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Publication numberUS3648308 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 14, 1972
Filing dateMay 26, 1970
Priority dateMay 26, 1970
Publication numberUS 3648308 A, US 3648308A, US-A-3648308, US3648308 A, US3648308A
InventorsGreenawalt Monte H
Original AssigneeGreenawalt Monte H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Elevated traction pillow
US 3648308 A
Abstract
An elevated traction pillow is described herein having, in side view, a substantially triangular configuration. The pillow extends, in length, from proximate the sacrum to above the head of the user and is comprised of a firm support member and a head-receiving member. The support member comprises all of the triangular configuration except for the apex thereof wherein the head-receiving member is secured. The head-receiving member is comprised of material offering negligible resistance when receiving the head of an individual. In a preferred embodiment, a cervical spine support, i.e., neck support, is formed on the firm support member adjacent the head-receiving member and extends upwardly of the firm support member.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Greenaw alt [54] ELEVATED TRACTION PILLOW Monte H. Greenawalt, 225 Southgate, Dubuque, Iowa 52001 [22] Filed: May 26,1970

[21] Appl.No.: 48,626

[72] Inventor:

Primary Examiner-James T. McCall Assistant Examiner-Andrew M. Calvert Attorneyl lenderson 8L Strom [57] ABSTRACT An elevated traction pillow is described herein having, in side view, a substantially triangular configuration. The pillow extends, in length, from proximate the sacrum to above the head of the user and is comprised of a firm support member and a head-receiving member. The support member comprises all of the triangular configuration except for the apex thereof wherein the head-receiving member is secured. The headreceiving member is comprised of material offering negligible resistance when receiving the head of an individual. In a preferred embodiment, a cervical spine support, i.e., neck support, is formed on the firm support member adjacent the head-receiving member and extends upwardly of the firm support member.

6 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures ELEVATED TRACTION PILLOW BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to an elevated traction pillow which supports the upper body of an individual in a raised or semireclining position. The novel design of this pillow causes a stretching and relaxing of the neck muscles to provide greater comfort and rest to the user thereof.

It is often desirable to support the body in a raised or semireclining position. Patients suffering from cardiac conditions, emphysema, and respiratory difficulties commonly sleep and rest in a raised or semireclining position. This same position is desirable when reading in bed or watching television.

Commonly, the support used to maintain this position is a number of ordinary pillows. The pillows are generally placed under the shoulders and head so as to curve the spine. This position is difficult to maintain, with any degree of comfort, for long time intervals. Additionally, the body cannot rest naturally in this position and various physical ailments may be caused thereby.

Various types of pillows have been designed to elevate the head and the upper body. None of these pillows, however, support the upper body and the head, when in the semireclining, supine position, in such a manner as to apply traction to the neck muscles. By applying traction to these muscles the entire body is relaxed and benefitted.

A pillow adapted to support the head and neck of an individual in the supine position is disclosed in my copending application entitled Pillow Construction, filed July 25, 1968, Ser. No. 747,722, now US. Pat. No. 3,421,310.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to an elevated traction pillow for supporting the back, neck and head of an individual in a semireclining, supine position. The pillow comprises a firm support member, in side view, of substantially triangular configuration, and a head receiving member secured in the firm support member proximate the apex of the triangular configuration and being in contacting engagement with the firm support member. The head-receiving member offers only negligible resistance when receiving the head of an individual.

It is an object of this invention to provide an elevated, tracmember adjacent the head-receiving portion, a raised portion adapted to receive and support the neck of an individual.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the elevated, traction pillow of this invention illustrating, in phantom, the firm support member, the head-receiving member, and the raised portion for receiving the neck.

FIG. 2 is a top view of the traction pillow with the outer covering or ticking partially cut away.

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the pillow taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a side view of the pillow with an individual resting thereon in the supine position.

FIG. 5 is a side view of another embodiment of this invention with the covering or ticking partially cut away. No raised portion for receiving the neck is included in this embodiment.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the drawings, the elevated traction pillow of this invention is indicated generally at 11 in FIGS. 1-5. The pillow 11 comprises a firm support member 12 (FIGS. 1-5) of generally triangular configuration, a head-receiving member 13 (FIGS. l-S), and a raised portion 14 (FIGS. 14) for supporting the neck of an individual reclining thereon in the supine position. In FIGS. 1 and 4, the component parts of this pillow 11 are covered with an outer ticking 16.

The firm support member 12 (FIGS. 11, 3-5) is, in side view, of substantially triangular or wedge-shaped configuration, preferably, of right triangular configuration. The user of this pillow 11 reclines on the hypotenuse 17 of the right triangle (FIG. 4). Proximate the apex 18 of the right triangle (FIG. 5) or at the apex 18 (FIGS. 1-4) a depression 19 (FIGS. 35) is formed in the firm support member 12. The head-receiving member 13 is received in this depression 19.

The depression 19 (FIGS. 3 and 5) preferably extends from one side 21 of the pillow 11 to the other side 22 (FIGS. 1 and 2). The longitudinal edges 23 and 24 of the depression 12 are preferably parallel and substantially vertically disposed. The depth of the depression 19 is not critical, however, it must be deep enough to allow the head 26 of an individual 27 to sink downwardly therein as illustrated in F I6. 41.

