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Publication numberUS3645017 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 29, 1972
Filing dateMar 18, 1970
Priority dateDec 8, 1969
Publication numberUS 3645017 A, US 3645017A, US-A-3645017, US3645017 A, US3645017A
InventorsHickmann Horst R
Original AssigneeAmf Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ski boot construction
US 3645017 A
Abstract
A ski boot construction including a flexible inner boot portion separable from an outer boot portion. The outer boot comprises substantially rigid toe and heel shells hinged together and a closure member hinged to the heel shell. Buckles and clasps are provided so that the shells and the closure may be fastened in a unitary structure about the inner boot. Cooperating means are provided in the interior of the outer boot and the exterior of the inner boot to fix the inner boot with respect to the outer boot.
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United States Patent Hickmann 1 Feb. 29, 1972 [54] SKI BOOT CONSTRUCTION [72] Inventor: Horst R. Hickm'ann, Cincinnati, Ohio [73] Assignee: AMF Incorporated, New York, NY.

[22] Filed: I Mar. 18, 1970 [21] Appl. No.2 20,694

Related U.S. Application Data [63] Continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 815,289, Apr. 1 l,

1969, abandoned.

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Dec. 8, 1969 Canada ..69,252

[52] U.S. Cl. ..36/2.5 AL

[51 Int. Cl. t ..A43b 00/00 [58] Field of Search ..36/2.5 R, 2.5 AL, 50,55

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,303,584 2/1967 Werner et al ..36/2.5 AL

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,007,668 5/1957 Germany ..36/2.5 AL 891,063 9/1953 Germanymf ...36/2.5 AL 1,217,460 5/1960 France ...36/2.5 AL 952,420 11/1956 Germany 36/2.5 AL

Primary Examiner-Patrick D. Lawson Attorney-Cushman, Darby & Cushman [57] ABSTRACT 53 Claims, 15 Drawing Figures Patented Feb. 29,1972 3,645,017

8 Sheets-Sheet l ATTORNEYS Patented Feb. 29, 1972 8 Shuts-Sheet 2 'INVENTOR rmar/vfi/v/v M, ATTORNEYS Patented Feb. 29, 1972 3,645,017

8 Sheets-Sheet 5 N m x Z ATTORNEYS Patented Feb. 29, 1972 ATTORNEYs Patented Feb. 29, 1972 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR ZZiZSTMCKMfl/VA/ Patented Feb. 29, 1972 8 Sheets-Sheet 6 Mu Aw: F II N I. W w m H ,m A l ,k, m @3 I mvmmra riwctfifi/m/ ATTORNEYS Patented Feb. 29, 1972 8 Sheets-Sheet, 7

% ATTORNEY$ Patented Feb. 29, 1972 3,645,017

' B Sheets-Sheet 8 Z422, wm

ATTORNEYS particularly, better quality ski boots for many years have been formed of leather, a substance which, when properly formed, provides comfort to the wearer and performs acceptably. However, as leather is exposed to the stresses of ski boot use,

it stretches and as a result loses the support characteristics originally built into the boot. As skiing techniques have advanced, more emphasis has been placed on the control of the ski's behavior by transmission of leg movement through the boots to the skis. Consequently, increased attention has been focused on ski boot constructions which firmly support the ankles and feet of the user.

With the advent of synthetics, the use of such materials in ski boots as a substitute for leather has been undertaken. These synthetics permit a boot to be made having permanent characteristics of durability and strength. However, the substantial rigidity of these boots introduces problems of providing comfort for the wearer and of proper fitting. The present invention is directed to a ski boot design wherein the wearers foot is surrounded by a flexible inner boot which, in turn, is firmly maintained within a substantially rigid outer boot made of plastics. The inner boot is positively and securely positioned within the outer boot whereby the wearer is provided with strong support for his ankles and fixed positioning for his feet while enjoying the comfort of the flexible inner boot.

In greater detail, the inner boot comprises a relatively soft construction which closely adheres to the wearers foot, particularly in the instep area. This inner boot is a comfortable slipperlike item which is relatively easy to fit to a person. The outer boot comprises toe and heel shell portions which are hinged together. A closure member is also hinged to the heel shell. The shells are molded of substantially rigid plastic. The shells and the closure are provided with buckles and clasps wherein the shells and closure may be fastened as a unitary structure about the inner boot after the latter has been inserted within the outer boot construction. The interior of the outer boot and the exterior of the inner boot are provided with cooperating locking means to prevent the inner boot from longitudinal, vertical or lateral movement with respect to the outer boot. By so securing the inner boot within the outer one, the wearer's foot is comfortably retained in a fixed position whereby maximum response can be achieved between the skier and his skis.

