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Publication numberUS3645460 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 29, 1972
Filing dateOct 27, 1969
Priority dateOct 27, 1969
Also published asCA926836A1
Publication numberUS 3645460 A, US 3645460A, US-A-3645460, US3645460 A, US3645460A
InventorsScaffidi Francis
Original AssigneeRex Chainbelt Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Upper liner for crushers
US 3645460 A
Abstract
A bowl liner and a bowl for use in gyratory cone crushers in which the body of the liner has improved wear-resistant features and the liner is mounted in a shock-free manner to greatly increase the life of the liner. A circumferential, inwardly extending bowl ledge is provided with sockets through which inserts which are fused to the liner body project. The inserts have bores threaded to receive spring-loaded mounting bolts yieldably connecting the liner to the bowl.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Unite @WFME? l niemit Seaailfidi lFeh. 29, 11972 [54] UPPER lLHNlEiR IFQR CRUSH-KENS 3,063,649 11/1962 Pollak ..24l/299 [72] Inventor: Francis Scaffidi, west Allis Wis 3,281,083 10/1966 Johnson ..241/299 X [73] Assignee: Rex Chainlhelt line, Milwaukee, Wis. Primary Examiner-Donald G. Kelly [22] Filed: Oct 27 1969 Attorney-Parker, Caner & Markey [21 Appl. No.2 $69,544 [57] ABSTRACT A bowl liner and a bowl for use in gyratory cone crushers in US. the of the liner ha improved wea -.resistana fea- [51] mm. C]. "Emile 2/04 tures and the liner is mounted in a h kf manner to [58] Field ol'Seni'eh ..241/299,300,293,207-216 g y increase thg life of the net A circumfemmial i wardly extending bowl ledge is provided with sockets through [56] References (med which inserts which are fused to the liner body project. The in- UNITED STATES PATENTS serts have bores threaded to receive spring-loaded mounting 8 l1 9 G d 24 I299 bolts yieldably connecting the liner to the bowl. 2,107,7 6 2 38 ruen er 1 2,718,358 9/1955 Burls ..241/299 X 9 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures Patented Feb. 29, 1972 3,645,460

2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Maw/me.

lUlPPlEI't LINER FOII CRUSIIIEIIS SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention is in the field of cone crushers and is concerned specifically with a new and improved bowl and liner or wearing member to be mounted on the bowl of a crusher of the type in which the head is gyrated.

A primary object of the invention is a new and improved bowl liner or upper liner which has greatly increased wear-resistant property.

Another object is a method and means for mounting such a liner in the bowl of a crusher so that it may be quickly and easily removed and replaced.

Another object is a bowl liner of the above type with an improved mounting arrangement having a shocloresistant feature so that crushing blows and bouncing will be absorbed.

Another object is a method and apparatus for mounting a bowl liner in a crusher where the material of the liner itself is a hard, wear-resistant material which, for all practical purposes, cannot be drilled or tapped.

Another object is a new and improved bowl liner which provides more backing area.

Another object is a bowl liner which, when it is worn out, reduces the throwaway or scrap.

Another object is a bowl liner which provides the same effective crushing, improved wear resistance and increased life but with substantially less overall weight compared to prior liners.

Another object is a bowl liner which requires substantially less machining both on the bowl and on the liner itself.

Another object is a bowl liner which will not tend to slip or rotate in the bowl during use.

Another object is a mounting for such bowl liner which takes up shock.

Another object is a bowl liner which is easier to assemble and disassemble.

Another object is a bowl liner which eliminates any throat area problems.

Other objects will appear from time to time in the ensuing specification, claims and drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. l is a top plan view of the liner;

FIG. 2 is a front view of FIG. 11; and

FIG. 3 is a section substantially along line 3-3 of FIG. l, on an enlarged scale, mounted in a bowl.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In FIG. 3, the liner has been shown mounted in the bowl of a crusher with only a portion of the bowl shown therein. It will be realized that the details of the overall crusher, the head, the frame, the spring release, the bowl itself, are all unimportant and reference is made to U.S. Pat. No. 2,770,423, issued Nov. 13, 1956, and U.S. Pat. No. 3,140,834, issued July 14, 1964, as an example of typical machines to which this invention could be applied, although it is not limited thereto.

In FIG. 3, the bowl is indicated generally at III and is of the type which extends inwardly and provides a circumferential flange or ledge I2 with a bowl liner M mounted thereon. The bowl itself has a generally frustoconical lower surface 16 which extends upwardly and inwardly and matches and fits against a similar surface on the bowl liner.

