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Publication numberUS3645090 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 29, 1972
Filing dateJun 19, 1970
Priority dateJun 19, 1969
Also published asDE2031216A1
Publication numberUS 3645090 A, US 3645090A, US-A-3645090, US3645090 A, US3645090A
InventorsMochizuki Yoshifumi, Tsuzuki Akira
Original AssigneeCitizen Watch Co Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Day-date quick-adjuster for calender timepiece
US 3645090 A
Abstract
The calendar correction mechanism for use with a calendar timepiece having a date and a day calendar dial operable independently from each other is operable by the manually rotatable winding stem.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Mochizuki et al.

[54] DAY-DATE QUICK-ADJUSTER FOR CALENDER TIMEPIECE [721 lnventors: YoshiiumiMochimki;Akira Tsuzuki, both of Tokyo, Japan (73] Assignee: Citizen Watch (20., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan [22] Filed: June 19, 1970 2: Appl, No.: 47,701

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data June 19, i969 Japan ..44/48443 June 19, 1969 Japan ..44/58l67 [52] [1.5. CI ..58/58 [51] Int. Cl. .G04b 19/24 [58] Field ofSearch ..58/4, 5, 58

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,470,687 10/1969 Ono et al. ..58/58 [4 Feb. 29, 1972 3,470,688 10/1969 Miyasaka ..58/58 Primary Examiner-Richard B. Wilkinson 1 Assistant Examiner-George H. Miller, Jr.

Attmmy-Sughfiet, Rnthu'ell. Mimi, Tina and Mt .m'w'al [57 ABSTRACT The calendar correction mechanism for use with a calendar timepiece having a date and a day calendar dial operable inde pendently from each other is operable by the manually rotatable winding stem.

The correction torque transmitting arrangement is so designed that by turning said stem in one direction both calendar dials are rotated for correction in unison with each other and by turning the stem in the opposite direction only one of the dials is rotated independently from the other and in the same direction as before when the stem was rotated in said one direction.

9 Claims, 13 Drawing Figures 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 A Pater ltecl Feb. 29,1972 3,645,090

6 Sheets-Sheet 2 I I I; 390% E 35mm 38 g 38a Patented Feb. 29, 1972 3,645,090

6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Patehted Feb. 29, 1972 3,645,090

6 Sheets-Sheet 4 Patented Feb. 29, 1972 3,645,090

6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Patc nted Feb. 29, 1972 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 DAY-DATE QUICK-ADJUSTER FOR CALENDER TIMEPIECE The'present invention relates broadly with improvement in and relating to calendar timepieces. More specifically, it relates to a quick-calendar correction mechanism for use with the timepiece of the above kind having a date calendar dial and a, day calendar dial operable independently from each other.

One of recently advanced day and date calendar correction mechanisms is constructed so that by turning the conventional winding stem in one direction upon preparatory positioning thereof in its quick calendar correcting position, either of the both calendar displays is subjected correction and by turning the stern in the reverse direction the remaining calendar display is corrected.

If the timepiece movement should stop its motion for several days, the winding stern must be rotated for performing one kind of calendar correction at first in one direction and then in the opposite direction for performing the remaining kind of calendar correction. Therefore, with use of the prior advanced correction mechanism, two successive operations must be adopted for carrying out the day and date calendar corrections.

It is therefore an object of the present inventionto provide a further improved quick calendar correction mechanism, adaptedfor performing simultaneously the both day and date calendar corrections.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a calendar correction mechanism of the above kind, capable of providing the ability to correct the day calendar display in the reverse direction for attaining an easier and quicker day correction at the end ofa small month.

These and other objects, features and advantages of the invention will become more apparent when read the following detailed description by reference to the accompanying drawings illustrative of several preferred embodiments of the invention.

In the drawings:

F I0, I is a schematic plan view of a preferred first embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken substantially along a section line A,-A' shown in FIG. 1.

F IG; 3 is a sectional view taken substantially along a section line 8-8 shown in FIG. 1.

FIGS. 4 and 5 are plan views of several main working parts of preferred second and third embodiments of the invention, respectively.

FIG.v 6 is a sectional view taken substantially along a section line C-C' shown in FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a schematic plan view of a fourth embodiment of the invention.

F IG. 8 is a sectional view taken substantially along a section line D D' in FIG. 7.

FIGS. 9 and 10 are schematic plan views of two different working modes of a preferred embodiment of the invention.

