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Publication numberUS3648330 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 14, 1972
Filing dateMar 26, 1969
Priority dateMar 27, 1968
Also published asDE1915266A1
Publication numberUS 3648330 A, US 3648330A, US-A-3648330, US3648330 A, US3648330A
InventorsRolf Binder, Max Meier
Original AssigneeRieter Ag Maschf
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for mixing staple fibers
US 3648330 A
Abstract
The fiber bales are moved continuously over the plucking machine and the plucked flocks are distributed among the various chutes. The flocks become layered in each chute according to the sequence of bales moved across the plucking machine. Thereafter, the flocks in the chutes move separately at uniform speeds along paths of different or the same lengths into a common path disposed at least 90 DEG to the chutes where the separate streams of flocks are joined together and laterally compressed. The mixed flocks are then taken off by the take-off rolls.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent lBinder et all.

[ Mar. M, 11972 [54] METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MTXTNG STAPLE FIBERS [72] Inventors: Rolf Binder, Raterschen; Max Meier, Winterthur, both of Switzerland [73] Assignee: Rieter Machine Works, lLtd., Winterthur,

Switzerland [22] Filed: Mar. 26, 1969 [21] Appl. No.: 810,500

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Mar. 27, 1968 Switzerland ..'..4643/68 [52] US. Cl ..l9/l45.5, 198/54, 302/28 [51] Int. Cl ..D0lg 13/00 [58] Field ofSearch ....l9/145.5, 145.7, 204, 205, 19/203, 105; 198/53, 54, 55, 56; 302/28, 34, 99, 59;

214/17 R, 17 A, 17 C [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,576,280 11/1951 Brooks ..19/203 3,080,617 3/1963 Lytton l9/l45.7 3,414,330 12/1968 Trutzschler 19/105 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,091,080 11/1967 Great Britain ..19/65 R 52,453 l/l967 Poland 19/156 96,210 3/1924 Australia 198/53 58,706 11/1967 Germany 19/105 16,734 1908 Great Britain 198/56 1,036,836 6/1966 Great Britain .19/l45.5

52,694 2/1967 Poland 193/54 OTHER PUBLICATIONS Japanese Patent Publication 39- 25, 426 Published 1 l-l l-64 Primary Examiner-Dorsey Newton Attorney-Kenyon & Kenyon Reilly Carr & Chapin [5 7] ABSTRACT The fiber bales are moved continuously over the plucking machine and the plucked flocks are distributed among the various chutes. The flocks become layered in each chute according to the sequence of bales moved across the plucking machine. Thereafter, the flocks in the chutes move separately at uniform speeds along paths of different or the same lengths into a common path disposed at least 90 to the chutes where the separate streams of flocks are joined together and laterally compressed. The mixed flocks are then taken off by the takeoff rolls.

27 Claims, 7 Drawing lFigures PAIENIEUMAR 14 1972 3, 648 3 3 0 sum 1 BF 3 R INVENTORS O F" !/\H ER M0 M EIE way/42%. ATTOPN Y5 PATENTEDHAR 14 L972 3, 648 330 sum 2 UF 3 VDE INVENTORS POL F BINDEQ MKIX ME/EF? PATENIEDMAR 14 I972 3, 648 3 3 0 sum 3 or 3 Fig.5 1 a, a, a d,

INVENTORS FOL F El IN DER MAX IWE IE METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MIXMG STAPLE FIBERS This invention relates to a method and apparatus for mixing staple fibers. More particularly, this invention relates to a method and apparatus for mixing staple fibers in a pneumatic system.

Due to ever-increasing demand for yarn quality, spinners have been required to obtain more efficient mixing of the initial staple fibers in order to level out any difference in the fiber origin which may appear eventually as differences in structure, color, maturity, etc., in the yarn. In addition to the yarn quality, the processing of the fiber materials on preparatory machines and, particularly, on ring spinning machines has required as trouble-free as possible an operation. Further, by more thoroughly mixing the raw fiber material, the processing of the fiber into yarn is decisively improved.

