Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3645438 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 29, 1972
Filing dateOct 20, 1969
Priority dateOct 20, 1969
Also published asDE2051362A1
Publication numberUS 3645438 A, US 3645438A, US-A-3645438, US3645438 A, US3645438A
InventorsJohn L Lanahan
Original AssigneeMohawk Ind Lab Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Floating decimal coding system
US 3645438 A
Abstract
A method and apparatus for coding and selecting data members such as cards. A plurality of series arranged fields on the data member are coded and sensed in sequence with a special code to represent a number, the field following the last digit of the number being a decimal, which decimal can be placed at any field in the series. An electrical circuit for coding and sensing includes a keyboard connected through a stepping switch to coding and sensing solenoids.
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1 J l J i ii 1 i i w i i [titted @tnte stem n51 swim ise linniihen [451 2%., ii [54] H LUATHNG lDllECllll/IIAL C nilDllNG 2,543,435 2/1951 Buckley 23 1/1108 it @Yfi'illEM 3,145,920 8/1964 Berlinsky et a1. i 3,388,858 6/1968 Andersson [72] inventor. John L. lldnnahnn, Wh1teshoro, NY. 3,389,242 6/1968 Cross Jr. u N [73] Assignee: Mlohuwh industrial lliiihomtories, llnc., 3,452,925 7/ 1969 Gettle et a1. B i E2 Vernon, NY.

Primary ExaminerWilliam S. Lawson [22] 0cm W69 Attorney-Larson, Taylor (it Hinds [21] App]. No.: semen [57] AllwTitAC'll lU-S. A method and apparatus for coding and electing data ng- 1 [5 I] i CL i "Gum; Mm bers such as cards. A plurality of series arranged fields on the [58] Field of Search ..234-/13, 42, 46-48, data b are cgded d ensed in sequence with 1.?! special 234/108 123425 131; 209/805; 235/61 R code to represent a number, the field following the last digit of References CHM} the number being a decimal, which decimal can be placed at any field in the series. An electrical circuit for coding and sensing includes a keyboard connected through a stepping switch to coding and sensing solenoids.

6 Claims, 0 llllmwirigg Figures PAIENIEDFEBZQ I972 3. 645,438

SHEET 1 BF 4 KEYBOARD NUMBERS DEC F|ELDS- I II III I! Y m 1H YIIIIX X XI ABCDE NJ 1 I I 1 r 1 1 I 1 I 1 I I DEC , I I1 111 EC X1: m

ABCDEABCDE I I I I I 1 I I E. 4 D C 3 INVENTOR JOHN H. LANAHAN ATTURNEYS PAIENIEOFB29 I972 33, 645,438

SHEET 2 OF 4 mvlzmons JOHN H. LANAHAN ATTORNEYS 221 CR-l SRI 29 23 24 CR If E 54 INVENTORS JOHN H.. LANAHAN ATTORNEYS I PATENTEDFEB29|912 SHEET '4 OF 4 mvsmons JOHN H. LANAHAN m1 jc uwmf ATTORN EYS lllLGAt'llllNG llllEGIll/MML GOIDIING SYSTEM BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to the sorting of data members, and in particular it relates to a new and improved code system for use with such members.

in copending US. Pat. application Ser. No. 811,826, filed Mar. 31, 1969, a method and apparatus for coding and sorting edge notched cards is disclosed and claimed. The cards normally have a plurality of field positions located along one edge thereof, each field position being notched in accordance with a predetermined pattern to represent a number. For example, there may be five bit positions within each field and each of the 10 digits can be represented by a different group of two of the bit positions. In the operation of the apparatus of the said copending patent application, there is a stage during which the entire pack of cards is moved towards a set of selector bars wherein some of the bars are raised relative to the other bars in accordance with a predetermined selection pattern. The cards to be selected move against the said selected bars a greater distance than the remaining cards since the said selected cards have a notch pattern which agrees with the pattern of the raised selector bars, whereas the remaining cards are blocked by the said seiector bars.

However, this conventional coding system has suffered from the disadvantage that it has not permitted complete dis crimination between the selected cards and the remaining cards. For example, assume that one wished to select the card coded with the number 4. The code bars representing the number 4 would be raised in one of the fields and all cards having a notched pattern representing the number t would move onto these raised selector bars. However, there is nothing to prevent movement onto the bars of cards having other fields notched to represent different numbers. For example, cards representing 40, 400, 4,000, etcetera, would also move sent the desired "4" cards.

Thus, there exists a need for a new and improved system for coding data members such as edge notched cards and the like for permitting complete discrimination between the data members representing the specific selected number and the remaining data members of the group.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Thus, it is a. purpose of this invention to provide a new and improved coding system for use in random selection of selected data members from the remaining data members in a group, which system overcomes disadvantages of the prior art.

