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Publication numberUS3645757 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 29, 1972
Filing dateMay 28, 1970
Priority dateMay 28, 1970
Publication numberUS 3645757 A, US 3645757A, US-A-3645757, US3645757 A, US3645757A
InventorsArthur L Gordon, Leonard A Warwick
Original AssigneeKraftco Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Food packaging method employing release agent coated packaging material
US 3645757 A
Abstract
An improved package for moisture-containing food products and a method for providing improved release properties for such food products is provided. The release properties are provided by a thin film or layer of a suitable readily hydrated hydrocolloid. Suitable hydrocolloids may be selected from pregelatinized starches, modified cellulose materials or mixtures thereof.
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United States Patent Gordon et a1.

[ 1 Feb. 29, 1972 FOOD PACKAGING METHOD EMPLOYING RELEASE AGENT COATED PACKAGING MATERIAL Arthur L. Gordon, Des Plaines; Leonard A. Warwick, Niles, both of 111.

Assignee: Kraftco Corporation, New York, NY.

Filed: May 28, 1970 Appl. No.: 41,635

Related US. Application Data Continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 654,041, July 10, 1967, Pat. No. 3,519,470.

Inventors:

US. Cl ..99/l71 CA, 99/178, 117/21,

117/84, 117/85, 117/92, 117/165, 117/166 Int. Cl..., ..B65b 25/06 Field of Search ..99/171 R, 171 CA, 171 LP, 178;

Primary Examiner-Frank W. Lutter Assistant ExaminerSteven L. Weinstein AttorneyFitch, Even, Tabin & Luedeka [5 7] ABSTRACT An improved package for moisture-containing food products and a method for providing improved release properties for such food products is provided. The release properties are provided by a thin film or layer of a suitable readily hydrated hydrocolloid. Suitable hydrocolloids may be selected from pregelatinized starches, modified cellulose materials or mixtures thereof.

5 Claims, No Drawings FOOD PACKAGING METHOD EMPLOYING RELEASE AGENT COATED PACKAGING MATERIAL The present application is a continuation-in-part of copending application Ser. No. 652,041, filed July 10, 1967, which has now issued as U.S. Pat. No. 3,519,470.

The present invention relates generally to packaging material and more particularly relates to packaging materials for use in packaging foods, with improved release properties.

It is desirable to wrap certain foods in a packaging material prior to distribution. However, various of these foods, such as some types of cheese, margarine, or some types of candy, tend to stick or cling to the packaging material when the consumer attempts to remove the packaging material prior to consumption. Such sticking or clinging is undesirable in that it may lead to food wastage or tearing of the packaging material.

Various materials have been used on the interior surface of packaging materials to prevent blocking. Blocking is defined as undesired adhesion between touching layers ofa packaging material such as occurs under moderate pressure conditions which occur during storing or wrapping operations; For example, it is known to provide a thin coating of dry granular starch on the packaging material. Such coating of dry granular starch, however, is not satisfactory in effecting release of the packaging material from the food product that is wrapped therein.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide an improved packaging material. It is another object of the present invention to provide a packaging material with improved release properties when used for food products. It is further object of the present invention to provide a method for treating packaging materials which provides easy release of the packaging material from the food products at the time of consuming.

These and other objects of the present invention will become more clear from the following detailed disclosure.

in general, in accordance with certain features of the present invention, packaging materials which are used to package food products are coated with a hydrocolloid which forms a thin film on the interior surface of the packaging material. As used herein, the term hydrocolloid refers to any of several substances which may be hydrated with water to yield gels and which will subsequently form thin films upon drying of a thin coating of the hydrated hydrocolloid. In particular such classes of hydrocolloids as treated or untreated starches, polysaccharide gums, farinaceous flours, and modified cellulose materials are suitable for the practice of the present invention. For example, cornstarch, wheat flour, guar gum, carrageenan and carboxy methyl cellulose and combinations of these materials are suitable for the practice of the present invention.

in accordance with the present invention the hydrocolloid may first be mixed with cold water to form a paste or suspension. The suspension is then heated to a predetermined elevated temperature to promote hydration of the hydrocolloid. The suspension is maintained at the elevated temperature under stirring conditions until the hydration is completed and a colloidal solution or gel is formed. The hydrocolloid gel is then applied to the packaging materials by any suitable technique. For example, a Gravure cylinder and knife combination may be used to apply a controlled thin film layer of the hydrocolloid to a continuous web of packaging material.

The hydrocolloid material is added to water at a level so as to provide a suitable viscosity at the temperature of application to the web of packaging material. For example, when the hydrocolloid material is cornstarch, the cornstarch is added so as to provide from about 3 percent to about percent by weight of cornstarch in water. Suitable levels of other hydrocolloids or mixtures of hydrocolloids are readily determined by one skilled in the art. These levels are, in general, from about 2 to about 12 percent by weight.

