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Publication numberUS3646781 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 7, 1972
Filing dateJun 17, 1970
Priority dateJun 17, 1970
Publication numberUS 3646781 A, US 3646781A, US-A-3646781, US3646781 A, US3646781A
InventorsHeilmann Horst, Ploch Siegfried, Schattauer Friedrich, Scholtis Walter, Schonfuss Martin
Original AssigneeForsch Textillechnologie
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for producing knitted fleeces on multineedle knitting machines
US 3646781 A
Abstract
The present method teaches the production of knitted fleeces on multineedle knitting machines from a plurality of strand layers by entering the needles to different depths and thus into different strand layers and then forming stitches about bunches of strands seized by the needles out of different strand layers. The present apparatus comprises pressure means especially in the form of a plurality of pressure bars of different length or having contoured zones, which press the strand layers against the needles to different extents in different places whereby different needles enter to different depths into the strand layers.
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United States Patent Scholtis et al.

[ Mar.7,1972

[54] METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING KNITTED FLEECES ON MULTINEElDLE KNITTING MACHINES 3,377,821 4/1968 Vajda et al ..66/85 3,417,580 12/1968 Scholtis et al ..28/4 X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLlCATlONS 1,143,827 2/1969 Great Britain ..66/85 Primary ExaminerRonald Feldbaum Attorney-Nolte and Nolte [57] ABSTRACT The present method teaches the production of knitted fleeces on multineedle knitting machines from a plurality of strand layers by entering the needles to different depths and thus into different strand layers and then forming stitches about bunches of strands seized by the needles out of difierent strand layers. The present apparatus comprises pressure means especially in the form of a plurality of pressure bars of difierent length or having contoured zones, which press the strand layers against the needles to different extents in different places whereby different needles enter to different depths into the strand layers.

22 Claims, 19 Drawing Figures EMF AZ] PATENTEDMAR 7 m2 SHEET 1 [1F 6 INVENTORS BY M W ATTORNEYS PATENTEBHAR 71972 3,646,781

sum 3 OF 6 BYMIM ATTORNEYS PATENTED MR 7 I972 SHEET 4 [IF 6 ATTORNEYS PATENTEDMAR 7 i972 SHEET 5 BF 6 WXM ATTOR NEYS PATENTEBHAR 7 1972 SHEET 8 BF 6 W417i)? sax/0,4 7/5 ATTORNEYS METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING KNITTED FLEECES ON MULTINEEDLE KNITTING MACHINES BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION It is known to bind fiber or strand fleeces into fleeced knitted fabric or knitted fleeces by stitching such strand fleeces together in such a manner that the hooked needles which are attached to the needle bar of a multineedle knitting machine and which either have a closeable or an open hook are permitted to enter into a fleece layer along the entire width of the needle bar to a uniform depth. For this purpose the known apparatus comprises counterholding means which are arranged opposite the needles either in a fixed position or in a movable manner. These counterhoiding means comprise effective front edges all of which extend to the same elevation and perpendicularly to the plane through which the stitchforming needles move. Due to said uniform elevation of the effective front edges of the counterholding means, all of the needles enter the strand always to the same strand layer along the entire width of the stitch formation corresponding to the width of said needle bar and then form these strands into stitches or meshes. The movable counterholding means or the counterholding means which are arranged in a fixed position are adjusted with regard to the thickness of the fleece, with regard to the type of strand of fiber and also with regard to the several knitting machine operational parameters or conditions in such a manner that the strands or fibers which are seized by the needles are seized from the fleece or strand layer which is remotest from the needles, that is, from the strand layer which is opposite the needles rather than the strand layer facing the needles. This is necessary because otherwise the strands of this remotest layer would not be bound into the fleece structure by the apparatus just described.

The product manufactured as described above accordingly comprises bunches of strands arranged in stitch formation and which are taken from an outer strand layer, that is, the strand layer on the side facing away from the needles. The product also comprises strands in a second inner layer which faces the needles and which inner strands are merely bound by the socalled jack stitches without actually participating in the stitch fonnation.

