generally cylindrical vertical outer casing 126 having a lip 128 which is connected by glue or other conventional means to bellows neck 32, and a generally horizontal top portion 130 having a central opening through which lens 14 extends. Ring 132 surrounds lens 14 and is spaced therefrom by setscrews 134 which are threaded through holes 136 in ring 132. Casing 126 includes an arcuate slot portion 138 through which pin 140 extends. Pin 140 is connected at its inner end to ring 132 by threads 142 or other conventional connecting means, and includes finger-gripping portion 144 mounted on its outer end. Pin 140 additionally extends through generally semicircular shield 146 which extends laterally outward from pin 140 to cover slot 138 thereby preventing the entrance of light into the lighttight casing. From the above, it is readily understood that enlarger lens 14 may be opened or closed by the manual movement of finger-gripping portion 144 in slot 138. The arcuate length of shield 146 is such that slot 138 is continually covered thereby, even when finger-gripping portion 144 is moved to either extreme end of slot 138. Supports 148 are additionally provided within casing 35 to hold a photographic filter (not shown).

Referring now to FIGS. and 11, another embodiment of apparatus for varying the amount of light projected through lens 14 is disclosed. Enlarger lens surrounding portion 34 of the casing includes generally vertical walls 148 and generally horizontal top portion 150 having a central opening through which lens 14 extends. Vertical walls 148 include lower lip portion 152 which is connected to bellows neck 32. Ring 154 surrounds the lower portion of enlarger lens 14 and is spaced therefrom by setscrews 156 extending therethrough. Ring 154 includes toothed bottom portion 158 which is adapted to mate with cooperatingly toothed gear 160. Gear 160 is mounted on pin 162 which extends through wall 148 and is connected to external finger-gripping knob 164. Light shields 166 are additionally mounted on pin 162 to seal opening 168 through which pin 162 extends against the leakage of light. From the above, it will be readily seen that rotation of finger-gripping portion 164 causes ring 154 and lens 14 to which it is connected to rotate. As is commonly known, rotation of an enlarger lens either enlarges or closes the lens opening thereby allowing a greater or lesser amount of light to pass therethrough. Inwardly extending ledges 170 are provided to support slidable drawer 172 in which a photographic filter 174 may be disposed.

In producing a photographic print using the apparatus of the present invention, printing apparatus 10 is mounted on the viewing base of a conventional photographic enlarger. Portion 34 of the casing 12 is then connected to the enlarger lens such that the lens may be opened or closed by manipulation of an external knob such as knob 164. As has been described above, the enlarger need not be placed in a darkroom, as is necessary in prior photographic printing, but rather may be used in a normally lighted room. Drawer 18 is removed from casing 12 and placed in a conventional black bag wherein a piece of unexposed photographic paper is loaded into the drawer. Portions 106 and 112 of the drawer may be snapped apart, the paper inserted in grooves 100 such that it abuts stop 102 and portions 106 and 112 rejoined such that the drawer is lighttight. Alternatively, slide 92 may be removed from the drawer, the paper inserted in slots 100 through opening 90, and plate 92 reinserted to again make the drawer lighttight. The loaded drawer is then reinserted into hole 70 in base portion 26 of the casing such that focusing target 98 is on its top side. The negative to be printed (not shown) is then inserted into enlarger 16 in the conventional manner required by the individual enlarger. It should be understood that differing enlarger designs may require the negative to be inserted into the enlarger prior to connection of lens-gripping portion 34 to the enlarger, but these modifications of the described procedure are considered to be obvious.

The enlarger is then turned on and the lens opened as wide as possible such that a bright image is projected on to the focusing target 98 of drawer 18. The height of the enlarger above the focusing target is adjusted to produce a sharp image on the focusing target, as judged by the operator looking through viewing port 54. Slide 56 is then moved to close port 54 and, if desired, the enlarger lens is stopped down. Drawer 18 is removed from slot 70, turned over, and reinserted such that side 106 having opening disposed therein is upward. Plate 92 is then slid outwardly in slot 94 and the enlarger light is turned on allowing the beam of light to project the image of the negative onto the light-sensitive paper for the desired time. Plate 92 is then slid inwardly to close opening 90, and drawer 18 having the exposed light-sensitive paper therein is removed from casing 12.

