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Publication numberUS3646647 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 7, 1972
Filing dateMar 19, 1970
Priority dateMar 19, 1970
Also published asCA942649A1, DE7110041U
Publication numberUS 3646647 A, US 3646647A, US-A-3646647, US3646647 A, US3646647A
InventorsNorman E Klein
Original AssigneeDeering Milliken Res Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for the production of nonwoven materials
US 3646647 A
Abstract
An improved apparatus for forming textile nonwoven net fabrics composed of a sheet of weft threads adhesively secured to one or more sheets of warp threads, the weft sheet being formed by continuously winding two or more threads about a pair of spaced thread supporting screws to form a plurality of reaches therebetween, and wherein the screws are rotated about their longitudinal axes such that the helically threaded surface of the screws support the loop ends of the thread reaches to laterally advance the reaches in spaced relation along the screws to form the weft sheet. The weft threads are delivered from a nonrotating creel and supported for transfer creel operation.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

0 United States Patent [151 3,646,647

Klein Mar. 7, 1972 [54] APPARATUS FOR THE PRODUCTION 3,422,511 l/l969 Sequin ..28/l CL OF NONWOVEN MATERIALS 3,3145; lsseBolt et al.. ....l56/440 5,71 erua e ..28 1 CL [72] Inventor: Norman E. Klein, lnman, S.C. g l

[73] Assignee: Deering Milliken Research Corporation, Primary Rimmdt Spartanburg, S.C. Attorney-Norman C. Armrtage and H. William Petry [22] Filed: Mar. 19, 1970 [57] ABSTRACT 1211 pp 21,039 An improved apparatus for forming textile nonwoven net fabrics composed of a sheet of weft threads adhesively secured to one or more sheets of warp threads, the weft sheet being [52] U.S. Cl. ..28/1 CL, 156/181, 11556473401, formed y continuously winding two or more thrcads about a [51] Int Cl Dozg 3/00 D0411 3/08 pair of spaced thread supporting screws to form a plurality of [58] Fieid 21,156/l81 440 reaches therebetween, and wherein the screws are rotated 156/441 about their longitudinal axes such that the helically threaded surface of the screws support the loop ends of the thread reaches to laterally advance the reaches in spaced relation [56] References cued along the screws to form the weft sheet. The weft threads are UNITED STATES PATENTS delivered from a nonrotating creel and supported for transfer creel operation. 3,340,584 9/1967 Kalwartes ..28/l CL 3,390,439 7/1968 Kalwaites ..28/l CL 16 Claims,6l)rawing Figures PATENTEDMAR 7 I972 SHEET 1 BF 4 INVENTOR. NORMAN E. KLEIN no. mm Y B o 09 am e e e G oq No. 2 m9 9 N. 3: S Q om ATTORNEY PAIENIEHMAR 11922 3,646,647

sum 2 or 4 INVENTOR. NORMAN E.KLEIN ATTORNEY Qua-Q1 nv N M .V m mm W11 w m a o I I 1 inn-$5522- O: wv wv mm PATENTEDMAR 71972 3.646.647

sum u or 4 F, I I INVENTOR.

NORMAN E. KLEIN M n MAM ATTORNEY APPARATUS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF NONWOVEN MATERIALS This invention relates to the production of textile fabrics and, more particularly, to an improved apparatus for the formation of nonwoven net fabrics. These fabrics are widely used as reinforcement in various laminated products, such as synthetic polymeric films, paper sheets, and the like, and as a support backing for carpets and multipart materials, such as ceramic or wooden floor tiles. Such fabrics are also useful as packing materials, and as screening material for windows, doors and the like.

In US. Pat. application Ser. No. 770,885, filed Sept. 23, 1968, now US. Pat. No. 3,505,7l0, there is disclosed apparatus and method to provide nonwoven fabrics which employ a multiplicity of weft bobbins which rotate with the thread-guide arms to form at least two series of flat weft hooks on the guide bars at approximately the same time. This rotation of the weft bobbin creates some problems due to the centrifugal force and windage effect on the unwinding ballooning strand. Furthermore, vibration problems are caused since the packages do not unwind evenly causing an unbalanced creel rotor. The aforementioned problems also tend to make it very difficult to use a transfer creel arrangement where when one bobbin runs out a second bobbin will automatically replace the first bobbin and start to unwind. Another problem of the rotating bobbin is that the size of package that can be handled is more limited.

Therefore it is an object of the invention to provide an apparatus to manufacture nonwoven net fabrics which uses a multiplicity of bobbins which do not rotate.