F IO. 11 is a similar view to FIG. 9, illustrative of the time setting position of the fifth embodiment. 7

FIGS. 12 and 13 are plan views of a sixth embodiment of the invention, illustrative of different operating positions of the mechanism.

Referring now to FIGS. 13, illustrating the first embodiment, ,the numeral 10 represents a conventional plate of a timepiece movement and a conventional winding stem 11 is rotatably and slidably mounted in the plate.v The stem 11 is formed with a ring groove Ila with which a projection 12a of a setting lever 12 is kept in engagement as conventionally for the prevention of otherwise possible slip-out of the stem from position.

Winding stem 11 carries a winding pinion l3 and a clutch wheel 14 having a gear portion 140 made integral therewith, as conventionally. v

Winding position 13 is slidable in the axial direction of the stem II and rotatable relative thereto, while clutch wheel 14 is arranged only slidable longitudinally of the stem, thus being rotatable in unison with the latter.

Clutch wheel 14 is formed on its cylindrical peripheral surface with a ring groove 14b with which one end of clutch lever 15 is engaged, the latter lever being movable in unison with the push-in and drawout manual operation applied to the winding stem 11 by receiving motion therefrom through the setting lever 12.

In the position shown in FIG. 1, clutch wheel 14 having a tooth portion 14c being kept in its disengaged position with the tooth portion at 13a formed on the winding pinion I3. At this stage, setting wheel 16 mounted rotatably on a stationary shaft portion 10a formed on the plate 10 is kept again in its disengaged position, as shown, with the toothed portion at of clutch wheel 14. At this stage, further, the clutch wheel 14 is so positioned, as shown, in a stabilized way that its toothed portion 14a is positively kept in engagement with a gear which is rigid with a shaft 19 rotatably mounted in a lever 17.

When the winding stem 11 is pushed in rightwards in FIG. 2 from the position shown therein, the clutch lever 15 is moved leftwards relatively, thus the toothed portion 13a on winding pinion 13 is brought into engagement with the toothed portion 140 of clutch wheel 14, while the engagement between the toothed-portion 14a with the gear 18 is released ready for spring winding.

Conversely, when the winding stem 11 is drawn out leftwards in FIG. 2 from the position shown, clutch lever 15 is moved rightwards relatively and the toothed portion 14d on winding pinion 14 is brought into engagement with the setting wheel 16. As seen from FIG. 1, this position is ready for the timesetting operation wherein motion is transmitted from the winding stem through a conventional minute wheel 24.

Since the lever 17 can move more than that which is performed by the winding pinion 14 in the right-hand direction in FIG. 2 in this stage, the engagement of the toothed portion 14a on winding pinion with the gear 18a is released. The gear 18 rigid with gear 18a fixedly mounted on the shaft 19 will act as the prime mover wheel for the mechanism to be described, as will be more fully described hereinafter.

Now turning back to FIG. 1, illustrative of the mechanism according to this invention in a specific way, setting lever 12 is rotatably mounted around a shaft 20 which is rigid with the plate 10, and clutch lever 15 is rotatably mounted on its shaft 21 which is also rigid with the plate. A conventional clutch lever spring 22 urges the clutch lever 15 so as to establish a pressure contact thereof with setting lever 12. Numeral 23 represents a conventional setting lever spring the main nonelastic part of which is fixed onto the plate 10 by means of setting screws 23a and 23b.

Setting lever spring 23 comprises an elastic arm 23c which is kept .in pressure. contact with setting lever pin 12b. Setting lever spring 23 is formed with an elastic arm 23d whichexerts a resilient pressure upon the setting lever 12 for keeping the latter in position within the timepiece movement.

Setting wheel 16 is kept in meshing with minute wheel 24.

The lever 17 is rotatably mounted on a shaft 25 which is rigid with the plate 10, said lever 17 being abutting under pressure against the setting lever pin 12b under the influence of a bar spring 26 which is shown only partially for simplicity of the drawing. Although not shown, this bar spring 26 is mounted at its root portion fixedly on the plate 10.

The aforementioned relative arrangement of setting lever 12, clutch lever 15, clutch lever spring 22 and winding stem 11 is substantially known per se for the two position setting mechanism for the timepiece movement.