After the hydrocolloid suspension has been hydrated by heating, it is held at a temperature so as to provide the desired viscosity for application to the packaging material. In general,

this temperature will be from about 15 to about 35 F. below the boiling point of the hydrocolloid-water mixture.

After application to the packaging material the hydrated hydrocolloid is dried so as to form a thin continuous film on the packaging material. This hydrocolloid film is subsequently placed in contact with the food product during the wrapping operation so as to provide improved release properties.

Certain readily hydrated hydrocolloid materials such as pregelatinized starch, which may be derived from any suitable food source such as rice, potato or tapioca. dextrin, and nonionic water soluble cellulose ethers may be applied to the surface of the packaging material in a substantially dry condition.

It is believed that these readily hydrated hydrocolloid materials have the ability to hydrate so as to form a thin film in situ by absorption of moisture from the packaged product. Application of these readily hydrated hydrocolloid materials to the packaging material may be effected by any suitable method. One such method is simply dusting of the hydrocolloid material onto the surface of the packaging material. Another method is to provide a slurry of the hydrocolloid material in a suitable inert organic carrier, such as isopropanol or ethanol. The hydrocolloid slurry may then be applied to the surface of the packaging material and the organic carrier removed by drying so as to provide a thin, dry layer of the hydrocolloid material.

The thin, dry film of readily hydrated hydrocolloid material is subsequently placed in contact with the food product during the wrapping operation. The thin, dry layer of hydrocolloid material absorbs moisture from the packaged food product so as to form a thin substantially continuous hydrocolloid film with improved release properties.

The hydrocolloid, whether hydrated by heating of a slurry of the hydrocolloid or whether applied in a substantially dry condition is applied to the packaging material so as to provide a level of from about 0.5 to about 5.0 pounds of the hydrocolloid (dry basis) per ream of packaging material. For purposes of this application a ream refers to an area of 3,000 square feet. At levels above about 5.0 lbs/ream no substantial additional benefit is derived and the total cost of the hydrocolloid material used is consequently greater. However, levels above about 5.0 lbs/ream may sometimes be used to achieve improved machining and handling properties for the coated packaging material. While the advantages of the invention are attained at levels of application within the above indicated range, higher levels may sometimes be used in commercial practice of the present invention. Such higher levels are primarily encountered due to lack of control during application of the hydrocolloid material with particular commercial application equipment. Also, variations during application may result in higher levels of up to about 15 lbs/ream at a particular local point even when the average level is within the indicated range of about 0.5 to about 5.0 lbs/ream. Local variation in levels of hydrocolloid present is particularly prevalent when a readily hydrated hydrocolloid is applied by dusting or by application of a slurry of the hydrocolloid in an organic carrier. For this reason, it is preferred that the average level of application of the hydrocolloid be at the higher end of the indicated range, that is, at a level of from about 2.0 to about 5.0 lbs/ream. When the average level is within this preferred range or higher a sufficient margin of error is established to compensate for local variations due to lack of control.

The packaging material of the present invention is particularly suitable for wrapping process cheese and certain details are hereinafter described with particular reference to process cheese. However, it should be understood that the packaging material is equally suitable for wrapping other food products which have a tendency to stick or adhere to the packaging material. Such food products include cream cheese, margarine, caramels, or toffee. When process cheese is being packaged in accordance with the present invention it is preferred to select a release agent that provides a dull, translucent film rather than one which provides a glossy, shiny finish to the packaging material. Particularly preferred release agents for packaging process cheese are pregelatinized and nongelatinized starch and carrageenan.

Process cheese in general is made by grinding and mixing together by heating and stirring one or more cheeses of the same or of two or more varieties, together with other ingredients, until a homogeneous plastic mass is formed. American cheddar cheese and other American-type cheeses such as colby, and also Swiss, gruyere, brick, limburger and other cheeses are examples of cheeses which are used in the production of process cheese.

The cheese for each batch is cleaned and cut into uniform size if the cheese pieces are large. The cheese pieces are then passed through a grinder into a steamjacketcd kettle or a horizontal cooker. The other ingredients, such as emulsifiers and flavoring materials, are added either as the cheese is run' through the grinder or while it is being heated. The cheese is heated and is held at an elevated temperature for at least 30 seconds. When the cheese is smooth, homogeneous, glossy and creamy it is automatically packaged into carbons while in a heated fluid condition. The cartons are lined with a packaging material which may be sealed to exclude air. The packaged cheese is then cooled to room temperature and is placed under refrigeration. The high temperature attained in heating,- together with the heat retained during the time required to cool the cheese to room temperature makes the cheese practically sterile, and the cheese keeps well and does not ripen further. However, the cheese tends to adhere to the packaging material and subsequent removal of the packaging material is difficult. A m M Any suitable packaging material which is commonly used, for packaging food products that tend to adhere to the packaging material may be used in accordance with the present invention. One such commonly used packaging material for use in packaging cheese is a cellophane/aluminum foil/fortified wax lamination. Fortified wax refers to wellknown wax-resin blends, wherein the resin is a polymer selected to provide desired viscosity or body.