Presently known methods for producing of knitted fleeces have the disadvantage that due to the close spacing between the needles which is required for achieving a sufficient strength of the finished product, a large number of strands are engaged simultaneously by adjacent needles. This subjects the needles as well as those strands which are employed for the stitch formation to a substantial strain which quite frequently results in damages.

Another disadvantage of prior art knitted fleeces is seen in that those strands which are substantially oriented across the main orientation of strands are tightly bound into the knitted fabric. This tight binding of the cross strands provides a high resistance against the further processing steps. For example, the cross oriented strands tend to be torn during the dressing or finishing step, for example during the roughening so that a long rough nap could not be achieved prior to the invention. Furthermore, the tearing of the cross oriented strands during the roughening step results in a relatively high loss in the tearing resistance of the final product.

In order to obviate the above difficulties it has been suggested to arrange the needles of a knitting machine in rows taking up different elevations and one row being spaced from the other by a spacing corresponding to the needle spacing. However, employing this type of arrangement in a practical manner is hampered by the fact that the product must be fed ahead for each stitch formation cycle by an amount larger than the spacing between the needle rows which are arranged above one another in order to assure that each needle is enabled to seize unstitched strand material and thus provide a continuous stitch formation. Besides, even with this needle arrangement the strand material used for the stitch formation is always seized from the same, namely the outer, strand layer which faces away from the needles.

OBJECT OF THE INVENTION In view of the above it is an object of the invention to remove the outlined drawbacks.

Another object of the invention is to improve the inner structure of knitted fleeces to make them more amenable to further processing steps and to improve their tearing characteristics.

It is also an object of the invention to provide a stitch binding about strands which are seized from different strand layers.

Yet another object of the invention is to assure that not only outer strands but also inner strands will partic pate in the stitch formation so that strands from different layers may be bound in the same stitch.

A still further object of the invention is to avoid damages to the strands as well as to the needles in the stitch formation.

Another important object of the invention is to provide patterns on the surface of the finished product such as a knitted fleece surface by seizing and stitch binding strands from different strand layers whereby such layers are formed by strands having different colors and/or by strands made of different materials.

It is also an object of the invention to provide longer rough naps and pattern surface effects by permitting a larger flotation of the naps while maintaining the density of wales the same as heretofore.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide means for controlling the depth of needle entrance into fleece layers whereby the needles will seize strands from different layers.

A still further object of the invention is to provide means for varying the position of presser means individually and/or in groups whereby the layered strand material will be pressed against the needles to different extents in different locations.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The above objects have been achieved according to the method of the present invention in that strand bunches are seized by the needles either simultaneously or sequentially from different layers of strands especially also from the layer adjacent to the needle and then stitch binding the strand bunches.

It is possible to seize bunches of strands from different strand or fleece layers during one and the same stitch formation cycle. Therefore it is possible to introduce within the same stitch row variations in the binding or in the pattern. Furthermore, the seizing of strand bunches may be carried out during mesh formation cycles following each other sequentially so that the binding variation or the design or pattern variation is accomplished within a wale.

The binding of strand bunches seized from different fleece or strand layers has especially the advantage that the inner structure of the knitted fleece is improved whereby the strength of the finished product is materially increased.

Another advantage of the invention is seen in that by employing layers of strands having difierent colors or strands made of different materials which different colors and/or different materials may be intermixed in one or several layers, it is possible to achieve rather effective designs or patterns by seizing such strand bunches from different strand layers for the stitch formation. Furthennore, the material of which the strands are made may be selected so that the individual strands or the strands in a particular layer of strands have a different aff'mity to any particular dye whereby, for example, in connection piece dying a gaily colored product may be manufactured.