As is best seen in FIG. 15, the drawer and the enclosed exposed paper are then inserted into a tank 176 holding conventional photographic developer fluid 178. It will be readily understood that the fluid passes quickly through the winding channels in the edges of drawer l8 and into the center portion thereof where it contacts the exposed photographic paper. Assuming a black-and-white print is being made, after the appropriate developing time has passed, the drawer is removed from tank 176 and inserted into a second tank of similar configuration (not shown) holding a conventional photographic stop fluid. It should be understood that in removing drawer 18 from tank 176, the developing fluid must be allowed to drain out of the side channels of the drawer. Due to the relatively large size of these channels, this drainage is rapid. After the exposed print has been treated by the stop for the desired time, drawer 18 is removed from the second tank allowing the stop fluid to drain from the drawer, and is then inserted in a third tank holding a conventional photographic fix solution. After a proper time, the drawer and enclosed print may be serially placed in any desired washes or additional treating solutions. Finally, drawer 18 is opened and the developed photographic print is removed and allowed to dry.

If a color print is being made, it is understood that the drawer and enclosed print may be serially inserted in any necessary alternate or additional chemical-holding tanks or washes. The developing steps in producing either a black-andwhite or colored print may be exactly the same as those normally used in print developing in a conventional darkroom, with the only difference being that the steps may be performed in daylight with the print enclosed within lighttight casing 18.

As disclosed in the drawings, tank 176 is substantially similar in cross-sectional area to drawer 18, thereby allowing a relatively small amount of chemical to be used in developing. As drawer 1 8 is inserted into tank 1'76, the photographic solution therein is first forced into the interior of drawer l8, and then upwardly in the tank such that the entire print may be submerged in a relatively small amount of fluid. Tanks 176 may be made of clear plastic and may include a marking line showing the amount of fluid needed in order to cover a piece of exposed paper after the lighttight drawer is inserted therein. It is also contemplated that tanks of varying size corresponding to the drawers used to hold the light-sensitive paper for making prints of various size may also be provided.

FIGS. 12-14 disclose another embodiment of the present invention which may be used to develop a plurality of exposed prints at one time. After exposing the light-sensitive paper to the light beam projected by the enlarger through the negative, drawer 18 is removed from slot 70 and placed in a conventional lightproof black bag wherein the exposed paper is removed from drawer 18 and inserted, exposed side up, in guides 180 on the inner surface of portion 182 of the multiple print developer 184. Multiple print developer 184 and the exposed print are left in the black bag while a second print is exposed as has been described above. Drawer 18 is again placed into the black bag and the second piece of exposed paper is placed in slots 184 of portion 186 of the multiple print developer. Portions 182 and 186 are then pressed together to form a lighttight container having a plurality of baffles 188 disposed along at least two opposite edges to define fluidpassing light wells. As is best seen in FIG. 14, baffles 188 define channels 190 through which fluid may easily pass, but which prevent the passage of light therethrough.

As is seen in FIG. 13, the multiple print developing apparatus is then disposed serially in containers such as tank 192 containing the necessary conventional black-and-white or colored developing chemicals and baths. It will be readily understood that although a tank for developing two prints simultaneously has been disclosed, that additional print-holding means might be disposed within container 184 to allow additional prints to be developed simultaneously. Although not shown, it is also contemplated that means 'for removing container 184 from tank 192 may be provided such as a plastic bail extending into the tank to lower and lift the container 184.

Again, although not shown, it is contemplated that apparatus for rotating drawer 18 from focusing target side up to closable opening side up without having to remove it from casing 12 might also be provided.

The invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or central characteristics thereof. The present embodiments are therefore to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive, the scope of the invention being indicated by the appended claims rather than by the foregoing description, and all changes that come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are therefore to be embraced therein.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for exposing light-sensitive paper to a beam of light from a light source through a photographic negative comprising a lighttight casing connected to said light source; light-sensitive paper storage means extending inwardly through said casing; said light-sensitive paper storage means including a first side having a focusing area for said beam of light; a second side opposite said first side having an opening aligned with said focusing area, said opening including a closing means, and a light-sensitive paper display area within said light-sensitive paper storage means and aligned with said focusingarea and said opening; said light-sensitive paper display area adapted to be oriented such that said focusing area and said light-sensitive paper display area may be placed an equal distance from said light source.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said light source is a conventional photographic enlarger.

3. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein said lighttight casing includes bellows means for adjustably connecting said casing to said photographic enlarger.

4. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said lighttight, lightsensitive paper storage means comprises a drawer movable into and out of said casing.

5. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein the orientation of said drawer with respect to said casing is reversible.

6. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said focusing area is substantially similar in size and color tone to the light-sensitive paper to be exposed.

7. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said closing means for said opening comprises a plate slidable in tracks disposed on said light-sensitive paper storage means.

8. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said light-sensitive paper display area includes a pair of spaced slots mounted internally in said light sensitive paper storage means and adapted to receive opposite edges of said light-sensitive paper.

9. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said lighttight casing includes filter-holding means adapted to hold a filter in said beam of light.

10. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said lighttight casing includes closable viewing means.

11. The apparatus of claim 10 wherein said viewing means includes an outwardly extending eyeshade, said eyeshade being contoured to conform to the face of the viewer.

12. The apparatus of claim 1 including a manually adjustable gripping means extending through said casing.

13. The apparatus of claim 12 wherein said manually adjustable gripping means includes a flexible lighttight seal adjacent said casing.

14. The apparatus of claim 1 including means mounted externally on said casingto focus the beam of light from said light source.

15. Apparatus for exposing light-sensitive paper including a lighttight casing having a neck portion adapted to be connected to the lens of a photographic enlarger, said lighttight casing including a lighttight, light-sensitive paper storage means, said lighttight, light-sensitive paper storage means comprising a closed container having an opening on one surface thereof, said opening having a sliding close, said container including a focusing area on a second surface opposite said opening, a piece of light-sensitive paper disposed within said container and aligned with said opening, said container adapted to be reversibly disposed in said lighttight casing such that said focusing area and said light-sensitive paper may be spaced an equal distance from said lens.

16. In combination with a photographic enlarger, apparatus for printing photographic paper comprising a lighttight chamber connected to the lens of said enlarger; a photographic paper support disposed in a lighttight container, said lighttight container adapted to be positioned within said lighttight chamber, said lighttight container including a focusing area on one side and a closable opening on a second side opposite said focusing area and aligned with said photographic paper support, said photographic paper support and said focusing area adapted to be positioned an equal distance from said enlarger lens; and at least one tank adapted to hold photographic developing fluids, said lighttight container being at least partially immersible therein. 1

17. The apparatus of claim 16 wherein said lighttight container includes a circuitous fluid-passing channel extending through the wall thereof.

19'. a developing fluids, said tanks being of similar shape to said container but of slightly larger cross section such that said paperholding container may be serially disposed in said containers to develop said photographic paper.

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EP0153279A1 *Feb 11, 1985Aug 28, 1985Ciba-Geigy AgPhotographic enlarger
WO1997005525A1 *Jul 15, 1996Feb 13, 1997Black & Veatch Arch IncFlow camera for large document reproductions having lens adjustment and document feed control mechanism
Classifications
U.S. Classification355/44, 355/72, 396/583, 355/27
International ClassificationG03B27/32
Cooperative ClassificationG03B27/326
European ClassificationG03B27/32E