This purpose of the present invention is achieved by providing a system including, in addition to the codes representing the separate digits, a further code which represents the decimal point. Moreover, this decimal point may be characterized as a floating decimal point" since it is capable of being placed in any of the fields of the data member. For example, in coding a data member, one will normally start with the first available or useable field and code successive fields to represent successive digits of the number. With the present invention, the decimal point will always be placed in the field next following the field of the last digit of the number being represented. Thus, for example, when a data member is coded to represent the number d, then the representation for the number d will occupy the first field position and the decimal will then be placed in the second field position. n the other hand, if the data number is coded to represent the number 400, then the decimal will be placed in the fourth field position following representations of 4," o, and 0 in the first three held positions.

The code for the decimal will normally be different in kind from the codes of the digits. For example, each of the 10 digits can be represented by a different group of two of five possible bit positions within a field. However, the decimal will use three of the five bit positions. Thus, no data cards can move onto the raised selector bars unless they have a decimal code at the same field as the card being selected. This of course provides a blocking feature which will prevent all cards from moving onto the selector bars except for the cards having the selected number.

Another feature of the present invention includes a means for both encoding and selecting the data members such as the data cards in accordance with the new coding system of the present invention. In the, preferred arrangement, each field position includes five bit positions. A set of solenoids is pro-- vided for each bit position within each field. The desired digit is introduced at a conventional keyboard and the input is directed to the appropriate field by means of a stepping switch. As each number is entered into the keyboard, the appropriate solenoids are activated at the appropriate field position after which the stepping switch is automatically moved to the next field. As explained in our said previous application, these solenoids actuate selector bars, and after all of the tieids have had the necessary selector bars actuated therein, ihrther means on the apparatus either use the selected selector bars to (a) punch the card for placing the desired code therein or (b) raise the selector bars in preparation for a sorting operation. After all digits have been entered, thereby activating all of the appropriate solenoids for representing the desired number, a further means may be actuated to concurrently enter the decimal code in the next field and then activate the apparatus, that is either the punching apparatus or the sorting apparatus, depending upon the desired mode of operation.

Thus, it is an object of this invention to provide a new and improved coding system for data members.

it is another object of this invention to provide a new and improved method and apparatus for encoding date members such as edge notched cards and the like using a decimal code in addition to numerical codes for improved discrimination of selected data members from the remaining data members of a group.

It is another object of this invention to provide a new and improved method and apparatus for sensing selected data members such as edge notched cards and thelike relative to the remaining data members of a group.

It is another object of this invention to provide a new and improved means employing a common input member for encoding and/or sensing members at various field positions of a data member through a stepping switch.

Other objects and the attendant advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the detailed description to follow, together with the accompanying drawings.

BRIIEF DESCRIFTIION OF THE DRAWiNGS There follows a detailed description, to be read together with the accompanying drawings. However, it is to be un derstood that the description and the drawings are provided only to illustrate a preferred embodiment of the invention and that modifications and variations are apparent to those slrillcd in the art.

FIG. l is a table illustrating a code of the present invention.

FIG. 2 illustrates a data card showing a feature of the coding system of the present invention.

FIGS. 3, d and 5 each show a portion of a data card similar to that shown in FIG. 2, and each illustrates the new coding system of the present invention.

FIG. 6 illustrates the relative position of the data cards shown in FIGS. 3, 4 and 5 during a sorting operation.

FIG. 7 is a schematic view of a circuit which can be used for encoding and sensing, using the coding system of the present invention.

FIG. it is another schematic diagram showing a. portion of the circuit of FIG. 7 in combination with a portion of a card encoding and sorting apparatus.

DETAILED DESCRlPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the figures, like elements represent like numerals throughout the several views.

FIG. 1 is a table illustrating the coding system used in the present invention. In the example of an edge notched card, the card may have a plurality of field positions along its said edge, each field position having five bit positions. As can be seen from FIG. 1, different combinations of two of the five bits are used to represent each one of the digits. The decimal is then represented by three of the five bits.

FIGS. 2 through 6 illustrate the application of the invention to an edge notched card 10. FIG. 2 illustrates the entire card which has eleven possible field positions represented by Roman numerals I through XI. Each field position is in turn subdivided into five bit positions. In FIG. 2 the first field position I is shown broken down into five bit positions A through E.

When encoding cards of this type, the first digit is normally encoded in the first field I. Subsequent digits of the number would then be encoded in subsequent adjacent fields. FIGS. 3 through 5 represent cards encoded with the numbers 4, 40 and 400, respectively. In each case the decimal code is entered into the field next adjacent the last digit of the numeral.