The apparatus according to the invention for perfonning the above method is adapted for use in connection with multineedle machines especially knitting machines in which a supporting bar arranged opposite the needles carries pressing means for pressing the strand layers against the needles to different extents. In one embodiment a presser plate or bar is provided for each needle. All the presser bars are supported on the common support bar or member. In this instance the presser bars have front edges which bear against the fleece. These effective edges of the presser plates are contoured or have indentions and are arranged in accordance with a predetermined pattern so that the edges extend into two or three different planes which planes in turn extend perpendicularly to the direction of needle movement. In an alternative embodiment the supporting bar does not carry a presser bar for each needle. The desired pattern is then achieved in this alternative embodiment in that certain presser plates are omitted so that empty spacings appear on the support member. The arrangement of such spacings is in accordance with the desired pattern as it is to appear on the finished product.

Since the needles take the material along on their downward stroke until such taking along is stopped by the pressing or presser bars the position of such bars or their shape or contour determines from which of the strand layers the needles will seize bunches of strands. Thus it is for example possible to assure that by means of the shape of the effective edges of the presser bars or by means of their relative position the outer strand layer which faces away from the needles is brought in front of the needle tips or even into the range of the needle hooks provided adjacent to the needle tips. In the latter instance strand bunches will be seized out of this outer strand layer and will be bound in the stitch formation. By continuously varying the arrangement of the presser bars it has been achieved that the needles seize in adjacent rows of stitches alternatively bunches of strands from different layers. The position of the effective edge of the presser bars may be varied within the same stitch row or in stitch rows following each other sequentially so that respectively different fleece or strand layers are brought into the range of the needle hooks. Presser bars which have been omitted or rather wider spacings between adjacent bars cause the seizing of strands by the needles from layers closer to the needles, that is from layers facing the needles as distinguished from layers facing away from the needles.

SHORT FIGURE DESCRIPTION In order that the invention may be clearly understood it will now be described, by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a schematic representation of a work station in a multineedle knitting machine such as a stitching knitting machine in which presser bars are arranged for cooperation with the needles in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 2 is a schematic representation showing long and short presser bars arranged in accordance with a predetermined pattern;

FIG. 3 illustrates the surface appearance of a finished fleece produced in a multineedle knitting machine employing the presser bar arrangement shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 illustrates the surface appearance of a fleece produced in accordance with the invention and having a twilllike look or a twill-like back filling;

FIG. 5 is a partial view on an enlarged scale of the work station employing presser bars according to the invention whereby the presser bars are suspended to extend in a direction perpendicularly to the direction of needle reciprocation;

FIG. 6 is a view similar to that of FIG. 5, however, the presser bars are supported to extend in a direction corresponding to that of the needle reciprocation;

FIGS. 7a,b,c,d and e illustrate differently contoured or shaped presser bars;

FIGS. 8 and 9 illustrate presser bars extending with different effective working edges in different planes;

FIGS. 10 and 11 illustrate presser bars having a pointed effective edge which slopes in one direction in FIG. 10 and in a different direction in FIG. 11;

FIG. I2 shows a plurality of presser bars arranged in a common support member and drive means for the presser bars;

FIG. 13 illustrates an embodiment quite similar to that of FIG. 12 however the presser bars extend in a direction perpendicularly to the direction of needle reciprocation;

FIG. 14 illustrates an embodiment wherein a plurality of presser bars are rockable in unison in a direction extending perpendicularly to the direction of needle reciprocation; and

FIG. 15 illustrates an embodiment wherein a plurality of presser bars are shiftable back and forth in unison in a direction extending perpendicularly to that of the needle reciprocation.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION FIG. 1 shows a work station 1 of a multineedle knitting machine wherein a needle bar 2 carries a plurality of needles 3. The needles have hooked tips which are shown in more detail in FIGS. 5 and 6.

The needles 3 reciprocate in unison with their needle bar along a path represented by the double arrow 4. The needles pass through a knocking-over plate 5 which serves for facilitating the withdrawal of the needles from the fleece 6 The fleece comprises two strand layers 7 and 8. The fleece 6 advances in a direction extending perpendicularly to that of the needle reciprocation.