Since the lever 17 is kept in a positive pressure engagement with the setting lever 12b and movable in the counter clockwise direction in FIG. 1 irrespective of occasional and selective moving direction of the lever 12 caused by a push-in or drawout operation applied to the winding stem, indeed, by the intimate and positive cooperating engagement of cam parts 17a; 17b of the setting lever pin 17b. On the lever 17, a gear 28 is rotatably mounted around a shaft 27 which is rigid with the lever, said gear 28 meshing with said gear 18. On the same lever 17, there is a further gear 29 which is rotatable around a shaft rigid with the said lever. A further lever 30 is also mounted rotatable on the same shaft 25, a further shaft 31 being fixedly mounted on the said lever 30 and a further gear 32 being rotatably mounted on the shaft 31 and meshing with gear 29'.

When gear 29 rotates in clockwise direction in FIG. 1, lever 30 is subjected to a .mechanical urging force acting in clockwise direction and gear 32 is brought into meshing with gear 34 which is rotatably mounted on the shaft at 33.

As shown in FIG. 3, gear 34 meshes at its ratchet tooth portion 34a with that shown at 35a of gear 35 which is rotatably mounted on the shaft 33. These ratchet tooth portions are so designed and arranged that when gear is rotated in clockwise direction, rotation is transmitted therefrom to gear 35 which is kept in meshing with a day star wheel 36, the latter being controlled in itsmovement by a jumper lever 44 as is known per Gear 34 meshes gear 38 which is rotatably mounted on a shaft 37. Gear 39 is rotatably mounted on the same shaft 37 and so designed and arranged that when gear 38 rotates in counter clockwise direction, rotation is transmitted to gear 39 through the intermeshing between ratchet tooth portions 38a and 39a. Gear 39 is kept in meshing with date display ring 40.

With the arrangement so far shown and described and with a clockwise rotation of gear 29, gear 32 is brought into meshing with gear 34, motion being thus transmitted through gear 35 to the day star wheel 36 for performing the desired correction of the day display.

At the same time, rotation is transmitted from gear 34 through gears 38 and 39 to the date display ring 40 for the correction of display. Although not shown, the date ring 40 is controlled by a conventional jumper means.

It will be clear from the foregoing that with rotation of gear 29 in clockwise direction, both the day display and the date display are subjected to correction.

With counter clockwise rotation of gear 29, gear 32 is shifted to a position shown at 32a so as to mesh with gear 42. Gear 42 is rotatably mounted on the shaft 41and a gear 43 is positioned on the gear 42 and rotatably mounted concentrically therewith. As seen these related parts are so designed and arranged that only with counter clockwise rotation of gear 42, the correction force can be transmitted to date ring 40. The configuration and arrangement of the ratchet means are selected for satisfying these requirements.

With counter clockwise rotation of gear 29, gear 32 is shifted to a position shown at 32a and the correction force is transmitted through gears 42 and 43 to date ring 40.

With either rotational direction of gear-29, date ring 40 is turned in its regular or forward direction and when a drive power is transmitted from the power spring or the like source to both the date ring and the day ring, gears 43, 35 and 39 are rotated in idle and rotation can not be transmitted to any other means not related therewith, thanks to the design and arrangement of the related ratchet means.

Next, referring to FIG. 4, the second embodiment will be described in detail. Since, in the present embodiment, the design and function of the working parts arranged in advance of the gear 29 rotatably mounted on the shaft 25 are substantially similar to those shown and described with reference to the foregoing first embodiment, detailed description thereof may be omitted without injury to better understanding of the present second embodiment.

With counter clockwise rotation of gear 29, a gear 45 rotatably mounted on a shaft 46 made rigid with an arm 57 meshing with a gear 49 which is rotatably mounted on a shaft 48 made rigid with arm 57. Arm 57 is kept in contact with a stop means which is rigid with the plate of the timepiece which is pivotably mounted on a shaft 47 is brought into meshmovement, although not shown.

Gear 50 is rotatably mounted on a shaft 52 and made with a gear 51 meshing with the day star wheel 36 controlled by a jumper lever 44 as conventionally.

With rotation of gear 29 in counter clockwise direction, motion will be thus transmitted through gears 45, 53 and 55 to date ring 40 and, through gears 45, 49, 50 and 51 to day star wheel 36, for the correction of dayand date dials.

With clockwise rotation of gear 29 and on account of that gears 29 and 45 have deeper dedendums, respectively, gear 45 is brought to a position shown at 45a, and gear 49 to a position shown at 49a. Thus, rotation is transmitted from gear 29 through gears at 45, 49, 53 and S5 to date ring 40 which is thus subjected to a correction as in the former way. Day ring is not affected in this case.