The firm support member 12 may, in a preferred embodiment (FIG. 5), encompass the head-receiving member 13 on all sides except that side forming a portion of the hypotenuse 17. By surrounding the head-receiving member 13 on all sides, the pillow 11 retains its shape better and stress and strain on the joints between the firm support member 12 and the headreceiving member 13 are reduced.

The firm support member 12 should extend from proximate the sacrum 28 to proximate the top of the head 26, generally about 26 inches. In width, the firm support member 13 is generally about 26 inches. The depth can vary from about 6 inches to about 26 inches although a slope of 45 is quite unusual and is generally not utilized herein.

The firm support member 12 can be manufactured from a number of different materials. One of the preferred materials is a urethane foam having a compression density of from about 20 pounds to about 40 pounds. Material of this compression density is adequate to properly support the back and shoulders of an individual utilizing this pillow. The compression density of this material is calculated by the standard R.M.A. test.

Preferably, the urethane foam is out rather than molded. A skin forms on molded urethane foams and prevents them from breathing. Cut urethane foams, however, are porous and breathe exceptionally well and are generally very comfortable to recline thereon.

The head-receiving member 13 (FIGS. 1-3 and 5) is of the same general configuration as the depression 19 formed in the firm support member 12. The top 29 of the head-receiving member 13 forms a portion of the hypotenuse 17 of the trian gular configuration. The head-receiving member 13 is secured in the depression 19 in contacting engagement with the firm support member 12 by any suitable means. One of the least expensive methods of securement is bonding these two components together with glue.

The head-receiving member 13 can :also'be comprised of a number of materials if those materials offer negligible resistance when receiving the head 26 of an individual 27. Polyester fibers having a compression density of less than about 6 pounds are suitable for use herein. Other materials having approximately this same compression density can also be used herein.

A raised portion 14 (FIGS. 1-4l) is formed on the firm sup port member 12 adjacent the head-receiving member 13 for receiving and supporting the neck 31 of an individual reclining on the pillow 11. The raised portion 14 generally extends from one side 21 to the other side 22 of the pillow 11 and is raised above the hypotenuse 17 of the triangular configuration. The raised portion 14 is contoured to properly fit the neck 31 (FIG. 4) between the shoulders 32 and the head 26. The raised portion 14 keeps the neck 31 in proper alignment with the normal curvature of the spine when the user 27 thereof is in a semireclining, supine position (FIG. 4).

The raised portion 14 has another use (FIG. 3). When watching television or reading, the user 27 can utilize the raised portion 14 as a head rest as illustrated in FIG. 3.

The raised portion 14 can be manufactured from many materials. One that has been found useful herein is urethane foam having a compression density of from 8 pounds to about 16 pounds. The raised portion 14 is secured to the firm support member 12 by any convenient means, generally by gluemg.

The entire pillow 11 is preferably covered with a ticking 16. If the pillow 11 is used in the home, corduroy or similar heavy duty cloth is preferred for the ticking 16. When the pillow 11 is used in hospitals and nursing homes, the ticking 16 is preferably white cotton which can readily be laundered.

The abrupt transition from the firm support member 12 and the raised portion 14 to the relatively soft head-receiving member 13 provides this pillow with the unique feature of stretching the neck muscles and permitting them to relax, thereby leading to a more restful sleep and reduced likelihood of neck and shoulder spasms.

Although a preferred embodiment of this invention has been described and disclosed hereinbefore, it is to be remembered that various modifications can be made thereto without departing from the true spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. An elevated traction pillow for supporting the back,

kll

neck, and head of an individual in a reclining position, the pillow comprising:

a firm support member, in side view, of substantially triangular configuration;

a head-receiving member secured in said finn support member proximate the apex of said triangular configuration and being in contactingengagement with said firm support member, said head-receiving member offering negligible resistance when receiving the head of an individual; and

a raised portion formed on said firm support member adjacent said head-receiving member, said raised portion adapted to receive and support the neck of an individual.

2. The traction pillow of claim 1 wherein said raised portion is formed from a material offering more resistance than the head-receiving member and less resistance than the firm support member.

3. The traction pillow of claim 2 wherein said firm support member encompasses said head-receiving member on all sides except that side forming a'portion of the hypotenuse'of the triangular configuration.

4. The traction pillow of claim 3 wherein said firm support member comprises cut urethane foam having a compression density of from about 20 pounds to about 40 pounds.

5. The traction pillow of claim 4 wherein said raised portion comprises cut urethane foam having a compression density of from about 8 pounds to about 16 pounds.

6. The traction pillow of claim 5 wherein said head-receiving member has a compression density of less than 6 pounds.

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US3400413 *Dec 13, 1966Sep 10, 1968La Grossa ElinorContour pillow
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification5/632, 5/636, 297/391, D06/601, 5/633
International ClassificationA47G9/10, A47G9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47G9/10
European ClassificationA47G9/10