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Publication numberUS3645759 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 29, 1972
Filing dateJun 25, 1970
Priority dateJun 25, 1970
Publication numberUS 3645759 A, US 3645759A, US-A-3645759, US3645759 A, US3645759A
InventorsHeiligman Fred
Original AssigneeUs Army
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of packing flexible packages in a cylindrical container
US 3645759 A
Abstract
A method of packing a plurality of substantially flat elongated flexible packages in a rigid cylindrical container where the length of the packages exceeds the interior height of the container comprising folding the flexible packages transversely to a length which is less than the interior height of the container and providing a folded end portion which is less than half the interior height of the container, stacking the folded packages in pairs with their folded end portions in the same plane, placing the stacked pairs into the container and filling the remaining space between the container wall and the stacked pairs with a single flexible package folded at least twice transversely and placed sidewise in the container. The method is particularly useful in packing five 1-pound packages of sliced bacon in a standard size (No. 10) tin plate container.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Heiligman 5] Feb. 29, 1972 [72] Inventor:

[73] Assignee:

Fred Heiligrnan, Framingham, Mass.

The United States of America as represented by the Secretary of the Army 22] Filed: June 25,1970

[211 App1.-No.: 49,703

[52] US. Cl ..99/174, 206/65 R, 53/21 FW,

2,654,473 10/1953 Pierce ..206/65 K 2,915,235 12/1959 Rueckert. ..99/174 UX 2,969,146 l/l961 Metz ..206/65 R 3 ,424,596 l/l969 Sullivan ..99/174 Primary Examiner-Frank W. Lutter Assistant Examiner-Robert l-lalper AttameyHarry M. Saragovitz, Edward J. Kelly, Herbert Berl and Charles F. Murphy [57] ABSTRACT A method of packing a plurality of substantially flat elongated flexible packages in a rigid cylindrical container where the length of the packages exceeds the interior height of the container comprising folding the flexible packages transversely to a length which is less than the interior height of the container and providing a folded end portion which is less than half the interior height of the container, stacking the folded packages in pairs with their folded end portions in the same plane, placing the stacked pairsjnto the container and filling the remaining space between the container wall and the stacked pairs with a single flexible package folded at least twice transversely and placed sidewise in the container. The method is particu larly useful in packing five l-pound packages of sliced bacon in a standard size (No. 10) tin plate container.

4 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures PAIENTEUFEB29 I972 3, 645, 759

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION- This invention relates to a method of packing a plurality of flexible packages in a rigid cylindrical container and, more particularly, to a method of folding and packing elongated flexible packages in such a container.

Sliced bacon is normally marketed in l-pound units of shingled slices approximately inches long packed in flexible packaging material and kept under refrigeration. With the development of processes for the treatment of bacon with high-intensity ionizing radiation, it became possible to store bacon at room temperatures for extended periods of time without spoilage. However, after radiation treatment, the treated bacon must be protected from subsequent exposure to spoilage bacteria and micro-organisms. The well-known tin plate can is most suitable for this purpose from the standpoint of cost, availability and protection, but problems have been encountered in packing the bacon in standard cylindrical cans.

Bacon has been packed in l-pound cans with some success by rolling the shingled bacon slices into a cylinder and placing in the can. Such small cans are most inefficient and uneconomical for institutional or military use, but efforts to pack shingled 10-inch slices of bacon in larger cans such as the No. 10 (607x700) can commonly used in institutional packs were unsuccessful due to excessive breaking, splitting and distortion of the bacon slices. This damage occurs during folding or rolling of the shingled bacon slices, insertion into the can and removal from the can without a suitable method to follow.