Next, when a drive force is transmitted from the power spring or the like source to rotate the day star wheel, gears 51 and 49 are also brought into rotation, but, the gear 49 is receded to the position at 49a so that no mechanical interference may be invited. Even with rotational movement of the date ring, a slip may be invited through the ratchet means provided between the related gears 55 and 53.

Referring furtherto FIGS. 5 and 6, the third embodiment of the invention will now be described.

The upstream working parts in advance of gear 29 when seen in the transmitting direction of the calendar correcting force are substantially same as before and a detailed description thereof will be omitted herein.

With clockwise rotation of gear 29, motion is transmitted therefrom to a gear 58 which is rotatably mounted on a shaft 59 and provided on an arm 60 which is pivotable on the same shaft 59 rigid with the, plate.

Shafts 61 and 62 are made rigid with arm 60 and gears 63 and 64 are rotatably mounted on these shafts, respectively. As seen from the sectional drawing in FIG. 6, gear 64 is kept in meshing with gears 65 and 66 rotatably mounted on a shaft 68 made rigid with the plate 10. The ratchet means 66a; 67a are so designed and arranged that rotation is transmitted therethrough only with counterclockwise rotation of gear 65. Gear 65 meshes gear 67 through said ratchet means. Gear 65 is kept in meshing with gear 69 rotatably mounted on the shaft 70. Rotation is transmitted from gear 69, only when rotated in clockwise direction, through ratchet means 69a; 71a to gear 71 which is kept in meshing with date calendar ring 40. Calendar ring 40 and day star wheel 36 are controlled by jumper means as conventionally, although not specifically.

With clockwise rotation of gear 29, both calendar rings-are subjected to correction in unison.

With counter clockwise rotation of gear 29, arm 60 is correspondingly swiveled and gear 63 is shifted to a position shown at 63a and gear 64 to a position shown at 64a. Rotation will be thus transmitted from the gear 29 through gears 58, 63a, 69 and 71 to date ring 40 which is thus subjected to a corresponding correction.

At this stage, gear 69 is kept in meshing with gear 65, but gear 64 does not act as a member of the related gear train, thus, no rotation being transmitted to the gear 66. It will be seen that in this case the correction is made only upon the date ring 40.

Further, referring to FIGS. 7 and 8, the fourth embodiment will be described in detail.

In the present embodiment, the following numerals denote respective same parts as before, thus a further analysis of these parts have been omitted:

10; 10a; 11; 11a; 12; 12a; 12b; 13; 13a; 14; 14a; 14b; 14c; 14d; 15; 16; 17; 18; 18a; 19; 20; 21; 22; 23; 23a; 23b; 23c; 23d; 24; 25; 26; 27; 28 and 29.

Gear 29 is fixedly attached with gear 121 and an arm 122 is pivotably mounted on the shaft 25, said arm 122 fixedly mounting in turn a shaft 123 which mounts a gear 124 carrying thereon two pins 126a and 126b adapted for meshing with a date gear 125 having 31 gear teeth formed in its periphery.

With clockwise rotation of gear 29, rotation is transmitted therefrom through gear to day calendar ring 127. At the same time, rotation will be transmitted through gear 124, pins 126a and 126b and date gearv 125. Therefore, both date and day corrections are brought about.

With-rotation of gear 29 in counter clockwise direction, the day calendar ring will be rotated in the reverse direction as in the above case, but, on account of counter clockwise rotation of arm '122 causing the pins 126a and 126b to disengage from gear 125, and therefore the date calendar ring being affected in no way.

Under the regular working conditions of the timepiece, the lever 17 is brought to its counterclockwisely rotated position. The arm 122 is urged mechanically by contact with a pin 17d formed on the projecting part 17c of lever 17 so as to release the engagement between pins 126a; 126b and gear 125 and thus there may be a possibility of the engagement of gear 121 with day calendar ring 127. But, it may be observed that all the gears meshing with the gear 121 are kept in their free position, thus no mechanical interference being invited in this case.

Next, referring to FIGS. 9 and 10, the fifth embodiment of the invention will be described in detail. The position shown in FIG. 9 is that for spring winding.