Various systems have heretofore been known for mixing fibers which incorporate a plurality of chutes fed consecutively by a common carrier means located above the chutes. Generally, the fibers are taken off in predetermined quantities by a pair of takeoff rolls located at the lower end of said chute and placed onto a common carrier means. In such systems, the fiber flocks are dropped into the chutes by gravity only, and thus are placed loosely. As a result, a relatively large room becomes filled by small quantities of flocks. This is a disadvantage in mixing, as large flock quantities preferably are needed for levelling over the longest possible periods of raw material feed. Consequently, in order to fulfill this requirement, the design of relatively high machines is required which, however, is undesirable if cost and operation are considered.

Other systems have also been known for mixing fibers in which a plurality of chutes aligned in a row have been fed consecutively by a common overhead pneumatic feed duct. In these systems, the fibers are taken off from the lower chute end through a grid by rolls provided with pins and dropped onto a common carrier means, e.g., a transporting belt. In order to eliminate the fiber feed carrier air from the chute being fed a chute wall has been provided with perforations and the carrier air has been guided by exhaust ducts arranged between the chutes downwardly into the region of the transporting belt below the chutes. The exhaust air from the individual ducts has then been collected along the transporting belt and eliminated at the end of the room.

However, in these latter systems, obviously, only part of the flocks taken off has settled on the transporting belt, while the rest has been carried by the exhaust air current acting above the transporting belt. As a result, no systematic mixing action has taken place, particularly as the speeds of the exhaust air current and ofthe transporting belt have been ofwidely differing magnitude.

Further, in chutes which have been fed consecutively, other disadvantages have been noticed. For example, a complicated and trouble-prone control mechanism is needed for opening a flap of the chute to be filled to permit entry of the flock and for closing the flaps of the other chutes. Furthermore, it is typical for the chutes fed in this manner, that the last chute supplied with flocks must be filled almost to capacity and that the chute to be supplied next must be almost empty. Thus, as only half the overall filling capacity of the total volume of the chutes is used, a large filling capacity must be provided. However, such would be poorly utilized for mixing the prepared weight of raw material, since given feed quantities can be mixed over short periods of time only. The second type of system mentioned above which uses takeoff rolls provided with pins for pulling the flocks through a grid shows a further disadvantage in that such operates properly only if the flocks are packed loosely in the chute. This factor, however, limits the quantity of material stored in addition to providing a poor utilization of the chute volume and a limited machine height.

Additionally, the known instance of the second type of system mentioned above is also provided with flaps which swing to and fro just above the grid in order to move the flock material laterally in the lowest part of the chute above the beating circumference of the takeoff roll, the direction of rotation of which is reversed periodically in concert with the flaps, e.g., every 5 seconds. Doubtlesslly, such flock material shifting mechanisms and takeoff reversing devices are very costly and trouble-prone.

Accordingly, it is an object of the invention to obtain a full utilization of the total chute capacity for storing compressed flock material in the chutes of systems for mixing staple fiber.

It is another object of the invention to maintain the storage quantities of fiber material as large as possible in any blending process.

It is another object of the invention. to efficiently and reliably mix staple fibers with a minimum of moving parts.

Briefly, the invention provides a system which utilizes a method and apparatus in which staple fibers are plucked from different fiber bales, layered into a plurality of chutes in succeeding layers and thereafter led along paths of different lengths to be mixed and compressed in a separate zone spaced from the ends of the chutes. In this way, the layers of fibers derived from one bale enter the mixing zone at different times and are mixed with different layers derived from the other bales.

The method of the invention initially plucks predetermined quantities of flock from each of a series of fiber bales of different origin in sequential order and thereafter feeds the flock pneumatically, for example, by a pressurized carrier air stream to a plurality of chutes. The total incoming air stream to the chutes is divided into a plurality of flock-laden part air streams and each air stream is directed into a chute. The flocks in each part air stream are then separated from the air stream and deposited in the respective chute. Successive layers of flock are thus built up to form individual columns of fiber flock each of which becomes compressed by air pressure and consists of superimposed part flock columns of different origin. Next, the fiber flock in each column is moved at a uniform descending speed and upon leaving the lower end of the chute is joined with the other columns of fiber flock into superimposed layers of fiber which forms an included angle of at least with respect to the direction of descent of the columns. Thereafter, the superimposed layers of fiber are transported to a takeup station while being laterally compressed. Finally, the compressed material is further compressed and flocks are plucked therefrom for conveyance, for example, pneumatically, to a cleaning machine.