The liner itself is shown with a main body portion or lower section I8 and an upstanding, somewhat cylindrical neck 29. The lower surface 22 of the main body portion is generally frustoconical and may be considered the crushing surface toward which the head works and defines the crushing cavity, all of which is conventional. The upper surface 24 of the liner is generally frustoconical and engages the mounting or backing surface to of the bowl.

As shown in cross section on an enlarged scale in FIG. 3, and on a plan basis in the first two figures, a plurality of inserts 26, shown in this case as six, are positioned around the liner and project upwardly somewhat from the upper surface. These inserts are shown as equally spaced in FIGS. 1' and 2, but it might be otherwise.

Each such insert, in FIG. 3, has a lower or foot portion 28 which is somewhat flared and is fully embedded in the main body portion lift of the liner itself. While the flare or foot has been shown at right angles to the upright axis of the insert, it might be at an angle, for example, to match the surfaces 22 and M. It will be noted in FIGS. I and 2 that the inserts are generally cylindrical, although they might be any other suitable shape, and the foot portion 23 may be considered somewhat conical, although it might be otherwise.

Each insert 265 rises or extends above the backing or upper surface of the liner a suitable distance and, when mounted in the bowl, projects into a socket or cavity 30 formed therein. An opening or passage 32 of reduced size is provided in the top of the socket opening through the top of the bowl ledge so that a securing arrangement, shown in this case as a conven' tional threaded bolt 34, may extend down through the opening and into the insert. The insert has a threaded hole 36 to accept the lower end of the bolt and the upper end of the bolt may have a suitable hex head 3% or the like.

A plurality of spring washers Alt commonly referred to as Belleville springs, are shown on the bolt and although three have been shown, it could be more or less. In fact, in one situation one such spring washer was completely adequate. In any event, the washers, if there is a stack, rest on the upper surface of the supporting ledge and engage the bolt head so that the result is a shock-resistant, yieldable mounting for the liner. The degree of tension may be selected and preset by turning the bolt into the insert and compressing the Belleville washers to whatever extent is desired.

The upstanding somewhat cylindrical neck 20 is provided with a series of outstanding projections or spacing lugs or guiding and centering extensions 42. The outer surfaces Ml of these lugs, as a group, are swung on the same circle and closely approach the inner surface to of the bowl ledge so that when a new such liner is initiflly mounted in the bowl, the lugs or extensions 42 will pilot or guide the liner and bowl together so that the contacting surfaces In and 24 will be as closely matched and fitted together as possible.

Each socket or space 30 is filled with a backing material which may be a suitable epoxy resin or the like. This material may be poured in liquid form after a new bowl liner has been fully mounted in a bowl and connecting parts, bolts, etc., inserted through the openings in the bowl and threaded into the inserts 26. The backing material could be poured down between the inner edge of the bowl and the liner neck 20 in the space between the lugs or guiding projections $2 to fill the individual sockets 3t), as shown in FIG. 3, up to any suitable level. The contacting surfaces to and M would serve as a sea] at the lower end and the sockets and portions of the bowl which will be contacted by the backing material should preferably be greased so that when the backing material solidifies, it does not adhere to the bowl or any part of it and resists removal. Also, a shrink ring 4% may be shrunk on the outer edge or surface of the liner to apply substantial radial stresses to the body of the liner to counteract. any tendency for localized areas of the liner to fail due to tension stresses occurring therein, for example the rear surface. Part of the feed cone 56) of the crusher has been shown resting on the upper end of the neck portion but is not important.

The use, operation and function of the invention are as follows:

It has long been known to mount removable liners on the bowl of cone crushers and it has been traditional to make those liners out of manganese steel. It: has recently become of interest to make such a liner out of a metal which has a great resistance to wear. But this presents the problem that any such material would be much more brittle and it is extremely difficult if not impossible to machine such material, for example drilling, threading, etc. As example of such materials, a nickle steel now sold by International Nickle Company under its trademark NIHARD would be suitable and has the wear-resistant characteristics desired. Such a material is a hard, wearresistant metal described as a pearlitic, carbidic white cast iron; martensitic, carbidic, chrome-nickle alloyed cast iron which may have a Brinell hardness at least as high as 400 or better.