Winding stem 128 mounts rotatably a winding pinion 129 and the conventional square section part of the stem 128 a conventional clutch wheel 130 is mounted nonrotatably, yet axially slidably. Clutch lever 132 urged resiliently by a conventional clutch lever spring 131 is kept by its projecting end in engagement with a ring groove formed on the stem 128 as before: Under normal operational conditions, therefore, the clutch wheel 130 is kept in engagement with the winding pinion 129. Rotation of the winding stem can be transmitted to a conventional crown wheel for winding the power spring, not shown. In this operational stage, it is natural that clutch wheel 130 is kept in disengagement from the setting wheel In FIG. 10, the quick-calender correcting position of the same embodiment is shown, being of the one step drawing out type.

With the winding stem 128 drawn out, setting lever 134 is rotatedin the counterclockwise direction and the projecting end shown at 134a of the lever will rise up along the convexly curved-surface shown at 132a of clutch lever, the latter being thereby urged to rotate in the counterclockwise direction so that clutch wheel 130 is brought into engagement with setting wheel 133 by virtue of the mechanical cooperation of the tip end of clutch lever 132 with a ring groove formed on the clutch wheel. At the same time, the engagement between winding pinion 129 and clutch wheel 130 is released. A spring 136 is provided for urging the lever at 135 pivoted on the setting'wheel shaft to rotate in clockwise direction.

A gear 137 rotatably mounted on a shaft rigid with lever 135 is kept in engatement with setting wheel 133 and urged by a spring 136 against a gear 140 which is fitted with a further gear 139 kept in meshing with the day star wheel 138.

A lever 141 is rotatably mounted on the shaft of gear 140 and mounts a further shaft mounting a gear 142 meshing with said gear 140. The gear 142 is so designed and arranged that with clockwise rotation of gear 140, the gear 143 fixed on gear 142 is brought into engagement with date ring 144 for the correction thereof, so that, in this case, the both calendars day and date, are subjected to correction simultaneously. On the other hand, when gear 140 is rotated in the counterclockwise direction, gear 142 will escape or recede in the counter clockwise direction so that the gear 143 is released from engagement with date ring 144. Thus, correction is made only on through the day star wheel.

It can be thus seen that in the present embodiment, a regular rotation of the winding stem, both calendars are corrected, while with a reversed rotation of the stem, the clay calendar is corrected in the reverse sense.

In FIG. 11, the shown position is that for time setting.

The winding stem 128 has been brought to a still further drawn but second position. By this manual operation, a pin l34b mounted on the setting lever 134 acts upon the lever to rotate it in counter clockwise direction against the action of spring 136 so that gear 137 is brought into engagement adapted for transmitting the rotation of setting wheel to minute wheel 145.

Further transmission of the time setting effort from the minute wheel is carried out as in the conventional way. Although the position of setting lever 134 is at this stage somewhat different from that shown in FIG. 10, the clutch lever will occupy a substantially same position as before so that the clutch wheel 130 is kept in engagement with the setting wheel 133. Although the winding stem 128 and the setting lever 134 have been omitted only for simplicity, these parts are kept in position for being prevented from slipping out of the timepiece movement, by virtue of the provision ofa setting lever spring, as was referred to hereinbefore.

Finally, the sixth embodiment of the invention will be described. In the present embodiment, the day calendar can be corrected in either direction, but the date calendar may be adjusted in one direction only, as was referred to hereinbefore in connection with the fourth to the fifth embodiment.

The position shown in FIG. 12 is that for time setting and that shown in FIG. 13 is for calender correction.

In FIG. 12, the full line position of the main working parts are those ready for for the spring winding operation, while the chain-dotted line position for the time setting.

In FIGS. 12 and 13, several working parts already described hereinbefore in connection with the first embodiment are represented with respective same reference numerals, each, however, attached with a prime.

Thus, 12 represents a conventional setting lever; 12b a setting lever pin; 20 a pivot shaft thereof; 23 a setting lever spring; 23a a pivot shaft thereof; 230 a first elastic arm similar to that shown at 230 in the foregoing; 23d a second elastic arm similar to that shown at 23d in the foregoing; 24' a minute wheel; 29 a gear; 30 a pivotable lever similar to that shown at 30 in the foregoing; 32 an intermediate gear; 33' a shaft similar to that denoted 33 in the foregoing; 34 a gear,

35' a further gear; 36' a day star wheel; 40 a date calendar dial; and 44 ajumper lever for control ofstar wheel 36.