In accordance with the invention there is arranged adjacent to the needles a support means such as a bar 9 for supporting presser means such as presser bars 10, 11 in such a position that the presser bars can cooperate with the needles by pressing the fleece 6 against the needles as the latter proceed on their downstroke.

The presser means comprise in this particular embodiment a plurality of long presser bars 10 as well as a plurality of short presser bars 11. The presser bars may be rigidly or movably supported on the support bar 9 as will be described in more detail with reference to FIGS. 12 to 15.

The presser bars are arranged individually and/or in groups in such a manner that they represent the predetermined pattem and define in unison a pressing surface 12 having elevations 13 and depressions 14 therein. It will be appreciated that the presser means could also be embodied by a plate having a contoured surface 12 with said elevations and depressions therein.

The apparatus shown in FIG. 1 operates as follows:

When the needles 3 descend, five of the six needles shown with the exception of needle 3 enter into the fleece by passing entirely through strand layer 7 and partially into strand layer 8. However, due to the fact that adjacent to the needle 3' the long presser bars 10 are arranged, needle 3 is enabled to pass entirely through both strand layers 7 and 8. Incidentally, in this connection it should be noted that a contoured plate providing the elevations and depressions l3 and 14 would comprise apertures for entrance of the needle tips to avoid an interference between the presser plate and the needles.

The needles which merely enter with their tips into strand layer 8 due to the fact that they face short presser bars 11 take or seize strands out of layer 7 but not out of layer 8. On the other hand, needle 3 will seize with its hook strands from strand layer 8 which is facing away from the needle tips contrary to layer 7 which faces toward the needle tips as they descend through the knocking-over plate 5.

FIG. 2 is intended to illustrate still more clearly the arrangement of long presser bars 10 and of short presser bars 11 in predetermined positions along the presser support bar or member 9. In order to arrange the presser bars in accordance with a predetermined pattern it will be noted that, proceeding from left to right along the support bar 9, a long presser bar 10 is followed by three short presser bars which in turn are followed by three long presser bars succeeded by two short presser bars which in turn are followed by a single long presser bar prior to three following short presser bars and then again a single long presser bar. The arrangement of presser bars may be varied individually or in groups to accommodate any desired pattern.

The pattern accomplished by the presser bar arrangement illustrated in FIG. 2, is shown in FIG. 3. It will be noted that the stitch lines 15 are separated from each other by strand portions l6, l7, and 18 the length of which depends upon the positioning of the long and short presser bars and 11.

Referring to FIG. 4 there is shown a pattern 19 comprising rows of stitches 20 wherein the stitch lines 21, 22 are displaced relative to each other. This laced twill-like look or appearance of the finished fleece is accomplished by a respective distribution of the presser means.

With regard to FIG. 2 it should be mentioned that the pattern has a surface which is especially suitable for producing a rough nap because the strands are not bound or float for a length corresponding to three needle spacings in those areas which are opposite to three short presser bars. These areas are suitable for producing relatively long naps and in spite of such floating a sufficient material strength is achieved for the production of clothing and top clothing due to the fact that the wales are closely spaced on the backside of the knitted fleece 15.

In connection with the production of knitted fleeces having a high needle density and relatively short spacings between adjacent needle stitches resulting in a short so-called flotation, it is not necessary to use short presser bars. In those instances where the short presser bars may be obviated they are simply omitted from the presser bar support member 9 shown in FIG. 2. In such instances only long presser bars will be used and their spacing is such that a relatively short flotation results.

Referring to FIG. 5 there is shown a needle 23 having a hook 24 adjacent to its tip 25. Such hook needles are used in accordance with the present invention. A presser bar 26 is suspended from the support member 9 by means of a screw connection 27. The fleece 6 which is also shown in FIG. 1 is advanced in the direction of the arrow 28 into the gap formed between the knocking-over plate 5 and the presser bar 26. The knocking-over plate 5 is also shown in FIG. 1. However, in the side view of FIG. 5, it will be noted that the knocking-over plate Sis supported by a stationary bar 29.