In the absence of the decimal code, a system attempting to select only card number 4 would also select the cards 40 and 400. This is because the apparatus attempting to select card 4 would raise selector bars corresponding to hit positions C and E in field member I. All remaining selector bars would remain in the recessed position. Thus, it can be seen that there would be nothing to prevent the cards shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 from moving onto the selector bars along with the desired card of FIG. 3.

This problem is eliminated by the feature of the present invention wherein the decimal code is entered into the field next following the last digit of the number for which the card has been coded. In operation in a sorting apparatus, selector bars are raised not only for the numbers themselves but also for the three bit positions of the decimal code. FIG. 6 illustrates how a card coded as shown in FIG. 3 (shown in dotted lines in FIG. 6) would be selected to the exclusion of all other cards such as those shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 (shown in dotted lines in FIG. 6). Selector bars 50 are raised at field position I at bit positions C and E for the number 4. Without more, any card starting with a 4 would also drop onto the selector bars 50. However, according to the present invention, the decimal code is applied at field position II, causing the three selector bars 51 to be raised at field position II at bit positions B, C and D. As is apparent from FIG. 1, there are no digits utilizing all three bit positions B, C and D. Thus, the raised selector bars in FIG. 6 will clearly eliminate all cards except those specifically coded for the number 4.

FIGS. 7 and 8 illustrate a preferred embodiment for encoding and selecting data members such as data cards in accordance with the features of the present invention.

First, the right-hand side of FIG. 8 illustrates, schematically, the relevant portion of a card punching and sorting apparatus which is explained in greater detail in our said copending application.

In an apparatus of the present type, a selector bar is provided for each of the bit positions. In the present case, since there are 11 fields, each with five bit positions, there would be selector bars. The first 15 of these selector bars, that is the selector bars for fields I through III are shown at 40 in FIG. 8. These selector bars pass through a first portion 42 whereat card sorting takes place and a second portion 41 whereat edge punching of a card takes place in order to apply a given code to a card. Each selector bar includes a solenoid for selectively moving the same in its longitudinal direction. The solenoids for positions A through E for each of the first three field positions are shown in FIG. 8. A typical card 10, shown from above, is also shown in FIG. 8.

Whether cards are to be sorted or punched, the first step is to move the appropriate selector bars to the right (as viewed in FIG. 8). The selector bars of FIG. 8 have been set for the number 40. Note that the bars moved to the right in each of the first three field positions correspond to the notches shown in FIG. 4. For punching, a card would be placed into the area 41 as shown in FIG. 8 and the punching apparatus would act through the selector bars moved to the right to effect appropriate punching of the card as explained in greater detail in our said copending application. On the other hand, if it is desired to select and sort out the cards with the number 40" thereon, then the apparatus for the sorting area 32 would then be operated to lift the selector bars which have been moved to the right and to complete the cycle of operation as explained in the said previous copending application.

The left-hand side of FIG. 8 shows three of the five stepping switches shown in FIG. 7. The other two stepping switches have been deleted for purposes of clarity since it is believed that the principle of operation of the invention is clear from the illustrated switch.

Referring now to FIG. 7, there is provided a plurality of stepping switches 12 through I6 each capable of moving the system through eleven positions corresponding to the eleven field positions. The switches are now located at the field position number III. Each of the stepping switches 12 through 16 have been associated therewith, respectively, solenoids 17 through 21 representing bit positions A through E, respectively. FIG. 7 shows only a single solenoid connected to each stepping switch. In practice, there would be one line to each of the A" solenoids in each of the eleven field positions. Three of these leads from each of the stepping switches 32, I3 and 14 are shown in FIG. 8. Of course there would be an additional lead for each of the remaining field positions IV through XI. However, these have been deleted even from FIG. 8 for purposes of clarity.

At the left side of FIG. 7 there is shown a representation for a keyboard having buttons for each of the digits 1 through 0. Lines are directed from these buttons through lines 311 to the stepping switch 12, through lines 32 to the stepping switch 13, through lines 34 to the stepping switch 14, through lines 35 to the stepping switch 15, and through lines 36 to the stepping switch 16. These lines are connected to energize the respective solenoids for bit positions A through E in precisely the manner as illustrated in the table of FIG. I. For example, the number l should energize solenoids for bit positions A through E. Thus, it will be seen that lines from button number l lead through lines 31 and 36 to stepping switches 112 and 16 for energizing solenoids A and E respectively. All buttons also direct current along an additional line 33. This completes the circuit through the stepping relay 26, thereby energizing it. When the button of keyboard 11 is then released, the energized stepping relay deenergizes causing movement of the stepping switches 12 through 16 to the next field position.