When the setting lever 12 is swiveled in clockwise direction in FIG. 12 from its full line position to its chain-dotted line one by drawing out the winding stem, not shown, from its spring winding to its time setting positioma pin 146 rigid with lever 12' will act upon one end 147a of a change-off lever 147 rotatably mounted on a shaft 148 rigid with the conventional plate, not shown, thereby the lever 147 being caused to rotate in clockwise direction in FIG. 12, against the spring action exerted by an elastic arm 149a formed on a minute wheel positioner 149 which is fixedly attached to the plate, not shown, by means of a set screw 150 and a positioning pin 151 which is studded on-the plate and in engagement with a cooperating recess 14% formed on said positioner 149.

With the temporarily of setting lever 12' in clockwise direction, the tip end 12c of the latter acts upon an inclined end surface 30a on the lever 30 so as to tempararily turn the latter in clockwise direction against the resilient action exerted thereupon by a spring strip 152 the root end of which is fixedly mounted the lever 30' although the fixing means have been omitted from the drawing only for simplicity. However, the lever 30' will occupy substantially the same position shown in full line in FIG. 12, because the thus clockwise turned setting lever 12 is brought by its tip end 12c into engagement with a recess 30'b formed on the lever 30. Thus, gear 32 mounted on the lever 30 will substantially occupy the shown position.

At this operational stage, the intermediate gear 29 mounted in the present embodiment on the changeoff lever 147 will occupy the shown position in which the latter is kept in separation from the gear 32. During the time setting operation by manipulating the winding stem for this purpose, motion is transmitted therefrom to the gear 29 in the same manner as was referred to in the foregoing several embodiments, thus the gear 29' being kept in rotation at this stage, wherein the last-mentioned gear meshes a further intermediate gear 153 rotatably mounted on the plate. Motion is transmitted from gear 153 through minute wheel 24. and minute pinion 154 made rigid therewith. The minute pinion 154 rotates a conventional cannon wheel 155, thus the minute hand, not shown, is rotated as desired.

change-off lever 147 is also rotated in clockwise direction so as to occupy its full line position. In this case, gear 29 is brought into meshing relation with gear 32 carrying rigidly thereon a pinion 156 which is now brought into engagement with an intermediate pinion 157 mounted rotatably on the plate, on account of the pinion 156 rotatably mounted on the lever 30'. Gear 157 is permanently kept in meshing with gear 34', a gear 35' serving as a driver for day calendar correction being coupled concentrically with the gear 34 through a friction coupling, although not specifically shown. The gear 35 is kept at this operational stage in meshing with the day star wheel 36'. By rotation of the winding stem in either direction under these operational conditions, the day calendar dial, not shown, is corrected in one direction or in another direction, as the case may be, depending upon the rotational direction of the winding stem. When a driving torque, if applied from the regular gear train including cannon wheel 155, to star wheel 36', no day calendar correction will be invited, because such torque may be relieved through said friction coupling.

In this embodiment, an improved jumper lever 44' having two tooth projections 44'a and 44'b is arranged-to cooperate with the star wheel 36', so as to provide two holding positions to the wheel for providing two different day calendar displays, such as, for instance, expressed in English and German.

Simultaneously with the day calendar correction, rotation is transmitted from gear 32 to gear 242 permanently meshing therewith, the latter gear cooperating with a date correction pallet 243 through an one way clutch, not shown, arranged between the gear 242 and the pallet 243, as at 66a shown at 66a; 67a in FIG. 6. The pallet is arranged to drive the date calendar dial only partially shown. Therefore, motion is transmitted normally from gear 242 to the pallet so as to rotate the latter in clockwise direction. When the gear 242 is rotated in the opposite or counter clockwise rotation by rotation of the winding stem in the opposite direction, no torque will be transmitted from the gear 242 through the one way clutch to the pallet, thus no correcting effect being transmitted to the dage calender dial 40'.

Holding plate 159 is fixedly attached to the plate by means of a plurality of set screws of which only one is shown at 160, a spring arm 159a projecting the main part of the holding plate 159, so as to contact from upper with the pallet 243 so as to provide an axial pressure onto the one way clutch to keep it always in its ready-for-operational position.

For the regular drive of the date from the side of the normal gear train of the timepiece movement, the pallet 243 must be disengaged from the dial, in order to avoid an excess energy consumption of the drive poser source. For this purpose, there is provided an elongated spring arm 161 which is fixed at its root end to the holding plate 159, while the free end of the spring arm is kept in pressure contact with the tooth space on the pallet.