Another object of the invention is to provide an apparatus to manufacture nonwoven net fabric which uses a multiplicity of bobbins which provide for automatic transfer action when one of the bobbins runs out of yarn.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become clearly apparent as the specification proceeds to describe the invention with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. I is a schematic side elevation view of an apparatus for producing nonwoven net fabrics in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 2 is a blownup side elevation view of the weft laying guide arm assembly shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a blownup side elevation view of the new and improved creel rotor cage;

FIG. 4 is a top view of the creel rotor cage shown in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a view taken on line 5-5 of FIG. 4; and

FIG. 6 is a front view of the guide arm assembly.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, FIG. I shows an apparatus for continuously forming nonwoven net fabrics which generally includes a thread winding section 10, a weft sheet forming section 12, a warp and weft sheet combining section 14, a section, indicated at 16, for securing the sheets in contiguous coplanar relation to form a nonwoven net fabric and a creel rotor section 17.

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, thread winding section 10 includes thread winding means comprising three hollow tubular thread-guide arms I9, and 21 secured to a hollow central shaft 22 for rotation therewith. Shaft 22 is suitably supported, as by a support frame 23, for rotation about its central axis and is rotatably driven by a motor 24, the shaft 25 of which is drivingly connected thereto by sprockets 27, 28 and an endless drive chain 29 (shown in broken lines). During rotation of thread guide arms 19, 20 and 21, continuous threads 31, 32 and 33 are continuously passed from the creel rotor 17 through the hollow shaft 22, radially outwardly through their respective hollow tubular arms I9, 20 and 21 and through thread outlets 36 at their outer end.

The weft sheet forming section 12 includes a pair of spaced thread support members 40 which supportably receive the threads 31, 32 and 33 passing from the outlets 36 of guide arms 19, 20 and 21 in a plurality of generally parallel thread reaches therebetween. Thread support screw members 40 are of substantially identical construction and each comprises an elongate screw having a helically threaded surface extending throughout a major portion of its length. The screw is constructed of high strength, rigid material, such as steel, aluminum, plastic, or the like, and one end thereof is removably secured, in the enlarged end portion of a stub shaft 46 for rotation therewith. The stub shaft 46 is rotatably mounted on the end of a crossarm 48 which is supported by a bearing surrounding the drive shaft 22. Each thread support screw is rotated about its longitudinal axis by a sprocket chain drivingly connecting a sprocket on the end of drive shaft 22 to sprockets 54 on the respective stub shafts 46. To facilitate positional support of the screws, suitably supported blocks or stop members 56 are positioned beneath each screw and abuttingly engage the same to prevent rotation of the crossarm 48 and screws about the shaft 22 during its rotation and thereby positionally stabilize the same.

As best shown in FIG. 2, the shaft-supported end portion of each screw is of relatively large cross section to provide maximum strength and rigidity to the screw during its rotation by the stub shaft. The screw preferably is tapered along its length in the direction of advancement of the thread reaches thereon to bring the upper and lower reaches of the thread loop ends progressively toward each other during their advance along the screws, such that the weft sheet reaches approach coplanar alignment as they enter the warp and weft sheet combining section 14 of the apparatus. Note the position of loop end portions of the continuous weft thread 3] in the grooves of the thread support screw 40 shown in FIG. 2. The taper of the thread supporting screws also serves to relieve any tension which may be imposed on the thread reaches during the winding of the thread on the screws and which might tend to cause misplacement of the reaches in the weft sheet as the reaches leave the ends of the screws.

The ends of the screws adjacent the stub shafts 46 may be provided with conically shaped thread guides 58 which facilitate placement of the thread reaches in the thread grooves of the screws as they are wound thereon by the guide arm 20.

As best seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, the warp and weft sheet combining section 14 includes a pair of nip rolls 84, 86 which are rotatably supported by suitable means, not shown, between the free or open ends of the screws. As seen in FIG. I, as the screws rotate to advance the thread reaches in spaced, parallel relation therealong to form the weft sheet, the thread reaches leaving the open ends of the screws pass between and are engaged by nip rolls 84, 86. One or more sheets 90, 92 of warp threads are supplied continuously to the nip portion of the rolls 84, 86 from a suitable source, not shown, and, during their movement therethrough, the warp and weft sheets are brought into contiguous coplanar relation. As can be seen in FIG. 1, the loop ends of the weft thread reaches are released from the rotating support screws and the combined sheets pass over a guide roller 98 to the sheet securing section 16.

The securing section 16 includes an adhesive bath 100 through which the composite sheet of warp and weft threads are passed by rotatable squeeze rolls 102, 103 to apply a suitable adhesive thereto. The sheet thereafter passes about the surface of heated drying rolls 104, 105 where the warp and weft sections thereof are secured together, and the thus formed nonwoven net fabric is collected on a takeup roll 106. Although not shown, one or more of the rolls in the securing section 16 may be suitably driven to move the warp and weft sheets through the apparatus.