Some previous bowl liners have been held at the top by a mounting flange, as shown for example in the above referred to prior US. patents. But in view of the brittle nature of the material proposed to be used for the liner here, clamping such a liner at the top or upper end of the neck would be impractical since the lower portion of the liner might break off and fall.

I propose to cast mild steel inserts into such a liner. This would be clone by positioning the inserts in the sand mold and casting the wear-resistant, brittle base material about them. Each of the inserts would extend up from the rear or top surface of the liner and fit into an oversize socket or cavity in the bowl. The insert itself is easily machineable and can be drilled and tapped. A simple conventional bolt can then be inserted down into the insert to join the liner and bowl together. It is preferred that a yieldable shock-resistant mounting be provided for any such bolt, or whatever securing means is used, so

. that during crushing there will be a degree of play or give in the mounting which will reduce the possibilities of the base material breaking.

The inserts are integrally fused or molded directly into the base metal and the union between the two suffers no gaps or separations. Thereafter the inserts may be considered an integral, fused part of the liner itself, except that it has the advantage that it can be drilled, tapped or otherwise machined.

One of the advantages of the present liner and mounting arrangement is that it provides more backing area behind the liner. The backing use, be it an epoxy resin or what-have-you, can be poured between the neck of the liner and the rim of the bowl so that all sockets or cavities are filled. The only metalto-metal point of contact is between the conical outer mating surfaces on the liner and bowl. Thus, only this area is metal-tometal and the rest may be considered to be backed or cushioned by a suitable filler backing.

I have shown a cylindrical neck and it should be understood that in some situations and installations, such a neck may not be important. In that case, the neck might be brought down or eliminated down to a level generally at the centering or guiding projections 42. In such case, the total amount of metal that would have to be thrown away when the liner is worn out would be greatly reduced. Also, elimination of the upper neck would reduce the overall weight of the liner some 20 to 30 percent, which greatly facilitates handling.

The only contacting surfaces which require machining are the limited areas 16 and 24 which reduces expense. Also, the supporting surfaces of the bowl that contact the washers or bolts or studs do not have to be machined but can be left in the as-cast state, although it could be spot-faced if desired.

The use of the inserts fitting into appropriate sockets will prevent the liner from rotating if it should become loose. And the filling or backing material firmly holds the liner in place.

One of the important features is the shock-free mounting which in this case is shown as a group of so-called Belleville washers which is important and advantageous when the main body of the liner itself is a hard, brittle material.

The liner is easy to assemble since the sockets in the bowl can be much larger than the inserts. Thus, no accurate pistonand-cylinder fit is required. The outstanding lugs projecting outwardly from the upstanding liner neck accurately center the liner in the bowl. But a tight fit is not necessary.

In the past, a substantial amount of unexplained wear has occurred in certain situations in the upstanding neck portion 20. This has been particularly disadvantageous on liners that are clamped at the top by wedges, outstanding flanges, and what have you. Once the neck wears excessively, the entire liner must be disposed of, even though the main crushing body portion may still have a lot of life left in it. In the present arrangement, wear of the neck is completely incidental if it occurs. In certain situations the neck might be eliminated in which case a simple, inexpensive wear member, separate from the liner body, might be used, which would protect the adjacent portions of the bowl and related parts.

While I have shown six such inserts in the drawings, it should be understood that more or less could be used.

It may well be that in certain installations, the inserts rising from the back of the liner can be used to guide the liner in place in the bowl and the projecting lugs 42 will not be needed. But this will depend upon the particular application involved and at present the lugs are considered desirable.

Also, the Belleville washers or cone washers 40 additionally protect the studs since any shocks that otherwise might tend to break off the head of the stud will be dampened out. I have shown Belleville or cone washers, but it should be understood that any suitable or equivalent element might be used. Also, in certain installations or applications, Belleville springs or some form of dampening device may not be necessary. And the liner might be merely held by the bolts or some holding device.

While the preferred form and several variations of the invention have been shown and suggested, it should be understood that suitable additional modifications, changes, substitutions and alterations may be made without departing from the inventions fundamental theme.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. A bowl liner for use in a crusher of the gyrated head type, the liner having a generally circumferential frustoconical crushing body with an upper surface adapted to engage a similar such surface on the bowl of a crusher when the liner is mounted therein, a lower generally frustoconical surface on the liner adapted to define a part of the crushing cavity in the crusher, the liner being of a hard, wearresistant, somewhat brittle material, and a plurality of inserts integrally fused into the body of the liner and projecting from the upper surface, and the inserts being circumferentially spaced about the liner and being of a tough fracture-resistant material, each such insert having a threaded bore opening through the top thereof to receive a mounting bolt.