In the similar way, a further elongated spring arm 162 is provided for the gear 35.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are as follows:

1. In a calendar timepiece comprising a rotatable date calendar ring, a rotatable day calendar ring, a rotatable winding stem and setting means operatively connected between said rings and said stem for imparting a correcting rotation to both of said rings simultaneously upon rotating said stem in one direction and for imparting a correcting rotation to only one of said rings by rotating said stem in the opposite direction, said setting means comprises first and second date indexing means for indexing the date calendar ring and day indexing means for indexing the day calendar ring, a first transmission means for coupling the winding stem to the first date indexing means and the day indexing means upon rotation of said stem in the said one direction and a second transmission means for coupling the winding stem to the second date indexing means upon rotation of said winding stem in the said opposite direction.

2. A calendar timepiece as claimed in claim I wherein each of the transmission means includes a common gear operatively coupled to the winding stern during calendar ring setting and arranged for selective meshing with another gear of one of said first and second transmission means in dependence on the direction of rotation of the winding stem. I

3. In a calendar timepiece comprising a rotatable date calendar ring, a rotatable day calendar ring, a rotatable winding stem and setting means operatively connected between said rings and said stem for imparting a correcting rotation to both of said rings simultaneously upon rotating said'stem in one direction and for imparting a correcting rotation to only one of said rings by rotating said stem in the opposite direction, said setting means comprises a day indexing means for indexing the day calendar and a date indexing means being coupled to first and second gears respectively and a third gear 7 arranged to be coupled to the winding stem during the calendar ring setting.

4. A calendar timepiece as claimed in claim 3 wherein the setting means comprises fourth and .fifth meshing gears mounted on a common rotatable support, said fourth gear disposed in mesh with the third gear so that upon turning of the winding stem in the said one direction the support is rotated to a position in which the fourth gear meshes with the second and third gears and the fifth gear meshes with the first gear and upon turning of the winding stem in the said opposite direction the support is rotated to a position in which the fourth gear meshes with the third gear and the fifth gear meshes with the second gear.

5. A calendar timepiece as claimed in claim 3 wherein the third gear meshes with the first gear and the setting means comprises a fourth gear mounted on a support rotatable about the axis of the first gear and which is disposed in mesh with the first gear, said fourth gear arranged to be coupled to the second gear only during turning of the winding stem in the said one direction during calendar ring resetting.

6. A calendar timepiece as claimed in claim 3 wherein the third gear is brought into mesh with the first and second gears during calendar ring resetting and wherein one of the indexing means is coupled to its associated gear of the first and second gears through a one-way clutch.

7. A calendar timepiece as claimed in claim 3 wherein the day and date indexing means are coupled to said first and second gears respectively by means of a one-way clutch.

8. A calendar timepiece as claimed in claim 7 wherein the setting means comprises a sun gear in mesh with said third gear and first and second planet gears in mesh with the sun gear and mounted on a support rotatable about the axis of the sun gear, said first and second planet gear being selectively brought into mesh with the first and second gears in dependence on the direction of turning of the winding stem during calendar ring setting.

9. A calendar timepiece as claimed in claim 7 wherein the third gear is brought into mesh with the first gear during calendar ring resetting.

Patent Citations
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US3470688 *Nov 30, 1967Oct 7, 1969Suwa Seikosha KkDate and day correcting device of a calendar timepiece
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3732687 *Feb 14, 1972May 15, 1973Citizen Watch Co LtdCalendar correction mechanism for timepiece
US3748848 *Oct 18, 1972Jul 31, 1973Ebauches SaDay-date timepiece
US3775965 *May 3, 1972Dec 4, 1973Ebauches SaCalendar timepiece
US3779000 *Oct 3, 1972Dec 18, 1973Suisse HorlogerieCorrection device for day-and-date calendar watches
US3969888 *Dec 10, 1973Jul 20, 1976Cyril VeuilleumierDriving mechanism for day-date calendar device
US4443112 *Sep 29, 1982Apr 17, 1984Timex CorporationPlanetary gear for date mechanism in a wristwatch
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Classifications
U.S. Classification368/32, 968/83, 968/172
International ClassificationG04B11/00, G04B19/253, G04B19/25, G04B19/00
Cooperative ClassificationG04B19/25, G04B11/006
European ClassificationG04B19/25, G04B11/00F