The thickness of the fleece is reduced after the stitch formation as shown at 30 and as compared to the fleece thickness prior to the stitch formation as shown at 31.

The arrangement shown in FIG. 6 is quite similar to that shown in FIG. 5. The needles 23 reciprocate in the direction of a double arrow 32 just as in FIG. 5. However, the presser bar 33 is supported by the support member 9 so that it extends in the direction of needle reciprocation rather than perpendicularly thereto as is the case in FIG. 5.

The presser bars shown in FIGS. 1, 2, 5 and 6 may have the configuration shown in FIG. 7a to 7e. The presser bars 34 to 38 are aligned horizontally relative to each other to show that their front ends have working edges or contours or indentations which become effective in two zones I and II. The presser bars 34 to 38 are supported on a movable support means which will be described in detail with reference to FIGS. 12 to 15.

Referring to presser bar 34 it will be seen that it has a larger width in zone I than in zone ll. Thus, by moving the presser bar 34 back and forth in the direction of the arrow 39 that is in the direction of its longitudinal axis and depending on the direction of needle movement the presser bar 34 may be used either with its effective edges 40 and 41 if the needles move in a direction perpendicularly to the direction of arrow 39, or edges 42 and 43 may be employed if the needles reciprocate in the direction of the arrow 39.

Presser bar 35 has the same width in zone I and in zone II but it may vary in its length L. Presser bar 36 has a smaller width in zone I than in zone II due to the indentation 44. The effective working edges 45 and 46 will become effective depending upon the instantaneous position of the presser bar 36.

Presser bar 36 has a bent shape which may be desirable for certain applications. Presser bar 38 has a contour or shape similar to that of presser bar 36. However, the indentation 47 is not as deep as the corresponding indentation 44.

The indentations 44 or 47 or the working edge 41 become effective when the needles are to seize strands from a strand layer facing the needles. On the other hand, if the needles are to seize strands from the layer facing away from the needles the thicker width of the presser bars will become effective.

The depth of the indentation will control the depth of the needle penetration. Thus presser bar 36 with its indentation 44 will assure that strands are seized from the inner layer that is from the layer facing the needles. The indentation 47 in presser bar 38 will assure that strands are seized from an intermediate strand layer.

Referring to FIGS. 8, 9, l0 and 11 there are shown presser bars which are preferably shaped for a rocking movement rather than for a back and forth movement. The rocking movement may be performed by a drive means as shown in FIG. 14 to be described below. However, the presser bars 48, 49,50 and 51 are not limited to such rocking movement. Presser bars 48 and 49 are adapted to be effective in two zones I and II as described with reference to FIG. 7. However, presser bars 50 and 51 have slanted working edges 52 and 53 respectively. As these working edges 52 and 53 are rocked back and forth against the strand layer facing away from the needles the strands will be lifted toward the needles to a larger or lesser extent depending upon the instantaneous position of the working edge.

Referring now to FIG. 12 the support member 9 for the presser bars 54 is provided with slots 55 within which the presser bars are movable back and forth along the direction of the double arrow 56. The back and forth movement of the presser bars 54 is accomplished by drive shaft 57 to which are attached cam members 58.

The presser bars 54 are provided with butted ends 59. Each butted end 59 accommodates a compression spring 60 placed around the end of each presser bar 54 between the butted end 59 and the support member 9. These springs 60 tend to press the butted end against the cam member 58 so that drive motion imparted to a presser bar 64 by its cam member 58 will move the presser bar toward the left-hand side of FIG. 12 whereas the spring force will impart a movement toward the right-hand side of FIG. 12. The latter is the case with regard to the two intermediate presser bars 54 as shown.