The apparatus of the invention for mixing staple fibers includes a pressurized feed duct for conveying flock-laden air from a fiber bale plucking station and a chute assembly having a plurality of chutes which are arranged in parallel in a row to continuously receive the flock-laden air from the feed duct at the top and to form a compressed flock column within each. In addition, each chute is open at the bottom end to allow passage of the flock column without obstruction and is provided with perforations for exhausting of the air while retaining the flocks within the chute. The apparatus further includes a flock transporting means at the lower ends of the chutes for transporting the flock material emerging, from the chutes in a direction which forms an included angle of at least 90 with respect to the direction of flock descent in the chutes. This flock transporting means is provided with a first means for compressing the flock material in a precompressing zone outside the chutes as well as a second means for further compressing the fiock material before the material is plucked into flocks for transport out of the mixing apparatus.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will become more apparent from the following detailed description and appended claims taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 schematically illustrates a longitudinal cross-sectional view of an apparatus for mixing staple fibers according to the invention;

FIG. 2 illustrates a view taken on line l-l of FIG. 11;

FIG. 3 illustrates a cross-sectional view of a modified chute assembly according to the invention;

FIG. illustrates a cross-sectional view of another modified chute assembly according to the invention;

I columns in a chute assembly according to FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 graphically illustrates the composition of the flock columns in a chute assembly according to FIG. 3; and

FIG. 7 illustrates a cross-sectional view of a mounting of a deflecting means on a chute wall.

Referring to FIG. 1, a mixing machine M has a housing 7 which connects with a feed duct 8 at an upper end in order to receive a flock-laden air stream and with a takeoff duct 28 at an opposite lower end in order to discharge mixed flocks. The housing 7 contains a chute assembly consisting of a plurality of individual chutes 1-6, a flock transporting means adjacent the lower end of the chute assembly and a takeofi' assembly.

The chutes 1-6 of the chute assembly are formed by end walls 10, 11 imperforate intermediate walls 12, l3, 14, 15, 16 and sidewalls 29, 30 (FIG. 2). The end wall 10 also serves as an outer wall of the housing 7 which extends vertically downwardly from the feed duct 8 and is curved inwardly into the housing 7 at the lower end. The intermediate walls 12-16 are successively shorter in length than the end wall 10 so as to define chutes of shorter length and are curved uniformly at the lower ends. The end wall 11 is also curved at the lower end. Each intermediate wall 12-16 is provided on the upper end with a deflecting means such as a head 8 which is adjustably vertically mounted thereon. For example, as shown in FIG. 7, each head 8' is clamped on a respective wall 16 by integral portions 8" on the bottom thereof so that the head 8 is fixed by friction force on the wall 16 and can be adjusted by being moved vertically on the wall 16. Each head 8 is set successively higher than the one before to project into the upper end 9 of the housing 7 so as to intercept a part air stream from the feed duct 8. In this way, each head serves to narrow the area of the flock-laden air stream to maintain the speed of the air stream as its throughput above the chutes decreases.

The flock transporting means includes a horizontally disposed endless transporting belt 18 which is located adjacent to the curved lower end of the end wall 11 of the chute assembly and a longer horizontally disposed endless transporting belt which is located adjacent the lower end of the end wall 10 of the chute assembly. The upper belt 18 is driven so that the lower reach 19 moves to the left as viewed toward the takeoff assembly and the lower belt 20 is driven so that the upper reach 21 moves to the left also. In addition, the belts 18, 20 are driven at the same linear speed and form a precompression zone as will be described below. Further, the belts 18, 20 are disposed to be in a plane which is substantially perpendicular to the downward travel of the flock columns in the chutes 1-6.