The foregoing construction has many additional advantages. The inner boot is separable from the outer one and therefore may be used as a comfortable apr s-ski boot. By the means employed to lock the inner boot within the outer one, the size relationship between the inner and outer boots is not critical. The locking means permits the easily stored inner boot to be stocked conveniently in all sizes while the bulky outer boot can be inventoried in a lesser number of sizes. Such an arrangement is convenient for the seller of the ski boot.

Also precise and correct fitting of the ski boots can be easily managed since it only becomes necessary to closely fit the customer to a slipperlike inner boot rather than a complex rigid outer boot. Inasmuch as the outer boot need not be precisely fitted for each wearer, it is possible for persons of similar foot size to sue the same outer boot, and when inner boots are worn out, new inner boots may be purchased without the requirement that the outer boot be replaced. The fact that ski bindings are mounted on the skis in relation to the size of the outer boot, the interchange of boots from one person will often permit the skis to be used without the bindings being remounted.

Further advantages will become apparent from the following description of the embodiments of the invention illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a view in perspective of a left outer boot in its open position ready to receive an inner boot;

FIG. 2 is a front perspective view of a left inner boot adapted to cooperate with the boot shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a rear perspective view of the inner boot of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a bottom plan view of the inner boot of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of the' inner boot of FIG. 2 mounted within the outer boot of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a top plan view of a tarsal strap and adjusting mechanism therefor;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged fragmented view .in section taken along line 7-7 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 8 is a side elevational view of the outer boot of FIG. 1;

FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 9-9 of FIG. 8; a

FIG. 10 is a side elevational view of the outer boot of FIG. 1 taken from the side opposite that shown in FIG. 8;

FIG. 11 is a top plan view of the outer boot of FIG. 1 taken along the axis of the upper portion of the boot;

FIG. 12 is a rear elevational view of the outer boot of FIG.

FIG. 13 is a bottom plan view of the outer boot of FIG. 1;

FIG. 14 is an exploded side elevational view of a right outer boot of modified construction to that shown in FIG. I; and

FIG. 15 is an exploded side elevational view of the outer boot of FIG. 14 taken from the side oppositethat shown in FIG. 14.

Referring now to the drawings, the invention will be described in detail. FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrate the principal components of the first overall ski boot construction. FIG. 1 depicts a left outer boot with its elements in the entry position to provide easy access to its interior for the inner boot shown in FIG. 2. More particularly, the inner boot is designed to be received within the outer boot, and the two boots are. interlocked was to provide a unitary structure. The details of the interlocking arrangement will be set forth hereinafter.

The outer boot comprises three basic elements. These are a toe shell 10, a heel shell 12 and a closure 14. The toe and heel shells are preferably compression-molded polyester reinforced with fiber glass. The closure in the illustrative embodiment is an injection molded or cast polyurethane.

The toe and heel shells are interconnected by a transverse hinge (not shown) extending normal to the length of a boot at its sole portion. The area of the hingeconnection is generally indicated at 16.

The closure 14 is hinged to one upper side of the heel shell 12 by a hinge 18.

When the closure 14 is in the open position shown in FIG. 1, and when the toe shell 10 is tipped forwardly, access to the interior of the outer boot is facilitated, and the inner boot may be inserted therein. The inner boot is secured within the outer boot by buckling the toe shell 10 and the closure 14 to the heel shell 12. More particularly, with the inner boot inside the outer boot, the sole portion of the toe shell 10 is brought into substantial alignment with the corresponding portion of the heel shell 12, and portions of the edges of the shells mate as can be appreciated, for example, by reference to FIG. 8. Preferably this is accomplished by forming the mating edges in a tongue and groove fashion. A clasp 20 fixed to the upper portion of the toe shell is engaged by a buckle 22 to secure the toe shell to the heel shell. Clasps 24 and 26 are attached to the sides of closure 14 opposite hinge 18 and are positioned so as to be engaged by buckles 28 and 30, respectively, thereby securing the closure 14 to the heel 12. A fixture 32 is attached to the interior of one side of the heel shell beneath the hinge 18 to engage one end of a tarsal strap (not shown), the other end of the strap being secured to still another buckle 34 fixed to the outer portion of the opposite side of shell 12. The tarsal strap and its function will be described in detail hereinafter. Preferably fixture 32 is inlaid in a recess within shell 12. The clasps and buckles are of noncorrosive metals, and each buckle is provided with several adjustment notches in conventional fashion.