The following examples further illustrate various features of the present invention but are intended to in no way limit the scope of the invention which is defined in the appended claims.

open-mouthed rectangular package with a flap that could subsequently be folded over to seal the mouth. The package was folded to place the starch film on the interior surface of the package. Process cheese was then introduced into the package 5 at a temperature of 165 F. to provide a 2 pound block of process cheese. The packages were then sealed.

Process cheese at a temperature of l65 F. was alsopackaged in a similar manner into cellophane/aluminum foil/fortified wax packaging material which had not been treated to provide a thin film of starch. The packaging materi- .granular starch per ream of packaging material. This packaging material was then dried, leaving a coating of dry granular starch on the fortified wax surface. The process cheese which {had been packaged in accordance with the present invention and the process cheese which had been packaged with a coating of dry granular starch were compared after various periods of storage at temperatures of 72 and 45"v F. to determine the release properties. The release properties were visually noted by observing and rating theamount of cheese which adhered to the wrapper after a specified period of storage. After each 2-pound package of process cheese was unwrapped the condi- :tion of the wrapper was observed and noted according to the :following schedule:

1. Clean (no sign of cheese adherence to the packaging material) 2. Very slight to clean 3. Very slight 4. Slight 5. Slight to moderate 6Moderate 7. Moderate to definite 8. Definite (definite signs of cheese adherence to the HM wumaw packaging material) TABLE 1 Average grading of packing material at given examination periods and storage conditions Initial 1 month 2months 3months 4months limontlis Release coating material 72 45 72 45 72 45 72 45 72 45 72 isiififiaaaii'iaaamiixix: 5:2 in? t3 5'3 #13 ii? if 1:3 5:3 1:8 $13 $13 EXAMPLE I Dry cornstarch was added at a level of 5.7 weight percent to. water which had been heated to 85 F. The mixture was stirred, vigorously for 5 minutes until the starch was uniformly} dispersed in the water. The starch mixture was then gradually heated over a period of about 30 minutes to a boil (212 F.) under conditions of mild agitation. The starch mixture wasl held at a boil for 1 /5; minutes to fully gelatinize the starch. Heating was then stopped and the mixture was then cooled rapidly in less than 1 minute to 190 F. and held at that temperature until used.

The starch mixture was then applied to a web of cellophane/aluminum foil/fortified wax laminate packaging material. The starch mixture was applied with a Gravure cylinder and knife combination so as to provide starch at a level ofone pound per ream of packaging material (dry basis). The coated packaging material was then dried to provide a thin film of dry starch adjacent to the fortified wax layer. The

0 visually grading the appearance of each of the packaging materials. The average of the grades was then recorded in Table 1. As can be seen from the above grading scale, the lower the average grade the better the release properties of the packaging material.

It can readily be seen that packaging material treated in ac-.

icordance with the present invention to provide a thin film of lrelease agent material adjacent the surface of the processed cheese is superior to the known method of applying a dry starshssatiss;

EXAMPLE [1 A cellophane/aluminum foil/fortified wax packaging material was coated with a 5.7 weight percent mixture of packaging material was then cut and folded to provide an starch and carrageenan which had been hydrated in ac- EXAMPLE V A cellophane/aluminum foil/fortified wax packaging 5 material was coated with a mixture of pregelatinized starch and a nonionic water soluble cellulose ether. One hundred pounds of slurry containing a mixture of readily hydrated hydrocolloids in an inert organic carrier was prepared. The

slurry contained 5 weight percent of pregelatinized starch and 'I'ABLE2 Avorngo grading of packing material at given examination periods and storage conditions Initial 1 month 2months Bmonths 4months fimonths Release coating material 45" 72 45 72 45 72 45 72 45 72 45 72 Carrageenan/starchfilm 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1. 0 Dry granular starch (control) 7.0 6.0 7.0 5.5 7.0 4.5 7.0 4.0 7.0 4.0 7.0 3. 0

From the above it can readily be seen that the packaging material of the present invention which had a hydrated starch-. carrageenan film is superior.

EXAMPLE 111 r v TABLE 3 8 weight percent of nonionic water soluble cellulose ether. .lsopropanol was used as the inert organic carrier. The slurry was applied to the packaging material by means of a Gravure cylinder so as to provide 0.8 pounds of the hydrocolloid mixture (dry basis) per ream of the packaging material. The coated packaging material was then passed through a ten foot long oven at a rate of 100 feet per minute. The oven was maintained at a temperature of 175 F.