As best seen in FIG. 2, the stub shafts 46 and their respective thread supporting screws have aligned central passageways (note the screw passageway 108 shown in broken lines in FIG. 2) through which selvage threads 110, continuously pass during formation of the weft sheet to be positioned within the loop ends of the weft thread reaches as the reaches leave the open ends of the screws. The selvage threads not only strengthen the composite nonwoven net fabric product, but provide additional support to the weft sheet during its passage through the securing section I6 of the apparatus.

As discussed briefly before, it is desired to run more than one weft strand so as to provide increased production of nonwoven net fabric. In the preferred form of the invention, the apparatus is shown running three strands of yarn but is should be understood that it is contemplated that any desired number of strands can be run within the scope of the invention. Looking at FIG. 3, it can be seen that the necessary number of platforms inside of the cage is equal to the number of strands to be handled minus one since one package can be mounted externally.

Looking now in detail to FIGS. 3-5, the creel rotor section 17 is shown in detail with the creel rotor 17 being supported for rotation with shaft 22 by bearings 112 and 114 mounted on the support frame 23. The creel rotor section 17 consists basically of the bushings 116 rotatably mounted in the bearings 112 and 114, the cage structure defined by the hollow tubes 118,120 and 122 welded or otherwise secured to the bushings 116 and the hollow creel support member 124 welded or otherwise secured to the hollow tubes at 126. As discussed briefly before, it is desired to maintain the yarn packages in a fixed nonrotating position while allowing the yarn therefrom to be rotated by the guide anns. To this end stub shafts 128 and 130 are secured in the bushings 116 and stub shaft 132 is secured in the hollow creel support 124. Stub shafts 128 and 130 at the other end are supported in the internal race of bearings 134 and 136 respectively. In like manner, one end of stub shaft 132 is secured in bearing 138 and the other end engages bearing 140, thereby allowing the bushings 116 and creel support member 124 to rotate while allowing package supports 142 and 144 to remain suspended in fixed position through stabilizing action of counter weights 156.

The yarn package supports 142 and 144 are substantially identical and, as shown in FlG. 4, are designed to support a yarn package 146 which is being used and a transfer yarn package 148 which will automatically go into use when the yarn package 148 runs out. This is accomplished in the conventional manner of tying the transfer tail of package 146 to the lead end of the yarn package 148. To protect the yarn packages 146 and 148 and the yarn end being run, a metal shield 150 is provided which encircles about two-thirds of yarn unwinding area and is open at the top for ready removal of the empty bobbin and replacement of a new yarn package. Each shield 150 is welded or otherwise secured at one end to its respective bearing 134 or 140. Welded or otherwise secured to the outer upper ears are flange members 152 which are secured to collar 153 mounted on the rods 154. To stabilize the shield an additional support member 155 is welded to its midsection and to the respective bearing 136 or 138 at the other end. The counterweights 156 are welded or otherwise secured to the bottom of the shields 150 to stabilize the package supports 142 and 144 against rotation thereof. ()ther suitable means such as magnets an be utilized to prevent rotation of the package supports, if desired.

The rods 154 mounted in the bearings 136 and 138 project upwardly and outwardly and support the collar elements 160 and 162 to which hinge plate 158 has been welded to support creel pin 159. It can be readily seen that the weight of the packages 146 and 148 will hold the hinge plate 158 in the down position against the stop members 164 welded to the face of the bearings 136 and 138. Creel pins 159 will then hold packages 146 and 148 in a horizontal position.

Mounted to the rear of the creel rotor 17 on the frame 23 is the third set of yarn packages 166 (only one of which is shown). Yarn packages 166 are mounted on a rotatably mounted package platform 168 in a manner similar to platform 158 and is connected to an upright support member 170 to which is attached a stop member 172 to limit the downward movement of the package 166.

As can readily be seen the herein disclosed apparatus will deliver three separate strands of yarn from the packages 146, 148 and 166 to the spaced thread support members 40. The yarn from package 166 passes successively through the apex guide 173 attached to bushing 116, hollow tube 120, bushing 116 at opposite end of rotor shaft 22, shaft 22 and guide arm 20 onto the spaced thread support members 40. Yarn from package 146 passes successively into apex guide 174, through stub shaft 132, creel support member 124, hollow tube 118, bushing 116. shaft 22 and guide arm 19 onto the spaced thread support member 40. Yarn from package 146 passes successively into apex guide 175, through bushing 116, shaft 22 and into guide arm 21 onto the spaced thread guide members 40. lt should be kept in mind that the guide arms 19, 20 and 21 are following a continuous rotary path so that three continuous strands of yarn are being placed on the spaced thread guide 40 to be joined with the warp yarns and 92.

It can be seen that the herein disclosed apparatus provides a machine to produce nonwoven fabric at an increased production rate and which eliminates the necessity of rotating the yarn packages thereby eliminating the inherent problems caused by the centrifugal force developed and windage. Furthermore, the herein disclosed machine provides for easy and automatic transfer tail operation when a package runs out of yarn and ready replacement of the yarn package.