Other features of the outer boot which can be observed in FIG. I are the elements used in locking the inner boot, particularly in the heel area, against slippage either longitudinally, laterally, or vertically with respect to the outer boot. For this purpose, a pair of serrated plates 36 and 38 are provided at the inside rear of the shell 12. The serrations of these plates will be described in detail hereinafter, but generally they comprise serrations extending longitudinally of the boot, the serrations of plate 36 being oriented oppositely to those of plate 38. These serrations engage cooperating ones on the outside bottom of the inner boot to prevent the heel of the inner boot from sliding laterally with respect to the outer boot. Forwardly of the plates 36 and 38 is a still further plate 40 having serrations extending transversely of the length of the boot. These serrations engage cooperating serrations on the bottom of the inner boot to prevent forward movement of the inner boot within the outer one. Forwardly of plate 40 is still another serrated plate 42 having serrations extending longitudinally of the boot to cooperate with corresponding serrations on the bottom of the inner boot in the area of the ball of the foot so as to prevent the forward portion of the inner boot from lateral movement with respect to the outer boot. Preferably plates 36, 38, 40 and 42 are molded from rubber or synthetic materials and are attached to heel shell 12. However, other substances could be employed. In fact, these plates conceivably could be molded as part of the heel shell. Additional serrations 44 are molded in the rear of the heel shell 12 above the sole portion, these serrations cooperating with a plate on the heel of the inner boot to prevent the latter from moving vertically with respect to the heel shell.

Two additional features of the outer boot construction which can be seen in FIG. 1 are a snow guard 46 at the upper rear portion of heel shell 12 and a recess 48 in approximately the center of the upper edge of closure 14. The snow guard 46 is a woven or synthetic material stretched across a recess 50 in the upper rear of the heel shell 12 to prevent snow from gaining access to the heel shell through the recessed area. The recess 48 permits the wearer of the boot to lean forwardly inasmuch as it is positioned to accommodate the shinbone of the wearer. Recess 50 allows the wearer limited upward move ment, and its contour distributes the pressure of the back of the heel shell over different areas of the wearer's leg.

Details of the inner boot will be described with reference of FIGS. 2 through 4. This inner boot comprises a leather upper portion 52 secured to a sole 54 molded of rubber or synthetic material. The top forward edge of the upper portion 52 is provided with a recess 56 to accommodate the shinbone of the wearer thereby permitting movement of the leg with respect to the upper portion of the inner boot. A cuff 58 is provided at the top of the inner boot so as to receive padding to fill the space which would otherwise exist between the inner boot and the top of the heel shell 12 of the outer boot. The padding arrangement will be discussed hereinafter.

As the success of a ski boot is directly dependent on the foot of the wearer being securely located within the boot, it is important in the present construction that the foot closely adhere in the instep area to the inner boot. Since the top of the upper portion 52 of the inner boot extends a considerable distance above the instep of the wearer, means are provided to permit the foot to enter the boot while still allowing the inner boot to closely conform with the foot in the vicinity of the instep. This is accomplished, as shown in FIG. 3, by providing an elongated slot 60 in the rear of the upper portion 52 of the inner boot. An elastic gore 62 is sewn or otherwise attached to upper 52 in the slot 60. A leather strap 64 is sewn or otherwise secured to the upper portion 52 above and below slot 60. Strap 64 serves to cover the gore 62, but it is arranged so as to have some slack thereby permitting the gore to stretch outwardly from the inner boot as the wearers foot enters or leaves the boot. In use, the wearer inserts his toes downwardly into the boot. His heel contacts the gore 62 and stretches it outwardly thereby permitting the foot to slip totally within the boot. By such an arrangement, the instep portion of the inner boot can be made to closely conform with the wearers foot.

A strip of molded rubber or synthetic material 66 is sewn or otherwise attached to the heel of the inner boot portion 52 below gore 62. The strip 66 contains projecting serrations which cooperate with serrations 44 molded in the rear of the outer boot. More particularly, the upper surface of the projecting serrations forms a 90 angle with the base of strip 66, the angle at the apex of each serration being approximately 60. Since the serrations 44 in the outer boot are identical, but oppositely oriented, the interlocking engagement of the projecting serrations of strip 66 with the molded serrations 44 prevents the inner boot from moving upwardly with respect to the outer boot.