Process cheese was then packaged in the coated packagingv material and the packaged process cheese was stored at a tem- Average grading of packing material at given examination periods and storage conditions 1 Initial 1 Month 2 Months 3 Months 4 Months 5 Months We ght Release coating material percent 72 45 72 45 72 45 72 45 72 45 72 D ranular starch From the above. it can be seen that various mixtures of hydrocolloids may be used in the practice of the present in: vention. Certain release coating materials are particularly eflfective in preventing sticking when the food product is stored at relatively low temperatures, while others are more suitable lfor relatively high-temperature storage, such as at room temperature. A suitable hydrocolloid or mixture of hydrocolloids llor particular conditions of storage is readily determined by one skilled in the art.

EXAMPLE IV A cellophane/aluminum foil/fortified wax packaging material was coated with dry, pregelatinized starch in accordance with the following procedure. Sixty pounds of pregelatinized starch was added to 48 pounds of 99 weight percent isopropanol. The starch-isoproponal mixture was agitated so as to provide a uniform starch slurry. The starch slurry at a temperature of 70 F. was applied to the packaging material by means of a Gravure cylinder. The starch slurry was applied at a rate sufficient to provide 3 pounds of starch per ream of packaging material (dry basis). The coated packaging material was then passed through a l0-foot long drying tunnel maintained at a temperature of 200 F. at a rate of 100 feet per. minute to evaporate the isopropanol.

The coated packaging material was then used to package process cheese. after 90 days storage, the release properties of the packaging material prepared in accordance with the above procedure were still excellent. I

.perature of 45 F. The release properties of the packaging material were excellent after 90 days storage.

It can be seen that a superior release coating material and method have been supplied by the present invention.

What is claimed is: V H M V V i i. A methodior treating the sur face of packaging materials .which are used for packaging moisture containing foodv products so as to provide a release coating thereon, which method comprises providing a dry thin layer of a readily jhydrated hydrocolloid or mixture of readily hydrated hydrocolloids on the surface of packaging material, wrapping %a moisture-containing food material with said packaging material, and hydrating said hydrocolloid by moisture transfer from said food material so as to provide a thin substantially ;continuous film of said hydrocolloid, said hydrocolloid being applied at a level sufficient to provide from about 0.5 to about 5.0 pounds of hydrocolloid on a dry basis per ream of packaging material.

food product is cheese. I

4. A method 155555505555 with claim 1 wherein said dry thin layer of a readily hydrated hydrocolloid is provided by mixing said hydrocolloid with an alcohol to provide a dispersion, spraying said dispersion onto the surface of said packaging material and drying said dispersion to remove said alcohol 5. A method in accordance with claim 1 wherein said dry thin layer of a readily hydrated hydrocolloid is provided by} dusting a substantially dry readily hydrated hydrocolloid; powder onto the surface of the packaging material.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3881023 *May 11, 1972Apr 29, 1975Reynolds Metals CoFlexible cooking container having powder distributed over its interior surfaces
US4927647 *Nov 23, 1988May 22, 1990R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyAnti-stick package for hygroscopic foods
US5120382 *Nov 30, 1990Jun 9, 1992Highland Supply CorporationProcess for forming a paper, burlap or cloth flower pot cover
US6365211Jun 18, 1999Apr 2, 2002The Procter & Gamble Co.Cooking aid with reduced foaming
US6403144Apr 25, 2000Jun 11, 2002The Procter & Gamble Co.Food preparation compositions
US6544574Sep 21, 2001Apr 8, 2003Nizar El-KhouryFood preparation compositions
US6623773Apr 24, 1998Sep 23, 2003Transform Pack Inc.Packaging material for curing or marinating fresh foods during storage at low temperatures
US6893675Jun 25, 2001May 17, 2005Afp Advanced Food Products LlcAcidified imitation cheese sauce and pudding compositions and methods for producing such compositions
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US7214400Apr 25, 2000May 8, 2007Smucker Fruit Processing CompanyFlavor enhancing oils
US7867531Apr 28, 2006Jan 11, 2011Curwood, Inc.Myoglobin blooming agent containing shrink films, packages and methods for packaging
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US8623479Dec 28, 2011Jan 7, 2014Curwood, Inc.Packaging articles, films and methods that promote or preserve the desirable color of meat
US8668969Jun 9, 2010Mar 11, 2014Curwood, Inc.Myoglobin blooming agent containing shrink films, packages and methods for packaging
US8709595Aug 15, 2011Apr 29, 2014Curwood, Inc.Myoglobin blooming agents, films, packages and methods for packaging
US8741402Aug 18, 2006Jun 3, 2014Curwood, Inc.Webs with synergists that promote or preserve the desirable color of meat
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Classifications
U.S. Classification426/415, 426/811, 427/415
International ClassificationB65B25/06
Cooperative ClassificationY10S426/811, B65D81/24