Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3648684 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 14, 1972
Filing dateAug 4, 1970
Priority dateAug 4, 1970
Publication numberUS 3648684 A, US 3648684A, US-A-3648684, US3648684 A, US3648684A
InventorsBarnwell Cleora W, Fogarty Linda J
Original AssigneeBarnwell Cleora W, Fogarty Linda J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for the direct transfer of blood from a human to culture bottles
US 3648684 A
Abstract
A device for use with a conventional vacuum adapted with insertion needle for the direct transfer of blood, usually in small quantities, from a human being to a plurality of vacuumized culture bottles with one insertion of the needle into the patient's vein. The device is especially adapted for the drawing of blood to be tested for septicemia and bacteremia, where the blood specimen must be drawn and aerated aseptically. The device eliminates the need for using syringes and tubing units for drawing blood for testing, and provides sterile aeration of the blood after it is drawn.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[ 1 Mar. 11 1, 11972 United States Patent Barnwell et all.

2,684,068 7/1954 Orens 3,536,061 l0/l970 Ogle 128/2 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1541 lDlEl/llClE TOR Til-1E DIRECT TRANSFER 01F BlLUUD FROM A HUMAN T0 CULTURE BUTTILES Germany Great Britain.........................l28/272 t e d U a G A m a h .m 76 J 66 99 a H .n 52 W m 000 00 E w 99 31 m n 11 P [72] Inventors: Cleora W. Barnwell, 2 Cameo Circle, Ormond Beach, Fla. 32074; Linda .1. Few garty, 3801 NW. 79th Ave, Coral Springs, Fla. 33065 Assistant Examiner-Kyle L. Howell Attorney-John N. Randolph [22] Filed: Aug. 4, 1970 [21] AppLNo:

7] ABSTRACT A device for use with a conventional vacuum adapted with in- [52] U.S.Cl...........................l28/21F, 128/DIG.5, 128/215,

sertion needle for the direct transfer of blood, usually in small 60 0 7 .2 H 6 OOnlI Z D ,8 6R A wow 1 m E Mum M m .l m w C We mn m E C T m m A r. T. I m S R m mh U c UN N 55 5 ll .1

2,524,363 10/1950 Smith.....................................128/220 2,604,095 7/1952 Brody....................................128/220 5Claims,8ll)rawingll igures Patented March 14, 1972 3,648,684

2 Sheets-Sheet l FIGJH CLEORA W. BARNWELL LINDA J FOGARTY 7 6 0 w/ lllr/llll/y w p 1 my 2 r J l INVENTORS BY 9,4 21. W

ATTORNEY 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 PEG. 2.

ll rarl/ INVENTORS CLEORA W. BARNWELL LINDA J. FOGARTY DEVICE FOR THE IDIIRECT TRANSFER OF BLOOD IFIROIVI A HUMAN TO CULTURE BOTTLES SUMMARY It is a primary object of the present invention to provide a novel device adapted for use with a conventional vacuum adapter with insertion needle for drawing blood directly into vacuumized blood culture bottles, to avoid the present practice of transferring blood from collecting tubes to culture bottles by the use of syringes or other devices.

Another object of the invention is to enable sterile aeration of the blood culture without removal of the needle from the patients vein, and which eliminates the need for entering the blood culture bottle twice with a needle, for supplying blood and air thereto.

A further object of the invention is to provide a device which when connected to a vacuum adapter and blood culture bottle can be readily held steady and comfortable for the user and the patient.

Another object of the invention is to provide a device which may be very economically manufactured, enabling it to be disposed of after a single use, so that the needle thereof is inserted only into a single culture bottle, to minimize the possibility of contamination.

Various other objects and advantages of the invention will hereinafter become more fully apparent from the following description of the drawings, illustrating a presently preferred embodiment thereof, and wherein:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a fragmentary exploded view, partly in elevation and partly in longitudinal section, showing the device, constituting the invention, and the two conventional components with which it is utilized;

FIG. 2 is an elevational view showing the components illustrated in FIG. 1 assembled for use;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary substantially central vertical sectional view of the parts seen in FIG. 2;

FIGS. 4, and 6 are cross-sectional views taken substantially along the lines 44, 5-5, and 6-6, respectively, of FIG. 3;

FIG. 7 is an exploded view in elevation of the device comprising the invention, and

FIG. 8 is an elevational view partly in longitudinal section showing the parts appearing in FIG. 7 assembled.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring more specifically to the drawings, a conventional vacuum adapter 10 and a conventional vacuumized blood culture bottle 11 are illustrated in the drawings to illustrate the use of the device 12, comprising the invention, which enables the direct transfer of blood from a human to the culture bottle 1 1.