The takeoff assembly includes two pairs of compressing rollers 22, 23 and a pair of fast rotating takeoff rolls 24, 25. The nips formed between each pair of compressing rollers are positioned adjacent to the vertical plane which substantially defines the ends of the transporting belts 18, 20 to receive the material fed therefrom. Further, the takeoff rolls 24, 25 are substantially aligned with the nips of the compressing rollers 22, 23 to pluck the fiber material emanating therefrom and arranged in a chamber 26 provided with an air intake opening 27 at the upper end and connected with the takeoff duct 28. The distance A between the opposed transporting belt reaches 19, 21 is substantially smaller than the total width B of the chutes of the chute assembly. Also, the circumferential speed of the compressing rollers 22, 23 corresponds to the linear speed of the belts 19, 20.

Referring to FIG. 2, the sidewalls 29, 30 of the chute assembly are perforated, the size of the perforations being chosen so that the fiber flocks carried into the chutes cannot penetrate the sidewalls and thus are retained in the chutes. These sidewalls 29, 30 extend downwardly to the lower transporting belt 20 and towards the discharge end of the housing up to the chute end wall 11. In addition, the housing 7 has a pair of sidewalls 31, 32 which are spaced from the perforated chute walls 29, 30 so as to form exhaust ducts 33, 34 on either side of the chute assembly. These exhaust ducts 33, 34 merge into air exhaust ducts 35, 36 at the side of the lower ends of the ducts 33, 34.

Referring again to FIG. 1, in order to feed flock to the mixing machine M, a bale plucking machine 37 is positioned at a suitable station and a series of fiber bales a-f to be opened are circulated across a flock-forming plucking device 38 of the machine 37. The flocks are then drawn off and are blown into the feed duct 8 by a fan 39.

Referring to FIgS. 1 and 5, the method of utilizing the mixing machine M includes the initial step of supplying the individual chutes l-6 with opened flocks in a stream of flockladen compressed air from the bale plucking station via the feed duct 8. The input flock stream consecutively carries flock concentrations originating from the bales a, b, c, d, e, f as the bales circulate across the plucking device 38.

In order to mix the supplied flocks, the flocks arriving via the feed duct 8 in the carrier air stream above the chutes 1-6 are distributed into the individual chutes by means of the deflecting heads 8'. As the sidewalls 29, 30 (FIG. 2) of the chute assembly are perforated, the carrier air is exhausted via exhaust ducts 33, 34 downwardly into the lateral air exhaust ducts 35, 36. Thus, the flocks are separated from the part carrier air streams at the walls 29, 30, and deposited in the corresponding chutes, and arewhich is important-compressed vertically (as indicated by arrows S in the chutes 2 and 4) into a compact flock column by the air pressure acting in the feed duct 8. A flock column is thus formed in each chute, each of which contains part flock columns 11,, b,, c d e f (FIG. 5). These superimposed part columns a through f, sink down evenly in the individual chutes as fiber material is taken off by the pairs of takeoff rolls 22, 23. As the chute height decreases from chute 1 to chute 6, the part flock columns of the same origin (e.g., d, in chute 6) reach the lower end of each chute after different sinking distances. The part flock columns emerging from the chutes are then deflected due to the lower part of the chute walls 10 through 16 being curved into the direction of the flow of material governed by the adjacent transporting belts 18, 20. Thereafter, the part flock columns emerging from the chutes, the column of chute 6 being the first, are condensed in the precompressing zone formed by the transporting belts 18, 20. In this regard, the flock columns leaving the chutes 1 through 6 are condensed laterally, i.e., at right angles to the direction of material flow T in addition to being condensed longitudinally in the direction S by the pressure of the carrier air stream in the chutes. This lateral compression is achieved by choosing the distance A between transporting belts 18, 20 of a smaller value than the total width B of the chutes.

Upon passing through the precompressing zone, the flock material is formed into horizontal flock layers S, through 5,, corresponding to the individual flock columns. These layers continue to be laterally precompressed progressively as they advance, and are divided horizontally again shortly before reaching the pairs of compressing rolls 22, 23, respectively, arranged at the end of the transporting belts 18, 20. In this regard, the upper half of the layers, i.e., S. through S are carried towards the pair of compressing rolls 22 and the lower half of the layers, i.e., S, through S towards the pair of compressing rolls 23. Owing to the compression by these compressing rolls 22, 23, a compact fiber mass is fed to each of the takeoff rolls 24, 25, respectively, rotating at about 1,500 rpm, which then separate the fiber mass into flocks again.