FIG. 4 illustrates the sole portion 54 of the inner boot. The sole is molded with serrated areas recessed therein. These areas are designated as 68, 70, 72 and 74. Areas 68 and 70 cooperate with the projecting serrations 36 and 38, respectively, in the heel shell 12 of the outer boot. The recessed serations 72 cooperate with projecting serrations 40 of the outer boot, and the recesses serrations 74 are cooperatively related to the projecting serrations 42 of shell 12. With respect to serrations 40, the rear surface of each serration forms a substantially 90 angle with the bottom portion of the heel shell whereas the apex of each serration is approximately 60. Of course, the recessed serrations 72 are identical but are oppositely oriented. Thus, with the serrations 40 and 72 interlocked, the inner boot is prevented from sliding forwardly with respect to the outer boot. The apex of each serration 42 is approximately a 45 angle. The identical recessed serrations 74 cooperate with serrations 42 to prevent lateral movement of the inner boot with respect to the outer boot at the forward part of the former in the area of the ball of the foot.

Of course, it is possible to reverse the relationship of serrations on the bottoms of the inner and outer boots so that the serrations in the outer boot are recessed and those in the inner boot are projecting. However, it is anticipated that the inner boot will be worn independently of the outer boot as an aprsski boot, and such use would cause wear on projecting serrations which could eventually adversely affect the locking characteristics of the total boot construction.

The actual operative interrelationship between the inner and outer boots can be appreciated by reference to FIG. 5 which shows the toe shell 10 and closure 14 in their closed positions buckled to the heel shell 12 surrounding the inner boot. The serrations on strip 66 of the inner boot project within the recessed serrations 44 of the outer boot while the projecting serrations 36, 40 and 42 on the sole portion of the outer shell project within the cooperating serrations 68, 72 and 74, respectively, of the inner boot sole. To insure maintenance of this relationship, a tarsal strap 76 is connected at one of its ends to element 32 and at its outer end is secured by a clasp and buckle 34 (FIG. 1). The tarsal strap is provided with an adjusting device 78 so that its length may be varied. In its properly secured position, strap 76 passes snugly over the instep portion of the inner boot. As stated previously, this boot portion closely conforms with the contour of the wearer's foot. Accordingly, the inner boot is restrained against movement with respect to the outer boot, and the wearer's foot is securely positioned within the inner boot.

The cross-sectional view of FIG. 5 also illustrates other features of the invention. More particularly, the upper portion of the inner. boot is matched to the interior of the surrounding outer boot by means of padding 80 inserted within cuff 58 of the inner boot. This padding is preferably of plyurethane foam which not only cushions the wearer from the hard molded outer shell, but also supports his ankle against lateral movement within the boot.

14 in their closed position, the closure 14 overlaps the toe shell within recess 82, and the upper edge of toe shell is received within recess 84. The shoulders defined by the L- shaped recesses are inclined so that pressure exerted by the wearer on the upper part of the closure 14 does not result in disengagement between closure 14 and shell 10. The mating surfaces of shell 10 and the closure may be provided with horizontal serrations to effect a moisture seal.

The arrangement for hinging the toe and heel shells together is also known in FIG. 5. Hinge plates 86 and 88 are secured within molded recesses to the sole portions of the toe and heel shells, respectively, so that the plates are flush with the inner bottom surface of the shell. The transverse hinge 90 which interconnects hinge plates 86 and 88 projects within cooperating dovetail recesses 92 and 94 molded in the bottom of the shells. To prevent snow from entering the outer boot through recesses 92 and 94, the recesses are filled with a synthetic foam 95 which is self-vulcanizing and self-adhering to the shells. The entire bottom of the outer boot construction is covered by a flexible rubber or synthetic sole 96. This sole is not secured to the shell over the area of hinge 90 thereby allowing the sole to belly out" when the hinge operates to position the toe shell 10 as shown in dash lines in FIG. 5.

The details of the flexible tarsal strap 76 are shown in FIG. 6. As staged previously, a clasp is connected to one end of the strap by conventional means. This clasp, which cooperates with buckle 34, is designated as 98. A conventional strap adjustment device 78 is joined to the opposite end of strap 76. The adjustment device includes a slot 100 which cooperates with a hook 102 on fixture 32 (FIG. 1) so as to secure the tarsal strap to the heel shell. The tarsal strap may be padded along the area where it engages the inner boot.

The arrangement for preventing lateral movement of the heel portion of the inner boot with respect to the outer boot is shown in the enlarged sectional view of FIG. 7. As can be seen, the inclined portions of projections from plate 36 rise at an angle of approximately 30 from the horizontal and the apexes of these projections form angles of approximately 60. The other upwardly extending surface of each projection forms an angle of approximately 90 with the horizontal. The recessed serrations 68 in heel shell 12 correspond in contour with the serrations 36. It will be appreciated that the serrations 36 and 68 cooperate to prevent movement of the heel area of sole S4 of the inner boot to the right as shown in FIG. 7. The projections from plate 38 (FIG. 1) and the cooperating recessed serrations 70 (FIG. 4) are identical to serrations 36 and 68, respectively, except that they are reversed in orientation to prevent movement of sole 54 to the left in the area of the heel. The additional recessed area 69 in sole 54 permits the inner boot to be positioned on plates 36 and 38 with some.

degree of latitude so that the wearer need not have to precisely align particular projections of the plates with specific ones of the recessed serrations 68 and 70.