The vacuum adapter 10 includes a hollow cylindrical body or sheath 13 having an open end 14 provided with a surrounding outwardly projecting flange 15, and an end wall 16 in which is secured the intermediate portion of an insertion needle 17. The tubular needle 17 is disposed axially of the body 13 and has an outer end 18 which is adapted to be inserted into the vein of a human being and an inner end 19 which is disposed in the body 13 and which extends a portion of the length thereof.

The bottle 11, which may be of any size and shape, has a neck 20 which is closed and sealed by a conventional rubber stopper 21 which is recessed at its opposite ends to provide a central portion 22 of reduced thickness which can be readily penetrated by a needle.

The device or invention 12, as best seen in FIGS. 1 and 3, includes an elongated plastic body 23 having a cavity 24 at one end which is provided with a rounded inner end. The other end of the body 23 terminates in an integral flared annular wall 25 having a cylindrical extension 26 projecting from its enlarged outer end and which combines with the portion 25 to form an outwardly opening chamber or cavity 27.

A tubular needle 28 has an enlarged intermediate portion 29 which is molded into the body 23 adjacent the wall 25. An inner end portion 38 of the needle 28 is disposed within the body 23 and opens into one end of an axial bore 31 of the body 23. The bore 31 which is of a diameter several times larger than the diameter of the bore of the needle 28 has an opposite end which opens into the cavity 24. The other end 32 of the needle 28 extends into the cavity 27 and terminates within the skirt 25,26 and inwardly of the open end thereof.

A cavity or chamber 33 is formed in the body 23 and opens outwardly of a part of the periphery thereof, and a port 34 connects an inner portion of the cavity 33 to a portion of the bore 31. A nonabsorptive sterile air filter 35 is pressure fitted into the cavity 33. The filter 35 may be formed of fibers of synthetic materials or wool. The outer end of the cavity 33 is sealed by a strong moisture and air proof tape 36, having a loose end or tab 37 to facilitate removal of the tape.

A rubber plug 38 closes and seals the open end of the cavity 24 and has recessed ends forming a central portion 39 of reduced thickness.

As seen in FIGS. 7 and 8, a cap 40 is provided for sealing the plug 38 and a cap 41 fits over the extension 26 and seals the chamber 27. FIG. 8 shows the device 12 as it would appear prior to use. When the device 12 is to be assembled with vacuum adapter 10 and bottle 11, caps 40 and 41 are removed.

To assemble the device 12 with the vacuum adapter 10 and the bottle 11, as seen in FIG. 1, the body 23 is inserted into the sheath 13 until the stopper 38 abuts against the end wall 16, as seen in FIG. 3. Before the body 23 reaches this position, the needle end 19 will have passed through the restricted wall portion 39, so that said needle end will open into the cavity 24 and be in communication with the bore 31 and the bore of the needle 28. The other end 18 of the needle 17 is then inserted into the vein, not shown, from which the blood is to be drawn. The bottle neck 20, carrying the plug 21, is then inserted into the cavity 27 to cause the needle end 32 to pass through the stopper wall portion 22, so that the bore of the needle 28 will be in communication with the vacuumized interior of the bottle 11, when the parts are in their positions of FIG. 3, with the other end of the stopper 21 seating against a part of the flared wall 25. The blood will then be drawn from the vein through the needle 17 into the cavity 24, and through the bore 31 and needle 28 into the bottle 11.

If the blood being drawn does not require aeration, the sealing tape 36 is left in place, as seen in FIG. 3. If the blood is to be tested for septicemia or bacteremia, requiring that it be aseptically aerated, the tape 36 is removed by grasping the tab 37 and stripping the tape from the body 23, so that air will be drawn by the vacuum in the bottle 11 inwardly through the liltering plug 35 and port 34 into the bore 31 to pass with the blood through the needle 28 into the bottle 11, without requiring another penetration of the plug 21 with a second needle in order to aerate the blood supplied to the bottle 11.