The chamber 26 in which the takeoff rolls 24, 25 are arranged is pressurized and contains a carrier air stream, air from the exterior being sucked in via the inlet 27 at the top of the chamber. The carrier air stream, moving at about 30 fps. then carries the flocks generated at the takeoff rolls 24, 25 via duct 28 to a subsequent cleaning machine (not shown).

Referring to FIG. 5, the different sinking distances of the part flock columns of the same origin in different chutes permit the mixing action to take place in the areas between the ends of the chutes and the plane VDE of the compressing rollers in an efficient manner. For example, all part flock columns a, are built up simultaneously by the part carrier air streams while material of this origin is supplied to the plucking machine 37 by bale a. As the input material weight supplied per time-unit via duct 8 and the output taken off by the pairs of rolls 22, 23 are equal in regular operation, the sinking speed of the part flock columns is uniform, new part flock columns originating from the subsequent bales being superimposed. As shown, of the part flock columns C (indicated by hatching) the one in layer 5 is the first one to reach the plane VDE of the pairs of compressing rolls 22, 23, whereas the one in the layer below barely has reached the zone of lateral precompression. Further, column C in the layer 8,, has just left the lower chute end, whereas C in the layer S still is in the curved deflection zone of the chute 3. In the layer 8,, C has not yet completed the deflecting curve and in the layers 5,, C just enters the deflection zone. The total distance Aw tot between the first and the last of the part columns of the same origin is given in the following expression:

4 F ilffil 5:

where:

g chute width 1 number of chutes A total height of layers S, through S Referring to FIGS. 3 and 5, the chute assembly is provided with chutes 40-45 which are of constant height H so that the respective lower ends terminate in the same horizontal plane. In addition, the flock transporting means is provided with upper and lower transporting belts 46, 47 similar to those above which form a precompression zone and are disposed on inclined planes at an angle a of about 120, i.e., more than 90, relative to the walls of the chutes 4045. Similarly, the axles of the pairs of compressing rolls 48, 49 of the takeoff assembly are disposed in a plane VDE which forms an equivalent angle a with the horizontal plane. The remainder of the mixing machine is the same as that described above and need not be further described.

The main direction of transport T of the flock columns in the precompression zone between the belts 46, 47 is thus disposed at an angle of greater than 90 with respect to the direction S of flock deposition in the chutes so that the differences in the distance of the individual part flock columns from the takeoff plane are determined only by the different distances traversed in the precompression zone before reaching the pairs of compressing rolls 48, 49. For example, as shown in FIG. 6, the part flock column e in the layer 5 already has reached the plane VDE of the compressing rolls whereas 2 in layer S is behind by the distance Aw. The difference Aw in the distance being given by the expression:

An=g sin a" (2-1 Comparison of the two distances for the structures of FIGS. 1 and 3 indicates that the example shown in FIG. 3 is somewhat less favorable.

Referring to FIG. 4, the chute assembly can as an alternative to the chutes of FIG. 1 be provided with double feed ducts 50, half of the chutes 51-53, being fed via one duct 54 and the other half of the chutes 5557, being fed via a second separated duct 58. The chutes 51-57, however, merge into a common precompression zone as described in regard to FIG. I above.

What is claimed is:

l. A method of mixing fiber flocks of different origin comprising the steps of generating a flock-laden air stream containing sequential charges of fiber flocks of different origin,

dividing the air stream into a plurality of part flock-laden air streams,

separating the flock from each part air stream and depositing the flock under air pressure in an individual column consisting of superimposed part flock columns of different flock origin,

moving each individual column at the same speed through a path having a downwardly directed portion and a following portion forming an angle of at least 90 with respect to the downwardly directed portion while separated from the other individual columns,

thereafter joining the individual columns together into superimposed fiber layers in a plane forming an angle equal to said angle of at least with respect to the descending direction of the individual columns to dispose the part flock columns of the same origin in said fiber layers in off set non-aligned relation to each other, and

transporting the joined fiber layers while simultaneously compressing the layers laterally.