Depending on the size and shape of the cam means 58 as well as on their relative position on the drive shaft 57 it is possible to drive the presser bars 54 individually or in groups. Thus, the cam members 58 drive two presser bars each, whereas the cam member 53' may for example, drive but one presser bar. Furthermore, the two cam members 58 are similarly shaped but located on the drive shaft 57 in opposite directions so to speak so that the first cam member 58 drives the first two presser bars to the left whereas simultaneously the group of the next two presser bars 54' is driven to the right by the force of the spring 60. Accordingly, the first two presser bars will assure that the needles 23 will seize strands from the strand layer facing away from the needles that is from the outer strand layer. On the other hand, the needles cooperating with the presser bars 54 will seize strands from the strand layer facing the needles that is from the inner strand layer. The fleece or strand layers will occupy a plane extending through the gap between the support member 9 and the knocking-over bar 61 which carries the knocking-over jacks 62, where such plane is indicated by dashed lines 63.

The drive shaft 57 may be rotated clockwise as indicated or counterclockwise as desired by any suitable conventional drive motor and/or gear device.

The needles 23 in FIG. 12 reciprocate in the same direction as the presser bars 54 and indicated by the double arrow 56. Accordingly the front edges 64 of the presser bars 54 will become effective in cooperating with the needles for pressing the fleece against the needle tips.

In FIG. 13 the needles 23 reciprocate in a direction indicated by the double arrow 65; this may be a horizontal or a vertical direction. In any event, the presser bars 66 and 66' reciprocate in a direction extending perpendicularly to the direction of double arrow 65, and indicated by the double arrow 67.

The supporting of the presser bars 66 and 66' as well as their drive in FIG. 13 is the same as that described with reference to FIG. 12. Accordingly the same reference numerals have been employed in FIG. 13. However, the front ends or working edges of the presser bars in FIG. 13 are differently shaped than those in FIG. 12. Thus, presser bars 66 have a front end shape or contour similarly to presser bar 34 shown in FIG. 7a. Presser bar 66' has a shape corresponding to that shown in FIG. 70.

The effective working edges of presser bars 66 and 66' will either be in zone I or in zone II (see FIG. 7,) depending upon the-instantaneous position of the cam members 58 and 58'. Thus, if the cam members push the presser bars to the left the effective working edge will be in zone I. On the other hand, when the cam members are in a position to permit the compression springs 60 to become effective the working edge of the respective presser bars will be in zone II. The control shaft 57 may be driven at an rpm. corresponding to the frequency of reciprocation or to a multiple or fraction of said needle reciprocation.

The fleece will move in a plane indicated by the dashed line 68 in FIG. 13.

In FIG. 14 the needles 23 reciprocate in the direction of a double arrow 69. However, the presser bars rock back and forth in the direction of the double arrow 70 which latter direction extends perpendicularly to the direction of arrow 69.

The fleece will extend in a plane indicated by the dashed line 71.

The presser bars 72 and 73 are rigidly supported in a support member 74 which has a baseplate 75 with slots 76 in which the presser bars 72,73 are held by means of a cover plate 77. The cover plate is attached to the baseplate by means of screws 78, for example.

In order to prevent the presser bars 72, 73 from longitudinal movement relative to their longitudinal axis, the baseplate 75 is provided with a longitudinal groove 79 into which a finger 80 of each presser bar reaches.

The support member 74 is carried by arms 81 which have an end portion 82 through which a rocker shaft 83 extends.

The rocker shaft is moved clockwise and counterclockwise as indicated by the arrow 84 by means of a crank drive 85 which is driven through a drive shaft 86. Such crank drive means are well known in the art. As the shaft 86 rotates the connecting crank bar 87 will move back and forth in the direction of the arrow 88 thereby rocking the crank member 89 back and forth.

It is not necessary that the frequency of the rocking motion of the rocker shaft 83 corresponds to the frequency of the reciprocation of the needles 23. Stated differently, needle reciprocation does not need to be synchronous with the rocking movement of the presser bars 72,73.