The filter 35 is nonabsorptive so that the blood in the bore 31 will not adhere thereto and commence clotting and clogging the air filter.

When blood is to be supplied to more than one vacuumized bottle 11 without removing the needle end 18 from the vein, the device 12 is removed from the adapter 10 and another device 12 applied thereto and to the second bottle 11 to prevent the possibility of contamination which could occur by the users finger touching the needle end 32.

Since the body 23 is substantially rigid, the assembly as shown in FIG. 2 including the adapter 10, bottle 11 and device 12, provides a rigid structure which can be readily held steady and comfortably by the user and with a minimum of discomfort to the patient, since there is less chance of movement of the needle end 18 in the arm or of said needle end slipping out of the vein. As a result, less time is required to effect withdrawal of the blood.

Various modifications and changes are contemplated and may be resorted to, without departing from the function or scope of the invention.

We claim as our invention:

1. A connecting device for use in an apparatus for transfer of blood from a human to a vacuumized blood culture bottle comprising; elongated body means having a passage therethrough; a cavity opening outwardly of one end of said body; a needle pierceable plug sealingly positioned in said cavity; a hollow needle secured in the opposite end of said body and projecting outwardly therefrom; said hollow needle communicating with the passage in said body; an opening intermediate the ends of said body and extending radially from the outer surface of said body to said passage; air filter means secured in said opening; and means detachably connected to said body for sealing the outer end of said air filter.

2. A connecting device as set forth in claim 1, and further including caps detachably applied to and sealing the ends of said body.

3. In combination with a vacuum adapter including a sheath having an open end and an end wall disposed remote from said open end in which is mounted an intermediate portion of a first tubular needle, and a vacuumized blood culture bottle having a rubber plug sealing the neck thereof; a connecting means including an elongated body having an end sized to fit jacent ends of the needles, and means detachably connected I slidably in said sheath and having a cavity opening outwardly of said end, a rubber plug sealing an outer end of said cavity and penetrated by an inner end of the needle when said body end is inserted into the sheath, a second hollow needle having one end secured in the opposite end of said body and an exposed opposite end projecting from said last mentioned body end to penetrate the bottle stopper when the bottle neck is displaced endwise toward said last mentioned body end, said body having a passage connecting the cavity thereof to the bore of the second needle for vacuumizing the bore of the first needle when the bore of the second needle is in communication with the interior of the bottle an air filter disposed in and opening outwardly of said body and a port connecting an inner end of said filter to said passage of the body between the adto the body for sealing the outer end of said air filter.

4. In a combination as defined by claim 3, said body having a skirt extending from the last mentioned end thereof and disposed around the last mentioned end of the second needle,

said skirt being sized to receive the bottle neck and to provide a seat for the bottle stopper.