2. A method as set forth in claim 1 wherein said joining of 0 the individual flock columns takes place at separated points.

3. A method as set forth in claim I which further comprises the step of separating the fiber layers after lateral compression into flocks.

l. A method as set forth in claim 3 which further comprises the step of taking off the flocks in a carrier air stream.

5. A method as set forth in claim I in which the flock-laden air stream is guided tangentially above a plurality of chutes arranged in a row and in which a part air stream is diverted into each chute and exhausted laterally through perforations in the chute while the flock in the part air stream is deposited in the chute.

6. A method as set forth in claim 1 wherein each succeeding individual column is of smaller height than the preceding column.

7. A method as set forth in claim (6 wherein the shortest flock column is carried through said plane over the shortest transporting distance.

8. A method as set forth in claim ll wherein the individual columns are respectively moved through passages of successively decreasing height.

9. A method as set forth in claim 1 wherein the individual columns are respectively moved through successively decreasing distances after said joining together.

10. A method of mixing staple fibers comprising the steps of forming a plurality of vertically disposed individual columns of flock consisting of superimposed part flock columns,

compressing each individual column under air pressure,

moving each individual column at the same speed through a path having a downwardly directed portion and a following portion forming an angle of at least 90 with respect to the downwardly directed portion while separated from the other individual columns,

thereafter joining the individual columns together into superimposed fiber layers in a plane forming an angle equal to said angle of at least 90 with respect to the descending direction of the individual columns to dispose the part flock columns of the same origin in said fiber layers in offset non-aligned relation to each other, and

transporting the joined fiber layers while simultaneously compressing the layers laterally.

11. An apparatus for mixing fiber flocks of different origin comprising a housing having side walls;

a pressurized feed duct for conveying a continuous flockladen air stream;

a plurality of parallel chutes disposed in a row between said side walls and connected with said feed duct, each said chute having an open lower end for passage of flock material therefrom and walls having perforations therein for exhausting the air and retaining the flock within said chutes, each said lower end being disposed in a common plane;

transporting means below said chutes between said housing side walls for receiving flock material from said chutes while retaining the material within said housing, said means including a first transporting belt disposed adjacent the lower end of said chutes between said side walls for receiving the individual columns of flock together in superimposed fiber layers, said transporting belt being disposed on a plane forming an angle with said chutes and disposed in angular relation to said common plane to space said lower ends of said chutes sequentially at an increasing distance from said first belt and extending away from said chutes within said housing; and

a second transporting belt spaced from said first belt a distance less than the width of said chutes and extending from said chutes within said housing to laterally compress the columns of flock in a precompression zone therebetween.

12. An apparatus as set forth in claim 11 wherein each chu'te is curved at the lower end in the direction of flow transport in said transporting means.

13. An apparatus as set forth in claim 11 wherein two adjacent chutes are provided with a common separating wall free of perforations.

14. An apparatus as set forth in claim 1 1 further comprising air stream deflecting means at the upper end of each chute for narrowing the area of the flock-laden air stream to maintain the speed of the air stream as its throughput above said chutes decreases.

15. An apparatus as set forth in claim 14 wherein said air stream deflecting means is a head having means for vertically adjusting said head relative to said chutes.

16. An apparatus as set forth in claim 11 wherein each succeeding chute is of less height than the preceding chute.

17. An apparatus as set forth in claim 1 l which further comprises an exhaust air duct extending across said chutes and communicating with each chute through said perforations therein to receive air therefrom.

18. An apparatus as set forth in claim 11 wherein said pair of transporting belts form a precompression zone.

19. An apparatus as set forth in claim 11 which further comprises at least one pair of compressing rolls downstream of said transporting means for receiving and compressing the transported material.

20. An apparatus as set forth in claim 19 which further comprises a take-off roll downstream of said pair of compressing rolls for plucking flocks from the compressed material.