Obviously, specially sized containers would avoid these problems as would specially sized packages, for example, 7- inch long sliced bacon. However, either of these approaches would increase the cost of the final pack since the containers or the packages would have to be specially produced and handled just for this purpose.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention comprises a method of packing a number of elongated flat flexible packages in a rigid cylindrical container which has an interior height less than the length of the flexible packages and equal to or greater than the width thereof and a diameter greater than the width of the flexible packages. The method comprises folding a predetermined number of such flexible packages transversely to a length which is less than the interior height of the container and which provides a folded end portion which is not more than one-half the interior height of the container, stacking the folded packages in pairs with the folded end portions of each pair lying in the same plane, placing a predetermined number of stacked pairs lengthwise in the container and placing one more flexible package which has been folded transversely at least twice sidewise between the stacked pairs and the interior wall of the container. This method provides for a minimum amount of folding of the flexible packages and maximum ease of insertion and removal from the container while permitting the container to be efficiently and snugly packed. Another object is to provide a method which provides for the packing of standard commercial size packages such as l-pound packages of sliced bacon in a standard size can.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a top view of a container packed with five flexible packages in accordance with the invention with the cover removed.

FIG. 2 is a side view of the container shown in FIG. I with the container being shown in section along line 2-2 of FIG. 1. The flexible packages are shown in slightly distorted form for purposes of clarity.

FIG. 3 is a plan view of a quantity of shingled bacon on a sheet of flexible wrapped material ready for wrapping.

FIG. 4 is a side view of a package of bacon after wrapping.

FIG. 5 is a side view of the package in FIG. 4 folded once in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 6 is a side view of a pair of packages folded and stacked in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 7 is a side view of a package folded twice in accordance with the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The standard commercial l-pound package of sliced, uncooked bacon comprises 10 to 10% inches long slices shingled together to form a unit of about about 10 to l0 inches in length about 5 inches in width and about its to '15 inch thick. In accordance with the invention, five of such packages are packed in a standard No. 10 can which is 6 7/16 inches in diameter and 7 inches in height.

The l-pound units of shingled sliced bacon are individually wrapped in food grade parchment paper. The bacon 10 is placed on the paper 11 as shown in FIG. 3, and ends 12 of the paper are folded over the bacon. The sides 13 of the paper are then folded over the bacon to form a package 14 as shown in FIG. 4. Four of the packages 14 are then folded once transversely as shown in FIG. 5 to a folded length which is slightly less than the interior height of the can 15, i.e., 7 inches.

The folded packages 14, stacked in pairs with the folded ends 16 lying in the same plane as shown in FIG. 6 and the two stacked pairs are placed lengthwise in the open topped can 15 as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2.

A fifth package 14 is folded twice transversely to a folded length slightly less than about one-half of its unfolded length as shown in FIG. 7 and then placed sidewise in the can 15 between the interior wall of the can and the already placed stacked pairs of packages as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. The can 15 is then covered and sealed by conventional methods.

The very limited amount of folding required by this method and the ease with which the bacon packages are placed in the can and subsequently removed result in the elimination of practically all breaking, splitting and distortion of bacon packed in this manner. At the same time, the method pennits the use of a standard size can and results in a relatively small amount of unused space within the packed can. The double folding of the last package and its sidewise placement in the can fills the remaining space and provides a snug pack which prevents movement of the bacon within the can during shipment and handling.

It will be apparent that the advantages of this method can be attained with a variety elongated flexible packages and container sizes. Generally, the width of the flexible packages must not be more than the inside diameter of the container and not more than the interior height of the container. In other words, the diameter and height of the container must be equal to or greater than the width of the packages. The length of the flexible packages is less critical than the width. Thus, while the bacon packages in the embodiment described were folded only once prior to stacking in pairs, longer packages may be folded two, three or more times, if necessary, so long as the method of folding provides one folded end portion which is not more than about half the interior height of the container. This will permit the highly advantageous stacking of the folded packages in pairs with the folded end portions lying in the same plane as shown in FIG. 6.

In other embodiments, the number of folds of the final package may be increased as necessary to obtain an optimum pack from the standpoint of ease of insertion and removal and snugness of fit.

The invention described in detail in the foregoing specification is susceptible to changes in the details, materials, configuration, and arrangement or parts as may occur to persons skilled in the art and is not limited to the precise details shown and described herein. The terminology used in the specification is used for purposes of description and not of limitation, the scope of the invention being defined in the claims.

is not more than one-half the interior height of said container,

b. stacking said folded packages in pairs with said folded end portions of each pair lying in the same plane,

c. placing said stacked pairs lengthwise in said container,

d. folding said one of said flexible packages at least twice transversely to a folded length of less than about half of its unfolded length,

e. placing said one of said flexible packages sidewise in said container between the interior wall thereof and said stacked pairs of packages therein; and

f. closing said container.