Although I have described in detail the preferred embodiment of my invention, 1 contemplate that many changes may be made without departing from the scope or spirit of the invention and I desire to be limited only by the claims.

That which is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for producing nonwoven fabric comprising yarn guide means including a pair of yarn guides spaced from each other, means for supporting a plurality of yarn packages, rotatable means operably associated with said yarn guide means to supply yarns simultaneously from each of said yarn package supports and to wind the yarn about said pair of yarn guides to form reaches of yarn therebetween, means stabilizing at least one of said yarn package supports from rotation. and means for combining a sheet of yarns with the yarn reaches between said spaced yarn guides to form a nonwoven fabric.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said means for supplying yarn includes a rotatably mounted cage and said stabilized yarn package support is mounted in said cage. l

3. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein said means to support a plurality of yarn packages includes a shield partially surrounding said stabilized yarn package support.

4. The apparatus of claim 3 wherein said stabilizing means includes a counterweight mounted in said shield.

5. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein said stabilized yarn package support is pivotally mounted within said cage.

6. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein said stabilized yarn package support includes at least yarn package platforms adjacent one another.

7. The apparatus of claim 6 wherein said yarn package platforms are pivotally mounted.

8. Apparatus to produce nonwoven fabric comprising: spaced apart yarn guide means, means for supporting a plurality of yarn packages, means operably associated with said spaced apart yarn guide means to continuously supply yarn from each of said yarn package supports and wind it around said spaced apart guide means, said yarn supply means including a rotatably mounted cage, said means for supporting a plurality of yarn packages including at least one yarn package support in said cage, means to stabilize said one yarn package support against rotation and means for combining a sheet of threads with the yarn wound on said spaced apart guide means to provide a nonwoven fabric.

9. The apparatus of claim 8 wherein said cage is constructed of hollow tubular members connected to a rotatably supported bushing.

10. The apparatus of claim 8 wherein said means for supporting a plurality of yarn packages includes a shield member partially surrounding said one yarn package support in said cage.

11. The apparatus of claim 10 wherein said shield is open at the top and said one yarn package is pivotally supported through said open shield top.

12. The apparatus of claim 11 wherein said means to stabilize said one yarn package support includes a counterweight mounted on the bottom of said shield.

13 Apparatus for producing nonwoven fabric comprising yarn guide means, means for supporting is stabilized first yarn package spaced from said yarn guide means, means for supporting a second yarn package spaced further from said yarn guide means than said first yarn package support means, means to supply yarn to said yarn guide means from said first yarn package support means, means to rotate yarn from said second yarn package support means, means to rotate yarn from said second yarn package support means, and to supply it to said stabilizing guide means, means stabilizing at least one of said yarn package support means from rotation, and means for combining a sheet of yarns with the yarn supplied to said yarn guide means to form a nonwoven fabric.

14. The apparatus of claim 13 wherein said first yarn package support means is stabilized against rotation.

15. The apparatus of claim 14 wherein said means to support said first yarn package includes a rotor.

16. The apparatus of claim 15 wherein said rotor includes a tubular member through which passes the yarn from said second yarn package support means.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3340584 *Jun 17, 1965Sep 12, 1967Johnson & JohnsonApparatus for cross-laying fibrous material
US3390439 *Oct 21, 1965Jul 2, 1968Johnson & JohnsonApparatus for cross-laying fibrous material
US3422511 *Oct 7, 1966Jan 21, 1969Chavanoz Moulinage RetorderieMethod and apparatus for making a non-woven fabric
US3493455 *Mar 7, 1966Feb 3, 1970Cromwell Paper CoContinuous web reinforcing machine
US3505712 *Sep 23, 1968Apr 14, 1970Chavanoz Moulinage RetorderieApparatus for forming flat weft loops for a nonwoven netting
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3885279 *Jun 18, 1973May 27, 1975Deering Milliken Res CorpYarn feed guide arms
US4108708 *Jul 1, 1977Aug 22, 1978Milliken Research CorporationAutomatic
US5442935 *Mar 24, 1993Aug 22, 1995Tech Textiles Holdings Ltd.Apparatus for producing multi-axial non-woven fabric
US7824513 *Jul 15, 2005Nov 2, 2010Ultrafab, Inc.Apparatus and method for making pile articles and improved pile articles made therewith
US8367181Sep 22, 2010Feb 5, 2013Ultrafab, Inc.Apparatus and methods for making pile articles and improved pile articles made therewith
Classifications
U.S. Classification28/101, 156/441, 156/430, 156/181
International ClassificationD04H3/04
Cooperative ClassificationD04H3/04, B29K2105/0854, D04H3/07
European ClassificationD04H3/04, D04H3/07