The presser bars 72 have a shape or contoured front end which is shaped oppositely to the front end of presser bars 73. Thus, presser bars 72 correspond substantially in their shape to presser bar 49 shown in FIG. 9 whereas presser bars 73 have a front end shape or contour corresponding substantially to that of presser bar 48 shown in FIG. 8.

The just-described shape of the working edge of the presser bars 72, 73 and the use of strand layers having different colors in combination with the rocking movement of the presser bars 72, 73 permits the production of a pattern or design having an appearance which is similar to a so-called pepita appearance. This appearance is accomplished by the fact that successive stitch rows and adjacent wale meshes or stitches of one color alternate with such meshes or stitches of another color.

The color pattern as described above which can be achieved with the rocking motion accomplished by the apparatus of FIG. 14, may also be achieved by a presser bar arrangement as illustrated in FIG. wherein the support member 74 for the presser bars 90 and 91 is constructed just as in FIG. 14. However, the carrier arms 92 and 93 for the support member 74 are constructed with elongated rear extensions 94 and 95 through which guide shafts 96 and 97 extend.

In the shown embodiment of FIG. IS the rear extensions 94 and 95 have a sliding seat on the guide shafts which are rigidly supported at their ends, for example, in a machine frame not shown. The sliding back and forth movement in the direction of the double arrow 98 is accomplished by a crank drive 99 driven by a shaft 100 which by its rotation causes the back and forth movement of crank member 101.

It will be noted that presser bars are longer than presser bars 91, thus a pattern distribution will be accomplished by repositioning long and short pressure bars in accordance with the lateral movement of the entire presser bar support member 74 so that all presser bars are moved in unison.

Rather than providing a sliding seat between the rear extensions 94, and the guide bars 96, 97, it would be possible to provide a rigid connection between the rear extensions and the guide bars while simultaneously providing a sliding seat between the ends of the guide bars and the machine frame. The drive 99 could then be attached as by a pin I02 to one of the rear extensions or directly to one of the guide bars 96 or 97.

The fleece will extend in a plane indicated by dashed lines 103 in FIG. 15.

The lateral back and forth movement of the presser bar support member will preferably be performed in synchronism with the frequency of the reciprocation of the needles 23.

Incidentally the pattern or design illustrated in FIG. 4 may be produced on a machine employing the lateral displacement mechanism shown in FIG. 15. In this connection well-known control mechanisms such as multispeed pattern wheels or control chains will be employed for driving the crank drive 99.

Although the invention has been described with reference to specific embodiments, it is to be understood that the invention covers all equivalents and modifications within the scope of the appended claims.

What we claim is:

l. A method for producing knitted fleeces on a multineedle knitting machine comprising the steps; of feeding a plurality of superimposed strand layers through said knitting machine, entering the needles to different depths into different strand layers for simultaneously seizing bunches of strands from said different strand layers and forming stitches about said strand bunches seized from different strand layers.

2. The method according to claim I, wherein said simultaneous seizing of strand bunches from different strand layers is carried out simultaneously for one course of stitches.

3. The method according to claim 1, wherein said simultaneous seizing of strand bunches from different strand layers is carried out sequentially in a plurality of stitch courses.

4. The method according to claim 3, wherein said plurality of stitch courses follow each other one after the other.

5. The method according to claim 1, wherein the strands in at least one strand layer have a different color from the strands in another strand layer.

6. The method according to claim 1, wherein the strands in at least one strand layer are made of material which is different from the material of the strands in another strand layer.

7. An apparatus for producing a knitted fleece from layered superimposed strands on a multineedle knitting machine, compnsmg:

a plurality of needles reciprocable in a path of given direction, presser means, support means arranged relative to said needle path for supporting said presser means in a position for cooperating with said needles, said presser means defining adjacent to said needle path a pressing surface extending substantially perpendicularly to said needle path and having elevations and depressions in said pressing surface whereby the needles are enabled to enter into said layered strands to differing depths depending on said elevations and depressions.