Additional details of the outer boot construction will be described by reference to FIGS. 8 through 13. FIG. 8 illustrates the manner in which clasps 20, 24 and 26 are supported. With respect to clasps 24 and 26, this is accomplished by securing to the closure a steel member 104 by rivets or other means and using plate 104 as a base for pivotally securing the clasps to the closure. A portion of member 104 overlaps the forward edge of heel shell 12 when the closure 14 is shut to thereby cover the mating edges of shell 12 and closure 14. Clasp is directly fastened to the toe shell 10 by conventional means such as rivets.

FIGS. 8 and 9 demonstrate the manner in which the tarsal strap 76 passes between shells l0 and 12 in extending from within the outer boot to exterior buckle 34.

FIGS. 10 and 11 demonstrate the manner by which the closure 14 and heel shell 12 are hinged together. More particularly, the front edge of heel shell 12 is provided withinterior and exterior recesses to accommodate a U-shaped metallic hinge plate 106. This plate is rigidly secured to the heel shell by rivets or other means. A further U-shaped hinge plate 110 complementary to plate 106 is fastened to closure 14 on the side opposite to that to which plate 104 (FIG. 8) is secured. A removable hinge pin 111 connects hinge plates 106 and 110. The advantage of providing a removable hinge pin is that closures of different durometer may be employed suitable to the type of skiing being done and accommodating skiers of differing abilities. The plates 106 and 110 are positioned on the inside of the ski boot. These plates protect the outer boot from damage arising particularly from rubbing engagement with the companion boot.

FIGS. 12 and 13 are included simply to illustrate the outer boot construction from the rear and the bottom.

Now that the construction of the boot has been described its use will be outlined. The user first puts on the inner boot and then inserts each foot into the outer boot with the toe shell and closure in the position shown in FIG. 1. The toe shell 10 is then returned to its normal position with its sole portion in substantial alignment with that of the heel portion 12, and the user adjusts the position of the inner boot within the outer boot so that the serrations on strip 66 are in engagement with those identified as 44 on the rear of the outer boot 12. Care is also taken to be sure that the heel of the inner boot is positioned such that projecting serrations 36 and 38 of the outer boot are within the recessed serrations 68 and 70 of the inner boot. The tarsal strap 76 is then snugly secured using-buckle 34 to hold the inner boot in the correct position. The toe shell is next fastened using clasp 20 and buckle 22, and the closure is swung such that lip 82 of toe shell 10 is received within recess 84 of the closure (FIG. 5). Whenthis relationship is achieved, the closure is secured by buckles 28 and 30. The boot is now ready for use.

An alternative construction of'the outer boot is illustrated in FIGS. 14 and 15. In the following description of this construction like numbers will be used to designate elements common to those of the previously described outer boot. In this embodiment the toe and heel shells and the closure are preferably injection molded polyurethane.

The outer boot construction of FIGS. 14 and 15 differs in a major respect from that boot shown, for example, in FIG. 1. More particularly, the heel shell 12 is a two-piece construction which is hinged together to permit limited pivoting movement of the upper portion of the outer boot. The modified outer boot will now be described.

The heel shell 12 comprises a lower portion 112 and an upper portion 114. Portion 112 is hinged to the toe shell 10, and cooperates therewith, in the same manner as previously described with respect to the first embodiment, except, as will hereinafter be described, there is no need to buckle the toe shell to portion 112. The upper exterior section of portion 112 is formed with a molded groove 116 to define shoulders 118 and 119 extending about the rear of portion 112. Recesses 120 and 122 are also provided on opposite sides of portion 112 to receive hinge plates 124 and 126, respectively, which are fastened to heel shell portion 112 by suitable means such as rivets.