5. In a combination as defined by claim 3, said passage of the body being of a diameter substantially greater than the diameter of the bores of the needles.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2524363 *Jul 19, 1947Oct 3, 1950Smith Arthur EDisposable syringe
US2604095 *Dec 18, 1948Jul 22, 1952Nathan BrodyDisposable syringe
US2684068 *Feb 21, 1951Jul 20, 1954Orens Sindey RSyringe
US3536061 *Dec 5, 1967Oct 27, 1970Tri Stopper CorpEvacuated blood collecting apparatus
DE1239808B *Dec 11, 1959May 3, 1967Georg A RinserZweikammer-Spritzampulle
GB1019500A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3814080 *Nov 13, 1972Jun 4, 1974Becton Dickinson CoVessel cannulator and clamp for lymphangiography
US4052320 *Jul 8, 1976Oct 4, 1977Eastman Kodak CompanyTelescoping serum separator and dispenser
US4393882 *Nov 17, 1980Jul 19, 1983American Hospital Supply CorporationMethod and device for collecting, transporting, and delivering micro samples of blood
US4444203 *Mar 26, 1982Apr 24, 1984Lab-A-Cath, Inc.Intravenous catheter placing and specimen gathering device
US4703761 *Aug 4, 1986Nov 3, 1987Rathbone R RodionBlood sampling device for obtaining small quantity of venous blood
US4703762 *Aug 4, 1986Nov 3, 1987Rathbone R RodionBlood sampling device for obtaining dual samples of venous blood
US5115817 *Mar 26, 1991May 26, 1992Walter Sarstedt Gerate Und Verbrauchsmaterial Fur Medizin Und WissenschaftBlood extraction device
US5195992 *May 13, 1988Mar 23, 1993Baxter International Inc.Protector shield for needles
US5222502 *Sep 24, 1991Jun 29, 1993Terumo Kabushiki KaishaBlood collecting needle
US5303713 *Mar 18, 1993Apr 19, 1994Terumo Kabushiki KaishaBlood collecting needle
US5685866 *Nov 4, 1994Nov 11, 1997Icu Medical, Inc.Medical valve and method of use
US5714125 *Mar 7, 1996Feb 3, 1998Medical Safety Products, Inc.Housing; puncturing means; ribs within port separated by slots for guiding
US5810792 *Apr 3, 1996Sep 22, 1998Icu Medical, Inc.Locking blunt cannula
US5910289 *Oct 15, 1997Jun 8, 1999Medical Safety Products, Inc.Device for collecting a blood sample from a plastic segment tube
US5928204 *Jun 7, 1995Jul 27, 1999Icu Medical, Inc.Medical valve and method of use
US5957898 *May 20, 1998Sep 28, 1999Baxter International Inc.Needleless connector
US6074612 *Apr 6, 1999Jun 13, 2000Medical Safety Products, Inc.Device for collecting a blood sample from a plastic segment tube
US6261282May 20, 1998Jul 17, 2001Baxter International Inc.Needleless connector
US6319209Aug 23, 1999Nov 20, 2001European Institute Of ScienceDisposable test vial with sample delivery device for dispensing sample into a reagent
US6503453Apr 14, 2000Jan 7, 2003Baxter International, Inc.Device for collecting a blood sample from a plastic segment tube
US6572592May 9, 2000Jun 3, 2003Icu Medical, Inc.Medical valve and method of use
US6599273Jan 20, 2000Jul 29, 2003Icu Medical, Inc.Fluid transfer device and method of use
US6635044Dec 4, 2001Oct 21, 2003Icu Medical, Inc.Medical valve with fluid escape space
US6669673Jun 5, 2002Dec 30, 2003Icu Medical, Inc.Medical valve
US6669681Jul 11, 2001Dec 30, 2003Baxter International Inc.Needleless connector
US6682509Nov 19, 2001Jan 27, 2004Icu Medical, Inc.Medical valve and method of use
US6695817Jul 11, 2000Feb 24, 2004Icu Medical, Inc.Medical valve with positive flow characteristics
US6709428May 25, 2001Mar 23, 2004Baxter International, Inc.Needle design and manufacturing method for medical applications
US6727101 *Mar 9, 2000Apr 27, 2004Baxter International Inc.Device for removing a blood sample from a plastic segment tube
US6758833May 22, 2002Jul 6, 2004Icu Medical, Inc.Medical value
US6916309Aug 7, 2003Jul 12, 2005Icu Medical, Inc.Medical valve with positive flow characteristics
US7024749Dec 12, 2002Apr 11, 2006Baxter International Inc.Method for manufacturing a cannula assembly
US7153386 *Apr 3, 2002Dec 26, 2006Baxter International IncMethod for manufacturing a device for collecting a blood sample from a plastic segment tube