8. The apparatus according to claim 7, wherein said presser means comprise a plurality of presser bars of differing length whereby the ends of the longer presser bars define said elevations and the ends of the shorter presser bars define the depressions in said pressing surface.

9. The apparatus according to claim 7, wherein said presser means comprise a plurality of presser bars having contoured zones for defining said elevations and depressions.

10. The apparatus according to claim 9, wherein said contoured zones provide a plurality of planes of different elevations relative to a plane defined by the maximum stroke of the needles, said plurality of planes extending perpendicularly to said given direction of needle reciprocation.

l 1. The apparatus according to claim 7, wherein said presser means comprise a plurality of presser bars which are arranged on said support means in accordance with a predetermined pattern.

12. The apparatus according to claim 11, wherein certain of said presser bars are omitted to satisfy said pattern.

13. The apparatus according to claim 7, further comprising drive means for moving said presser means into predetermined positions relative to said needle path.

14. The apparatus according to claim 13, wherein said presser means comprise a plurality of presser bars and wherein said drive means comprise cam members operatively connected to said presser bars for moving the presser bars in accordance with a predetermined pattern which is defined by the position and shape of said cam members.

15. The apparatus according to claim 14, wherein said support means for the presser means comprise a plurality of slots in which said presser bars are movably supported, wherein said presser bars have butted ends extending out of said slots, and wherein resilient means are located between said butted ends and said support means for pressing the butted ends into cooperating contact with said cam members.

16. The apparatus according to claim 13, wherein said presser means comprise a plurality of presser bars rigidly held on said support means, said support means being operatively connected to said drive means for moving presser bars in unison in a direction extending perpendicularly to said given direction of needle reciprocation.

17. The apparatus according to claim 16. further comprising a journal shaft, said support means for said presser bars being attached to said journal shaft, said drive means comprising crank means operatively connected for moving said presser bars back and forth in a direction extending perpendicularly to said given direction of needle reciprocation.

18. The apparatus according to claim 9, wherein said contoured zones of the presser bars are provided by indentations or cutouts in said presser bars.

19. The apparatus according to claim 18, wherein said zones are located at ends of said presser bars adjacent to said needle path.

20. The apparatus according to claim 7, wherein said needles comprise hooked tips.

21. The apparatus according to claim 9, wherein said contoured zones are curved end portions of saidpresser bars.

22. The apparatus according to claim 9, wherein said contoured zones are pointed end portions of said presser bars.

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US3309901 *Feb 28, 1966Mar 21, 1967Elitex Zavody TextilnihoApparatus for reinforcing a fibrous material
US3377821 *Oct 14, 1966Apr 16, 1968Elitex Zavody TextilnihoApparatus for reinforcing fibrous material
US3417580 *Mar 9, 1966Dec 24, 1968Forsch Textil TechnologieMethod of making textile fabric on sewing-knitting machines
GB1143827A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3849845 *Sep 20, 1973Nov 26, 1974Fehrer TextilmaschApparatus for needle-punching a web
US3894320 *Nov 6, 1973Jul 15, 1975Bentley John EdwardMethod of producing textile product
US3967472 *Dec 10, 1973Jul 6, 1976Arno Edgar WildemanStitch bonded fabrics
US5058249 *Jul 16, 1990Oct 22, 1991Textilmaschinenfabrik Dr. Ernst Fehrer AktiengesellschaftApparatus for needling a nonwoven web
US6973807 *Jul 23, 2004Dec 13, 2005Groz-Beckert KgTip-headed needle
EP1167604A1 *Jun 5, 2001Jan 2, 2002Sai Automotive Sommer IndustrieMethod of manufacturing stitches from a non-woven fibres and needles for carrying out the procedure
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/85.00A, 28/109
International ClassificationD04B23/10, D04B23/00
Cooperative ClassificationD04B23/10
European ClassificationD04B23/10