The upper heel shell portion 114 has U-shaped plates attached thereto at its front edges. The plate shown in FIG. 14 is identical to that designated as 106 in FIG. 10 except that it is provided with a forwardly projecting tab arrangement 128 at its lower portion. The U-shaped plate 130 on the opposite side of portion 114 (FIG. 15) similarly is provided with a tab ar rangement 132. The lower interior section of portion 114 is formed with a molded groove 134 to define interior shoulders 136 and v138 extending about the rear of portion 112. When assembled the heel portions 112 and 114 are pivotally connected by pins (not shown) joiningplate 124 to tab arrangement 128 and plate 126 to tab arrangement 132. When the upper portion 114 of the outer boot is pivotedto its rearward limit, the bottom edge of portion 114 restson shoulder 119 and the top edge of lower portion 112 engages shoulder 138. The width of groove 134 is greater than shoulder portion 118, so whenthe upper shell portion 114 is tipped forwardly, it pivots to a degree limited by ultimate engagement of shoulder um: nnaq 136 with shoulder 118. The widths of grooves 116 and 134, which define the 'shoulders, are selected such that the pivoting motion available in the construction is in the order of 70.

The closure portion 14 of the second embodiment of the invention is very similar to that closure previously described. However, one important difference is that a cutout area 142 is provided in the closure to receive an accordionlike compression member 144 of flexible material which permits the closure 14 to change its configuration due to the forces applied to it when the upper heel shell portion 114 is pivoted.

Another difference between the closures of the two embodiments is that in the construction of FIGS. 14 and 15 a groove 146 is provided near the lower interior edge of the closure to define a flange 148. Similarly, the toe shell 10 is provided near its upper edge with a groove 150 to define a flange 152. When the closure 14 is buckled to the heel shell 12, flange 148 is received in groove 150, and flange 152 is received in groove 146 to securely join the toe shell and the closure to each other and to the heel shell.

The manner of buckling the upper portion 114 of the outer boot to the closure and the tarsal strap 76 to buckle 34 is substantially identical to that described with respect to the outer boot of the embodiment of FIGS. l-13. This can be appreciated from FIG. 15.

From the foregoing discussion, it is apparent that the present invention provides a number of advantages. A principal one is that the skier need be precisely fitted only to the inner boot which is considerably less expensive than the outer boot construction. The slipperlike inner boot is flexible and conforms to irregularities of the wearer's foot. Accordingly, a very comfortable fit is obtained, so comfortable in fact, that the inner boot can be used for aprs-ski wear. The inner boot also provides the features of warmth and dryness.

Since an outer boot need only be produced in relatively few sizes to accommodate a great variety of lengths and widths of inner boots, the outer boot becomes permanent and can be used by persons of different foot size. Thus, for the purchaser of such a construction, the invention offers resale possibilities.

The foregoing constructions also provide the very important technical advantage that the foot and ankle are permanently and firmly secured with uniform pressure distribution in the correct skiing position within the boot. The proper positioning of the foot and ankle results in maximum response efficiency for the skier inasmuch as his movements are transmitted directly to the ski, and the action of the ski is communicated to the body.

Further features of the invention are the strength and dura bility of the boot construction, the ease of entry and adjustment, and its fashionability.

The above-described constructions are illustrative of preferred embodiments of the invention but are not intended to limit the possibilities of insuring the features hereinbefore described. it will become apparent to one skilled in the art that certain other modifications may be made within the spirit of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A ski boot construction comprising an outer boot portion and a separate inner boot portion adapted to be received within the outer boot; cooperating means in said inner and outer boots for securing the inner boot in fixed position within the outer boot, said cooperating means including an adjustable strap passing over and engaging the instep area of the inner boot; and means for providing access to the interior of the outer boot to facilitate the inner boots entry into and withdrawal from the outer boot.

2. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 57, wherein said inner boot is formed of a substantially flexible material and the outer boot is substantially rigid.

3. A skiboot construction as set forth in claim 1, wherein said outer boot comprises substantially rigid mating heel and toe shells interconnected by a hinge.

4. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 3, wherein said heel shell comprises a pair of pivotally connected portions.

5. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 4, wherein mating edges of said shell portions are formed in groove and shoulder relationship to limit the amount of movement between said portions.

6. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 3. wherein said hinge is in the sole of the outer boot and extends transversely of the length of the boot.

7. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 3, wherein mating edges of said shells are formed in a groove and tongue relationship wherein a tongue on the edge of one shell is received within a groove in the edge of the other shell.

8. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 3, further comprising means for securing said shells together to prevent pivoting about said hinge.

9. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 3, wherein said shells are of molded fiber reinforced plastic.

10. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 1, wherein said inner boot comprises a sole portion and an upper portion, said upper portion being designed to cover the ankle of the wearer, a cuff at the top of said upper portion, said cuff being adapted to receive padding so as to fill the space between said upper portion and the outer boot when the inner boot is within the outer one.

11. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 1, wherein said inner boot comprises a sole portion and an upper portion, said upper portion being designed to cover the ankle of the wearer and having an elastic gore extending vertically along the rear of the upper to facilitate entry into and withdrawal of a foot from the inner boot.

12. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 11, further comprising a cuff at the top of said upper portion, said cuff being adapted to receive padding so as to fill the space between said upper portion and the outer boot when the inner boot is within the outer one.

13. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 1, wherein said cooperating securing means further includes interlocking serrations on the exterior heel portion of the inner boot and on the interior heel portion of the outer boot.

14. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 13, wherein said serrations extend substantially horizontally.

15. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 1, wherein said cooperating securing means further includes interlocking arrangements on the exterior sole portion of the inner boot and on the interior sole portion of the outer boot.

16. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 15, wherein said arrangements are serrations extending longitudinally of the length of the boot.

17. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 16, wherein said serrations are located in the area of the ball of the foot of the wearer.

18. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 16, wherein said serrations are located in the area of the heel of the foot of the wearer.

19. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 18, wherein each serration on one-half of one of said sole portions is defined by a surface normal to the plane of the sole and another surface extending towards one side of the boot, whereas each serration on the other half of said one sole portion is defined by a surface normal to the plane of the sole and another surface extending towards the other side of the boot.

20. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 15, wherein said serrations extend transversely of the length of the boot.

21. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 1, wherein said access means, comprises a closure member extending across an opening in the outer boot, said closure being hinged to the outer boot at one side of the opening and selectively fastened to the outer boot at the other side of the opening.

22. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 21, wherein said opening is in the front upper portion of the outer boot, said closure being hinged to pivot about a substantially verticai axis.

23. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 21 wherein said closure is removably hinged to the outer boot to permit substitution of closure members.

24. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 1, wherein said outer boot comprises substantially rigid mating heel and toe shells interconnected by a hinge, a closure member extending across an opening in the heel shell, said closure being hinged to the heel shell at one side of the opening and selectively fastened to the heel shell at the other side of the openmg.

25. A ski construction as set forth in claim 24, further comprising means for securing said shells together to prevent pivoting about their hinge interconnection.

26. A ski boot construction as'set forth in claim 24, wherein said opening is in the front of said heel shell, the construction further comprising means for securing said shells together to prevent pivoting about their hinge interconnection and interlocking means joining the closure to the toe shell when the shells are secured and the closure fastened.

27. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 26, wherein said heel shell comprises a pair of pivotally connected portions, and a compression member provided in said closure to permit the closure to bend in response to pivotal movement of a heel shell portion.

28. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 27, wherein mating edges of said shell portions are formed in groove and shoulder relationship to limit the amount of movement between said portions.

29. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 26, wherein the hinge interconnecting the shells is in the sole of the outer boot and extends transversely of the length of the boot.

30. A ski boot construction comprising an outer boot portion having substantially rigid mating heel and toe shells interconnected by a hinge and a separate inner boot portion adapted to be received within the outer boot; an adjustable strap secured at one end to one side of said outer boot and selectively attached at its other and to the opposite side of the outer boot, said strap passing over and engaging the instep area of the inner boot to hold the inner boot in position within the outer boot; and means for providing access to the interior of the outer boot to facilitate the inner boot's entry into and withdrawal from the outer boot.

31. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 30, wherein said inner boot is formed of a substantially flexible material and the outer boot is substantially rigid.

32. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 30, wherein said hinge is in the sole of the outer boot and extends transversely of the length of the boot.

33. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 30, wherein mating edges of said shells are formed in a groove and tongue relationship wherein a tongue on the edge of one shell is received within a groove in the edge of the other shell.

34. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 33, further comprising means for securing said shells together to prevent pivoting about said hinge.

35. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 30, wherein said shells are of molded fiber reinforced plastic.

36. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 30, wherein said inner boot comprises a sole portion and an upper portion, said upper portion being designed to cover the ankle of the wearer, a cuff at the top of said upper portion, said cuff being adapted to receive padding so as to fill the space between said upper portion and the outer boot when the inner boot is within the outer one.

37. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 30, wherein said inner boot comprises a sole portion and an upper portion, said upper portion being designed to cover the ankle of the wearer and having an elastic gore extending vertically along the rear of the upper to facilitate entry into and withdrawal from the inner boot.

38. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 37, further comprising a cuff at the top of said upper portion, said cuff being adapted to receive padding so as to fill the space between said upper portion and the outer boot when the inner boot is within the outer one.

39. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 30, further comprising cooperating means on said inner and outer boots for securing the inner boot in fixed position within the outer boot, said cooperating means including interlocking serrations on the exterior heel portion of the inner boot above the sole and on the interior heel portion of the outer boot above the sole.

40. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 39. wherein said serrations extend substantially horizontally.

41. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 30, further comprising cooperating mans on said inner and outer boots for securing the inner boot in fixed position within the outer boot, said cooperating means including interlocking serrations on the exterior sole portion of the inner boot and on the interior sole portion of the outer boot.

42. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 41, wherein said serrations extend longitudinally of the length of the boot.

43. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 42, wherein said serrations are located in the area of the ball of the foot of the wearer.

44. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 42, wherein said serrations are located in the area of the heel of the foot of the wearer.

45. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 44, wherein each serration on one-half of one of said sole portions is defined by a surface normal to the plane of the sole and another surface extending towards one side of the boot, whereas each serration on the other half of said one sole portion is defined by a surface normal to the plane of the sole and another surface extending towards the other side of the boot.-

46. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 41, wherein said serrations extend transversely of the length of the boot,

47. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 30, wherein said access means comprises a closure member extending across an opening in the outer boot, said closure being hinged to the outer boot at one side of the opening and selectively fastened to the outer boot at the other side of the opening.

48. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 47 wherein said opening is in the front upper portion of the outer boot, said closure being hinged to pivot about a substantially vertical axis.

49. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 47, wherein said closure is removably hinged to the outer boot to permit substitution of closure members.

50. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 30, wherein said outer boot comprises a closure member extending across an opening in the heel shell, said closure being hinged to the heel shell at one side of the opening and selectively fastened to the heel shell at the other side of the opening.

51. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 50, further comprising means for securing said shells together to prevent pivoting about their hinge interconnection.

52. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 50, wherein said opening is in the front of said heel shell, the construction further comprising means for securing said shells together to prevent pivoting about their hinge interconnection and inter locking means joining the closure to the toe shell when the shells are secured and the closure fastened.

53. A ski boot construction as set forth in claim 52, wherein the hinge interconnecting the shells is in the sole of the outer boot and extends transversely of the length of the boot.

Patent Citations
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*DE952420A Title not available
DE1007668B *Oct 9, 1953May 2, 1957Wilhelm BoosSpezial-Sprunglauf- und Abfahrtsskistiefel
FR1217460A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3801119 *Jun 15, 1972Apr 2, 1974Andre JSafety ski binding
US4060256 *Nov 28, 1975Nov 29, 1977Ets. Francois Salomon Et Fils S.A.Device for connecting a skier's leg to a ski
US4083129 *Nov 28, 1975Apr 11, 1978Collombin Andre MArticulated casing for ski boots
US4268931 *Oct 19, 1977May 26, 1981Etablissements Francois Salomon Et FilsProcess of manufacturing an inner boot
US4392311 *Aug 3, 1981Jul 12, 1983Rudolf Warren PExpandable overshoe
US4747221 *Jun 2, 1986May 31, 1988Hayes Jaye BSki boot and sport shoe assembly
US5142798 *Jun 27, 1991Sep 1, 1992William H. Kaufman Inc.Downhill ski boot assembly
US5678833 *Jun 7, 1995Oct 21, 1997Rollerblade, Inc.Adjustable fit in-line skate
US5974698 *Nov 26, 1997Nov 2, 1999New England Overshoe Company, Inc.Overshoe construction
US6050574 *Mar 8, 1999Apr 18, 2000Rollerblade, Inc.Adjustable fit in-line skate
US6471219Mar 21, 2000Oct 29, 2002Benetton Sportsystem Usa, Inc.Adjustable fit in-line skate
US6557865Oct 9, 1998May 6, 2003The Burton CorporationHighback with adjustable stiffness
US6588771Jun 11, 2002Jul 8, 2003Benetton Sportsystem Usa, Inc.Adjustable fit in-line skate
US6851683Nov 4, 2002Feb 8, 2005Andreas C. WegenerAdjustable in-line skate
US7036244 *Jul 7, 2003May 2, 2006Dennis FinchRigid articulated Pointe shoe
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Classifications
U.S. Classification36/117.4, 36/117.9
International ClassificationA43B5/04
Cooperative ClassificationA43B5/0427
European ClassificationA43B5/04E
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 21, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: SUMITOMO BANK, LIMITED, THE, JAPAN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:HEAD SPORTS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:005150/0490
Effective date: 19890331
Mar 29, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: HEAD SPORTS, INC., A CORP. OF DE., COLORADO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:AMF INCORPORATED;REEL/FRAME:005201/0022
Effective date: 19890302