2. The bowl liner of claim 1 further characterized in that the liner includes a generally frustoconical truncated lower main body portion and an upper generally cylindrical neck rising from the upper inner part of the body portion.

3. The bowl liner of claim 1 further characterized in that each such insert has an expanded foot portion at the lower end thereof which is embedded in and integrally fused to the wearresistant somewhat brittle material of the liner.

4. The bowl liner of claim 1 further characterized in that the liner has a generally cylindrical upstanding neck portion at its upper inner end with a plurality of outstanding spaced projections on the outer surface thereof which function to center and guide the liner in the bowl when it is being initially mounted therein.

5. For use in a cone crusher of the type having a gyratable head, a bowl and liner assembly including a generally circumferential bowl having an inwardly projecting circumferential ledge with a generally frustoconical downwardly and outwardly extending lower surface, a bowl liner mounted on the lower surface of the bowl and in engagement therewith, a plurality of downwardly opening circumferentially spaced sockets in the bowl, a matching number of upstanding mounting projections on the back of the liner extending into the sockets, and a mounting assembly including a yieldable formation on the upper surface of the bowl supporting ledge connected to the projections on the liner, the mounting assembly including a plurality of bolts extending through openings in the bowls mounting ledge and threaded into the projections, and the yieldable formation including one or more cone washer springs around the bolts and bearing on the upper surface of the circumferential ledge.

6. The structure of claim 5 further characterized in that the bowl liner is made of a hard, wear-resistant, somewhat brittle material and the projections are inserts and are made of a tough, fracture-resistant material, the inserts being integrally fused into the body of the bowl liner.

7. The structure of claim 5 further characterized by and including a thermosetting backing material filling the space between the bowl liner and bowl extending into and filling the sockets in the bowl around the mounting projections on the back of the liner.

8. A bowl liner for use in a crusher of the gyrated head type, the liner having a generally circumferential frustoconical crushing body with an upper surface adapted to engage a similar such surface on the bowl of a crusher when the liner is mounted therein, a lower generally frustoconical surface on the liner adapted to define a part of the crushing cavity in the crusher, a plurality of upstanding circumferentially spaced integral mounting projections on the upper surface of the liner adapted to extend into sockets formed in the bowl, and a threaded bore opening through the top of each projection adapted to receive a mounting bolt.

9. The structure of claim 8 further characterized in that the projections are in the form of inserts fused into the body of the liner and made of a tough fracture-resistant material while the liner is made of a hard, wear-resistant somewhat brittle material.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2107786 *Sep 25, 1933Feb 8, 1938Nordberg Manufacturing CoCrushing machine
US2718358 *Jul 6, 1951Sep 20, 1955 Bowl structure and wearing parts for gyratory crushers
US3063649 *Nov 22, 1960Nov 13, 1962Allis Chalmers Mfg CoGyratory crusher
US3281083 *Sep 7, 1965Oct 25, 1966Johnson Louis WRock crusher bowl support
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6200415 *Jun 30, 1999Mar 13, 2001Lam Research CorporationLoad controlled rapid assembly clamp ring
Classifications
U.S. Classification241/299, 241/300
International ClassificationB02C2/00
Cooperative ClassificationB02C2/005
European ClassificationB02C2/00B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 3, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BOSTON, THE, 100 FEDERAL ST
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:NORDBERG, INC., 3073 SOUTH CHASE AVE., MILWAUKEE, WI 53207, A DECORP.;REEL/FRAME:005060/0994
Effective date: 19890308
Aug 4, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BOSTON, THE, 100 FEDERAL ST
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:NORDBERG, INC., A DE CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004930/0280
Effective date: 19880729
Owner name: FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BOSTON, THE, MASSACHUSETTS
Jan 26, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: NORDBERG INC., 3073 S. CHASE AVE., MILWAUKEE, WI 5
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:REXNORD INC.;REEL/FRAME:004834/0102
Effective date: 19880126
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:REXNORD INC.;REEL/FRAME:4834/102
Owner name: NORDBERG INC., A CORP. OF DE,WISCONSIN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:REXNORD INC.;REEL/FRAME:004834/0102
May 8, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: REXNORD INC.
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:REX CHAIN BELT INC.;REEL/FRAME:004713/0513
Effective date: 19850905