2. A method as in claim 1 wherein said flexible packages have an unfolded length which is greater than the interior height of said container but not more than one and one-half times said height and all but said one of said packages are folded transversely once only.

3. A method as in claim 2 wherein said flexible packages comprise shingled strips of uncooked bacon wrapped in parchment paper.

4. A method as in claim 3 wherein said flexible packages comprise about 1 pound of uncooked bacon in strips about 10 inches in length, said container comprises a tin plate can about 6 7/l6 inches in diameter and 7 inches in height, and five of said packages are packed in said can.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1706419 *Feb 3, 1925Mar 26, 1929Thorpe William HThermopile and method of manufacture
US2170540 *Jul 16, 1937Aug 22, 1939Steiner Sales CoPaper package
US2481285 *Sep 20, 1944Sep 6, 1949Dictaphone CorpMethod of packing flexible recording belts
US2609923 *Oct 27, 1949Sep 9, 1952St Regis Paper CoBag package with fork-lift handling means
US2622730 *Sep 7, 1951Dec 23, 1952Sharp Jr William WHosiery package
US2654473 *Jan 10, 1950Oct 6, 1953Pierce Lee DNesting container shells
US2915235 *Oct 29, 1956Dec 1, 1959Swift & CoContainer for frozen foods
US2969146 *May 14, 1958Jan 24, 1961Baxter Laboratories IncPackaging device and method of manufacture
US3424596 *Oct 22, 1965Jan 28, 1969Robert E SullivanPackage for storing and cooking bacon slices
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US5971153 *Dec 9, 1996Oct 26, 1999The Proctor & Gamble CompanyPackage comprising an array of compressed absorbent articles
US5987851 *May 20, 1998Nov 23, 1999Stac-Pac Technologies Inc.Packaging a strip of material
US6009689 *Feb 17, 1998Jan 4, 2000Stac-Pac Technologies Inc.Packaging a strip of material in layers
US6026957 *Jun 7, 1996Feb 22, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyFlexible paper covered package and process for producing same
US6176068 *Apr 23, 1998Jan 23, 2001Bki Holding CorporationPackaging a strip of material in layers with intervening splices
US6263814Dec 1, 1998Jul 24, 2001Bki Holding CorporationStrip of material with splices and products formed therefrom
US6293075Mar 8, 1999Sep 25, 2001Bki Holding CorporationPackaging a strip of material
US6321511Feb 18, 1999Nov 27, 2001Bki Holding CorporationPackaging a strip of material with compression to reduce volume
US6321512Jun 22, 1999Nov 27, 2001Bki Holding CorporationMethod of packaging a strip of material
US6336307Aug 9, 1999Jan 8, 2002Eki Holding CorporationMethod of packaging a strip of material for use in cutting into sheet elements arranged end to end
US6526899Apr 17, 2001Mar 4, 2003Bki Holding CorpStrip of material with splices and products formed therefrom
US6643993Dec 20, 2001Nov 11, 2003Bki Holding CorporationMethod of packaging a strip of material for use in cutting into sheet elements arranged end to end
US6679028 *Jun 26, 2001Jan 20, 2004Bki Holding CorporationMethod of packaging a strip of material
US6926655Dec 23, 1998Aug 9, 2005Bki Holding CorporationMethod of packaging a web, and a package produced thereby
EP1785353A1 *Nov 10, 2006May 16, 2007Elba S.p.A.Method for handling and packaging bags into containers
WO1997023391A1 *Dec 9, 1996Jul 3, 1997Rainer Richard Bernd BauerPackage comprising an array of compressed absorbent articles
Classifications
U.S. Classification426/411, 53/447, 53/429, 206/499
International ClassificationB65B25/06, B65B25/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65B25/065
European ClassificationB65B25/06D