After all digits have been entered into the keyboard, the cycle switch 22 is depressed. This closes the circuit through lines 25 to energize solenoids 18, I9 and 20 to enter the decimal into the field position next following that of the last digit. Simultaneously current through lines 53 and 5d energizes the stepping relay switch 26 and the holding relay 27, respectively. The stepping relay 26 closes stepping relay controlled contact 24 and the holding relay closes holding relay controlled contacts 23 and 29. Meanwhile, of course, the homing switch 28 is closed. With the holding contacts 23 and 29 closed, a holding circuit is formed through line 55 to the holding relay 27 and through lines 55 and S4 and through switches 23 and 24 to the stepping relay 26. Consequently, the cycle switch 22 may now be released. The stepping switch now steps through a complete cycle back to its original position at field I, ready for the next sorting or coding operation. Finally, movement of the stepping switches to their said original positions at field position I cams out, that is opens the homing switch 28, thereby breaking the circuit, deenergizing the relays 26 and 27 and hence opening the contacts 23, 24, and 25. Switch 28 may be opened just long enough to cause opening of the said contacts or, alternatively switch 28 may be mechanically connected to the stepping switches to be opened when the said stepping switches are at field position I and to be closed as soon as the stepping switches move to any other field position. A further contact as may be provided and operated by the circuit, for example it may be closed upon deenergization of relay 2'7, for commencing operation of a card sorting or a card punching operation.

Although the invention has been described in considerable detail with respect to a preferred embodiment thereof, it will be apparent that the invention is capable of numerous modifications and variations apparent to those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and'scope of the invention.

l claim:

1. A method of encoding a card having a plurality of usable positions located along one edge of the card with a code representing a series of symbols comprising the steps of:

punching notches in the edge of the card in said useable positions to encode the card such that the notches represent the series of symbols.

regardless of the number of positions encoded to represent the series of symbols, encoding the position next following the position of the last of said symbols with a code representing a decimal point.

2. A method according to claim ll wherein each symbol of the series of symbols is represented by a pair of notches and the decimal point is represented by a group of three notches.

3. A method of encoding a card having a series of encoding positions located along one edge of the card, the step of encoding comprising punching notches in the encoding positions on the card, the code representing at least (a) a eeleeted one of the digits of the decimal numbering system and {la} a decimal; and wherein each digit of the decimal system is represented by a different group oi two notches and wherein the decimal is represented by a group of three notches.

4i. An apparatus for encoding a card having a series oi en coding positions located along one edge of the curd, means for coding the card comprising means for punching notches in the edge of the card, encoding positions on the card heing notched with a code including a different pair of notches representative of each digit, and means for encoding a decimal comprising means for punching three notches in the edge of the card, the decimal being encoded in the card following the encoding of the last digit regardless of the number ol digits encoded.

5. An apparatus according to claim all including a common input means for entering the code into the apparatus and a stepping switch for connecting said common input means to successive encoding positions.

6. An apparatus according to claim fi including means for operating said switching means automatically, following the input of a code to an encoding position to connect the input means to the next successive encoding position.

t: at: t: i s

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2041085 *Mar 21, 1935May 19, 1936Mcbee CoKey card punch
US2062155 *Oct 2, 1935Nov 24, 1936Mcbee CoDouble row key punch
US2543435 *Dec 29, 1945Feb 27, 1951Gorton George Machine CoRecord forming, translating and printing apparatus, and automatic control mechanisms therefor
US3145920 *Jun 19, 1962Aug 25, 1964Anthony A BerlinskyFloating-point keypunch machine
US3388858 *Jun 13, 1966Jun 18, 1968United States Banknote CorpTape punching keyboard apparatus
US3389242 *Jun 4, 1963Jun 18, 1968Randomatic Data Systems IncCoded element and means for use therewith
US3452925 *May 31, 1967Jul 1, 1969Mosler Safe CoCard punching and notching method and apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4290630 *Feb 27, 1978Sep 22, 1981Governor & Company Of The Bank Of EnglandSecurity devices
US4370057 *May 22, 1980Jan 25, 1983The Governor And Company Of The Bank Of EnglandMethod of verification of a sheet element, such as a banknote
Classifications
U.S. Classification234/1, 234/48
International ClassificationB44F1/12, G06K19/063, G06K7/04, G06K21/00, G06K21/02
Cooperative ClassificationG06K7/04, G06K21/02, G06K19/063
European ClassificationG06K7/04, G06K21/02, G06K19/063