21. An apparatus as set forth in claim 20 which further comprises means for removing the plucked flocks under a suction air stream.

22. An apparatus as set forth in claim 11 wherein said feed duct includes a pair of ducts, one duct communicating with a first group of said chutes and the other duct communicating with a second group of said chutes, each of said groups of chutes merging downstream into a common precompression zone.

23. An apparatus as set forth in claim 1 1 wherein said transport means is disposed in a plane forming an angle of from 90 to 120 with respect to said chutes.

24. An apparatus as set forth in claim 11 wherein the upper end of said chutes are of increasing height in the direction extending away from said feed dEt.

25. An apparatus for mixing fiber flocks of different origin comprising a pressurized feed duct for conveying a continuous flockladen air stream;

a plurality of parallel chutes disposed in a row and connected with said feed duct, each said chute having an open lower end for passage of flock material therefrom and walls having perforations therein for exhausting the air and retaining the flock within said chute;

transporting means below said chutes for receiving flock material from said chutes, said means being disposed in a plane whereby the received flock material is transported in a plane forming an angle of at least with respect to the direction of flock descent in said chutes;

two pairs of vertically arranged compressing rollers downstream of said transporting means for receiving and compressing the transported material, the adjacent rollers of said pairs being closely spaced to each other; and

a take-off roller downstream of each pair of compressing rollers. Y

26. An apparatus as set forth in claim 25 wherein said compressing rollers are arranged in a common plane.

27. An apparatus for mixing fiber flocks of different origin comprising a pressurized feed duct for conveying a continuous flockladen air stream;

a plurality of parallel chutes disposed in a row and connected with said feed duct, each said chute having an open lower end for passage of flock material therefrom and walls having perforations therein for exhausting the air and retaining the flock within said chute;

transporting means below said chutes for receiving flock material from said chutes, said means being disposed in a plane whereby the received flock material is transported in a plane forming an angle of at least 90 with respect to the direction of flock descent in said chutes;

at least one pair of compressing rolls downstream of said transporting means for receiving and compressing the transported material;

a take-off roll downstream of said pair of compressing rolls for plucking flocks from the compressed material; and

means for removing the plucked flocks under a suction air stream, said means for removing the plucked flocks including a chamber above said compressing rollers and take-off roller including an air intake opening at the upper end and a take-off duct.

UNITED STATES PATENT owns CETIFIQATE F GBEC'HQN Patent No. 3, ,330 Dated March in, 1972 Rolf Binder et a3.

Inventor(s) It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

In the Abstract, line 7, 90 should be --90-- Column 4, line T, "FIgS" should be --FIGS.--

Signed and sealed this 15th day of August 1972.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD M, FLETCHER, JR. ROBERT GOTTSCHALK Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents FORM PO-1OSO(10--S9) USCOMMDC 6Q375 p69 U S GOVERNMENY PRINTING OFFICE: 1969 O366-334

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US3414330 *Nov 16, 1966Dec 3, 1968Truetzschler & CoPneumatic feeding arrangement for supplying fibrous materials
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Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Japanese Patent Publication JP 39025426 B Published 11-11-1964
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4064599 *Jun 13, 1975Dec 27, 1977Scott Paper CompanyFiberizing method and apparatus employing differential feed system
US4103398 *Jul 5, 1977Aug 1, 1978Wise Industries, Inc.Method and apparatus for blending textile fibers
US4531262 *Nov 22, 1982Jul 30, 1985Trutzschler Gmbh & Co. KgSystem for blending textile fibers
US4706337 *Apr 24, 1986Nov 17, 1987Temafa TextilmaschimenfabrikApparatus for mixing textile fibers
US4860407 *Feb 25, 1988Aug 29, 1989Hans RoessDevice for the blending of different fibres in a desired ratio of components
US4969236 *Apr 7, 1988Nov 13, 1990Hubert HergethShaft mixer
Classifications
U.S. Classification19/145.5, 198/493, 406/155, 198/544
International ClassificationD01G13/00
Cooperative ClassificationD01G13/00
European ClassificationD01G13/00