US7497849May 2, 2006Mar 3, 2009Icu Medical, Inc.High flow rate needleless medical connector
US7628774May 2, 2006Dec 8, 2009Icu Medical, Inc.Needleless Medical Connector
US7635357Jan 3, 2003Dec 22, 2009Mayer Bruno Franz PNeedleless injection site
US7713247May 3, 2006May 11, 2010Icu Medical, Inc.Medical valve and method of use
US7713248May 3, 2006May 11, 2010Icu Medical, Inc.Medical valve and method of use
US7713249May 3, 2006May 11, 2010Icu Medical, Inc.Medical valve and method of use
US7713250Apr 21, 2004May 11, 2010Becton, Dickinson And CompanyNeedleless luer access connector
US7717883May 3, 2006May 18, 2010Icu Medical, Inc.Medical valve and method of use
US7717884May 3, 2006May 18, 2010Icu Medical, Inc.Medical valve and method of use
US7717885May 3, 2006May 18, 2010Icu Medical, Inc.Medical valve and method of use
US7717886May 3, 2006May 18, 2010Icu Medical, Inc.Medical valve and method of use
US7717887May 3, 2006May 18, 2010Icu Medical, Inc.Medical valve and method of use
US7722575May 3, 2006May 25, 2010Icu Medical, Inc.Medical valve and method of use
US7722576May 3, 2006May 25, 2010Icu Medical, Inc.Medical valve and method of use
US7763199May 3, 2006Jul 27, 2010Icu Medical, Inc.Method of making a seal having slit formed therein
US7824393May 3, 2006Nov 2, 2010Icu Medical, Inc.Medical connector having high flow rate characteristics
US7947032Mar 19, 2010May 24, 2011Becton, Dickinson And CompanyNeedleless luer access connector
US8002765May 3, 2006Aug 23, 2011Icu Medical, Inc.Medical valve with fluid escape space
US8105314Oct 25, 2007Jan 31, 2012Icu Medical, Inc.Medical connector
US8197420Dec 13, 2007Jun 12, 2012Magnolia Medical Technologies, Inc.Systems and methods for parenterally procuring bodily-fluid samples with reduced contamination
US8221391Jul 27, 2010Jul 17, 2012Icu Medical, Inc.Needleless medical connector
US8231546Dec 22, 2011Jul 31, 2012Magnolia Medical Technologies, Inc.Systems and methods for parenterally procuring bodily-fluid samples with reduced contamination
US8337418Apr 27, 2012Dec 25, 2012Magnolia Medical Technologies, Inc.Systems and methods for parenterally procuring bodily-fluid samples with reduced contamination
US8398607Jan 30, 2012Mar 19, 2013Icu Medical, Inc.Medical connector
US8444628Jul 16, 2012May 21, 2013Icu Medical, Inc.Needleless medical connector
US8454579Mar 23, 2010Jun 4, 2013Icu Medical, Inc.Medical connector with automatic valves and volume regulator
US8496862Jan 15, 2009Jul 30, 2013West Pharmaceutical Services, Inc.Collet mechanism and method of molding cannula to a syringe barrel
US8535241Oct 12, 2012Sep 17, 2013Magnolia Medical Technologies, Inc.Fluid diversion mechanism for bodily-fluid sampling
US8628515Mar 11, 2013Jan 14, 2014Icu Medical, Inc.Medical connector
US8647286Nov 13, 2012Feb 11, 2014Magnolia Medical Technologies, Inc.Systems and methods for parenterally procuring bodily-fluid samples with reduced contamination
US8721603Sep 20, 2011May 13, 2014West Pharmaceutical Services, Inc.Syringe with co-molded hub and cannula
US8758306May 12, 2011Jun 24, 2014Icu Medical, Inc.Medical connectors and methods of use
EP0071329A2 *May 26, 1982Feb 9, 1983Becton, Dickinson and CompanyMultiple sample needle assembly
EP0478459A1 *Sep 26, 1991Apr 1, 1992Terumo Kabushiki KaishaBlood collecting needle
WO2001013795A1Aug 17, 2000Mar 1, 2001Europ I Of ScienceDisposable test vial with sample delivery device
WO2008077047A2 *Dec 18, 2007Jun 26, 2008Richard G PattonSystems and methods for parenterally procuring bodily-fluid samples with reduced contamination
Classifications
U.S. Classification600/577, 604/414
International ClassificationA61B5/15
Cooperative ClassificationA61B5/150389, A61B5/150351, A61B5/154, A61B5/150259, A61B5/1422, A61B5/150496, A61B5/15003, A61B5/150221, A61B5/150732, A61B5/150213, A61B5/1438
European ClassificationA61B5/154, A61B5/15B8B, A61B5/15B12, A61B5/15B18B2, A61B5/15B8D, A61B5/15B18B8F, A61B5/15B2D, A61B5/14B6, A61B5/14B12